Frogs In Maryland

By Snaketracks / November 23, 2021

There are 21 frogs in Maryland found with four different families living in the state.

The families of frogs living in Maryland are True Frogs (Ranidae), Tree frogs (Hylidae), Toads (Bufonidae), and Spadefoots (Pelobatidae). Frogs enjoy wet, moist environments and are most active from spring to fall.

In winter, most species go dormant and find a place to take shelter during the colder months, like underground or under some leaf litter.

Frogs can be found all over the state, and even in some residential areas. While all 21 species of frogs are abundant in the state, some may also be considered a species of concern. Contamination, water pollution, and habitat destruction affect all species of frogs and may even cause some of their endangerment.

In this list, you’ll find all of the endemic species of frogs and toads living in Maryland. Education about the frogs near you can help you identify them more easily if you spot them in the wild and also to know which species might need protection.

Different frogs live in different environments and some are more active than others. Here are all the frog species in Maryland and what you should know about each one:

Frogs In Maryland

1. American Bullfrog

American Bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus in the grass at Ambassador Park Victoria Canada
An American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) in the grass at Ambassador Park, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Rana catesbeiana
  • Other Names: Bullfrog
  • Adult Size: 3.5 to 6 inches
  • Lifespan: 7 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $20

American Bullfrogs are one of the largest species of frogs in Maryland and North America. They are found throughout the state, known for their large size and low-bellowing call.

Lakes, ponds, swamps, and even pools are some of the habitats they thrive in. They enjoy cool waters around 60 degrees Fahrenheit (15.5 degrees Celsius) and are one of the most aggressive species of frog.

Bullfrogs are large with brownish to green skin. Dark spots cover their back, and they have bright green lips. Their legs are long and help them jump far.  Their back feet are webbed, but not their front.

Bullfrogs will eat anything they can fit in their mouth including other frogs, lizards, birds, and bats. This frog can be considered a pest in some areas since it will eat and lower the populations of other local fauna.

Bullfrogs will breed yearly in the spring, and their large legs are eaten, oftentimes seen as a delicacy in some cultures.

2. Green Frog

Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans) on wet straw somewhere in Oxford County, Ontario, Canada
Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans) in wet straw somewhere in Oxford County, Ontario, Canada. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates clamitans 
  • Other Names: Northern Green Frog
  • Adult Size: 2.25 to 3.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 15 to 20 years
  • Average Price Range: $10

Green Frogs can be found in Maryland’s ponds, lakes, streams, and other sources of temporary water habitats. Swimming pools and man-made sources are also areas they can live in.

This species will travel to a source of water to breed in the spring. They are mostly aquatic and will jump into the water to escape predators but will travel on land mostly in search of other sources of water.

Green Frogs can be green, brownish-green, yellow, and tan. They are brighter near their front and have small dots on their back. Males have a bright yellow throat and will call in the breeding season near water.

Green Frogs are similar in characteristics to Bullfrogs but are slightly smaller. They have distinct dorsolateral stripes that run down their back.

Green frogs are active both in the day and the night, hunting small insects, fish, shrimp, snakes, and slugs.

3. Carpenter Frog

Carpenter Frog (Lithobates virgatipes) in some mud in Ellerbe, North Carolina, US.
Carpenter Frog (Lithobates virgatipes) in some mud in Ellerbe, North Carolina, US. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates virgatipes
  • Other Names: Sphagnum Frog
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 2.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 3 to 6 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Carpenter Frogs live in wetland habitats like bogs, marshes, swamps, and savanna ponds. They are active in murky waters filled with lots of vegetation.

They breed in late December to May. Their call can be heard year-round and sounds similar to a carpenter’s hammer, which is where they get their name.

Carpenter Frogs are brown to greenish. They have orange stripes running down their back and on both sides of their body. Their bellies are white or yellowish.

They can look similar to a Bullfrog since they are actually a part of the same family. They also have brown or black spots covering their back.

