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Top 20 Biggest Frogs In The World 

The biggest frogs in the world, such as the goliath frog and the helmeted bullfrog, which can weigh up to 7.2 pounds, are among the most remarkable amphibian species due to their size. This guide introduces you to 20 of these colossal frogs, highlighting the largest ones found on each continent.

Before we delve into the realm of the largest frogs, it’s crucial to grasp the characteristics that define a frog. As members of the order Anura, frogs are generally recognized by their stout bodies, elongated hind legs, shorter front legs, and a triangular head, although variations exist. They are also known for their glandular skin, prominent eyes, and the way their limbs fold underneath their bodies.

Biggest Frogs In The World 

1. Goliath Frog – Largest Overall & Largest in Africa

Goliath Frog (Conraua goliath) on a rock
Goliath Frog (Conraua goliath) on a rock
  • Family: Conrauidae
  • Binomial Nomenclature: Conraua goliath 
  • Size: 21.15 to 114.54 oz (600 to 3250 g), 6.7 to 12.6 inches (17 to 32 cm)
  • Distribution: Monte Alen, Equatorial Guinea to Nkongsamba, Cameroon
  • Conservation Status – IUCN Red List: Endangered
  • Population Trend: Decreasing

This is the biggest frog in Africa and the world as a whole. This massive giant of a frog can reach a snout-to-vent length of 12.6 inches or 32 cm and a weight of  7.2 pounds or 3250 grams. Not all individuals are as big as stated. The size range of this amphibian is 1.3 to 7.2 pounds (600 to 3250 g) and 6.7 to 12.6 inches (17 to 32 cm).

This frog is flat and wide with a typical triangular head. The skin is rough.  The skin is greenish brown and the underside is yellowish green. The eyes are nearly an inch (2.5 cm) in diameter. Apart from its massive size, its appearance is typical of a frog.

This massive frog is endemic to western-central Africa from southwestern Cameroon to Equatorial Guinea. Here the species live in fast-flowing waters in the rainforests. 

2. Marsh Frog – Largest Native Species in Europe

Green Marsh Frog (Pelophylax ridibundus) jumping
Green Marsh Frog (Pelophylax ridibundus) jumping
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Binomial Nomenclature: Pelophylax ridibundus
  • Size: 4 inches (10 cm); can reach 6.7 inches (17 cm)
  • Conservation Status – IUCN Red List: Least Concern
  • Population Trend: Increasing

The marsh frogs mostly live in marshes. While it can be found in the United Kingdom, it was introduced.

This large frog is brown or greenish with folds behind the eyes. These run down the back. The color of the amphibian changes from one season to another. During spring, their coloration darkens. This allows them to absorb more heat from the sun.

The maximum snout-to-vent length of this frog is 6.7 inches (17 cm). Most individuals reach a length of about 10 cm or 4 inches.

This frog is the largest in Europe – endemic to eastern, central, and western Europe.  It isn’t endemic to just Europe. Its range goes as far east as Asia where its range extends as far as northwestern Xinjiang, China. It is also endemic to the Middle East in places such as Iran, northern Afghanistan, Bahrain, and Saudi Arabia.

Within its geographic range, it inhabits a wide range of habitats including deserts, semi-deserts, grasslands, steppe, forest-steppe, and mixed and deciduous forests. 

(sources: https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/58705/11825745, https://www.discoverwildlife.com/animal-facts/amphibians/facts-about-marsh-frogs/, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marsh_frog

3. Chilean Helmeted Bullfrog – Largest in South America

Chilean Helmeted Bullfrog (Calyptocephalella gayi) by Felipe Rabanal
Chilean Helmeted Bullfrog (Calyptocephalella gayi) by Felipe Rabanal
  • Family: Calyptocephalellidae
  • Binomial Nomenclature: Calyptocephalella gayi
  • Size: Females – 13 inches (32 cm), Males – 6 inches (15.5 cm)for males; 1.1 to 2.2 pounds (0.5 to 1 kg)
  • Conservation Status – IUCN Red List: Vulnerable
  • Population Trend: Decreasing

This is the largest frog in South America and the 2nd largest frog in the world. The Chilean helmeted bullfrog generally reaches a weight of 1.1 to 2.2 pounds (0.5 to 1 kg). The species can reach a weight of 3 kg. The species have a snout-to-vent length of 13 inches (32 cm) for females and 6 inches (15.5 cm)for males.

