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Frogs In Colorado

There are 17 different types of frogs in Colorado. The various species are found all over the state, with some being more common than others. With over 5,000 frog species globally, there is always something new to learn about all the different types.

Identifying and locating species is when you know what to look for. Most species are native to the area, but frogs like the American bullfrog will always find their way into the state.

Knowing where they live, their features, and when they are most active can help you identify a particular species.

Some frogs are widespread, while others are rare. Let’s go over the frogs in Colorado.

Here are 17 species of frogs in Colorado and interesting facts to know about each one:

Frogs In Colorado 

1. Western Toad

Western Toad (Anaxyrus boreas) climbing a rock near San Bernardino High School, California, USA
A Western Toad (Anaxyrus boreas) climbing a rock near San Bernardino High School, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus boreas
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2.2 to 5.1 inches
  • Lifespan: 8 to 12 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Western toads inhabit Colorado and the western half of the U.S. In Colorado, most of the population lives in the high elevation forests and meadows. Willow trees, shrub birch, and wildflowers are common in their living area.

From January to October, this species is active but will hibernate over the winter. In cooler temperatures, they will venture during the day but become nocturnal at night.

Greenish, reddish-brown, or gray is the western toad base color. They are covered in warts, bumps, and dark blotches.

The warts that cover them can be brown or reddish-brown encircled by black coloring. Older toads may have a white stripe running down the center of their back.

Female toads usually have more warts than males. Western toads have dry skin, and their back feet are designed to help them burrow into the ground.

A parotoid gland is located on this toad’s neck that secretes toxins to make them less likely to be eaten. Birds like ravens and other animals will still prey on this species.

Western toads feed mostly on small invertebrates like bees, beetles, flies, and arachnids. Unless breeding or hunting, the western toad stays underground or under natural debris like rocks or logs.

2. Great Plains Toad 

Great Plains Toad (Anaxyrus cognatus) on sand and rocks at Pawnee National Grassland, Weld County, Colorado, USA
A Great Plains Toad (Anaxyrus cognatus) on sand and rocks at Pawnee National Grassland, Weld County, Colorado, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus cognatus
  • Other Names: Rana pipiens
  • Adult Size: 3.5 to 4.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $15

Great plains toads live in the eastern part of Colorado and other areas in the central United States. In lower plains, grasslands and open plains are where they live.

Rivers, floodplains, and other freshwaters are usually nearby their habitat. Loose dense soil is used by the great plains toad to burrow underground. Most of this species’ life is spent underground, but they may come out of their burrows in the day or night.

Yellow, brown, green, and gray are the colors they are found in. They are medium-sized species with round bodies and large eyes.

Their body is covered in dark blotches, and their skin is dry and bumpy. Their underside is pale with no markings. On the back of some toads is a faint dorsal stripe running through their center.

Moths, flies, beetles, and cutworms are some animals this insectivore eats. Great plains toads are mildly toxic to protect themselves from being eaten.

While they are not harmful to humans, if consumed by a small animal, they can be more dangerous. They will also inflate their bodies to make themselves large when they feel threatened.

Great plains toads have a healthy population and remain currently unthreatened due to their secretive lifestyle.

3. Western Green Toad 

Green Toad (Anaxyrus debilis) on mud at Comanche National Grassland, Colorado, USA
A Green Toad (Anaxyrus debilis) on mud at Comanche National Grassland, Colorado, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus debilis
  • Other Names: North American green toad
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $15 to $30

Green toads are widespread, with a scattered population across Colorado. They are found in other states located in the southwestern U.S like Texas and Arizona. This toad lives in dry, semi-arid habitats.

The substrate they live in is a mix of sand and soil, which they use to burrow. For most of their life, they remain underground but are brought out by heavy rainfall. Breeding for this species occurs from March to August, brought on by the summer rains.

Green toads are green but their shade ranges from dark to light. Black spots and a mottled pattern cover their body. Yellow coloring is sometimes present on their legs and sides.

Their belly is white and bumpy like the rest of their body. The parotoid glands sit behind their eyes that secrete a toxin similar to other toads.

The toxin secreted helps defend them from predators, but they stay underground to avoid most threats. Western green toads are insectivores and feed on things like locusts, worms, and flies.

This species is a popular pet for toad lovers because of its size and calm nature.

4. Red-spotted Toad

Red-spotted Toad (Anaxyrus punctatus) in mud at Comanche National Grassland, Colorado, USA
A Red-spotted Toad (Anaxyrus punctatus) in mud at Comanche National Grassland, Colorado, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus punctatus
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $20 

Red-spotted toads live in a myriad of habitats like coastal plains, deserts, and habitats next to permanent water sources. Rivers and streamers are preferred in the habitat they live in.

