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24 Vibrant Salamanders in Georgia

There are about twenty species of salamanders in Georgia. These include popular ones such as slimy salamanders, red salamanders, and tiger salamanders. More obscure salamanders such as the patch-nosed salamander can be found in Georgia.

Salamanders are amphibians that resemble lizards and are found within the order Urodela. The diversity of salamanders is highest in the Appalachian Mountains which extend into Georgia. As such, Georgia has a wide diversity of salamanders.

Salamanders can be terrestrial or fully aquatic. Terrestrial salamanders still usually require habitats with high humidity as many lack lungs.

Salamanders are also usually kept as pets. Some such as the red salamander are popular among herp enthusiasts.

Salamanders in Georgia

Family Ambystomatidae 

1. Marbled Salamander

Marbled Salamander (Ambystoma opacum) on a rock with moss
Marbled Salamander (Ambystoma opacum) on a rock with moss
  • Family: Ambystomatidae
  • Scientific Name: Ambystoma opacum
  • Average Adult Size: 3.5 to 4.25 inches (9 to 10.7 cm)
  • Life Span: up to 8 years (average of 3.5 years)
  • Average Price Range: Approximately $30
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S5 (Secured)

These are quite small even for the Ambystomatidae family. These salamanders can reach a length of 4.25 inches. A. opacum is short and chubby looking. The body of A. opacum is dark brown or even black with white or gray crossbands on the dorsum (tail, back, and head).

Similar to other salamanders, the females are larger than the main.  The crossbands of the males are much whiter than the females, especially during mating season.

Hatchlings do not have crossbands but rather they have white specks.

The species is endemic to most of the southeastern United States including Georgia. Interestingly, the species aren’t endemic to southeastern Georgia. These salamanders hide under logs, rocks, and discarded human trash.

These amphibians are easy to keep and make excellent first-time pets. They are also easy to find. They can be kept in a 10-gallon tank but larger tanks are better for the salamander.

2. Spotted Salamander

Spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) in foliage
Spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) in foliage
  • Family: Ambystomatidae
  • Scientific Name: Ambystoma maculatum
  • Common Name: Spotted Salamander
  • Average Adult Size: 6 to 9.5 inches (15 to 24 cm)
  • Life Span: 30 years in the wild, 25 years in captivity
  • Average Price Range: Approximately $30
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S5 (Secured)

The spotted salamander is so-called because of the spots on the back head and tail. These spots are yellowish or orange. The rest of their back, head, and tail are dark in coloration – black, brown, or gray. The underside of the species is gray.

A. maculatum is endemic to eastern North America. In Georgia and South Carolina, the species is endemic to the Piedmont and Mountain regions. They aren’t endemic to southeastern Georgia and very few are endemic to the Coastal Plain.

The species like to live near freshwater bodies. They live in burrows they make and are difficult to spot. Even if a spotted salamander lives in your vicinity, you are likely to never see one.

Similar to other salamanders, A. maculatum is carnivorous including the larvae. They feed on any animal smaller than they are and these include crustaceans such as fairy shrimp and insects. Larger spotted salamanders feed on frog tadpoles, large insects, amphipods, isopods, and even other salamander larvae. 

These amphibians are kept as pets and they are pretty easy to keep. They do not need UV lighting or additional heating. As long as you mist the enclosure and the salamanders regularly, and feed them as needed, they should be okay. Just make sure that the substrate isn’t drenched.

3. Mole Salamander

Mole Salamander (Ambystoma talpoideum) on a moist piece of wood with greenery in Jasper County, South Carolina, USA
Mole Salamander (Ambystoma talpoideum) on a moist piece of wood with greenery in Jasper County, South Carolina, USA. – source
  • Family: Ambystomatidae
  • Scientific Name: Ambystoma talpoideum
  • Common Name: Mole salamander
  • Average Adult Size: 3-4 inches (7.5-10 cm)
  • Life Span: 10 to 20 years
  • Average Price Range: Approximately $30
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S5 (Secured)

In Georgia and South Carolina, the species can be found in the Coastal Plain as well as in Piedmont. In the rest of North America, A. talpoideum is endemic to the southeast and central United States. The species isn’t present in southern Louisiana and southern Florida. 