Carpenter frogs eat crayfish, spiders, and aquatic insects. Some known predators are water snakes and water birds. This species is uncommon as it requires a specific habitat to live in.

It is also one of the species that suffers most from habitat loss.

4. Pickerel Frog

Pickerel Frog (Lithobates palustris) in the grass found in The Quarries, Virginia, USA.
A Pickerel Frog (Lithobates palustris) in the grass found in The Quarries, Virginia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates palustris
  • Other Names: Rana palustris
  • Adult Size: 1.75 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 8 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $15

The Pickerel Frog is the only species of poisonous frog in North America and Maryland. It is a medium-sized species that live in a wide variety of habitats such as mountain streams, ponds, coastal plains, forests, and fields.

Temporary water is preferred to avoid predators, but they will also breed in permanent pools, swamps, streams, and lakes.

The Pickerel Frog is similar in appearance to the Southern Leopard Frog, often being confused for that species. They are brown, yellowish, green to olive in color, and are covered in dark brown spots.

Their spots cover their legs, back, and sides. Two ridges run down their back and they are smooth, moist-looking species.

This frog can secrete a poison from its skin that is harmful to predators. Still some species are able to eat and prey on them, such as Hog-nosed Snakes and other frogs.

These toxins are not harmful to humans but can irritate the skin if the frog is picked up.

5. Northern Leopard Frog

Northern Leopard Frog (Lithobates pipiens) on a sandy, rocky ground in Mann Creek, Wisconsin, USA.
A Northern Leopard Frog (Lithobates pipiens) on a sandy, rocky ground in Mann Creek, Wisconsin, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates pipiens
  • Other Names: Meadow Frog
  • Adult Size: 2 to 3.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $15

Northern Leopard Frogs can be found in Maryland as well as all across the United States. They live in habitats with high moisture like marshes, meadows, and wetlands.

They’re active from Spring to Fall, and breeding will occur in late April. The species can be known to travel, moving up to 2 miles away from water.

 Northern Leopard Frogs look similar to Pickerel Frogs but are named after the leopard-like pattern running across their back. They are green and have rows of dark spots covering them.

They mostly consume flies, worms, beetles, ants, and other species of smaller frogs. Even with their small mouth, they will eat anything that fits into it, sometimes even eating birds and snakes.

Predators of this species include fish, raccoons, skunks, and snakes. Disease and destruction of habitat have caused the species population to decline.

6. Southern Leopard Frog

Southern Leopard Frog (Lithobates sphenocephalus) in long, green grass near Peacock Hill Park, Williamson County, Tennessee, USA
A Southern Leopard Frog (Lithobates sphenocephalus) in long, green grass near Peacock Hill Park, Williamson County, Tennessee, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates sphenocephalus
  • Other Names: Rana sphenocephalus
  • Adult Size: 2 to 3.5  inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $15

Southern Leopard Frogs live in shallow water habitats within Maryland. They spend the majority of their time on land but will often stay close to water. They are nocturnal but can sometimes be seen during the day.

The Southern Leopard Frog is a subspecies of the Leopard Frog and has a leopard-like pattern running across its back as well. They can be green or brown in color with yellow ridges running down both sides of their back along with dark spots that cover their sides and legs.

Males are larger than females and will have larger limbs.

Small insects and vertebrates make up a majority of their diet.

Breeding is triggered by heavy rainfall and eggs will be laid below the water’s surface. This season starts around winter and lasts until early spring.

7. Atlantic Coast Leopard Frog

Atlantic Coast Leopard Frog (Lithobates kauffeldi) on some leafy grass in Long Hill, New Jersey, United States
Atlantic Coast Leopard Frog (Lithobates kauffeldi) on some leafy grass in Long Hill, New Jersey, United States. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates kauffeldi
  • Other Names: Mid-Atlantic Coast Leopard Frog
  • Adult Size: 2 to 3.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 5 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The Mid-Atlantic Coast Leopard Frog is a medium-sized species. They are found in Maryland, other parts of the United States near streams and other slow-moving water habitats.