Red-spotted toads also prefer rocky areas since they will use them as shelter. They are only active in the moist season of the year and will spend their time underground, or hiding in vegetation to remain moist.

This species is named after the red spots that cover their body. Grey, olive, and reddish-brown are the most common colors they are found in. Dark spots also cover their body, and black blotches can be seen on their sides and legs.

Behind their eyes are parotoid glands that secrete a toxin similar to other toads. Males of this species will have a darker throat when compared with females.

Red-spotted toads make good pets because of their size, and minimal toxin secreted when handled. They have a simple diet consisting of insects like ants, bees, and flies.

When the opportunity arises they may feed on small amphibians. Red-spotted toads are a hardy species and are able to survive losing up to 40% of the water in their body.

5. Woodhouse’s Toad 

Woodhouse's Toad (Anaxyrus woodhousii) on a rocky, sandy surface near South Boulder Creek, Boulder County, Colorado, USA
A Woodhouse’s Toad (Anaxyrus woodhousii) on a rocky, sandy surface near South Boulder Creek, Boulder County, Colorado, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus woodhousii 
  • Other Names: Western Woodhouse’s toad 
  • Adult Size: 2.5 to 5 inches
  • Lifespan: 12 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Woodhouse toads live all over the central U.S and most of Colorado. They can be found in wooded, riparian, and wet meadow habitats. Freshwater sources like lakes, rivers, and streams are common in the habitats they live in, but they can also be found in urban areas.

This species is nocturnal and will mate sporadically in the year. They are also able to breed with the American toad and will lay their eggs in the water attached to vegetation.

Woodhouse toads are a large species that is usually grayish-brown, or yellowish. They have short hind legs with a large wounded snout.

Warts cover this toad’s skin, and a white stripe runs down the center of their back. Two large parotoid glands are prominent behind their eyes.

Snakes, birds, skunks, and other predators will feed on this species, but some may avoid them because of their toxins. Insects are what this species mainly eats and will hunt at night.

Occasionally they are found during the day but will spend most of their life buried to remain moist.

6. Plain Spadefoot Toad 

Plains Spadefoot (Spea bombifrons) on a rocky gray surface in Karval, Lincoln County, Colorado, USA
A Plains Spadefoot (Spea bombifrons) on a rocky gray surface in Karval, Lincoln County, Colorado, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Scaphiopodidae
  • Scientific Name: Spea bombifrons
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 2.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 

The Plains spadefoot toads live in areas within Colorado with loose sandy soil to make it easy for them to burrow. They spend most of their lives underground, and will only come out to breed and hunt.

Water sources near their burrows are where they will breed, and do so in the rainy seasons. They will not merge in the dry seasons, as they need to stay moist. Like other frogs, they do not drink but absorb water through their skin.

Plains spadefoot toads are round and small. They are named after the black spade on their back foot that helps them burrow. Tann to dark brown is the color the range in.

Orange spots and black spots cover their back. Their eyes are large with orange cat-like eyes.   

This species is secretive and not seen often. They are preyed on by bird and snake species the most. Insects like beetles, flies, and crickets are what they eat the most. They will emerge at night to feed.

They can remain underground for multiple days, or up to multiple years.

7. Great Basin Spadefoot Toad 

Great Basin Spadefoot (Spea intermontana) on pebbly rocky ground at Vasuex Protected Area, British Columbia, Canada
A Great Basin Spadefoot (Spea intermontana) on pebbly rocky ground at Vasuex Protected Area, British Columbia, Canada. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Scaphiopodidae
  • Scientific Name: Spea intermontana
  • Other Names: N/A 
  • Adult Size: 1.4 to 2.4 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $30

Great Basin spadefoot toads live in the northwestern corner of Colorado. They live in grasslands or woodland next to freshwater and will bury themselves underground.

Sandy soil is preferred to make it easier to burrow, but they will also use rodent holes as shelter. This species will come out of their burrows to breed in rainfall. From late fall to early spring they will hibernate underground.

Great basin spadefoots are small with round bodies. They have bumpy skin, and a black spade on the end of their foot to help them dig. Their colors range from gray to olive green, and they are covered in dark blotches. Their eyes are large, orange with cat-like ellipticals.

This species is nocturnal and will emerge at night to feed on insects. Snakes, rodents, and birds are the main predators of this species.