The mole salamander can either be terrestrial or aquatic. The terrestrial mole salamander can be found in semi-permanent and seasonal ponds while the aquatic or neotenic variant can be found in fishless permanent ponds. Regardless of the variant, both play their eggs in debris underwater or on twigs. 

Aquatic variants are individuals that retained their larvae characters as adults. Terrestrial variants are individuals that undergo complete metamorphosis. The reason for this variation is unknown but it may be due to light intensity, water levels, competition, predation, and other environmental cues. 

The mole salamanders sold as pets are terrestrial. These are relatively easy to care for but difficult to find on the pet market. As far as humidity levels are high enough, they should be easy to care for. 

The species is called the mole salamander because they are tiny and black in color. 

4. Eastern Tiger Salamander

Eastern tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) found in woods on ground close up
Eastern tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) found in woods on ground close up
  • Family: Ambystomatidae
  • Scientific Name: Ambystoma tigrinum
  • Common Name: Tiger salamander, eastern tiger salamander, tiger
  • Average Adult Size: 6.6 to 13 inches (17 to 33 cm)
  • Life Span: 25 years
  • Average Price Range: Approximately $30
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S3S4 (Vulnerable)

The tiger salamander is one of the more common salamander species in the eastern United States and the entire of North America. However, within Georgia, it is much less common. In Georgia, the species is classified as Vulnerable. The species can be found from Labrador to the Mexican plateau.

This species gets its common name from its collaboration which is black with many yellow spots or yellow with black stripes.

Similar to other ambystomids, A. tigrinum burrows in the wild and lives close to water bodies.

A. tigrinum is considered the largest terrestrial salamander in North America. This huge salamander is capable of reaching a length of 33 inches as an adult.

As a pet, this salamander is quite easy to care for although it requires a huge enclosure. The humidity level in the enclosure needs to be moderately high. As a rule of thumb, the substrate within the enclosure needs to be moist but not soggy. If you squeeze the substrate in your hands, it must not drip.

Family Plethodontidae 

5. Four-toed Salamander

Four-toed Salamander (Hemidactylium scutatum) close up on a log
Four-toed Salamander (Hemidactylium scutatum) close up on a log
  • Family: Plethodontidae 
  • Scientific Name: Hemidactylium scutatum
  • Average Adult Size: 2 to 4 inches (5.1 to 10.2 cm)
  • Life Span: 5.5 years
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S3 (Vulnerable)

In Georgia, H. scutatum is limited to Piedmont. Within Georgia, the species is considered Vulnerable because of their limited numbers. Here, they can be found in places where sphagnum moss grows. These include bogs, floodplains, and boggy streams. Within the rest of North America, the species is endemic from Nova Scotia (in Canada) to northern Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico.

This is a small salamander within the family Plethodontidae which includes most of the salamanders in Georgia. This amphibian is gray to brown in coloration with hind feet that have four toes. 

According to Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, this amphibian has a lifespan of 5.5 years in captivity. 

H. scutatum isn’t normally kept as a pet.

6. Longtail Salamander

Eastern Longtail Salamander (Eurycea longicauda) held on finger tips
Eastern Longtail Salamander (Eurycea longicauda) held on finger tips – source
  • Family: Plethodontidae 
  • Scientific Name: Eurycea longicauda
  • Other Common Names: eastern long-tailed salamander
  • Average Adult Size: 4 to 8 inches (10 to 20 cm)
  • Life Span: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: Approximately $30
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S4 (Apparently Secured)

In Georgia, E. longicauda occurs only in northern Georgia. Farther south and east, the three-lined salamander is more common. Outside of Georgia, this amphibia is endemic to most of the eastern united stands including southern and eastern Ohio, southern Indiana, eastern Illinois, southern New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, extreme southwestern and northwestern North Carolina, northern Alabama, and extreme northeastern Mississippi.

E. longicauda is yellowish to red with a long tail that makes up about 60% of the body length. On the tail are dark spots.

The species is known to have a lifespan of 5 to 10 years.

While larvae are aquatic, adults are terrestrial and live in crevices, underneath rocks, and other objects. Adults always live close to water bodies.

The species can be found in the pet trade although they are relatively rare.