Breeding occurs in early spring in March and April. During that time, many frogs will congregate in pools and lay eggs. Like other Leopard Frog species, the Mid-Atlantic Leopard Frog will have a second breeding in late fall.

This frog is dark olive green and brown to gray in color with dark round spots covering their backsides and legs. Their feet have webbing that helps them swim through the water.

Its mating call can help distinguish it from other Leopard Frogs.

This frog survives off insects like mosquitoes and ticks. Tadpoles mostly eat plants.

Habitat loss is the main issue that this species faces. It has seen many large dropping numbers and is in need of major conservation.

8. Wood Frog

Wood Frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) on a leather glove in Princeton, New Jersey, USA
Wood Frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) on a leather glove in Princeton, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates sylvaticus
  • Other Names: Rana sylvaticus
  • Adult Size: 1.38 to 2.75  inches
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: $15 to $30

Wood Frogs are found in mountainous piedmont areas in Maryland. They’re a species that spends most of its time on land and it will live in moist woodlands.

They can sometimes be spotted on the roads if it’s a rainy night. Temporary ponds and woods are where they breed and will gather in large numbers.

Eggs are attached to aquatic vegetation, which helps them from freezing.

Wood Frogs are brown and sometimes gray. Some wood frogs will also be reddish or pinkish. While they have minimal markings, they do have a dark mask-like spotting covering their eyes.

Females are larger and more colorful than males.

Wood frogs eat insects such as spiders, worms, slugs, snails, flies, and beetles. When winter comes they hide under the leaf litter and other natural debris.

Wood Frogs produce a special antifreeze substance that would prevent them from freezing. They can survive extreme temperatures and are more active in the cold compared to other frogs species.

9. Barking Tree Frog

Barking Treefrog (Dryophytes gratiosus) on bark near Netherfield, North Carolina, USA
Barking Treefrog (Dryophytes gratiosus) on some bark near Netherfield, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Dryophytes gratiosus
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2 to 2.75 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $15 

The Barking Treefrog is a large species of Treefrog found in Maryland. They inhabit pine forests and dry flatwoods. They use temporary waters with heavy vegetation to breed.

Barking Free Frogs have large bodies and round heads. They are one of the largest tree frogs in Maryland.

They can be dark green and have uniform spots on their back. This frog can be easily confused with the Squirrel Tree Frog, but is larger and has more granular skin.

This species of Treefrog breeds from March to August, its mating call like an explosive dunk and occurs every few seconds. They survive off insects like flies, spiders, beetles and will remain high in trees to avoid predators.

10. Gray Tree Frog

Gray Treefrog (Hyla versicolor) on a leaf somewhere near Lac-McGregor, Quebec, Canada
Gray Treefrog (Hyla versicolor) on a leaf somewhere near Lac-McGregor, Quebec, Canada. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla versicolor
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.25 inches
  • Lifespan: 7 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $20

The Gray Tree Frog is one of two species of Gray Tree Frog found in Maryland. They live in pinewood forests and other woodland habitats.

They’re mostly found in wooded areas with lots of leaf litter and ground debris, sometimes even in swamps and backyards. Small streams and standing water are needed for this species to breed and lay eggs.

Gray Tree Frog colors will vary depending on their environment; they will range from brown to grey with bumpy skin that resembles tree bark. Their underside is white or cream-colored and males have a dark throat.

They have bands on the undersides of their legs with bright orange or yellow spots on each leg. They will flash these bright oranges to ward off predators in fight or flight mode.

Gray Tree Frogs survive off insects like slugs and snails, plant lice mites, and spiders; they will sometimes eat other frogs if they are small enough as well. Mating will start in early spring but depends on the environment and temperature of the location.

They are nocturnal and will spend most of their time high in the trees. During the day, they can be found under logs, roots, and other ground debris.