In the wild, they can live for up to 10 years. They avoid most threats with their secretive nature, managing to stay out of the way of most threats. Some spadefoot toads can stay underground for up to 5 years.

8. Mexico Spadefoot Toad 

Mexican Spadefoot (Spea multiplicata) on dark concrete near Comanche National Grassland, Colorado, USA
A Mexican Spadefoot (Spea multiplicata) on dark concrete near Comanche National Grassland, Colorado, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: scaphiopodidae
  • Scientific Name: Spea multiplicata
  • Other Names: New Mexican spadefoot
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 2.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $5 to $10  

Mexican Spadefoot toads are an abundant species living in the extreme southwestern and southeastern Colorado. They live in grasslands, open plains, flood plains, and semi-desert areas.

They require loose sandy soil for burrowing and will spend most of their life underground. They will only emerge to breed and hunt. This species will breed in rainfall and only needs temporary waters. 

The New Mexico Spadefoot looks similar to other spadefoot toads. They have round bodies with large eyes. Green, gray, and brown are common colors, and they will usually be colored to match their soil’s habitat.

Mexican Spadefoot Toads are covered in black and orange dots with white bellies. 

This species is nocturnal and will come out of its burrow to feed on insects. The Mexican Spadefoot toad is similar to other Spadefoot a, but when handled or threatened it will emit a peanut butter smell.

This species has a healthy population and does not face any serious threats.

9. Couch’s Spadefoot Toad 

Couch's Spadefoot (Scaphiopus couchii) on multicolored rocks at Comanche National Grassland, Colorado, USA
A Couch’s Spadefoot (Scaphiopus couchii) on multicolored rocks at Comanche National Grassland, Colorado, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Scaphiopodidae
  • Scientific Name: Scaphiopus couchii
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2.5 to 3 inces
  • Lifespan: 10 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $30

Couch’s Spadefoot toads are located in the southeastern areas of Colorado. They are found in dry regions, as well as grasslands and meadows.

This frog spends most of its time underground and will come out to breed. It lives in areas with sandy soil to make it easier to burrow.

Breeding occurs sporadically and is triggered by heavy rainstorms during the summer season. The rain is required to breed since they will mate in temporary pools. Males make a goat-like sound to attract females.

Like other spadefoot toads, this species is named after the black spade on its hind feet to help it burrow. Couch’s Spadefoot toads range from green to gray and have a white underside.

They are covered in small warts and have large parotid glands on their neck. These glands can irritate human skin, and stop predators from eating them.

Insects are the main food this species eats. They will come out to hunt but can last without eating for months.

Predators of this species include snakes, rodents, and birds.

Couch’s Spadefoot toads can spend years underground until they come out to breed. The vibrations caused by rain hitting the ground and thunder is what triumph gets this species to emerge.

10. Western Narrow-mouthed Toad 

Western Narrow-mouthed Toad (Gastrophryne olivacea) on sand near Rita Blanca National Grasslands, Colorado, USA
A Western Narrow-mouthed Toad (Gastrophryne olivacea) on sand near Rita Blanca National Grasslands, Colorado, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Microhylidae
  • Scientific Name: Gastrophryne olivacea
  • Other Names: Great plains narrowmouth toad
  • Adult Size: 1.5 inches 
  • Lifespan: 6 years 
  • Average Price Range: $10

Western narrow-mouthed toads live in moist habitats with leaf litter. They live in a variety of areas but can be found in marshes, woodlands, grasslands, forests, and rocky hillsides. From May up until the fall season, they will breed when it rains, and use temporary water sources.

Western narrow-mouthed toads have a wide range and healthy population in the areas they live in.

Western narrow-mouthed toads have a plump body with a small narrow head. They have tiny mouths with small round eyes. Tan, gray, and olive green are common colors for this species.

They have dark spots and a mottled pattern on them. This species has long fingers and a white belly. Their skin is smooth and moist, with no warts or bumps like other toads.

Ants are what the narrow mouth toad eats most since they have small mouths. They are able to secrete toxins from their skin that help defends themselves from any bites.

Other insects are also eaten by this species, and they help control unwanted pest populations.

11. American Bullfrog 

American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) sitting on a rock near Bear Creek Greenbelt in Bear Valley, Lakewood, Colorado, USA
An American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) sitting on a rock near Bear Creek Greenbelt in Bear Valley, Lakewood, Colorado, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced 
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates catesbeianus
  • Other Names: lithobates catesbeianus
  • Adult Size: 3.5 to 8 inches 
  • Lifespan: 7 to 15 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20 

American bullfrogs can be found all over the U.S and live in Colorado. Like other states, they are not native but have become an invasive species that has managed to make a home in the state.