The species are long-lived. A female was recorded to have bred at the age of 24 years.

The Chilean helmeted bullfrog is endemic to chile. Here it can be found from Puerto Montt to Coquimbo. It occurs over the Región de Los Ríos. its range may be limited to Chile but its range is huge.

These large frogs inhabit large ponds and require permanent ponds to thrive and persist.

4. Colombian Giant Toad

Colombian Giant Toad (Rhaebo blombergi) in brush in the woods
Colombian Giant Toad (Rhaebo blombergi) in brush in the woods
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Binomial Nomenclature: Rhaebo blombergi
  • Size: Females – 6.7 to 9.8 inches (17 to 25 cm); Males – 5.9 to 6.7 inches (15 to 17 cm)
  • Conservation Status – IUCN Red List: Near Threatened
  • Population Trend: Decreasing

This is another massive frog. Females are generally larger than males. Females reach a snout-to-vent length of 6.7 to 9.8 inches (17 to 25 cm) while males reach a snout-to-vent length of 5.9 to 6.7 inches (15 to 17 cm).

The Colombian giant toad generally reaches a lifespan of about ten years in captivity but has been reported to reach 28 years.

This toad is endemic to Colombia and Ecuador. In Colombia, it is endemic to Choco, Valle del Cauca, Cauca, and the Cordillera Occidental, Nariño. In Ecuador, it is endemic to Carchi and Esmeraldas Provinces.

Within its geographic range, it inhabits tropical rainforests and breeds in permanent and temporary pools.

The species is considered Near Threatened.

5. Colorado River Toad

Close up of a Colorado River Toad (Incilius alvarius) on a rock
Close up of a Colorado River Toad (Incilius alvarius) on a rock
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Binomial Nomenclature: Incilius alvarius
  • Size:  4.3 to 7.5 inches (11 to 18.7 cm)
  • Conservation Status – IUCN Red List: Least Concern
  • Population Trend: Stable

Also known as the Sonoran desert toad, this is the largest native toad in the United States. The cane toad is larger than the colorado river toad but it isn’t native to the united states. The Colorado river toad has a leathery smooth skim which is olive green in color. It has warts on its hind limbs. This large frog reaches a length of 4.3 to 7.5 inches (11 to 18.7 cm).

The species is endemic to southwestern North America. Within the United States, it is endemic to extreme southern New Mexico, southern Arizona, and extreme southeastern California. Within Mexico, the species is endemic to northwestern Sinaloa, Sonora, and northwestern Chihuahua. The species is protected within the El Pinacate Biosphere Reserve in Mexico.

6. Titicaca Water Frog

Titicaca Water Frog (Telmatobius culeus) by osoandino
Titicaca Water Frog (Telmatobius culeus) by osoandino
  • Family: Telmatobiidae
  • Binomial Nomenclature: Telmatobius culeus
  • Size: 2.9 to 5.4 inches (7.4 to 13.8 cm), 400 grams (0.9 lb)
  • Conservation Status – IUCN Red List: Endangered
  • Population Trend: Decreasing

This is one of the biggest frogs in the world. It reaches a length of 2.9 to 5.4 inches (7.4 to 13.8 cm). The Titicaca river toad has loose glandular skin folds which hang loose on its legs, and dorsum. As a purely aquatic amphibian, the skin provides a large surface area for cutaneous gas exchange – respiration. The Titicaca river toad is black-green to olive-green with a white underside. The lowest they weigh is around 250 grams (0.55 lb). They can also reach a weight of almost 400 grams (0.9 lb).

The Titicaca river toad occurs in Lake Titicaca on the border of Bolivia and Peru. It also occurs in nearby water bodies such as Laguna de Alonso, Río Ilave,  Laguna Arapa, Lago Chajchor, Lago Umayo, and Lago Saracocha.

The Titicaca river toad is aquatic and lives in aquatic habitat. Here they can be found in rocky, muddy, and sandy portions of aquatic habitats with an abundance of vegetation and rocks.