11. Cope’s Gray Tree Frog

Cope's Gray Treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) on a stick at Black Bayou Lake, Monroe, Louisiana, USA
Cope’s Gray Treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) on a stick at Black Bayou Lake, Monroe, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla chrysoscelis
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1 to 1.25 inch
  • Lifespan: 7 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $20

Cope’s Gray Tree Frog is the second species of tree frog found in Maryland. They’re almost indistinguishable from the Gray Tree Frog but have a higher-pitched and faster-paced call.

They live in forested and woodland habitats but will sometimes be found in open areas, where they go to breed.

Cope’s Gray Tree Frogs are gray to green in color and look similar to tree bark. They have yellow and orange spots on the inside of their legs which can be seen when they leap and are used to ward off predators.

Males have black throats during breeding and the color of the species will vary depending on its environment.

They eat insects like moths, grasshoppers, ants, and beetles. Most of the year their time is spent in trees and on other plant life. In the breeding season, they will go towards wetlands and other fishless waters.

12. Green Tree Frog

Green Treefrog (Dryophytes cinereus) on a large leaf somewhere in Josephine, Alabama, USA
A small Green Treefrog (Dryophytes cinereus) on a large leaf somewhere in Josephine, Alabama, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Dryophytes cinereus
  • Other Names: American Green Treefrog
  • Adult Size: 2 to 2.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 6 years
  • Average Price Range: $10

Green Tree Frogs are arboreal like other tree frogs and spend their time living in trees. They live near pools, swamps, edges of wetlands, lakes, and other water habitats.

They are nocturnal and spend their day hiding in the water vegetation. They can also make their home in PVC pipes around wetlands.

Green Tree Frogs are medium-sized with long legs and sticky toe pads. They can range from light to dark green depending on their environment.

Brown, white, or yellow stripes run down their sides and orange or gold flecks are scattered around their backside. Some Green Tree Frogs will have no stripes and will be plainly colored.

Insects like flies, mosquitoes, crickets, mites, and beetles make up a majority of its diet. Green Tree Frogs choose their prey based on activity and not size.

They can be good pets and will thrive under the right living conditions for many years.

13. Mountain Chorus Frog

Mountain Chorus Frog (Pseudacris brachyphona) on gray concrete near Cave Run Lake, Kentucky, USA
A Mountain Chorus Frog (Pseudacris brachyphona) on gray concrete near Cave Run Lake, Kentucky, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris brachyphona
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1 to 1.25 inch
  • Lifespan:  1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Mountain Chorus Frogs are an endangered species found in Maryland.

They can be found in marshes and other vegetated wetland habitats. This species has faced the destruction of habitat caused by humans which have helped make it endangered.

They’re active during the day and night but are rare to find due to their low numbers.

These frogs can be gray, green, or brown. It has a dark triangle between its eyes and white coloring on its lips as well as a pattern similar to reverse parentheses on its back.

They look very similar to the Pine Woods Tree Frog, a species that is not found in Maryland.

This species eats insects and other bugs it finds on the ground. Like ants, small beetles, grasshoppers, caterpillars, and any spiders they might find.

These frogs are not the best climbers and spend most of their time hunting on the ground.

14. New Jersey Chorus Frog

New Jersey Chorus Frog (Pseudacris Kalmi) on wet pavement somewhere off Augustine Herman Highway, Maryland, USA
New Jersey Chorus Frog (Pseudacris Kalmi) on wet pavement somewhere off Augustine Herman Highway, Maryland, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris Kalmi
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 to 5 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The New Jersey Chorus Frog is a subspecies of Chorus frogs found in moist habitats in Maryland. Swamps and marshes in grassy plains and woodland areas are where they can be found; they prefer open waters with a lot of dense vegetation.

The species is small but robust with rough skin and warts covering them. This tree frog will range from gray to brown and may have light blotches covering their body and stomach. Dark markings can also be present on their eyes as well as their groin area.

Small insects and invertebrates are the species main source of food. Predators of this small species of frog include larger frogs, snakes, and birds.

Habitat destruction and pollution have caused a decline in their population.