7. Southern Redback Salamander

Southern Redbacked Salamander (Plethodon serratus) on plastic
Southern Redbacked Salamander (Plethodon serratus) on plastic – source
  • Family: Plethodontidae 
  • Scientific Name: Plethodon serratus
  • Common Name:  Southern Red-Backed Salamander
  • Average Adult Size:  3 to 4 inches (8 to 10.5 cm)
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S5 (Secured)

This is a tiny woodland salamander. This amphibian is dark in coloration – dark black to gray with a lighter-colored red stripe down the back.

In Georgia, the species can be found in disjunct populations in the northwestern third (in the Blue Ridge Mountains and Piedmont Plateau).

As a woodland salamander, expect to see this amphibian in forested areas, outside of Georgia, the species can be found in central Louisiana, western North Carolina, eastern Tennessee, eastern Alabama, west-central Arkansas, the Ouachita Mountains of extreme southeast Oklahoma, and southeast Missouri.

Since the species is a woodland salamander, the larvae aren’t aquatic. The females lay the eggs in damp substrates such as moss or damp logs.

These tiny salamanders are usually kept as pets.

8. Slimy Salamander

Close up of a Northern Slimy Salamander (Plethodon glutinosus complex)
Close up of a Northern Slimy Salamander (Plethodon glutinosus complex)
  • Family: Plethodontidae 
  • Scientific Name: Plethodon glutinosus complex
  • Average Adult Size: 6.8 inches (17 cm)
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S5 (Secure)

Slimy salamanders consist of about 13 different species. These species used to be thought of to be one single species. Nowadays, it is widely accepted that 13 species make up the slimy salamander wild populations.

Slimy salamanders are black with white speckles or gold speckles. They are quite large and can reach a length of about 6.75 inches.

Slimy salamanders can be found throughout Georgia. These salamanders are usually kept as pets.

9. Southern Appalachian Salamander

Southern Appalachian Salamander (Plethodon teyahalee) walking up a rock in Greenville County, South Carolina, USA
Southern Appalachian Salamander (Plethodon teyahalee) walking up a rock in Greenville County, South Carolina, USA. – source
  • Family: Plethodontidae 
  • Scientific Name: Plethodon teyahalee
  • Average Adult Size: 4.75-6.75 inches (7 to 17 cm)
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S2 (Imperiled) 

The range of P. teyahalee within Georgia is very limited for this reason, their conservation status is Imperiled. In Georgia, P. teyahalee is endemic to northern Rabun County. This species can also be found in Tennessee, North Carolina, and South Carolina. These are woodland salamanders and can be found in forested areas.

The species is quite large and reaches a length of 5 to 7 inches. The species is black with white flecks. P. teyahalee doesn’t have an aquatic stage. Even as larvae, P. teyahalee is terrestrial.

They inhabit decaying logs, crevices along stream beds, and under rocks. The species is nocturnal. They feed on small insects that they search for during the night. During the day, they remain hidden.

Southern Appalachian salamanders aren’t normally kept as pets.

10. Spring Salamander

Spring Salamander (Gyrinophilus porphyriticus) on a moist mossy rock in Oconee County, South Carolina, USA
Spring Salamander (Gyrinophilus porphyriticus) on a moist mossy rock in Oconee County, South Carolina, USA. – source
  • Family: Plethodontidae 
  • Scientific Name: Gyrinophilus porphyriticus
  • Common Name: Spring salamander
  • Average Adult Size: 5 to 7.5 inches (12 to 19 cm)
  • Life Span: 18.5 years
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S4 (Apparently Secured)

Gyrinophilus porphyriticus are native to the monotonous areas of northern Georgia. Outside of Georgia, this amphibian is native to northwestern South Carolina, throughout the northeastern U.S., and the Appalachian Mountains.

Spring salamanders are so-called as they inhabit areas around and in clear cool mountain springs, seeps, and creeks. They can also be found in moist forested areas.

G. porphyriticus is among the largest stream salamanders and can reach a length of about 7.5 inches. They are yellow-brown to salmon in color with a bit of red. There is a ridge that is noticeable from the tip of the snout to the eyes.

These salamanders live near water bodies and can be found under cover objects, logs and rocks. During the day, the salamander hides. This nocturnal amphibian searches for food during the night. Foods it eats include small vertebrates and invertebrates such as other salamanders, salamander eggs, spiders, slugs, crickets, centipedes, and earthworms.