7. Lake Junin Frog – Largest Aquatic Frog

Lake Junin Frog (Telmatobius macrostomus) by Eduardo Logan
Lake Junin Frog (Telmatobius macrostomus) by Eduardo Logan
  • Family: Telmatobiidae
  • Binomial Nomenclature: Telmatobius macrostomus
  • Size: 4.9 to 6.8 inches (12.4 to 17.3 cm), 4.5 lb (2000 grams)
  • Conservation Status – IUCN Red List: Endangered
  • Population Trend: Decreasing

Also known as the Andes smooth frog or the Lake Junin giant frog, this amphibian is one of the biggest frogs in the world. It is also aquatic. It is the largest purely aquatic frog in the world. Lake Junin giant frog has a snout-to-vent length of 12 inches (30 cm) and a weight of 4.5 lb (2000 grams). Some individuals grow even much bigger however most adults reach a snout-to-vent length of 4.9 to 6.8 inches (12.4 to 17.3 cm).

Females are bigger than males.

These massive frogs are endemic to the Pasco and Junin Departments in Peru. Here they are endemic to the drainage area of the Mantaro River, National Sanctuary of Huayllay, Pasco, and the Lake Junín drainage, Junín National Reserve.  

The Lake Junin giant frog is an aquatic species and is endemic to Lake Junín and other marshy lakes and the canals, rivers, streams, lakes, and wetlands close to Lake Junin.

8. Giant Asian River Frog

Blyth's River Frog (Limnonectes blythii) by Axl
Blyth’s River Frog (Limnonectes blythii) also known as the Giant Asian River Frog by Axl
  • Family: Dicroglossidae
  • Binomial Nomenclature: Limnonectes blythii
  • Size: Females – 3.5 to 10.2 inches  (9 to 26 cm), Males – 3.3 to 4.9 inches (8.5 to 12.5 cm); 2.2 lb (1 kg)
  • Conservation Status – IUCN Red List: Least Concern
  • Population Trend: Decreasing

This is one of the largest river frogs in the world with females being larger than males. Females reach a snout-to-vent length of 3.5 to 10.2 inches  (9 to 26 cm) and males reach a snout-to-vent length of 3.3 to 4.9 inches (8.5 to 12.5 cm). They can also reach weights of over 2.2 lb (1 kg).

The dorsum of giant Asian river frogs is yellowish, gray, or brownish and the ventrum is yellowish to whitish. Some individuals have a stripe that runs down their back.

The species is endemic to southeast Asia and can be found in Natuna Islands and Anambas Islands in Indonesia, Singapore, Peninsular Malaysia, Myanmar, and Thailand.

These are river frogs and similar to other river frogs, giant Asian river frogs are aquatic. They live in evergreen forests where they inhabit streams in or close to these forests.

9. Smooth-sided Toad

Smooth-sided Toad (Rhaebo guttatus)
Smooth-sided Toad (Rhaebo guttatus) – Source
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Binomial Nomenclature: Rhaebo guttatus
  • Size: Females – 6.9 inches (17.4 cm), Males – 5.9 inches (15 cm)
  • Conservation Status – IUCN Red List: Least Concern
  • Population Trend: Stable

This is one of the largest toads in South America. Females are noticeably larger than males – a common feature among frogs. Females reach a snout-to-vent length of 6.9 inches (17.4 cm) while males reach a snout-to-vent length of 5.9 inches (15 cm). The dorsum is reddish brown, light brown, or even whitish. The ventrum is darker.

The species releases bufotoxin which can cause heart failure in humans when ingested.

The smooth-sided toad is endemic to the Amazonian basin where it is endemic to central Amazonian Brazil, the Guianas to Bolivia & Peru, Venezuela, Colombia, and Ecuador. The species is commonly found within its range except in Peru and the Guianas (Guyana, Suriname, and French Guiana).

Within its rain, it is endemic to tropical rainforests(such as mature gallery forests). Here it lives in deep leaf litter on the forest floor.

10. African Bullfrog

Giant African Bullfrog (Pyxicephalus adspersus)
Giant African Bullfrog (Pyxicephalus adspersus)
  • Family: Pyxicephalidae
  • Binomial Nomenclature: Pyxicephalus adspersus
  • Size: 9.6 inches (24.5 cm), 3.1 pounds (1.4 kg)
  • Conservation Status – IUCN Red List: Least Concern
  • Population Trend: Decreasing

Also known as the pixie frog, these amphibians are massive. Only the cane toad, Blyth’s river frog (also known as the giant Asian river frog), the Lake Junin frog, the helmeted water toad (Chilean bull toad), and the goliath frog are bigger than the pixie frog.