15. Upland Chorus Frog

Upland Chorus Frog (Pseudacris feriarum) on some leaves in the water near Shady Side, Maryland, USA
Upland Chorus Frog (Pseudacris feriarum) on some leaves in the water near Shady Side, Maryland, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris feriarum
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.75 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 to 5 years 
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The Upland Chorus Frog is a small Chorus frog species found in Maryland. They can be living in Piedmont, coastal plains, grassy areas, woodlands, wetlands, and bogs.

These frogs are common in Maryland and throughout the United States.

This frog is active from February to late fall. Breeding occurs in wetlands ditches and other slow-moving water sources.

Males have a large vocal sack that inflates when they are calling. They will call during the Spring, with a sound like a finger running through a comb.

This small species is typically brown or gray with a white line running across their upper lip and a dark lateral stripe running through their eye. Markings of the species can vary depending on specific individuals.

Small insects and invertebrates are what they eat the most.

16. Spring Peeper

Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) on a leaf at Ladew Topiary Gardens in Monkton, Maryland, USA
Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) on a leaf at Ladew Topiary Gardens in Monkton, Maryland, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris crucifer 
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.25 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $20

Spring Peepers are a chorus frog species, most commonly known as being one of the first frogs to emerge after winter hibernation. Their call can be heard in early spring and is a sign of the season to come.

They live in a variety of habitats like marshes, swamps, pools, and ponds. Breeding will occur in semi-permanent water to avoid predators. This species spends most of its time on land, as water is only used for breeding.

Spring peepers are brown, tan, olive green, or gray. They have white-colored bellies with an x on their back. Females are lighter in color but males will have darker throats. A pattern of dark bars can be seen on their face and the side of their legs.

The colors of this species will change depending on their environment.

Their feet have sticky pads on them to help climb high in trees.

Spring peepers’ diet consists mostly of insects like ants, flies, beetles, and spiders. They’re nocturnal and come out at night to hunt. They can often be seen near light sources hunting for food.

17. Northern Cricket Frog

Northern Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans) on a leaf near a small pond in Albemarle County, Virginia, USA
Northern Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans) on a leaf near a small pond in Albemarle County, Virginia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner to Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Acris crepitans
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.625 to 1.75 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: $5 to $10 

The Northern Cricket Frogs live in moist habitats with lots of vegetation. They can be found in permanent water habitats like rivers, lakes, and large ponds.

While they enjoy the water, they prefer open grassy areas, next to a source of water. This species will congregate in large groups and the edges of banks and streams. In winter they move away from their breeding pools.

This is one of the smallest species in North America and Maryland.

The Northern Cricket Frog is small and has wet, warty skin. They have a dark triangular shape between their eyes on their back.

They can be shades of green, tan, gray, and brown. Some dark banding often appears on their legs.

They will eat beetles, ants, and mosquitos. Being so small they are vulnerable to prey like larger frogs, birds and snakes.

Cricket Frogs hunt along the shorelines at night, and sometimes even during the day. In spring to late summer is when they are most active.

18. Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad (Gastrophryne carolinensis) on a mossy rock in Peacock Hill Park, Tennesee, USA
Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad (Gastrophryne carolinensis) on a mossy rock in Peacock Hill Park, Tennesee, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced
  • Family: Microhylidae
  • Scientific Name: Gastrophryne carolinensis
  • Other Names: Narrowmouth toad
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 6 years
  • Average Price Range: $10

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toads live in a variety of habitats but they must be moist in order for them to thrive.

They will breed and live in fishless wetlands and ponds. Coastal plains, piedmont, and marsh habitats are where they can be found. They are nocturnal and will spend the day hiding under natural debris.

Narrow-mouthed toads are small and have triangular-shaped heads. They have narrow mouths, like their name suggests, and have a fold of skin across their head.

Gray, reddish, or brown are their possible colors, and they have a dark stripe running down their back.

Ants are this species main source of food but they will also eat other small insects.

