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19 Cool Lizards in Oklahoma

In Oklahoma there are around 19 lizard species that live in the state. The state of Oklahoma is filled with woodlands, mountains, prairie, and aquatic habitats. The lizards that live in the state can be identified by their appearance, behavior, location, and their types of scales.

Lizards are important in the ecosystems they live in, as they feed on pest populations, and are food for animals like predatory birds, mammals, and even large invertebrates. When you know what to look for you can find and identify lizards easily in the wild. Here we will take a look at the 19 lizards that live in Oklahoma, and everything you should know about them.

Lizards in Oklahoma

Anguidae

1. Slender Glass Lizard

Slender Glass Lizard (Ophisaurus attenuatus)
Slender Glass Lizard (Ophisaurus attenuatus)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Anguidae
  • Scientific Name: Ophisaurus attenuatus
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 22 to 46 in. (55.88 to 116.84 cm.)
  • Lifespan: 10 to 30 years
  • Average Price Range: $50

Slender glass lizards can be sighted in the majority of Oklahoma, but are absent from the far western portion of the state. These lizards are native to the southeastern United States. Prairies, open woodlands, fields, and other open habitats are where this species lives. They are more common near water, and places with sandy habitats.

The slender glass lizard is one of the largest lizards in the state of Oklahoma, and has a robust, snake-like body. These lizards have tan, gray, or brown coloring, with black stripes on their sides. Their scales are smooth. Unlike snakes these lizards have ear holes, blinkable eyelids, and can also detach their tails.

Slender glass lizards are active most from the spring and summer months. These lizards will hibernate in the winter. Burrows are used by slender glass lizards to rest, or hibernate in. When breeding in the spring these lizards lay around 5 to 15 eggs, placing them in areas like under logs.

These lizards feed on various prey like insects, spiders, small rodents, and other smaller reptiles. The predators of these lizards include things like hawks, or larger snakes. Slender glass lizards populations have been affected in parts of their range due to things like pollution from insecticides, and habitat fragmentation.

Dactyloidae

2. Green Anole

Green Anole (Anolis carolinensis)
Green Anole (Anolis carolinensis)
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Dactyloidae
  • Scientific Name: Anolis sagrei
  • Other Names: Bahaman Anole, Cuban Brown Anole
  • Adult Size: 5 to 9 in. (12 to 22.86 cm)
  • Lifespan: 5 years
  • Average Price Range: $10

Green anoles are native to the southeastern United States. They can be found in a small region within the southeastern portion of Oklahoma. These lizards live in subtropical habitats. They are arboreal, found in the trees, and other vegetation, not often seen on the ground.

These lizards get their name from their green coloring, but can also appear brownish, or change their shade to better blend into the habitat. These lizards have slender bodies, with large triangular heads. A dewlap sits under their chin, which has a reddish, pink coloring. Males have a much larger, and brighter colored dewlap than females.

Green anoles are active during the day, and spend their times moving through trees. They can be very territorial with each other, especially males in the breeding season. Green anoles are active through the year, but are seen most in the spring, and fall. In winter they are only seen on warmer days with sunlight.

Insects like grubs, grasshoppers, flies, moths, roaches, and butterflies are what this lizard eats. They may also eat plant material like seeds, grains, and fruit. Predators of this lizard include larger lizards, snakes, and birds like hawks. Green anoles have a stable population across their range, but may be affected by other invasive anoles.

Crotaphytidae

3. Eastern Collared Lizard

Eastern Collared Lizard (Crotaphytus collaris)
Eastern Collared Lizard (Crotaphytus collaris)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Crotaphytidae
  • Scientific Name: Crotaphytus collaris
  • Other Names: Yellow-headed Collared Lizard
  • Adult Size: 8 to 15 in. (20 to 38 cm.)
  • Lifespan: 10 to 12 years
  • Average Price Range: $70

The eastern collared lizard is native to a small region within the southeastern United States, which includes Oklahoma. Various habitats from rocky deserts, grasslands, and mountains are where these lizards live. Eastern collared lizards are a very alert species, and they are active in the day.

These lizards get their name from the black collar-like marking that appears around their neck. These lizards have a bluish, green body. They have yellowish, and black markings on them, which includes bars, and bands. Females are typically more grayish to brown coloring. Males of these species have a more colorful appearance of green, blue and yellow.