Males are considerably larger than females. The African bullfrog can reach a snout-to-vent length of 9.6 inches (24.5 cm), and a weight of 3.1 pounds (1.4 kg).

This massive frog is endemic to central to southeast Africa and is found in Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique, Malawi, Zambia, Angola, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Swaziland, Namibia, and South Africa. The species generally occur in dry savannahs where they remain buried for most of the year. They emerge during the rainy season. Their wild populations are negatively impacted by urbanization.  

11. Cane Toad

Cane Toad (Bufo marina) in wet forest litter near Hanalei National Wildlife Refuge, Okolehao Trail, Kauai, Hawaii, USA
A Cane Toad (Bufo marina) in wet forest litter near Hanalei National Wildlife Refuge, Okolehao Trail, Kauai, Hawaii, USA. – Source
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Binomial Nomenclature: Rhinella marina
  • Size: 5.91 to 9.37 inches (15 to 24 cm), 3.74 oz or 106.3 grams
  • Conservation Status – IUCN Red List: Least Concern
  • Population Trend: Increasing

This is one of the largest toads in the world and is considered to be the largest by most.  It reaches an adult length of 5.91 to 9.37 inches (15 to 24 cm) in snout-to-vent length and a weight of 3.74 oz or 106.3 grams. The skin of this is brownish gray and covered in warts. The underside is yellowish with mottles and speckles. The skin is granular.

This toad can be found in the wild in the United States in Texas, Florida, and the Hawaiian Island. Its range further extends from Mexico to northern South America where it is endemic to French Guiana, Guyana, Suriname, Venezuela, Colombia, Bolivia, and Brazil.

The cane toad is an adaptive species that can thrive in most humid habitats with adequate vegetative cover. It even thrives in urban environments and degraded habitats.

12. Cope’s Toad

Juvenile Curu Toad (Rhinella diptycha) also known as the Copes Toad
Juvenile Curu Toad (Rhinella diptycha) also known as the Copes Toad
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Binomial Nomenclature: Rhinella diptycha
  • Size: 7.1 to 9.8 inches  (18 to 25 cm)

This is a large toad, Males reach a snout-to-vent length of 7.1 inches (18 cm) and females reach 9.8 inches  (25 cm). This is a ‘cururu toad’. Another cururu toad is the cane toad.  

The species is endemic to the Chaco Department in the northwest of Paraguay. It may also be endemic to southern Brazil. Within its range, it lives in dry savannah although they require temporary or permanent ponds to breed.

13. Jimi’s Toad

  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Binomial Nomenclature: Rhinella jimi
  • Size: 5.3 to 5.8 inches (13.4 cm to 14.7 cm)  
  • Conservation Status – IUCN Red List: Least Concern
  • Population Trend: Stable

Jimi’s toad is a ‘cururu toad’. It is also quite large. Males are generally larger than females. Males reach a snout-to-vent length of 5.8 inches (14.7 cm) and females reach 5.3  inches  (13.4 cm).

The species is endemic to the western coast of Brazil from Maranhão State to Minas Gerais and Espirito Santo States. Within its range, the species live in savannahs, secondary forests, agricultural lands, and other disturbed habitats although they require temporary or permanent ponds to breed.

14. Mountain Chicken

Mountain Chicken (Leptodactylus fallax) by Mark Hulme
Mountain Chicken (Leptodactylus fallax) by Mark Hulme
  • Family: Leptodactylidae
  • Binomial Nomenclature: Leptodactylus fallax
  • Size: 16 to 17 cm (6.3 to 6.7 inches), 2.2 pounds (1000 grams)
  • Conservation Status – IUCN Red List: Critically Endangered
  • Conservation Status – IUCN Species Recovery Category: Critically Depleted
  • Population Trend: Decreasing

Also known as the giant ditch frog, the mountain chicken reaches a snout-to-vent length of 16 to 17 cm (6.3 to 6.7 inches on average. Some individuals grow to over 20 cm long. The species reach a weight of 2.2 pounds (1000 grams) and more. The mountain chicken’s back is brown with spots or stripes. The sides are yellowish orange and the undersides are yellowish.

The mountain chicken is critically endangered and according to IUCN, only 132 mature individuals remain. All individuals remaining occur in the Centre Hills of Montserrat and western Dominica. The species used to be endemic in St Kitts, Martinique, and Guadeloupe. The area the species now occupy in the wild is about 10 sq km.