A few salamanders that G. porphyriticus consume include red salamanders, southern Appalachian salamanders, southern red-backed salamanders, Jordan’s salamanders, and two-lined salamanders.

People don’t usually keep G. porphyriticus as a pet.

11. Ocoee Salamander

Ocoee Salamander (Desmognathus ocoee) held in hand for a picture
Ocoee Salamander (Desmognathus ocoee) held in hand for a picture – source
  • Family: Plethodontidae 
  • Scientific Name: Desmognathus ocoee
  • Common Name: Ocoee dusky salamander, ocoee salamander
  • Adult Length: 2.5 to 4.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 7 years
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S5 (Secured)

In Georgia, the species is limited to small portions of the northeast and the northwest. Outside of Georgia, the species can be found in North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and the Appalachian Plateau of northeastern Alabama.

The species can be found on wet rock faces, near springs, seepage areas, and springs during the winter and at lower elevations. They can also be found in forested areas during wet weather.

The species gets its common name from the Ocoee River and is a mountain dusky salamander.

12. Southern Zigzag Salamander

Multiple Southern Zig Zag Salamanders (Plethodon ventralis) in dirt on top of one another
Multiple Southern Zig Zag Salamanders (Plethodon ventralis) in dirt on top of one another
  • Family: Plethodontidae 
  • Scientific Name: Plethodon ventralis
  • Common Name: southern zigzag salamander
  • Average Adult Size: 2.5 to 3.5 inches
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S4 (Apparently Secured)

In Georgia,  P. ventralis can only be found in the extreme northwest in the French Broad River valley. Its population here is limited. Outside Georgia, the species can be found in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, southeastern Kentucky, the extreme northeastern Mississippi, and northern Alabama.

The species is small in size and has an orangish or reddish zigzag pattern on dark-colored skin. P. ventralis gets its common name from this zigzag pattern. The belly is gray or black with reddish speckles. There is also a grayish morph that lacks the zigzag pattern.

The species is terrestrial and inhabits the moist habitats of caves, under leaf litter, on forested slopes, and on cool hillsides.

This small salamander feeds mostly on small invertebrates such as insects and spiders.

The southern zigzag salamander isn’t commonly kept as a pet.

13. Seal Salamander

Seal Salamander (Desmognathus monticola) on a wet leaf on sand in Mariette, South Carolina, USA
Seal Salamander (Desmognathus monticola) on a wet leaf on sand in Mariette, South Carolina, USA. – source
  • Family: Plethodontidae 
  • Scientific Name: Desmognathus monticola
  • Average Adult Size: 3.0 to 6.0 inches
  • Life Span: 11 years
  • Average Price Range: Approximately 
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S5 (Secured)

The geographic range of the wild population in Georgia extends from northern Georgia to central Alabama. The species can also be found in western South Carolina, eastern Tennessee, western North Carolina, eastern Kentucky, western and northern Virginia, western Maryland, and West Virginia.

The species is quite large compared to other salamanders although it isn’t among the largest salamanders in North America. This amphibian is grayish to light brown with dark wormy spots or brown reticulate spots.

The species occur on wet rock faces, along stream banks, and in streams. They prefer cool weather and feed mainly on small invertebrates such as insects.

Desmognathus monticola isn’t commonly kept as a pet.

14. Blackbelly Salamander

Blackbellly Salamander (Desmognathus quadramaculatus) on green short leaves in Greenville County, South Carolina, USA
Blackbellly Salamander (Desmognathus quadramaculatus) on green short leaves in Greenville County, South Carolina, USA. – source
  • Family: Plethodontidae 
  • Scientific Name: Desmognathus quadramaculatus
  • Common Name: Blackbelly salamander
  • Average Adult Size: 4 to 7 inches
  • Life Span: 15 years
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S5 (Secured)

D. quadramaculatus is regarded as the largest stream salamander in the southeast. This salamander has a length of 4 to 7 inches on average. They are dark in color, usually black or brown, with two rows of horizontal light spots on their back. 

This species is named after its black belly. This underside may also have yellowish or whitish flecks. 