Bullfrogs live in freshwater habitats like lakes, ponds, rivers, and streams. They can even live in man-made habitats like pools or canals.

They are active most of the year but will hibernate in the winter. Bullfrogs can lay more than 10,000 eggs each season, which is why they become a dominant species in new areas.

American bullfrogs are the largest species of frog in Colorado and North America. They have green and brown skin with large features. They have yellow bellies and a large exposed eardrum on the side of their head. Dark blotches can be seen on their legs, and their body is slightly bumpy.

Bullfrogs smear a variety of species like birds, insects, smaller frogs, birds, bats, and snakes.

Being so large they eat food that other species rely on, as well as the other frog species. Their invasive nature makes native species lose populations and resources.

12. Wood Frog 

Wood Frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) on stone concrete near Laurel Run Park, Tennessee, USA
A Wood Frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) on stone concrete near Laurel Run Park, Tennessee, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates sylvaticus
  • Other Names: Rana sylvaticus
  • Adult Size: 1.375 to 2.75  inches
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: $15 to $30

Wood frogs are found mostly in the eastern United States but have a small population in Colorado. They live in forests, wetlands, and marshes.

Freshwater is common near the habitats they live in. In the summer they spend their time in woodlands, and breed in early March. They use temporary pools instead of permanent water for breeding.

Wood frogs will move to higher elevations during fall and hibernate for the winter. They are able to survive colder temperatures and can freeze, unlike other frogs.

Wood frogs look different than most other frogs in Colorado. They have light to dark brown coloring and a black mask mark near their eyes.

A white line appears above their lip, and they have small blotches on their legs. This small species has mildly bumpy skin and a white belly.

Wood frogs eat insects, arachnids, and other small creatures. They are active during the day, but in hot periods become nocturnal. Wood frogs are not endangered but are found in higher elevations in Colorado.

They are preyed on by animals like snakes, skunks, and birds.

13. Northern Leopard Frog 

Northern Leopard Frog (Lithobates pipiens) on mud near Medicine Bow Routt National Forests, Routt County, Colorado, USA
A Northern Leopard Frog (Lithobates pipiens) on mud near Medicine Bow Routt National Forests, Routt County, Colorado, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates pipiens
  • Other Names: Rana pipiens
  • Adult Size: 3.5 to 4.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $15

Northern Leopard frogs inhabit Colorado and are scattered throughout the entire state. They live in areas near permanent water sources like rivers, lakes, marshes, and streams.

Breeding for this species occurs in spring, and males can be heard calling until the season ends. Leopard frogs hibernate in the late fall and will emerge in the spring.

Northern leopard frogs are named after the leopard-like spots covering their back. They are tan to green in color and have long legs that help them escape predators.

This species is nearly identical to the plains leopard frog, but its dorsolateral stripe that runs down its back is unbroken.

Small insects, fish, frogs, and bats are some of the prey this species eats. They are primarily nocturnal and will do their hunting at night.

Bass, pikes, bullfrogs, garter snakes, water snakes, and birds of prey are the main predators that the northern leopard frogs face.

In Colorado, this species is declining and listed as threatened within the state. They have a healthy population in other areas but have been affected by pollution and habitat destruction. It is endangered and rare to find within the state often.

14. Plains Leopard Frog 

Plains Leopard Frog (Lithobates blairi) in water on rocks at Centennial High School, Pueblo County, Colorado, USA
A Plains Leopard Frog (Lithobates blairi) in water on rocks at Centennial High School, Pueblo County, Colorado, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates blairi
  • Other Names: Blair’s leopard frog
  • Adult Size: 2 to 4.25 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $30 

Plains Leopard frogs are found throughout Colorado in the eastern half of the state. They live in moist plains, prairies, grasslands, and fields. Breeding occurs in a large source of water like a lake, river, or stream.

Plains leopard frogs are usually found near a permanent source of water and will use it when frightened. They are active from spring to fall and will hibernate during the winter.

Plains leopard frogs can be green or brown and have a dark leopard-like pattern painted on their back. Dark bars appear sometimes on their long legs. Their eyes are large, and their underside is white.

Down their back runs dorsolateral ridges that are tan. Their coloring helps them blend into a muddy, moist environment.

Plains leopard frogs and northern leopards are nearly identical but can be differentiated by their forsake material stripe. The plains leopard frog stripe is broken.

