Snakes In Texas

By Snaketracks / October 10, 2021

There are 106 different types of snakes in Texas. Four of the species on this list are venomous with 14 different subspecies to encounter. New snakes and subspecies are always being discovered. Subspecies are sometimes found to be the same or different as another species, so the number of subspecies in Texas is always changing. Texas has many plains, hillsides, deserts, grassland, and water habitats that are perfect for snakes. Residential and urban areas house many species. 

Everything is bigger in Texas and so is the amount of snakes found in the state. Texas has more snake species than all other U.S states. All of the species and useful facts about them can be found on this list. Many snakes are similar to each other and only have minor differences. It is easy to confuse one species for the next. Knowing what it looks like and how it behaves can help identify a species. Most snakes are harmless and beneficial to the environment. Their pattern, behavior, and habitat can help identify one species from the next. Here are all the snakes in Texas and what you should know about each one. 

Snakes in Texas

1. Southern Copperhead

Southern Copperhead (Agkistrodon Contortrix Contortrix)
Southern Copperhead (Agkistrodon Contortrix Contortrix)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix
  • Other Names: Copperhead
  • Adult Size: 20 to 37 inches
  • Lifespan: 18 years
  • Average Price Range: $125

Southern copperheads can be found in Texas lowlands, pastures, and wooded areas. They have been known to travel close to residential areas and adapt well to humans. Copperheads enjoy habitats with plenty of hiding spots. Under logs and leaf litter are common places to find them. Copperheads are venomous pit vipers, but their bite is seldom lethal.

Southern Copperheads have thick bodies with triangular-shaped heads. They have a tan or reddish-brown coloring with dark hourglass-shaped crossbands running across their back. Their scales are roughly keeled and their eyes are cat-like. 

Copperheads are diurnal but will become nocturnal in summer to avoid heat. They use their pattern to blend into the surrounding and ambush prey. Rodents, lizards, baby turtles, and insects are some of the things that are eaten by copperheads. Large birds and snakes prey on them. Copperheads can make good pets for the experienced snake handler.

2. Broad-banded Copperhead

Two captive Broad-banded Copperheads (Agkistrodon contortrix laticinctus)
Two captive Broad-banded Copperheads (Agkistrodon contortrix laticinctus) – source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Agkistrodon laticinctus
  • Other Names: Trans-Pecos Copperhead, Texas Copperhead
  • Adult Size: 20 to 36 inches
  • Lifespan: 18 years
  • Average Price Range: $125

Broad-banded copperheads are a subspecies of copperheads that can be found in Texas. Trans-Pecos copperheads are also broad-banded copperheads, as before they were thought to be a different species. Broad-banded copperheads have reddish heads with dark bands that cover its body. These bands are wider than in other subspecies. Their base color is light tan and they have roughly keeled scales.

When copperheads are born they are alive and can inject a poisonous bite. Younger snakes are greyer and have yellow tails to attract prey. Copperheads will eat snakes, mice, insects, frogs, lizards, and other small animals it finds. They are preyed on often by large birds, large rodents, and other snakes.

Copperheads are venomous and are known to be in areas with human presence. You will most likely come across one at night since they are nocturnal. If they feel threatened they will raise their head defensively and rattle their tail. A bite from one can be wicked and may need medical attention, but their venom is more effective at neutralizing prey.

3. Cottonmouth

Northern Cotton Mouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus leucostoma)
Northern Cotton Mouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus leucostoma)
  • Experience Level:  Advanced
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Agkistrodon piscivorus leucostoma
  • Other Names: Cottonmouth
  • Adult Size: 24-48 inches
  • Lifespan: 10-20 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Western Cottonmouths can be found in Texas’s marshes, swamps, lakes, rivers, and other wet habitats. These snakes will rarely leave the water and rely on a source to live. They will try to avoid human contact and will only bite if necessary. The expansion of residential areas has allowed cottonmouths to be in areas with humans more often.

Cottonmouths have thick bodies. They are dark brownish. When born they will be lighter in color and as they age they darken. Sometimes they become completely black and most have no markings. Catlike pupils and large heads are traits they share with other venomous species.

Cottonmouths stay in the water most of their life and even do their hunting there. They swim with their heads above their water to look for prey. Fish, frogs, tadpoles, and other aquatic life are preyed upon by this snake. They are not picky eaters and will eat rats, lizards, and other animals while on land. Cottonmouths produce a musky odor that can be smelled and is used to ward off predators.

4. Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox)
Western Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox)
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family:  Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Crotalus atrox
  • Other Names: Texas Diamondback 
  • Adult Size: 30-90 inches
  • Lifespan: 15-20 years 
  • Average Price Range: $150

The western diamondback rattlesnake can be found in meadows, rocky fields, and near canyons. They live in Texas and are also known as the Texas diamondback. These snakes can inhabit a variety of desert and field-type habitats. They are not active from October to March, since they hibernate underground. 

Like most pit vipers, diamondback rattlesnakes are equipped with deadly venom. They have a rattle at the end of their tail, which they shake if they are preparing to strike. Rattlesnakes have roughly keeled scales with large heads and fangs. They are grey and have dark diamond spots across their back, which is where they get their name from.

Small mammals consist of most of their diet, but rattlesnakes will also prey on birds and lizards. Hogs, large birds, and other snakes feed off of this species. This species is one of the most aggressive types of rattlesnake in the U.S. They are common and if left alone they will usually ignore humans.

5. Timber Rattlesnake

Timber Rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) curled up
Timber Rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) curled up
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Crotalus horridus
  • Other Names: timber rattler
  • Adult Size: 30-60 inches
  • Lifespan: 10-20 years
  • Average Price Range: $300

Timber rattlesnakes live in wooded and moist areas. Near rivers, streams, ponds, and swamps are common habitats. They prefer areas that are highly vegetated. Timber rattlesnakes are killed by humans for their threatening presence. This has caused some population decline, but overall their species has seen a recovery in numbers.

Timber rattlesnakes are the second largest snake in Texas and have huge fangs to match their size. They are grey and have dark jagged crossbands that cover its body. A rust-colored stripe goes down their back. Their heads are large and their pupils are thin.

Rodents are this snake’s main source of food including rabbits and mice. When they hunt they lie still and wait to ambush smoothing that mistakenly crosses its path. Kingsnakes and possums are predators of this species. Timber rattlesnakes live in deep wilderness areas so contact with humans happens less often than other species.