In Georgia the species are endemic to the southern Appalachian Mountains at elevations of 1,600 to 5,000 ft. since they are steam salamanders, expect to find them in small streams as well as seeps. Outside of Georgia, the species can be found in southern West Virginia, southwestern Virginia to eastern Tennessee, and finally in western North Carolina. 

This species is predominantly aquatic and feeds on aquatic larvae, crayfish, and aquatic worms. They are also known to be cannibalistic. 

D. quadramaculatus isn’t commonly kept as a pet.

15. Blue Ridge Two-lined Salamander

Blue Ridge Two-lined Salamander (Eurycea wilderae) on moss
Blue Ridge Two-lined Salamander (Eurycea wilderae) on moss – source
  • Family: Plethodontidae 
  • Scientific Name: Eurycea wilderae
  • Average Adult Size: 2.75 – 3 inches (7-10.7 cm)
  • Life Span:  4 to 10 years 
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S5 (Secured)

In Georgia, the species is found in the extreme north. Expect to find these amphibians in the streams, brooks, rills, and rocky seeps of the Blue Ridge Mountains where they get their common name from. Outside of Georgia, the species can be found in North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.

Eurycea wilderae is a lungless salamander and is quite tiny. It has a bright orange or yellow body with broad stripes. These two stripes make it resemble the southern two-lined salamander. However, unlike the two-lined salamander, the Blue Ridge two-lined salamander’s coloration has a greater saturation of orange or yellow. 

Do not expect to find Eurycea wilderae on the pet market. These amphibians aren’t kept as pets. 

16. Apalachicola Dusky Salamander

Apalachicola Dusky Salamander (Desmognathus Apalachicolae) being held in hand
Apalachicola Dusky Salamander (Desmognathus Apalachicolae) being held in hand – source
  • Family: Plethodontidae 
  • Scientific Name: Desmognathus apalachicolae
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S3 (Vulnerable)

D. apalachicolae occurs in small patches in the Chattahoochee River and lower Flint River in southeast Georgia. It also occurs in Florida and Alabama. Here, it also occurs in limited numbers. The species inhabits springs, intermittent rivers, and temperate forests. 

The species is bright orange in color. It uses this coloration to stay hidden from predators.

This species isn’t bred and cannot be found on the pet trade market. 

17. Patch-nosed Salamander

Patch-nosed Salamander (Urspelerpes brucei) in shallow water
Patch-nosed Salamander (Urspelerpes brucei) in shallow water – source
  • Family: Plethodontidae 
  • Scientific Name: Urspelerpes brucei
  • Average Adult Size: 2 inches (5 cm)
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S1 (Critically Imperiled)

This species is endemic to Georgia and South Carolina. In the United States and Georgia, the species is considered Critically Imperiled. The range of the species is about 100 sq-km in northeastern Georgia and adjacent South Carolina. Although there are no known threats, the population is very low. 

This amphibian has five toes on its feet and closely resembles brook salamanders (genus Eurycea). The species have a yellow patch on the nose/snout. This characteristic gives the amphibian its common name. 

Males have yellowish backs with two dark stripes, females also have the same pattern. However, the female colors are more muted.

18. Three-lined Salamander

Three-lined Salamander (Eurycea guttolineata) walking on a bark surface at Congaree National Park, South Carolina, USA
Three-lined Salamander (Eurycea guttolineata) walking on a bark surface at Congaree National Park, South Carolina, USA. – source
  • Family: Plethodontidae 
  • Scientific Name: Eurycea guttolineata
  • Average Adult Size: 4 – 6.25 inches (10 – 15.9 cm)
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S4S5 (Apparently Secured)

The species is endemic to most of the southeast. In Georgia, they can be found from the Coastal Plain to the Mountains. The species is almost always found near water bodies. Expect to find E. guttolineata in bottomland hardwood forests and cypress swamps. This species hides under rocks, woods, and other covers during the day. These habitats are close to streams.

Other states the species occur in include Virginia, Tennessee, South Carolina, North Carolina, Mississippi, Louisiana, Kentucky, Florida, and Alabama.

E. guttolineata is nocturnal. And feed on insects as well as other invertebrates.

The species is also nicknamed the gentleman salamander as it is not aggressive towards other salamanders.

This salamander is orange (tan or yellowish) with three dark parallel stripes that run down its back. As you may already have guessed, the species gets its common name from these three stripes.