Eastern collared lizards are active during the day. This lizard is very speedy, able to run up to 16 mph (26 km/h), and can even run bipedally. Eastern collared lizards will flee if sighted, and use the crevices of rocks for covers. The spring and summer is when these lizards mate, and they lay between 4 to 6 eggs.

Insects like crickets, grasshoppers, moths, and arthropods like spiders are what this lizard eats. They may also eat shrubs, flowers, and other similar plants. Eastern collared lizards have a stable population in their range, and are listed as a species of least concern by the IUCN.

Phrynosomatidae

4. Prairie Lizard

Prairie Lizard (Sceloporus consobrinus) by ericmon
Prairie Lizard (Sceloporus consobrinus) by ericmon
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Phrynosomatidae
  • Scientific Name: Sceloporus consobrinus
  • Other Names: Southern Prairie Lizard
  • Adult Size: 4 to 7 in. (10.16 to 17.78 cm.)
  • Lifespan: n/a
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Prairie lizards are native to Oklahoma, but also found in other states like Texas, New Mexico, Kansas, Colorado, Arizona, Missouri, and Nebraska. Woodlands, and prairies are the habitat this lizard lives in. They are also common in urban areas near homes. The spring to fall is when this species is most active, seen often on sunny days.

This lizard is very small, with gray to brown coloring. They have roughly keeled scales with sharp claws. Males are dark gray, or brown, with no distinguishing markings on them. Females may have patterns like lines, or orange coloring on their tail.

Prairie lizards are very common in their range. Previously they used to be called northern fence lizards, and were considered a subspecies of the eastern fence lizard before being re-analysed. These lizards breed in spring, and fall, laying around 4 to 17 eggs. In the winter this lizard is not active.

Insects and other small animals are what this lizard eats. They may be preyed on by larger lizards, birds, and small mammals. Not much is known about this lizard when compared with other similar species since they are very small, secretive, and easily missed.

5. Greater Earless Lizard

Greater Earless Lizard (Cophosaurus texanus)
Greater Earless Lizard (Cophosaurus texanus)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Phrynosomatidae
  • Scientific Name: Cophosaurus texanus
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 2.6 to 5.3 in. (6.6 to 13.4 cm)
  • Lifespan: 3 years
  • Average Price Range: $15

The greater earless lizard is found in parts of the southwestern United States, including Oklahoma, New Mexico, Arizona, and Texas. These lizards live in semi-arid environments, including scrublands, and rocky habitats. Greater earless lizards are often found in open habitats with sparse vegetation, and lots of rocks. 

Greater earless lizards are medium-sized, and are named after their lack of ear holes opening. These lizards have small, and very granular scales. Brown, gray, and reddish brown are the colors these lizards appear in. Greater earless lizards can have pinkish, orange, yellowish, or green markings on their bodies. 

The spring and early summer is when these lizards mate, and they lay anywhere between 2 to 9 eggs. These lizards reach sexual maturity at around 1 years of age. Greater earless lizards are common in their environments, and their populations are considered stable.

Greater earless earless are mainly insectivores, feeding on things like crickets, locusts, and grasshoppers the most. These lizards use the sit, and wait strategy of hunting. Greater earless lizards can even run bipedally to make themselves slightly quicker. The day is when these lizards are active, seen most often in the late morning.

6. Western Earless Lizard

Western Earless Lizard (Holbrookia maculata) by j_cadenm
Western Earless Lizard (Holbrookia maculata) by j_cadenm
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Phrynosomatidae
  • Scientific Name: Holbrookia maculata
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 4 to 5 in. (10 to 13 cm.)
  • Lifespan: 3 to 7 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The western earless lizard is native to the southwestern, and Central United States. This species is found within Oklahoma in grasslands, shrublands, and desert habitats. Western earless lizards are active in the day from the morning to the afternoon. In the summer they tend to avoid the hottest time, but are seen through the day in spring and fall.

Western earless lizards are a small species, with scales that are smooth and granular. They are named after their lack of external ear openings. Western earless lizards have a tannish, gray coloring, with a dark pattern covering them. The throats of females may sometimes have orange coloring in the breeding season.

The breeding for this lizard occurs in the spring months, and they lay anywhere from 1 to 10 eggs. In the winter, these lizards are not seen, and hibernate. Insects like beetles, ants, grasshoppers, and butterflies are what this species eats. When not active this species will spend its time hiding in dense vegetation.