6. Banded Rock Rattlesnake

Small Banded Rattlesnake on rocks (Crotalus lepidus klauberi)
Small Banded Rattlesnake on rocks (Crotalus lepidus klauberi)
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Crotalus lepidus klauberi
  • Other Names: Green rattlesnake
  • Adult Size: 23-27 inches
  • Lifespan: 10-15 years
  • Average Price Range: $200

Banded rattlesnakes are the smallest rattlesnake species that live in Texas and can only be found in the Franklin Mountains of El Paso. These snakes are nocturnal and spend a lot of their time hiding. Under rocks in crevices are areas they like to hang around. These snakes are extremely shy and will not travel far from their living area. If threatened sometimes they will not rattle.

This species is small and has light gray coloring. They have dark bands that go down their back. Like other rattlesnakes, they have a rattle at the end of their tail, diamond-shaped heads, and cat-like eyes.

Lizards are the main part of this snake’s diet but they will also eat small rodents. They use their venom to neutralize prey. This species is active from spring to fall. In winter they brumate, which is where they slow their heart rate and metabolism.

7. Mottled Rock Rattlesnake

Eastern Rock Rattlesnake (Crotalus lepidus lepidus)
Eastern Rock Rattlesnake (Crotalus lepidus lepidus)
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Crotalus lepidus
  • Other Names: rock rattlesnake
  • Adult Size: 24-32 inches
  • Lifespan: 10-15 years
  • Average Price Range: $200

The mottled rock rattlesnake is a threatened species of rattlesnake that lives in Texas. They live in the areas of south-central and west Texas. Rocky and dry areas make perfect homes for this species. This species is nocturnal and not aggressive. It will only strike if physically harassed.

These snakes are small but have fairly thick bodies. Their coloring varies greatly but they match the color of rocks. Grey and light pink are common colors and these snakes have dark bands across their bodies.

Mottled rattlesnakes are sought-after pets and are in many zoos. Their calm nature and different colors are why many people appreciate them. Their venom helps capture prey and can harm humans. Small mammals, lizards, and frogs are animals that are preyed upon by this species.

8. Northern Blacktail Rattlesnake

A black-tailed rattlesnake (Crotalus molossus molossus) from the ArizonaMexico border in a defensive strike position
A black-tailed rattlesnake (Crotalus molossus molossus) from the ArizonaMexico border in a defensive strike position
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Crotalus molossus
  • Other Names: black-tailed rattlesnake
  • Adult Size: 30-42 inches
  • Lifespan: 15-20 years
  • Average Price Range: $100-$150

Blacktail rattlesnakes live in the southwestern United States and Texas. They live in grasslands, deserts, and mountainous areas. In the spring they are active during the day and in summer they become nocturnal. These rattlesnakes are calm and bites are rare. They are good climbers and can sometimes swim, but they spend most of their lives on land.

These snakes are medium-sized and have black-tipped tails. They have a rattle at the end of their tail and they are yellowish, olive, and brown. Their heads are triangular shaped and they have roughly keeled scales.

Rodents, small mammals, and small reptiles are what this snake primarily feeds off of. Blacktail rattlesnakes are preyed upon by large predatory birds. They rely on camouflage and fleeing for defense. The venom of the blacktail rattlesnake is usually not fatal to humans and is weaker than other rattlesnake species.

9. Mojave Rattlesnake

Mojave rattlesnake (Crotalus scutulatus) curled up on gravel
Mojave rattlesnake (Crotalus scutulatus) curled up on gravel
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Crotalus scutulatus
  • Other Names: Mojave Green
  • Adult Size: 25-40 inches
  • Lifespan: 10-15 years 
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Mojave rattlesnakes live in the extreme western areas of Texas. Deserts, mountain slopes, and lowland areas with sparse vegetation are common habitats this species lives in. This snake is one of the most venomous snakes in the world and lives in open arid places. Mojaves are more aggressive than other species and will not hesitate to strike. They are sometimes known to chase humans.

These rattlesnakes are colored in shades of brown to green. They have a green hue on their scales. Their back has roughly keeled scales and is covered in dark diamond-shaped blotches. The diamond shapes have white surrounding them and around the tail, it turns to dark bands.

Mojave rattlesnakes are nocturnal but will come out on cooler days to bask in the sun. They spend time in burrows when sleeping or during long periods in the winter. Small rodents, lizards, frogs, and birds are animals this species eats. They have a healthy population in Texas and are a species of least concern.

10. Prairie Rattlesnake

Prairie Rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis viridis) ready to stike on gravel road
Prairie Rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis viridis) ready to stike on gravel road
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Crotalus viridis viridis
  • Other Names: Great Plains rattlesnake
  • Adult Size: 24-36 inches
  • Lifespan: 10-15 years
  • Average Price Range: $100-$150

Prairie rattlesnakes are native to the Western United States and parts of Texas. These snakes live in dry mildly vegetated areas but their habitat can vary. Woodlands, prairies, mountainous areas, and rocky fields are this snake’s primary habitat. They rely on their living area to have a high rodent population for feeding and taking over their burrow.

Prairie rattlesnakes are lightly colored and medium in size. They have dark blotches going down their back. They have common rattlesnake features like the rattle at the end of their tail, triangular-shaped heads, and catlike eyes. These snakes are active from spring to the end of fall. In winter they hibernate underground and in dens. Their scales are roughly keeled.

Rodents and small mammals are this species’ main source of food. They use their venom to neutralize prey and can be potentially deadly to humans. Large mammals and carnivores, predatory birds, and other snakes hunt this snake. Prairie rattlesnakes have a healthy population and are a species of least concern.

11. Desert Massasauga

Desert Massuasauga (Sistrurus catenatus edwardsii) in defensive position on sand and rocks by J.N Stuart
Desert Massuasauga (Sistrurus catenatus edwardsii) in defensive position on sand and rocks by J.N Stuart
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Sistrurus catenatus edwardsii
  • Other Names: Edwards rattlesnake
  • Adult Size: 15-21 inches
  • Lifespan: 15-20 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The desert massasauga is one of two subspecies of massasauga found in Texas. This species lives primarily in desert grasslands. They are nocturnal and will occasionally bask in the sun on cool days. The massasaugas venom is extremely deadly but they administer less venom per bite. If bitten, medical treatment is needed but their venom is used mostly on prey.

The desert massasauga is smaller and thinner than the western massasauga, which is also found in Texas. Their scales are white, gray, or tan with dark blotches covering their body. A white line runs down the snake’s side and a rattle sits at the end of their tail. The sound of their rattle is higher pitched and sounds like a buzzing noise.

The desert massasauga eats rodents, lizards, and frogs. In Texas, this snake is not protected but you are not likely to come across this snake since they dwell and hunt at night. Rattlesnakes are not aggressive and this species will flee if approached.