19. Cave Salamander

Orange and black spotted Cave Salamander (Eurycea lucifuga) on top of fence plank
Orange and black spotted Cave Salamander (Eurycea lucifuga) on top of fence plank – source
  • Family: Plethodontidae 
  • Scientific Name: Eurycea lucifuga
  • Average Adult Size: 4.0 to 6.0 inches
  • Life Span: 
  • Average Price Range: Approximately 
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S4 (Apparently Secured)

This is a bright orange or red amphibian which has dark spots on its body. The underside is yellow and patternless. The tail of this species makes up about two-thirds of its body length. This salamander is known as the cave salamander as it mostly resides in caves. They are also good climbers. 

Eurycea lucifuga is carnivorous and eats mostly insects such as mites, moths, beetles, crickets, and flies. 

Within Georgia, the species is endemic to the extreme northwest. The species is endemic from central Alabama to central Indiana and from northern Virginia to eastern Oklahoma.

20. Red Salamander

Close up of a Red Salamander (Pseudotriton Ruber) on wet green vegetation
Close up of a Red Salamander (Pseudotriton Ruber) on wet green vegetation
  • Family: Plethodontidae 
  • Scientific Name: Pseudotriton ruber
  • Average Adult Size: 4 to 6 inches (10 to 15 cm)
  • Life Span: 20 years
  • Average Price Range: Approximately 
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S5 (Secure) 

The red salamander is one of the larger stream salamanders in Georgia. This stout-bodied short-tailed salamander can reach a length of 4 to 6 inches. As you may have already guessed, the species is bright red or reddish orange. This bright coloration gives the species its common name.

Within Georgia, the species can be found in the mounts of Piedmont and the Upper Coastal Plain. Here Pseudotriton ruber inhabits areas around creeks, springs, and streams. Adults can also be found in forested areas. During the day. they spend most of their time under covers such as logs and rocks.

They come out at night to search for food.

These amphibians are relatively easy to keep as pets and can live for about a minimum of  6 to 10 years in captivity. Expect this amphibian to live for 20 years.

21. Many-lined Salamander

Many-lined Salamander (Stereochilus marginatus) on a leafy moist surface in Georgia, USA
Many-lined Salamander (Stereochilus marginatus) on a leafy moist surface in Georgia, USA. – source
  • Family: Plethodontidae 
  • Scientific Name: Stereochilus marginatus
  • Average Adult Size: 2.5 to 4.5 inches (6.4 to 11.4 cm)
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S3 (Vulnerable)

The many-lined salamander is a small amphibian that has several dark stripes that run longitudinally along its body. These lines give the species its name. This salamander usually reaches a length of about 2.5 to 3.7 inches. The color of the body is brown.

In Georgia, the species can be found in the Coastal Plain. Similarly, outside Georgia, it is still endemic to the Coastal Plain from southeastern Virginia to Georgia.

The species inhabits creek swamps and streams. It is aquatic. It generally inhabits sphagnum moss under decaying organic litter in small streams or ponds. These salamanders usually never stray far from their aquatic habitats.

This amphibian isn’t normally kept as a pet.

Family Amphiumidae

22. Two-toed Amphiuma

Two-toned Amphiuma (Amphiuma means) in dry pine and moist dirt in Jackson, South Carolina, USA
Two-toned Amphiuma (Amphiuma means) in dry pine and moist dirt in Jackson, South Carolina, USA. – source
  • Family: Amphiumidae
  • Scientific Name: Amphiuma means
  • Average Adult Size: 14.5 to 46 inches (36.8 to 117 cm)
  • Life Span: 27 years
  • Average Price Range: Approximately $60
  • Population Trend: Unknown
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S5 (Secured)

Although a salamander, the two-toed amphiuma looks more like an eel. These long amphibians can reach a length of 14.5 to 46 inches. These amphibians are cylindrical in shape and have four vestigial legs which have two toes. Their skin is smooth and dark in color.

The species is endemic to the coastal Plain in Georgia. Its geographic range extends from Louisiana to Florida to southeastern Virginia. Throughout this region, it is endemic to the Coastal Plain.

This amphibian is kept as a pet. It is aquatic and needs an aquarium, a large one. Compared to other salamanders they can be tricky to handle.