7. Texas Horned Lizard

Texas Horned Lizard (Phrynosoma cornutum)
Texas Horned Lizard (Phrynosoma cornutum)
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Phrynosomatidae
  • Scientific Name: Phrynosoma cornutum
  • Other Names: Horny Toad
  • Adult Size: 3.7 to 5 in. (9.93 ot 12.7 cm.)
  • Lifespan: 5 years
  • Average Price Range: $40

Texas horned lizards are native to Oklahoma, found in the majority of the state. These lizards are found across the southern United States. These lizards are common in semiarid environments that are open, and have sparse vegetation. Texas horned lizards prefer habitats with sandy soils, and desert-like vegetation.

The body of the Texas horned lizard is covered in spikes, with the larger ones being on their head. These lizards have flat, round bodies. They have a grayish, to tan coloring. The color and spikes on these lizards help them blend into sparse vegetation.

Texas horned lizards are active in the day, and during this time they bask in the sun. They spend their time near ant hills, since these insects make up the majority of their diet. These lizards may also feed on other insects like beetles, and grasshoppers. Their bodies are immune to ant venom, but they have seen a decline due to invasive red ants.

In regions like Oklahoma Texas horned lizards have experienced some decline due to pesticides, and the destruction of their habitats. The spikes and camouflage are how these lizards defend themselves. Blood is also able to be squirted from their eyes at their predators to ward off animals like dogs.

8. Roundtail Horned Lizard

Roundtail Horned Lizard (Phrynosoma modestum) by Jerry Oldenettel
Roundtail Horned Lizard (Phrynosoma modestum) by Jerry Oldenettel
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Phrynosomatidae
  • Scientific Name: Phrynosoma modestum
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 2.7 to 4.3 (7 to 10.5 cm)
  • Lifespan: 7 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The roundtail horned lizard is only found in a small portion of extreme western Oklahoma, and are very rare in the state. These lizards are also found in other states like Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and Colorado. Roundtail horned lizards live in rocky, and sandy habitats that are semi-arid.

Roundtail horned lizards have a gray, brown, or yellowish coloring. Their shade typically matches the habitat they live in. They have round bodies, with very small spikes on them. Their heads are small, and limbs short. When hunched over these lizards look very similar to a rock.

The spring and summer is when these lizards mate, and they lay around 6 to 19 eggs. These lizard eggs hatch in the fall, and in the winter they are not seen since they hibernate.

Harvest ants, and honey pot ants are the main food that this lizard eats. Coyotes, large snakes, and birds are this species’ main predators. Their camouflage is their main defense, and they easily hide within thick vegetation. The population of these lizards are isolated, and they are very rare in Oklahoma.

Scincidae

9. Little Brown Skink

Little Brown Skink (Scincella lateralis)
Little Brown Skink (Scincella lateralis)
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Scincidae
  • Scientific Name: Scincella lateralis
  • Other Names: Ground Skink, Brown-backed Skink
  • Adult Size: 3 to 5.25 in. (7.62 to 13.3 cm.)
  • Lifespan: 2.5 years
  • Average Price Range: $5

Little brown skinks are found in the southeastern United States. These lizards are found in the majority of Oklahoma, but are absent from the western regions of the state. Little brown skinks are fossorial, and live within loose soil, or leaf litter. They are common in moist woodland habitats.

This skink is one of the smallest lizards in all of North America. They have very slender bodies, small limbs, and long tails. The color of this lizard is brown, to copper, and they have a dark stripe on their sides, with black specks on them. Little brown skinks that are female tend to grow larger, and faster than males.

Little brown skinks breed from April to July, and lay around 1 to 7 eggs. Their eggs hatch around 22 days later, and they reach their adult size after around a year. In the winter these lizards are not active, and enter into a state of brumation until the warm comes.

Small insects, spiders, and isopods are what these lizards eat. Being so small they are easy prey for animals like hawks, snakes, owls, and even small birds. Little brown skinks use camouflage to hide within plain sight, and can drop their tail to escape predators.

10. Coal Skink

Coal Skink (Plestiodon anthracinus) - source
Coal Skink (Plestiodon anthracinus) – source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Scincidae
  • Scientific Name: Plestiodon anthracinus
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 5.1 to 7.1 in. (13 to 18 cm.)
  • Lifespan: 6 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Coal skinks have a scattered population across the eastern United States, and these lizards are mainly found in the eastern half of Oklahoma. Coal skinks live in humid woodland habitats with lots of natural debris like leaf litter, rocks, and logs. These lizards are common near water sources like springs, streams, and other shallow waters.