12. Western Massasauga

Western Massasauga (Sistrurus catenatus tergeminus) in Garza County Texas
Western Massasauga (Sistrurus catenatus tergeminus) in Garza County Texas
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Sistrurus catenatus tergeminus
  • Other Names: Gulf coast massasauga
  • Adult Size: 14-36 inches
  • Lifespan: 15- 20 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The Western massasauga is a species of rattlesnake that inhabits parts of Texas. They live in grasslands, edged habitats of forests, and rocky hillsides. Burrows of other animals and taken over and used by this snake. They are nocturnal. Sometimes they will be out after a rainstorm or out during a cool day to bask in the sun.

The western massasauga is gray or tan and covered in tan dark blotches. This species of rattlesnake is smaller than others and has a thick body. Elliptical eyes, large triangular heads, and a rattle at the end of their tail are traits shared with other species. They have dark brown markings around their face and a white belly.

The rattle of the massasauga is small and makes a buzzing noise to alert enemies. Their venom is deadly but small fangs make a bite less deadly. Small prey like rabbits and mice are neutralized and eaten by this species.

13. Western Pygmy Rattlesnake

Western Pygmy Rattlesnake (Sistrurus miliarius streckeri) found in Wayne County, Missouri
Western Pygmy Rattlesnake (Sistrurus miliarius streckeri) found in Wayne County, Missouri – source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Sistrurus Miliarius Streckeri
  • Other Names: Pygmy rattlesnake, ground rattlers, sand rattlers
  • Adult Size: 16-24 inches
  • Lifespan: 15-20 years
  • Average Price Range: $100

The Western pygmy rattlesnake is the only species of pygmy rattlesnake that lives in Texas. They live in wooded habitats usually with a body of water. This snake is rare to find and in Texas will be found in the Eastern region of the state. The western pygmy rattlesnake has seen a loss in numbers and is facing habitat loss.

This rattlesnake species is smaller than others. They are grey with black spots running down their back. A copper-colored stripe is presently running down the center of its body. Baby timber rattlesnakes are often confused for this species since they look similar. The western pygmy rattlesnake has an extremely small rattle compared to other snakes.

The bite of a pygmy rattlesnake is not life-threatening but can bring extreme pain. Children and smaller animals are more vulnerable to its venom. The pygmy rattlesnake uses its venom to prey upon lizards, rodents, and other small animals. To warn enemies it will shake its small rattle, which sounds like a buzzing noise due to its size.

14. Texas Coral Snake

Texas Coral Snake (Micrurus tener) by Ashley Tubbs
Texas Coral Snake (Micrurus tener) by Ashley Tubbs
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Micrurus tener
  • Other Names: N/A 
  • Adult Size: 24-30 inches
  • Lifespan: 5-7 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The Texas coral is a subspecies of coral snake that is native to the United States and Texas. It can also be found in parts of Mexico. These snakes have the second strongest venom in the world but a bite is not fatal if medical treatment is provided. Moist areas with lots of vegetation are habitats they live in. They are fossorial and only will come out after dark or in heavy rains.

The patterns of this snake are red, yellow, and black bands. They are smooth-scaled and have rounded heads. The Texas Coral snake is larger and longer than the Eastern Coral snake. Coral snakes are cousins to the cobra and will lay eggs.

Fear is what causes the deaths of many snakes, and this venomous species is the victim of many killings. This species has seen mild habitat loss but overall has a healthy population. Earth Snakes, lizards, and small burrowing species are what the coral snake eats. They are underground most of their life, but if they come across a human they will try to flee. If picked up they may remain docile but are known to thrash around and bite.

15. New Mexico Blind Snake

New Mexico Thread Snake (Rena dissecta) (Leptotyphlops dissectus)
New Mexico Thread Snake (Rena dissecta) (Leptotyphlops dissectus)
  • Experience Level: Beginner-Intermediate
  • Family: Leptotyphlopidae
  • Scientific Name: Rena dissecta
  • Other Names: New Mexico thread snake
  • Adult Size: 5-12 inches
  • Lifespan: N/A
  • Average Price Range: $25-$50

New Mexico blind snakes are a subspecies of blindsnake that are common in Texas. They live in hillsides, prairies, deserts, and other areas. The New Mexico blind snake was once thought to be the same species as the Texas blind snake. New research has allowed this species to be classified as its own due to small differences.

Blindsnakes are small and similar in appearance to an earthworm. They are tiny, with pinkish smooth scales. Their heads are small with tiny black eyes sitting upon them.

Blind snakes are secretive and do not like being out in the light. If not underground they will hide under natural debris like rocks, logs, and leaves. They survive off small insects and invertebrates. Bigger snakes and animals will eat blindsnakes if they are caught.

16. Plains Blind Snake

Texas Blind Snake (Leptotyphlops dulcis)
Texas Blind Snake (Leptotyphlops dulcis)
  • Experience Level: Beginner-Intermediate
  • Family: Leptotyphlopidae
  • Scientific Name: Rena dulcis
  • Other Names: Texas blindsnake
  • Adult Size: 8-10 inches
  • Lifespan: N/A
  • Average Price Range: $25-$50

The pain blind snake is also referred to as the Texas blindsnake. They are common in Texas and can be found in fields, forests, and plains habitats. They are fossorial and will spend most of their time underground. Under rocks and debris are common hiding places for this species.

Blind snakes are small and shiny. They are pinkish-brown with small eyes at the top of their head. Their jaws are extremely tiny with no teeth on their upper jaw. It is easy to mistake a blindsnake for a worm. When hunting they will flag their jaws at prey.

Small bugs and larvae are what this snake primarily eats. Areas with lots of insects and moisture will house this species. They are often preyed on by larger snakes, amphibians, and birds.

17. Trans-Pecos Blind Snake

Southwestern Threadsnake, Rena humilis humilis
Southwestern Threadsnake, Rena humilis humilis
  • Experience Level: Beginner-Intermediate
  • Family: Leptotyphlopidae
  • Scientific Name: Rena humilis
  • Other Names: western blindsnake
  • Adult Size: 8-10 inches
  • Lifespan: N/A
  • Average Price Range: $25-$50

The trans-Pecos blindsnake lives in arid regions in the Western half of Texas. The trans-Pecos blind snake is one of six subspecies of blindsnake. They are small and secretive creatures. Blindsnake spends most of its time underground. When above ground they will not stop moving. Earthworms look similar in appearance to the blind sake.

The blindsnake is pinkish or dark tan. They have smooth and shiny scales. Insects are what this species survives off of. They will live in areas with high insect populations. There is a spine at the end of its tail which it uses for burrowing and moving around.