Family Proteidae

23. Mudpuppy

Common MudPuppy (Necturus maculosus) held in two hands
Common MudPuppy (Necturus maculosus) held in two hands – source
  • Family: Proteidae
  • Scientific Name: Necturus maculosus
  • Other names: Common mudpuppy
  • Average Adult Size: 8 to 13 inches (20 to 33 cm)
  • Life Span: 20 years
  • Average Price Range: Approximately $50
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Least Concern on IUCN Red List, S1 (Critically Imperiled)

In Georgia, the mudpuppy can be found in the extreme north. This species can be found from southeast Manitoba to southern Quebec, in Canada to Georgia in the United States. The species have an extensive 

geographic range that is limited to eastern North America. Because of their small population size in Georgia, they are regarded as Critically Imperiled. 

The mudpuppy is relatively easy to keep and is an ideal pet for people with no experience when it comes to keeping an aquarium. 

Mudpuppies are quite large and measure between 8 to 13 inches. They are dark in color with blue-black blotches and spots. Their heads are flat and their tails are short. They have four limbs each with four toes. 

They are considered to be Critically Imperiled in Georgia.

Family Cryptobranchidae

24. Hellbender

Close up of Ozard Hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis bishopi) being held in hand for picture
Close up of Ozard Hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis bishopi) being held in hand for picture – source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Cryptobranchidae
  • Scientific Name: Cryptobranchus alleganiensis
  • Common Name: Hellbender, hellbender salamander
  • Average Adult Size: 11.61 to 27.01 inches (30 to 69 cm)
  • Life Span: 30 years
  • Population Trend: Stable
  • Conservation Statuses: Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List, S3 (Vulnerable)

Hellbenders are huge and with the exception of amphibians and sirens, they are probably the largest salamanders in their native continent. These amphibians are broad and stout. Their coloration is a black or deep brown with dark orange spots. There are red and albino morphs.

The hellbender is endemic to just the far north of Georgia, outside of Georgia, this amphibian is endemic to the central interior parts of the eastern United States. 

Hellbenders live in aquatic habitats such as rivers and rocky clear creeks.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are some large salamanders in Georgia?

There are several large salamanders endemic to Georgia. For instance, the mudpuppy can reach a length of 13 inches. The spotted salamander can reach a length of about 9.5 inches. The eastern tiger salamander can reach a length of 13 inches.

What are some black salamanders in Georgia?

There are no black salamanders (Aneides flavipunctatus) in Georgia. However, there are several salamanders in Georgia with dark colorations. Some of these include the marbled salamander, the spotted salamander, the mole salamander, the southern redback, and the southern Appalachian salamander, 

Are there slimy salamanders in Georgia?

Slimy salamanders can be found in Georgia. These include the northern slimy salamander (Plethodon glutinosus), and the southern Appalachian salamander.

Does Georgia have hellbender salamanders?

Georgia does have hellbenders. Hellbenders are among the largest salamanders in North America. These salamanders can reach a weight of 35.6 oz and a length of 27 inches. Hellbenders are endemic to the Appalachian Mountains. These salamanders are found strictly in northern Georgia. 

Does Georgia have red salamanders?

Yes, Georgia is home to red salamanders (Pseudotriton ruber). Red salamanders are bright red to reddish-orange in coloration. Their vibrant coloration makes them popular pets.

What are some salamanders in north Georgia?

Several salamanders inhabit north Georgia. Some of these are hellbenders, mudpuppies, longtail salamanders, southern zigzag salamanders, blue ridge two-lined salamanders, cave salamanders, and southern redbacks. Most salamanders in Georgia have some wild populations in the north.

Conclusion

There are several salamanders in Georgia and these even include mudpuppies, hellbenders, and amphiuma. These three are sometimes not considered to be salamanders. More typical salamanders you can find in Georgia include dusky salamanders such as the ocoee dusky salamander & Apalachicola dusky salamander, red salamander, and spotted salamander. 

Salamanders are amphibians and as such are either aquatic or live in places with high humidity levels. They also prefer cool temperatures. As such, these amphibians are generally nocturnal. 

Salamanders in Georgia are also commonly kept as pets. Some popular species usually kept as pets include the marbled salamander, the tiger salamander, the longtail salamander, and the slimy salamander.

Other nearby states

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