Coal skinks are medium sized with a smooth appearance. They have a tan, olive, or dark brown coloring. Dark stripes run down the side of their body. When born these lizards have a bright blue tail similar to other skinks, which fade with age. The limbs of these lizards are slender and nimble.

Spring and early summer is when these lizards mate, and they lay around 8 to 9 eggs in a clutch. These eggs hatch in about a month, and when born are around 2 in. (5 cm.) in length. Young coal skinks may have stripes and bold coloring.

Coal skinks rely on a diet of insects, which includes things like grasshoppers, caterpillars, and arthropods like spiders. These lizards are active in the day, and are only seen on the ground. They have a stable population, and are listed as a species of least concern.

11. Common Five-lined Skink

Five Lined Skink - (Plestiodon fasciatus)
Five Lined Skink – (Plestiodon fasciatus)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Scincidae
  • Scientific Name: Plestiodon fasciatus
  • Other Names: American
  • Adult Size: 4.9 to 8.5 in. (12.5 to 21.5 cm)
  • Lifespan: 6 years
  • Average Price Range: $12

The common five-lined skink is one of the most common lizards that lives in Oklahoma. These lizards are found in the southeastern United States, and can be sighted in the eastern half of Oklahoma. Common five-lined skinks are terrestrial, and live in woodland habitats. They are more common near water sources like rivers or streams.

This lizard gets its name for the five lines that run down their back, which are yellowish or white. They have a dark brown, tan, or black base coloring. When born these lizards have a bright blue tail. In the breeding season males may get a reddish head on their cheeks, and males of this species also usually grow larger than females.

Common five-lined skinks mate in the months of May and June. These lizards lay around 15 eggs, and place them in moist soil under debris like rock or logs. Females will brood their eggs, and guard them until they hatch.

The day is when this lizard is active, and they hunt for animals like spiders, ants, crickets, and beetles. This lizard may also eat fruits, or vegetables. They have also been seen to eat newborn animals like small mice, or other lizards.

12. Broad-headed Skink

Broad-headed Skink (Plestiodon laticeps)
Broad-headed Skink (Plestiodon laticeps)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Scincidae
  • Scientific Name: Plestiodon laticeps
  • Other Names: Broadhead Skink, Red-headed Scorpion
  • Adult Size: 5.9 to 13 in. (15 to 33 cm.)
  • Lifespan: 4 to 8 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Broad-headed skinks are common across the southeastern United States. These lizards are semi-arboreal, and are common in oakwood habitats. In Oklahoma broad-headed skinks are mainly found in the southeastern corner of the state. Broad-headed skinks may sometimes go to the ground, but sleep, hunt, and hide in trees.

Broad-headed skinks are one of the largest lizards that live in Oklahoma. These lizards are named after their robust heads, which sometimes have a red coloring. They have a tan, to olive coloring, most of the time with a plain appearance. Young broad-headed skinks may have stripes on their bodies, and blue tails like other young skinks.

Male broad-headed skinks are typically larger than females, but bigger females will be better equipped to lay more eggs. This lizard mates in the spring, and uses chemicals to communicate with each other. Females lay up to 22 eggs, and will guard them until they hatch in the summer.

These large skinks hunt in the day, and feed mainly on invertebrates. Broad-headed skinks have predators like large reptiles, birds, and mammals, and drop their tail to escape being eaten. Across their range this lizard’s population is stable.

13. Great Plains Skink

Great Plains Skink (Plestiodon obsoletus)
Great Plains Skink (Plestiodon obsoletus)
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Scincidae
  • Scientific Name: Plestiodon obsoletus
  • Other Names: 3.5 to 5.11 in. (9 to 13 cm.)
  • Adult Size: 6.5 to 13.75 in. (16.51 to 34.9 cm.)
  • Lifespan: 3 years
  • Average Price Range: $50

Great Plains skinks are found in the majority of Oklahoma, but these lizards are absent from the southeastern corner of the state. These skinks live in open habitats, and are common in foothills near the rocky mountains, as well as grasslands and prairies. In the United States these skinks are mainly found in the Great Plains region like their name suggests.

Great plains skinks are one of the largest skinks in Oklahoma, and have robust bodies. They have a gray, or tan coloring, with a dark mottled pattern on them. The scales of these lizards go diagonally across their body. The bellies of these lizards are plain, with a yellow color.