18. Texas Glossy Snake

Texas Glossy Snake (Arizona elegans arenicola)
Texas Glossy Snake (Arizona elegans arenicola) – source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Arizona elegans arenicola
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 16-48 inches
  • Lifespan: 10-18 years
  • Average Price Range: $50

The Texas glossy can be found in the southeastern region of Texas. Plains, grasslands, sagebrush plains, and areas with sandy soils are where you can find this species. The species lives in areas with other glossy snakes and inbreeding occurs often. They are nocturnal and can be seen hunting near edged habitats.

Glossy Snakes are hard to differentiate from one another since they are so similar to one another. The Texas glossy snake is tan with dark blotches covering its body. Their belly is white or cream. They have smooth scales and faded coloring. Their heads are pointed and they have large round eyes.  Their coloring can vary and will generally match the dirt color it lives near.

Lizards, small animals, and rodents are common prey for the glossy snake. Breeding season occurs in late spring and snakes can have as many as 20 eggs. During winter they hibernate and will take refuge in animal burrows.

19. Kansas Glossy Snake

Kansas Glossy Snake (Arizona elegans elegans)
Kansas Glossy Snake (Arizona elegans elegans)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Arizona elegans elegans
  • Other Names: Faded snake
  • Adult Size: 24-40 inches
  • Lifespan: 10-18 years
  • Average Price Range: $50

The Kansas glossy snake is a species of glossy snake found in Texas. They are nocturnal, active in the depth of night. On cloudy and cool days they may emerge. This snake lives in sandy habitats with plenty of loose soil. They blend in well with a desert habitat and have a cloudy, faded look to them.

The Kansas glossy snake is medium-sized with smooth glossy scales. They are tannish or brown, with a light-colored belly. Dark blotches cover their body, outlined in black. They have pointed heads. The Kansas glossy snake has a similar look to the gopher snake. They are smaller and will usually have a tannish coloring.

If disturbed they will vibrate their tail but are harmless and non-venomous.  Lizards and small rodents are their main sources of food. Burrowing is a trait of this species, and many times they are seen slithering across a road at night.

20. Painted Desert Glossy Snake

Painted Desert Glossy Snake (Arizona elegans phillipi) in Colorado by Andrew DuBois
Painted Desert Glossy Snake (Arizona elegans phillipi) by Andrew DuBois
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Arizona elegans philipi
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 20-35 inches
  • Lifespan: 10-18 years
  • Average Price Range: $50

The painted desert glossy snake is another subspecies of glossy snake that can be found in Texas. They live in semi-arid grasslands and areas with loose sandy soil. These snakes are generally nocturnal but can be found out on cool mornings and afternoons. Spring is when they breed, and eggs will hatch in early summer.

Glossy snakes look like gopher snakes, but all subspecies are smaller in size. They have narrow heads and are tan. Light brown blotches cover the snake’s back and they have cream-colored bellies.

Glossy snakes can burrow and will go into other animal burrows. Lizards and rodents are their primary diet. This snake is identifiable by its glossy smooth scales.

21. Trans-Pecos Rat Snake

Northern Trans-Pecos Rat Snake (Bogertophis subocularis subocularis)
Northern Trans-Pecos Rat Snake (Bogertophis subocularis subocularis)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Bogertophis subocularis
  • Other Names: Davis mountain rat snake
  • Adult Size: 36-54 inches
  • Lifespan: 10-20 years
  • Average Price Range: $200-$250 

The trans-pecos rat snake is found mostly in Mexico but has a range that expands into southwestern Texas. They live in desert habitats with rocky outcrops and mild vegetation. This species is nocturnal and is a rare snake to see in the wild. This species and other rat snakes are kept as pets for their size and beautiful colors.

The trans-pecos rat snake is medium-sized and non-venomous. This snake is yellow or tan with dark H markings that run across its back. The H markings can help identify it from other nearby species. They have large round eyes.

This snake will eat anything it can find. Rodents and lizards are the main part of their diet, but they will also eat bats. They are calm and are less likely to bite than other species.

22. Western Worm Snake

Western Worm Snake (Carphophis Vermis) by Douglas Mills
Western Worm Snake (Carphophis vermis) by Douglas Mills
  • Experience Level: Beginner-Intermediate
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Carphophis Vermis
  • Other Names: worm snake
  • Adult Size: 7.5-11 inches
  • Lifespan: 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $15

The Western worm snake is a rare and secretive species that live in parts of Texas. They are endangered and spend most of their time underground. This species lives on prairies, fields, savannahs, and open woodlands. They rarely travel in the open, and can sometimes be found under rocks, logs, and other debris. In heavy rainfalls, they may merge and will disappear deep into the ground during summer and fall.

Western worm snakes are similar to other fossorial species like blind snakes and earth snakes. The western worm snake is two-toned. Their back is dark black and their stomach is a light pink or red color.

Western worm snakes face many threats like pollution, predators, and the destruction of their habitat. Worms and grubs are the main food they eat. If harassed they will release musk and have a pointed tail to poke attackers with, They are harmless to humans and other animals.

23. Northern Scarlet Snake

Northern Scarlet Snake (Cemophora coccinea copei) by Glenn Barolotti
Northern Scarlet Snake (Cemophora coccinea copei) by Glenn Barolotti
  • Experience Level: Intermediate-Advanced
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Cemophora coccinea copei
  • Other Names: False coral snake, milk snake
  • Adult Size: 14-20 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $36-$50

The Northern scarlet snake is one of two scarlet snake species that live in Texas. They are found in forest habitats with dry soil, sandhills, and the habitats of the coastal plain. This snake is small and fossorial. It will spend most of its life underground, and hiding in dark, moist places. This species is nocturnal and will rarely appear during the day.

The northern scarlet snake has a very similar appearance to the coral snake. They are not venomous, but it is thought that they mimic the coral snake’s appearance to drive away predators. Scarlett snakes are slender with tri-colored patterns of red, black, and yellow. Red bands do not touch the yellow bands, unlike a coral snake. This Snake has smooth and shiny scales.

Scarlett snakes are rare and beautiful creatures. They survive off of lizards, small rodents, and eggs they scavenge. The decline of their population has been a problem due to killings, habitat loss, and capture.

24. Texas Scarlet Snake

Texas Scarletsnake (Cemophora lineri) by Craig McIntyre
Texas Scarletsnake (Cemophora lineri) by Craig McIntyre
  • Experience Level: Intermediate-Advanced
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Cemophora lineri
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 15-26 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $20-$50

The Texas scarlet snake is a rare species and has been found in around 8 counties in Texas. Coastal habits and forests with sandy soil are habitats they live in. This species is secretive and spends most of its time burrowing underground. This snake does not share any range with any other species of scarlet snake.

Texas scarlet snakes are larger than the northern scarlet snake. It has gray or white skin with red blotches covering its back. Its stomach is pale white.