The species is endemic to hill forests, ravines, and dense secondary vegetation.

15. American Bullfrog – Largest in North America

American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) sitting on water in Ansted, West Virginia, USA
American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) sitting on water in Ansted, West Virginia, USA. – Source
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Binomial Nomenclature: Lithobates catesbeianus
  • Size: 3.5 to 6.9 inches (9 to 17.5 cm), 1.1 pounds (500 grams)
  • Conservation Status – IUCN Red List: Least Concern
  • Population Trend: Increasing

These are the largest frogs in the family Ranidae in North America. Frogs of the family Ranidae are referred to as ‘true frogs’. This doesn’t mean other frogs are false frogs.

The American bullfrog reaches a length of 3.5 to 6.9 inches (9 to 17.5 cm) and a weight of up to 1.1 pounds (500 grams). The species have been known to reach a length of 46 cm or 18.1 inches. The coloration of the American bullfrog is green to brownish green. There are often blotches and spots on the back.

The species is endemic to North America and is found from Canada to Mexico where it was introduced. The species have been introduced to many countries around the world in Europe, Asia, and South America.

The species is endemic to ponds including brackish ponds, marshes, lakes, swamps, reservoirs, irrigation ditches, and temporary water bodies.

16. Amazonian Horned Frog

Amazonian Horned Frog (Ceratophrys cornuta)
Amazonian Horned Frog (Ceratophrys cornuta)
  • Family: Ceratophryidae 
  • Binomial Nomenclature: Ceratophrys cornuta 
  • Size: 2.76 to 5.91 inches (7 to 15 cm)
  • Lifespan: 15 years
  • Distribution: Amazonian Basin
  • Conservation Status – IUCN Red List: Least Concern 
  • Population Trend: Stable

This is one of the largest horned frogs and it measures about 2.76 to 5.91 inches. It is known to reach a snout-to-vent length of 7.9 inches (20 cm).  This frog is known as the horned frog because of the horn-like protrusions on the head. Because of its wide mouth, it is also known as the Pacman.

Its coloration includes orange, tan, and green. Females are generally tan while males can be a wide variety of colors.

The species is endemic to the Amazonian Basin which gives it its common name. It is also known as the Surinam horned frog because it can also be found in Suriname. Other places within its range include Brazil, Bolivia, Peru, Guyana, French Guiana, Ecuador, and Colombia.

17. South American Bullfrog

South American Bullfrog also known as the smoky jungle frog (Leptodactylus pentadactylus)
South American Bullfrog also known as the smoky jungle frog (Leptodactylus pentadactylus) – source
  • Family: Leptodactylidae
  • Binomial Nomenclature: Leptodactylus pentadactylus
  • Size: 6.9 inches (17.6 cm)  to 7.1 inches (18 cm)
  • Conservation Status – IUCN Red List: Least Concern
  • Population Trend: Stable

Also known as the smoky jungle frog, the South American bullfrog reaches a snout-to-vent length of 6.9 inches (17.6 cm) with some specimens capable of reaching 7.1 inches (18 cm).

The skin of the South American bullfrog is smooth with a dorsal coloration of reddish brown with markings. The underside is whitish with dark markings.

The species is endemic to the Amazon forest. Here it is endemic to French Guiana, northern and central Brazil, northern Bolivia, eastern Peru, eastern Ecuador, and southern Colombia.

The species inhabit tropical rainforests where they usually occur in leaf litter.

18. Giant River Frog

Giant River Frog (Limnonectes leporinus)
Giant River Frog (Limnonectes leporinus) – source
  • Family: Dicroglossidae
  • Binomial Nomenclature: Limnonectes leporinus
  • Male Size: 6.9 inches (17.5 cm )
  • Female Size: 4.9 inches (12.5 cm)
  • Conservation Status – IUCN Red List: Least Concern
  • Population Trend: Decreasing

As evident by its name the giant river frog is pretty huge. Males can reach a length of 17.5 cm while females can reach a length of 12.5 cm. Sub-adults and juveniles are generally bumpier than adults.

The species is endemic to Borneo. Brunei Darussalam, Malaysia (in Sabah and Sarawak), and Indonesia (in North, East, Central, and West Kalimantan Provinces). Within its range, the species inhabit hilly rainforests where they occur on the banks of rocky streams. They can live in old plantations with clear pools of good water quality.