The months of April and May are when these lizards are most active, and mate. They can lay up to 32 eggs, or as little as 5. Female Great Plains skinks will guard their young until they hatch in summer.

Beetles, spiders, grasshoppers, and crickets make up the majority of what this lizard eats. They are a very secretive species, and not seen often due to their shy nature and camouflage. Great Plains skinks may hide under rocks, or in thick shrubs, and are active most in the morning.

14. Southern Prairie Skink

Southern Prairie Skink (Plestiodon s. obtusirostris) by Franz Herpman
Southern Prairie Skink (Plestiodon s. obtusirostris) by Franz Herpman
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Scincidae
  • Scientific Name: Plestiodon septentrionalis obtusirostris
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 5 to 9 in. (13 to 22 cm.)
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The prairie skink is found in the majority of Oklahoma, but is not seen in the far western regions of the state. These lizards live in grasslands, or sandy habitats that are open. They prefer places with some rocks, or vegetation for shade. The southern subspecies of the prairie skink is found in Oklahoma, along with Texas. These lizards are native to the east of the Rocky Mountains in North America.

Prairie skinks are a small to medium-sized species. They have brown, or tan coloring with dark stripes running down their sides. When born like other skinks this lizard will have a blue tail, which fades as they age. In the mating season this lizard will have a bright red coloring near their throat, used to attract mates.

Spring is when this species emerges from hibernation, and they begin to mate. This species lays around 8 eggs, which hatch a little later than a month. They are ready to breed around their third year. September is when the prairie skink begins to hibernate to wait out the cold.

Small insects, and spiders are what this species eats, but they do not prey on ants since they may be overpowered by them. Prairie skinks are one of the many lizards that has seen a decline due to the fragmentation and loss of their natural habitats.

Teiidae

15. Common Spotted Whiptail

Common Spotted Whiptail (Aspidoscelis gularis) by Kucycads
Common Spotted Whiptail (Aspidoscelis gularis) by Kucycads
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Teiidae
  • Scientific Name: Aspidoscelis gularis
  • Other Names: Texas Spotted Whiptail
  • Adult Size: 7 to 9 in. (17.78 to 22.86 cm.)
  • Lifespan: 3 to 7 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The common spotted whiptail is found in the southwestern United States, which includes Oklahoma. This lizard is found in grasslands, and semi-arid rocky habitats. They typically are around a water source. Common spotted whiptails are active during the day, and are seen most often during the spring mating season.

These lizards have tan, to brown coloring, with stripes that run down their body. They also have spots on their sides, with their bellies that are uniform. This lizard may have a red throat in the breeding season, and a blue belly.

Insects are mainly what this lizard feeds on, and they spend their day hunting. In the breeding season this lizard can lay anywhere between 1 to 5 eggs. This species has a stable population, and is common in the habitats they prefer within their range.

16. Six-lined Racerunner

Six-lined Racerunner (Aspidoscelis sexlineata)
Six-lined Racerunner (Aspidoscelis sexlineata)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Teiidae
  • Scientific Name: Aspidoscelis sexlineata
  • Other Names: Sandlapper lizard
  • Adult Size: 6 to 9.5 in. (15 to 24 cm.)
  • Lifespan: 4 to 5 years
  • Average Price Range: $30

Six-lined racerunner is native to Oklahoma. This species is found in woodlands, floodplains, and grassland habitats. They prefer places with dry soil, and in lower elevations. Six-lined racerunners are found in the southeastern, and south-central regions in the United States.

This lizard has a very elongated body, with a giant tail. They have long toes which help them run across their sandy habitat. This species gets its name from the six lines that run down their back from their head to their tails. Their stripes are yellowish or orange, with their base color being tan, olive, or black.

Six-lined racerunners are extremely quick, and use their speed to escape predators, or catch prey. They are mainly active in the morning time, before it gets too hot in the day. These lizards can run up to 18 mph (29 km/h). They use burrows to rest, and hibernate when not active. Six-lined race runners may be eaten by predators like invasive fire ants.

17. Prairie Racerunner

Prairie Racerunner Lizard (Cnemidophorus sexlineatus viridis)
Prairie Racerunner Lizard (Cnemidophorus sexlineatus viridis)
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Teiidae
  • Scientific Name: Cnemidophorus sexlineatus viridis
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 6 to 10.5 in. (15.24 to 26.67 cm.)
  • Lifespan: 6 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Prairie race runners are native to the United States, and are found mainly in the midwestern United States. These lizards live in prairie habitats, and are active mostly in the day during the early morning. Prairie racerunners spend their day feeding on insects, and when it gets too hot they hide out.