Eggs, small rodents, and lizards are the main part of its diet. This species is experiencing loss of population due to killings, predators, and loss of habitat.

25. Buttermilk Racer

Buttermilk Racer (Coluber constrictor anthicus) at Jesse H. Jones Park & Nature Center, Humble, Texas by Patrick Feller
Buttermilk Racer (Coluber constrictor anthicus) at Jesse H. Jones Park & Nature Center, Humble, Texas by Patrick Feller
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Coluber constrictor anthicus
  • Adult Size: 35-60 inches
  • Lifespan: 5-10 years
  • Average Price Range: $25-$40

Buttermilk racers are a subspecies of Eastern racer that inhabits southern and eastern Texas. This snake is active during the day. Racers are fast-moving and can live in a variety of habitats like grasslands. They prefer open areas to use their amazing eyesight. Spring through summer is when this species is most active.

Buttermilk racers are thin and long. They can be green, black, yellow or grey. They have a speckled pattern with white or yellow spots covering their body. Their bellies are a white color. They have round eyes and heads.

Buttermilk racers are fast and use their speed to catch prey.  Rodents, lizards, and frogs are the main part of their diet. Racers will flee or aggressively bite if handled by a human. They do not make good pets since they are a species that travels long distances. They can also release a smelly musk to deter predators.

26. Tan Racer

  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Coluber constrictor etheridgei
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 30-60 inches
  • Lifespan: 5-10 years
  • Average Price Range: $25-$40

Tan racers are found in Louisiana and Texas. They are endemic to the United States and are a subspecies of the Eastern racer. They are most active in spring, to mate. From summer until winter they will be active during the day. Pine flatwoods are habitats this species prefers. When mating occurs this species has been seen to lay eggs in a communal den.

Tan racers are solid brown. When snakes are born they have a pattern of dark brown blotches which fade as they age. They have grey bellies with occasional yellow spotting. Large eyes help them to see prey and long distances.

Racers are fast and adept hunters. Rodents, lizards, birds, eggs, and other small animals are what they eat. They use their tan coloring to blend into dirt habitats. These snakes do not make good pets and should be left alone if found in the wild.

27. Eastern Yellowbelly Racer

Eastern Yellow-Bellied Racer (Coluber constrictor flaviventris) by Peter Paplanus
Eastern Yellow-Bellied Racer (Coluber constrictor flaviventris) by Peter Paplanus
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Coluber constrictor flaviventris
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 30-60 inches
  • Lifespan: 5-10 years
  • Average Price Range: $25-$40

The Eastern yellowbelly racer is endemic to the United States and can be found in Texas. They are active in the day and live in grasslands, prairies, and open woods. They enjoy open areas to use their keen eyesight. They will overwinter in animal burrows and become active in early April.

Yellow-Bellied racers are medium-sized and smooth-scaled. Olive, tan, brown, blue, or black are common colors. Like their name suggests their bellies are a yellow or cream color.

Racers use their fast speed to catch prey and escape predators. Racers prey on insects, mice, and other small animals. They are preyed on by predatory birds, other snakes, and large mammals. Younger snakes and eggs are more at risk tor predators. When threatened they will use their speed to hide under a rock or escape underground.

28. Mexican Racer

  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Coluber constrictor oaxaca
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 30-36 inches
  • Lifespan: 5-10 years
  • Average Price Range: $25-$40

Mexican Racers are a subspecies of yellow-bellied racer and can be found in Mexico and parts of Southern Texas. These snakes live in wooded, rural, and riparian habitats. It is common to find them hiding under logs and other debris. They are more common in areas with a high rodent population.

This snake is one of the shortest of the racer species. They are grayish-brown with light-colored cream bellies. Their sides are olive-colored. The scales on their lips are what differs them from the Yellow-bellied racer. Their scales are smooth and shiny.

Mexican racers can be found near homes and residential areas. Rats are the main source of their diet but they will also eat lizards, birds, and other small animals. Racers can be aggressive and will bite if they feel threatened. Usually, they will try to flee or will release a musk to ward off predators. They are not venomous and kill their prey by suffocation before consuming.

29. Southern Black Racer

Southern Black Racer in the woods
Southern Black Racer in the woods
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Coluber constrictor priapus
  • Other Names: Black racer
  • Adult Size: 20-55 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $25-$40

Southern black racers are one of the most abundant subspecies of the racer in America. They can be found in pinelands, open woodlands, sandhills, deserts, prairies, and near suburban areas. These snakes are active in the day and spend their time hunting or basking in the sun. Spring to late summer is when these snakes are most active.

Black racers are all black with white under their chin. The snake’s scales are shiny and smooth. Their bellies are light gray. Younger snakes are grey with red blotches covering their body. As they age they turn into a jet black color.

Southern black racers are fast and rely on their speed to survive. When spotted they will flee and this species is known to be aggressive if handled. Lizards, insects, moles, eggs, rodents, frogs, and other snakes are what this species eats. They will feed off anything they can catch. Racers are harmless, like most snakes, and are beneficial in keeping a low rodent population.

30. Black-striped Snake

Black-striped Snake (Coniophanes imperialis) by Andrew DuBois
Black-striped Snake (Coniophanes imperialis) by Andrew DuBois
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Coniophanes imperialis
  • Other Names: Copes black-striped snake
  • Adult Size: 12-18 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years 
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Black-striped snakes can be found in Texas and have a range that reaches Mexico and SouthAmerica. This species is fossorial and spends its time underground, in loose leaves, and under other debris. Being nocturnal, you will only see this snake at night. In spring they mate and lay their eggs in loose soil.

This snake is medium in size. They are brown with a black stripe that goes down the center of its back. They have reddish bellies and keeled scales.

At night when this species comes out, they hunt lizards, rodents, and insects. They will also eat small snakes and other small creatures they can overpower. This species is harmless to humans and will try to flee or hide before biting.

31. Prairie Ringneck Snake

Prairie ring-necked snake (Diadophis punctatus arnyi) by Andrew Hoffman
Prairie ring-necked snake (Diadophis punctatus arnyi) by Andrew Hoffman
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Diadophis punctatus arnyi
  • Other Names: Ring-necked snake 
  • Adult Size: 10 to 14 inches
  • Lifespan: 6 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $30

Prairie ringnecks are a subspecies of ringnecks that live around prairies and fields. They live in moist habitats. They are active during the day during spring and fall. When the heat of summer comes along they become nocturnal. Hiding under rocks and other natural debris is where this species can be found. They also enjoy sunbathing on rocks.

Ringnecks are easily identifiable by the yellow ring around their neck. Their bodies are grey and their heads are black. Their scales are smooth with tiny black dots on some scales.