Insects are what this species eats most, but they will eat anything small enough to fit into their mouths. Crustaceans, fish, and smaller frogs are some examples. Plains leopard frogs’ greatest threats are habitat loss and pollution in the waters it lives in.

15. Canyon Treefrog 

Canyon Treefrog (Hyla arenicolor) sitting on a rock near McInnis Canyons National Conservation Area, Mesa County, Colorado, USA
A Canyon Treefrog (Hyla arenicolor) sitting on a rock near McInnis Canyons National Conservation Area, Mesa County, Colorado, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla arenicolor
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2 to 2.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5  to 8 years
  • Average Price Range: $50 to $100 

Canyon tree frogs live in Colorado and inhabit riparian areas with rocky canyons. They are found along streams and prefer to live in rocky habitats.

They are nocturnal and are active from July to August. Summer is when this species breeds and they will hang around rocks in periods of light rainfall.

To help them blend in with their environment, Canyon tree frogs are colored to better camouflage with rocks. Brown, gray, and grayish-green are common colors they appear in.

In areas with limestone, they can be pink. They have large eyes with wrinkly skin. Some frogs will be a solid color, while others can have dark blotches covering them.

They have large hands with toe pads to help them climb on rocks.

Canyon tree frogs are nocturnal, eating mostly insects. They are harmless and will use their camouflage to avoid threats. Whip snakes, garter snakes, raccoons, and skunks are common predators of this species.

This is a common species with a healthy population, but it may be hard to find because of its secretive nature.

16. Boreal Chorus Frog 

Boreal Chorus Frog (Pseudacris maculata) in muddy roots near Yampa River Preserve, Hayden, Colorado, USA
A Boreal Chorus Frog (Pseudacris maculata) in muddy roots near Yampa River Preserve, Hayden, Colorado, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris maculata
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A 

Boreal chorus frogs live across Colorado and are an abundant species to find in prairies. They can also be found in wetlands, marshes, and on the edge of water habitats.

Boreal chorus frogs will breed in water in spring, and lay their eggs in submerged vegetation. After breeding season they will spend their time hiding in burrows and under natural debris.

This species is small and often confused with the western chorus frog. They look near-identical, but the boreal chorus frog has shorter legs.

Gray and tan are their most common color, and they have three stripes running down their back. The belly of this frog is white, and males have a dark-colored throat.

When breeding this species will make a “preeep” sound to call out to females.

Small insects are what this species feeds on. Boreal chorus frogs learn how to avoid predators, so new threats are more successful in preying on this frog.

Like the spring peeper, they are one of the first frogs to emerge in spring. Population decline has been experienced by the Boreal Chorus frog due to disease and habitat loss.

17. Northern Cricket Frog

Northern Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans) on loose leaves in Daniel Boone National Forest, Cookeville, Tennessee, USA
A Northern Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans) on loose leaves in Daniel Boone National Forest, Cookeville, Tennessee, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Acris crepitans
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $20

The northern cricket frog has an extensive range in the southeastern United States. In Colorado, they have a small range in the northeastern corner of the state.

Slow-moving permanent water sources are where this species prefers to live. They spend most of the time near the edges of water and will breed from spring to mid-summer.

Northern cricket frogs are active during the day and most of the year. In the coldest winter days, they will move away from water and hibernate.

Smaller than most frogs, this species can be grey, green, or brown. Their skin is covered in bumps, and they have a mottled pattern covering them.

Unlike other tree frogs, this species does not have large toe pads to help them climb, so they spend more time on the ground.

Northern cricket frogs feed on small insects like crickets and mosquitos.

Their size makes them vulnerable to predators like larger frogs, birds, and snakes. The only way they can defend themselves is with their jump, which is why they can leap as far as 6 feet.

Northern cricket frogs have a healthy population but are only found in the cleanest waters and environments.

Wrapping up

The 17 species of frogs in Colorado are all important to the state and their environment. A high population of frogs in the areas is a sign of a healthy habitat.

They also help keep pest insect populations low and are food for a variety of wild animals. Habitat loss and pollution are one of the main reasons frogs start to become extinct, and maintaining their habitat can help maintain their population.

Invasive species are also a threat to native frogs since they bring disease and take resources from the species that were originally in the area. Being released by humans are one of the main causes species become invasive.

Frogs can make good companions, but you should research any species to ensure you can properly take care of them.

This list of frog species should be helpful when learning about different species or finding the ones near you. Frogs and other amphibians are becoming more threatened and learning about them can help secure their future.

They are also amazing animals that always provide something new to discover.

Frogs in other states

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