These lizards are dark brown, to green, with yellow stripes running down their body. They have a white underside, with a very long tail, and slender body. This lizard is very quick, and uses its speed to escape predators. They have smooth scales, with a similar appearance to other race runners.

Prairie racerunners are active most in the spring and early summer. They mate during this season, and can lay up to 8 eggs. This lizard does not guard its eggs unlike other lizards. When born they may have a blue tail, which fades as they age.

18. Gray-checkered Whiptail

Gray-checkered Whiptail by Animalia
Gray-checkered Whiptail by Animalia
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Teiidae
  • Scientific Name: Aspidoscelis dixoni
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 8 to 12 in. (20 to 30 cm.)
  • Lifespan: 3 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The gray-checkered whiptail is found in semi-arid rocky habitats. They are native to the United States, and also Mexico. Gray-checkered whiptails are not a common species, and are considered a near-threatened species by the IUCN.

This lizard is medium sized, with gray coloring. They can have a striped, or checkered pattern on them, with thin bodies and long tails. This lizard has a very long tail, with long toes. They have wrinkly skin, with small scales.

The mid-summer is when this species lays its eggs, and their eggs typically hatch in around 6 weeks. This lizard is mainly active in the day, and feeds on insects. The decline and their population is mainly due to pollution and habitat loss.

Gekkonidae

19. Mediterranean House Gecko

Mediterranean House Gecko (Hemidactylus turcicus)
Mediterranean House Gecko (Hemidactylus turcicus)
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Gekkonidae
  • Scientific Name: Hemidactylus turcicus
  • Other Names: Turkish gecko
  • Adult Size: 3 to 6 in. (7.62 to 15.24 cm.)
  • Lifespan: 9 years
  • Average Price Range: $10

The Mediterranean house gecko is an invasive species to Oklahoma, and this lizard is originally native to the Mediterranean region. These lizards are mainly found in urban areas, and are seen near houses, or warehouses. This lizard may hide in the crevices of old buildings. They enjoy climbing on vertical surfaces like the sides of buildings.

These geckos are small, with a tannish, to cream coloring. They have bumps covering their body, with grayish, or brown spots covering them. Their tails are long, with bands on them. The eyes of these lizards are yellow, with cat-like ellipticals. Pads on these lizards’ feet help them climb.

Mediterranean house geckos are active at night, and spend their time feeding on insects. They are often found near light sources, and other places that have a high insect traffic. This species breeds in the spring to fall, and may lay up around 2 eggs.

Shipments from other countries are how this species made its way to North America. Their hardy nature, and ability to live in most places is how they survive in various habitats. This lizard is the only gecko in Oklahoma, and since they mainly live in urban areas their small populations do not really affect native lizards.

FAQ

In Oklahoma what is the most common lizard?

The family of skinks are one of the most common lizards that live in Oklahoma. There are several skink species that live in the state, with many of them being abundant in their ranges.

Are there any dangerous lizards that live in Oklahoma?

There are no dangerous lizards that live in Oklahoma, and all of them that you come across do not have any venom, or poison. When sighted, lizards will typically flee from humans. The bacteria that a lizard carries is its most dangerous trait, and if you handle them you should wash your hands. Lizards rarely bite, and typically do so if they feel cornered, but if they do you should also properly clean the wound.

What are the largest lizards in Oklahoma?

The slender glass lizard is the largest lizard that lives in Oklahoma. Other large lizards include the broad-headed skink, whiptail lizard, and eastern collared lizard. The size of a lizard is determined by its sex, and species.

Wrapping up

In Oklahoma there are 19 lizards that you may come across, with one of them being invasive. Lizards are very secretive, and due to their tendency to hide, and their camouflage you may not see them easily in the wild. When you know where, and when to look, finding lizards in the wild becomes very easy.

Some lizards do make good pets, but you should never take them from the wild since they can carry diseases, and it may affect the local wildlife populations. Protecting the habitats that lizards live in are important, since many species are declining in population, or considered endangered across the United States.

The more you learn about the lizards near you, the better we can protect each species. If you have any questions, or comments be sure to leave them below, as there is always something new to learn about lizards.

Lizards in other nearby states

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