Ringnecks feed off insects and small invertebrates. They are common and captured for their amazing colors. A docile nature accompanied by small size makes them great pets for beginners.

32. Regal Ringneck Snake

Regal Ring-necked Snake (Diadophis punctatus regalis)
Regal Ring-necked Snake (Diadophis punctatus regalis)
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Diadophis punctatus regalis
  • Other Names: 
  • Adult Size: 10 to 14 
  • Lifespan: 6 to 10 years 
  • Average Price Range: $30

The regal ringneck snake can be found in deserts and mountainous areas in Texas. These snakes are nocturnal and hide under rocks, logs, and other natural debris to avoid disturbance. In warmer months this species lays eggs in moist hidden areas.

The yellow ring around its neck bordered by black is this species’ most identifiable feature. This subspecies often lacks the ring around its neck. This snake is gray with a white belly. Near its tail on its underside is bright orange coloring. They have shiny smooth scales.

The regal ringneck survives off of other species of snakes. Earth snakes, flat-headed snakes, and other smaller species are what they eat. Their enlarged rear fangs produce venom that can paralyze tiny prey. Ringnecks are prey on by birds, large rodents, and other snakes. Showing their bright colors, puffing up their bodies, and releasing a foul musk are ways they try to defend themselves.

33. Mississippi Ringneck Snake

Mississippi Ringneck Snake (Diadophis punctatus stictogenys) in hand by Douglass Mills
Mississippi Ringneck Snake (Diadophis punctatus stictogenys) in hand by Douglass Mills
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Diadophis punctatus
  • Other Names: Ring-necked snake 
  • Adult Size: 10 to 15 inches 
  • Lifespan: 6 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $30

Mississippi ringneck snakes live in pine forests, ravine bottoms, grasslands, and deserts. They are more common in moist areas. In desert areas, their population is more scattered. Under natural debris is where they are commonly found, sometimes in multiples.

The yellow ring around this species neck is its most unique feature. Their bellies are orange, which they will flash to ward off predators. Gray to olive is their dorsal color. They are small and are rarely bigger than 14 inches.

Small in size and beautifully colored, ringnecks make great pets for beginners. Their mouths are too small to bite and harm a human. Mild venom is produced in the rear fangs to paralyze prey. This species is found abundantly in Texas and can be collected legally with a hunting license.

34. Texas Indigo Snake

Texas Indefo Snake (Drymarchon melanurus erebennus)
Texas Indefo Snake (Drymarchon melanurus erebennus)
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Drymarchon melanurus erebennus
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 6 to 8 ft 
  • Lifespan: 20 years 
  • Average Price Range: $1,300

The Texas indigo snake is an endangered species rare to see in Southern Texas. They live in open grasslands, coastal dunes, savannahs, and habitats next to water with light vegetation. They are active during the day and breed in the winter. The shrinking of its habitat and the expansion of humans has caused this species to become endangered.

Texas indigo snakes are a large snake species sometimes reaching up to 8 feet long. They are all black with shiny smooth scales and an iridescent hue. Their underside is light pinkish.

Texas indigo snakes will eat anything they can find. Lizards, rodents, birds, eggs, and small mammals are what it eats. Many people will keep this snake around for its tendency to attack rattlesnakes. Biting and releasing a foul musk are ways it protects itself from predators. Shaking their tails is also a defense tactic but they are not venomous.

35. Speckled Racer

Speckled Racer (Drymobius margaritiferus)
Speckled Racer (Drymobius margaritiferus)
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Drymobius margaritiferus
  • Other Names: Central American speckled racer 
  • Adult Size: 30 to 40 inches 
  • Lifespan: 10 years 
  • Average Price Range: N/A

In the extreme south of Texas, the speckled racer can sometimes be spotted roaming. Humid and wet areas are where it prefers to live. Forests, savannahs, pastures, marshes, and edged habitats are common living areas. Racers are active during the day. In Texas, they are endangered and hard to find. In other parts of the world like Mexico, they are more common.

Speckled racers are usually black with yellow or blue spotting. On each scale, there is a spot. Translated into Latin their scientific name means “pearl bearing”.  Their belly is yellowish to green and their scales are roughly keeled.

Speckled racers are fast and agile. They are adept hunters and will eat lizards, rodents, birds, and other small animals. Frogs and toads make up most of their diet. This species can be aggressive if handled and does not make good pets. They will try to flee first but if picked up they bite repeatedly.

36. Baird’s Rat Snake

Baird’s Rat Snake (Pantherophis bairdi)
Baird’s Rat Snake (Pantherophis bairdi) – source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Pantherophis bairdi
  • Other Names: Bairds Pilot Snake 
  • Adult Size: 25 to 55 inches 
  • Lifespan: 8 to 12 years 
  • Average Price Range: $50

Bairds rat snakes can be found in Western Texas by the Big Bend region. They can be hard to find and avoid humans in the wild. Rocky arid habitats are where they live. They are calm-tempered and are most active from spring to late summer. Mating occurs in summer and eggs hatch three weeks later.

Bairds Black snakes range from orange to bright yellow. Salmon and tan are also common colors. Four Stripes run down its dark body. Their belly is gray and gets darker towards its tail. The scales of this species are roughly keeled.

Bairds rats snakes are calm slow moving snakes. They feed off small creatures like rats, birds, and bats. They are often kept as pets and do not bite often. To warn predators they will hiss when they feel in danger.

37. Great Plains Snake

Great Plains Rat Snake (Pantherophis emoryi) on a limestone rock
Great Plains Rat Snake (Pantherophis emoryi) on a limestone rock
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Pantherophis emoryi
  • Other Names: Emory’s pilot snake 
  • Adult Size: 23 to 31 inches
  • Lifespan: 18 to 21 years
  • Average Price Range: $25 to $80

Great plains rat snakes can be found all across Texas in grasslands, mild forests, coastal plains, and rocky mountainous regions. They are nocturnal and can be found in areas with a high rodent population like farmlands. Rodents are the main part of this species diet but they will also eat lizards, frogs, and other animals they can overpower. This species is most active in spring, which is when they mate.

The great plains snake is gray or tan with blotching on its back and sides. The blotching can be gray, tan, brown, or even greenish. They are medium to large and are capable of reaching 5 feet in length. This species will rattle its tail when threatened but they are not venomous.

As a whole, this species is not aggressive and only has small teeth. When awake this species tends to remain more still than other snakes.