19. Indus Valley Bullfrog

Indus Valley Bullfrog (Hoplobatrachus tigerinus)
Indus Valley Bullfrog (Hoplobatrachus tigerinus)
  • Family: Dicroglossidae
  • Binomial Nomenclature: Hoplobatrachus tigerinus
  • Size: 6.60 inches (16. 8 cm), 0.6 to 1.7 pounds ( 0.27 to 0.77 kg)
  • Conservation Status – IUCN Red List: Least Concern
  • Population Trend: Stable

While the Indus Valley bullfrog, also known as the Indian bullfrog, may not be the largest frog, they are still quite large. They reach an average snout-to-vent length of 6.60 inches (16. 8 cm) and a weight of 0.6 to 1.7 pounds ( 0.27 to 0.77 kg).

They are brownish green to olive green in color. This helps them to hide within their habitats. During breeding seasons, males develop purple vocal sacs, and their overall coloration changes to bright yellow.

The species is endemic to Indian, northern Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Individual specimens have been recorded in Afghanistan, Myanmar, and Nepal.

Indus Valley bullfrogs live in freshwater environments such as freshwater wetlands.

20. White-Lipped TreeFrog – Largest in Australia

White-Lipped TreeFrog (Litoria infrafrenata)
White-Lipped TreeFrog (Litoria infrafrenata)
  • Family: Pelodryadidae / Hylidae
  • Binomial Nomenclature: Litoria infrafrenata / Nyctimystes infrafrenatus
  • Size: 5.5 inches (14 cm), 3.3 oz (95 grams)
  • Conservation Status – IUCN Red List: Least Concern
  • Population Trend: Population Trend: Stable

This is the largest treefrog in the world. It is endemic to Australia. This frog is also considered Australia’s largest native frog.

The white-lipped treefrog reaches a length of 5.5 inches (14 cm). It also reaches a weight of about 3.3 oz (95 grams).

Its coloration is green to pale brown. It can even be greenish brown. An identifying feature is a white stripe on the side of its head and lower jaw. The limbs of some individuals are pinkish during mating season.

This treefrog is endemic to Queensland in Australia, Papua New Guinea, and the islands of Karakelong (Indonesia), and Timor (Timor-Leste). Here it lives in mangroves, tea tree swamps, dry sclerophyll forests, heathland swamps, closed forests, and even in parks and gardens.

As a treefrog, Nyctimystes infrafrenatus is arboreal.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the biggest frog in the world?

The biggest frog in the world is the goliath frog. This massive frog reaches a length of 12.6 inches or 32 cm and a weight of  7.2 pounds or 3250 grams.

What is the biggest treefrog in the world?

The largest tree frog is the white-lipped treefrog. This frog reaches a weight of 3.3 oz (95 grams) and a snout-to-vent length of 5.5 inches (14 cm).

What is the biggest frog in Europe?

The biggest frog endemic to Europe is the marsh frog. The maximum snout-to-vent length of this frog is 6.7 inches (17 cm). Most individuals reach a length of about 10 cm or 4 inches. There are other non-native frogs such as the American bullfrog that are larger than the marsh frog.

What is the biggest frog in North America?

The biggest frog native to North America is the American bullfrog. The species have been known to reach a length of 46 cm or 18.1 inches and a weight of 1.1 pounds (500 grams).

What is the biggest frog in South America?

The biggest frog native to North America is the American bullfrog. The species have been known to reach a length of 46 cm or 18.1 inches and a weight of 1.1 pounds (500 grams).

What is the biggest frog in Africa?

The goliath frog which is the largest frog in the world is also the largest in Africa.

What is the biggest frog in Australia?

The biggest frog in Australia is the white-lipped treefrog. This is also the biggest tree frog. This frog reaches a weight of 3.3 oz (95 grams) and a snout-to-vent length of 5.5 inches (14 cm).

Conclusion

There are over 6500 species of frogs and new species are being discovered. Out of all these frogs, the biggest is the goliath frog which is adequately named. This frog can reach a weight of 7.2 pounds. Other big frogs include the Chilean helmeted bullfrog (the largest in South America) and the American bullfrog (the largest in North America). In Europe, the biggest frog is the marsh frog. In Australia, the largest frog is the white-lipped tree frog.

Some of these massive frogs can be kept as pets. Their massive sizes mean that they need a large terrarium or aquarium and an extensive setup which can be expensive. However, their care is relatively straightforward.

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