To protect itself from predators, it will secrete an irritating substance from its skin, which can also cause rashes on human skin.

This species will breed and be most active from April to October.

19. Eastern Spadefoot

Eastern Spadefoot (Scaphiopus holbrookii) on leaves near North Keys Community Park, Maryland, USA
Eastern Spadefoot (Scaphiopus holbrookii) on leaves near North Keys Community Park, Maryland, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Pelobatidae
  • Scientific Name: Scaphiopus holbrookii
  • Other Names: The Spadefoot Toad
  • Adult Size: 1.75 to 2.25 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $20

The Eastern spadefoot toads live in dry sandy habitats. They like to burrow and will remain underground for most of their life.

To eat and breed is when they will only come out. In periods of heavy rainfall, it will trigger breeding to occur. They will mate and lay their eggs in temporary ponds caused by the rain.

Eastern spadefoots are smaller in size compared to most toads and have moist-looking skin. Warts cover parts of their body.

They are yellow to dark brown in color and have no spots covering them. Markings appear around their eyes that look like an hourglass shape. They have cat-like eyes and bright yellow pupils.

Males will be more darkly colored.

The Spadefoot Toad is reported to smell like peanut butter by those who have encountered it.

This species secretes stuff from its skin that can irritate humans and other animals. They mainly survive off insects they find above, or underground.

20. American Toad

American Toad (Anaxyrus americanus) sitting on concrete near Rockburn Branch Park, Maryland, USA
The warty American Toad (Anaxyrus americanus) sitting on some light concrete near Rockburn Branch Park, Maryland, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus americanus
  • Other Names: Eastern American Toad
  • Adult Size: 2 to 3.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30

The American Toad inhabits areas all over Maryland and is one of the most commonly found toads in North America. They live near streams, rivers, wetlands, and other sources of water.

This species will travel to breeding pools, and can sometimes be found in forests, fields, and grassland. In winter they hibernate and stay just below the freezing line to survive.

This medium-sized species is a brown to reddish color. They have warts covering their body and their skin is rough and bumpy. They have white chests and thick, stout bodies.

American Toads eat insects like worms, snails, beetles, spiders, and ants.

To protect themselves from being eaten, they can secrete a toxin from their skin to make them unpalatable.

21. Fowler’s Toad

Fowler's Toad (Anaxyrus fowleri) in some forest debris near Cash Lake, Maryland, USA
Fowler’s Toad (Anaxyrus fowleri) in some forest debris near Cash Lake, Maryland, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus fowleri
  • Other Names: Bufo fowleri
  • Adult Size: 2 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 5 years
  • Average Price Range: $20

Fowler’s Toads typically live in forested habitats next to permanent bodies of water. They are found all throughout Maryland and are mostly active at night.

This toad will burrow itself underground and will remain inactive in the day. They will hang around the edges of muddy banks and make a bleating sound.

Fowler’s Toads are small with dry, warty skin, short legs, and are brown or gray in color, sometimes with a little tinge of yellow coloring. A light stripe runs down the center of its body and they have at least three warts in their dark spots.

Fowler’s toads eat insects like snails, worms, and crickets.

Predators include large fish, snakes, and birds.

Wrapping Up

Maryland has 21 different species of frogs living in the state, all of which are important to the environment. Frogs prey on many pests like insects but are also an important food source for larger animals.

Frogs are in a variety of habitats and even in some residential areas.

Forests, fields, and other areas near water are where frogs are found. Ponds, lakes, and other sources of water are breeding pools for many species and areas they are found in often.

Tree frogs are found mostly in trees and will come out at night. Toads usually spend more time on land, but will also use water to stay moist.

Species like the green frog, or American toad can make great pets if you are looking for an amphibious companion. Species with an easy car routine and diet will make the best pets.

This list is useful for finding the species near you and learning about each frog habitat, diet, and location. The frogs in Maryland are all unique and finding them is a sign of a healthy environment.

Leave us a comment down below or any questions you might have about the frogs in Maryland!

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