38. Corn Snake

Corn Snake (Pantherophis guttatus)
Corn Snake (Pantherophis guttatus)
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Pantherophis guttatus
  • Other Names: Chicken snake 
  • Adult Size: 4 to 5.5 feet long
  • Lifespan: 6 to 8 years
  • Average Price Range: $80 to $150

The corn snake is a species of rat snake that can be found in Texas and other parts of North America. They look similar to a copperhead and can be easily mistaken for one because of their color. Corn snakes are harmless and nonvenomous. In the wild, they can be found in overgrown fields, forests, woodlands, and near residential areas. They prefer to live in areas with a high rodent population and are beneficial in controlling their population.

Corn snakes are orange or brownish-yellow with large red blotches down their sides and back. Confused about copperheads they have much brighter colors. On their belly is a black and white checkered pattern. Corn Snakes can come in a variety of colors and patterns due to breeding and different habitats. They are popular pets due to their variant possibilities and docile nature.

Corn Snakes are contractors and eat frogs, lizards, and other small animals. They are most active in the day and are great climbers. Good chemosensory skills make this snake track prey easily. They have been seen to have intelligence and the ability to learn in their studies.

39. Texas Rat Snake

Texas Rat Snake (Elaphe obsoleta lindheimeri) being held in hand
Texas Rat Snake (Elaphe obsoleta lindheimeri) being held in hand
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Elaphe obsoleta lindheimeri
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 4 to 6 feet
  • Lifespan: 10 to 15 years 
  • Average Price Range: $80 to $150

Texas rat snakes’ main population is within Texas but they can be found in surrounding states in the U.S. This snake is the most abundant in Austin. These snakes are great climbers and can sometimes find themselves inside buildings. They can even climb a brick wall head-on.

Texas rat snakes are yellow or tan. They have blotches covering their back that are brownish to olive. Their grey heads help identify them from other rat snakes. White or gray is the color of their belly. Some snakes have orange specks on them.

Texas rat snakes are timid. Rodents, birds, and other small animals are what they eat in the wild. They live in Forrest, grassland, and urban habitats. Wild-caught snakes are easily domesticated.

40. Black Rat Snake

Western rat snake ready to strike (Pantherophis obsoletus)
Western rat snake ready to strike (Pantherophis obsoletus)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Pantherophis obsoletus
  • Other Names: Pilot black snake, Western rat snake 
  • Adult Size: 42 to 84 inches 
  • Lifespan: 10 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $50 to $100

Black rat snakes live in a wide range of habitats and are highly adaptable to humans. Grassy hills, forests, rocky areas, and swamps are some common places to find them. They live off of mice, lizards, and small rodents they find. They use their great climbing skills to maneuver and search for prey.

This species is medium but some individuals can grow to 6 feet. Black rat snakes are black with white markings in between some scales. They have white bellies and roughly keeled scales. Their eyes and tongue are pitch black.

Predators of this species include hawks, owls, raccoons, and foxes. They will freeze if frightened and produce a foul musk. Black rat snakes will shake their tail, and bite if picked up and provoked.

41. Slowinski’s Corn Snake

Slowinski’s cornsnake (Pantherophis slowinskii) in situ Colorado County Texas
Slowinski’s cornsnake (Pantherophis slowinskii) in situ Colorado County Texas – source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Pantherophis slowinskii
  • Other Names: Chicken snake 
  • Adult Size: 4 to 5.5 feet long
  • Lifespan: 8 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $50 to $100

Slowinski’s corn snake became its species in 2002 and was named after herpetologist Joseph Bruno Slowinski. This snake is rarely seen and only comes out at night. These creatures are docile and rarely bite. They rely on their camouflage for protection.

This snake is brown to gray. They have large brown blotches covering its body that are bordered by black. Its belly is black and white checkered. They have a spearhead marking on their head which helps identify them from other species.

Mice, rats, small birds, eggs, and other small animals are what it eats. Rodents make up most of its diet and they will even chase them into houses. These snakes are active from spring to fall and will hibernate in the winter.

42. Mud Snake

Western Mud Snake (Farancia abacura reinwardtii)
Western Mud Snake (Farancia abacura reinwardtii) – source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Farancia a Acura reinwardtii
  • Other Names: Western mud snake
  • Adult Size: 40 to  54 inches 
  • Lifespan: N/A
  • Average Price Range: $80 to $100

Mud snakes are nocturnal water snakes that can be found in Easter parts of Texas. They live mostly in water and will only leave to move to another source. Swamps, marshes, and wet habitats with high vegetation are where they live. Breeding takes place in spring and the mother will stay with the eggs until they hatch.

The mud snake is glossy black with smooth scales. Their bellies are bright red with a checkered pattern of black. Their red coloring extends to their sides. Some snakes are all black and lack red. This snake’s head is rounded and they have large circular eyes.

Amphibians like frogs and salamanders are what this species eats. They use their sharp tails to prod prey and consume it. Mud Snakes are harmless and will usually not bite if picked up. They will try to use their tail to stig predators but this is harmless to humans.

43. Mexican Hooknose Snake

Mexican Hooknose Snake (Ficimia streckeri)
Mexican Hooknose Snake (Ficimia streckeri) – source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family:  Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Ficimia streckeri
  • Other Names: Texas hook-nosed snake
  • Adult Size: 5 to 11 inches
  • Lifespan: 15 to 20 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The Mexican hooknose snake lives primarily in Mexico but has a range that extends out to Southern Texas. This snake is nocturnal and can be found in woodland-type habitats next to the Rio Grande. They are harmless and can even be found in named water sources.

This snake has an upturned snout similar to the hognose snake. In comparison, the scales are smooth and shinier than the hognose. Hooknose snakes are brown or gray. They have brownie blotches that run down their back but they can also look green. Their bellies are white or pearl-colored.

Insects like spiders and centipedes are what this snake primarily survives on. Their small size makes them vulnerable to predators like other snakes, birds, and large rodents.

44. Western Hooknose Snake

Western Hooknose Snake (Gyalopion canum)
Western Hooknose Snake (Gyalopion canum)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced
  • Family:  Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Gyalopion canum
  • Other Names: Chihuahuan hook-nosed snake
  • Adult Size: 10 to 14 inches
  • Lifespan: 15 to 20 years
  • Average Price Range:  N/A

Western hooknose snakes are small species that can be found in western Texas and parts of Mexico. They live in sandy habitats next to a source of water. This species is a burrower and spends most of its time underground. They can also be found under rocks and other natural debris.

This small species only reach up to 14 inches. They are gray or brown with black blotches covering their back. Their nose is slightly upturned and looks. Their bellies are light cream and their scales are smooth.

Small insects like spiders are what this snake primarily eats. They will also eat small snakes and scorpions if they can capture them. This species will fart to try and scare off predators. Their farts are so strong that they can lift them off the ground sometimes.

45. Dusty Hognose Snake

Dusty Hognose Snake (Heterodon nasicus gloydi)
Dusty Hognose Snake (Heterodon nasicus gloydi) – source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Heterodon gloydi
  • Other Names: spoonbill snake 
  • Adult Size: 14 to 36 inches
  • Lifespan: 9 to 20 years 
  • Average Price Range: $200 to $700

Dusty hognose snakes live in prairies, meadows, and other sandy habitats. They are a common species to have as a pet and are often found in the exotic pet trade. More rare colorings can cost as much as $1,000.

The dusty hognose snake is pale brown or yellow with dark splotches going down its back. Their upturned nose is their most identifiable feature. Compared to other species of hognose snake this sun species has a more upturned nose. Their stomach is black and without markings. Their scales are rough and keeled.

Snakes, toads, eggs, small rodents, and insects are what it eats. This species is generally harmless but is sometimes confused for copperheads. It will pretend to strike, flatten its body, and rollover when threatened. Their bites do not produce enough venom to harm a human but can hurt tiny prey.

46. Western Hognose Snake

Western Hognose Snake (Heterodon nasicus)
Western Hognose Snake (Heterodon nasicus)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Heterodon nasicus
  • Other Names: Plains hognose 
  • Adult Size: 14 to 36 inches 
  • Lifespan: 9 to 20 years
  • Average Price Range: $200 to $700

The western hognose snake can be found in a variety of habitats within Texas. Prairies, floodplains, grasslands, and deserts are habitats to find them. Loose sandy soil and gravely areas are where they prefer to live. They are docile and active during the day. Mating occurs in spring and eggs are laid in summer.

This snake is small and thick-bodied. Their upturned snout makes them easily identifiable. Hognose snakes are often confused with rattlesnakes but are smaller and harmless. Yellow or tan is its base color with dark blotches going down its side and back.

Amphibians are the main part of its diet but they will also eat rodents, insects, and other small animals. This snake can be identified by the defensive tactics it does. Playing dead, enlarging its body, fake biting, and rolling over are ways it protects itself. This species will not usually bite and can make a great pet for experienced snake owners.

47. Eastern Hognose Snake

Eastern Hognose Snake (Heterodon  platirhinos) by Natalie McNear
Eastern Hognose Snake (Heterodon  platirhinos) by Natalie McNear
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Heterodon platirhinos
  • Other Names: Puff adder, spreading adder
  • Adult Size: 20 to 33 inches 
  • Lifespan: 5 to 9 years
  • Average Price Range: $150 to $700

Eastern hognose snakes can be found through east and west Texas. They live in woodlands, fields, and open grasslands with lots of sandy soil. They travel underground through burrows and are only active in the day. These snakes reproduce in spring and will lay eggs in sandy soil.

The Eastern hognose snake is most known for its upturned snout. It can range in colors from brown, gray, yellow, green, or black. They have dark square blotches that run down their back. Their bellies are light yellow and scales are roughly keeled.

Toads are the main part of this snake’s diet. They are immune to a toad’s poison and have sharp rear fangs to deflate them. Salamanders, small mammals,  and insects are other things they eat. They raise their heads and puff out their skin to look more menacing to predators. Biting is rare for this species and they will more likely play dead.

48. Texas Night Snake

Texas Night Snake, (Hypsiglena torquata jani) in rocky desert habitat
Texas Night Snake, (Hypsiglena torquata jani) in rocky desert habitat
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Hypsiglena jani
  • Other Names: Chihuahuan night snake
  • Adult Size: 10 to 16 inches
  • Lifespan: 8 to 12 years
  • Average Price Range: $150-$200

The Texas night snake is a small snake species that can be found in most of Texas. They live in dry rocky areas with plenty of sandy soil. Like its name suggests this species is primarily nocturnal. During the day they hide under rocks and debris. They mate in spring and can lay up to six eggs. Rainy nights make this species appear more than usual.

Night snakes are small and have smooth scales. Their bodies are brown or tan. They have dark brown blotches that run on their back. Around their neck are three long blotches that sometimes connect. They have smooth and shiny scales. Their eyes are yellow with a catlike elliptical.

Night Snakes are too small to be handled comfortably but can make great pets. They primarily eat lizards, smaller snakes, and soft-bodied insects.

49. Grey-banded Kingsnake

Gray-Banded Kingsnake (Lampropeltis alterna)
Gray-Banded Kingsnake (Lampropeltis alterna)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Lampropeltis alterna
  • Other Names: alterna, Davis mountain kingsnake
  • Adult Size: 36 to 48 inches
  • Lifespan: 20 to 30 years
  • Average Price Range: $200-$300

The grey-banded kingsnake is nonvenomous and can be found in the Trans-Pecos and Chihuahuan desert regions in Texas. In the wild, they are not commonly found since they are nocturnal and secretive. They live far from humans and in areas that most people won’t hike to. This species is calm and docile towards humans.

This snake is medium-sized with a wide head. Its body is grey with orange bandings. Its bands are bordered by white and black. The bands can be thick or smaller in size. With breeding in captivity, many color patterns like all grey can be possible.

Lizards are what this snake feeds off of most but it will also eat rodents, frogs, and eggs. The small size and docile nature have made this species popular in the exotic pet trade.

50. Prairie Kingsnake

Prairie Kingsnake (Lampropeltis calligaster) by Peter Paplanus
Prairie Kingsnake (Lampropeltis calligaster) by Peter Paplanus
  • Experience Level: Beginner to Intermediate
  • Family:  Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Lampropeltis calligaster
  • Other Names: Yellow-bellied Kingsnake
  • Adult Size: 30-40 inches
  • Lifespan: 15-30 years 
  • Average Price Range: $100-$200

Prairie Kingsnakes are one of the most common species in North America and can be found in Texas. They live in fields, prairies, woodlands, and pictures. This species is secretive and spends its time hiding under debris.

Ranging in colors from brown to grey, this snake is painted with red blotches on its back that are outlined in black. In some snakes, their patter will fade to a solid brown. On the top of their head is a V-shaped mark. Their stomachs are yellow with brown markings.

King Snakes are known for their ability to eat other snakes, even venomous ones. They also eat lizards, mice, and other small animals. This creature is not prone to bite and is docile when handled. Shaking its tail and releasing a musk are signs it is getting defensive.

51. Speckled Kingsnake

Speckled Kingsnake (Lampropeltis getula holbrooki) by Andrew Hoffman
Speckled Kingsnake (Lampropeltis getula holbrooki) by Andrew Hoffman
  • Experience Level: Beginner to Intermediate
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Lampropeltis getula holbrooki
  • Other Names: salt and pepper snake
  • Adult Size: 48 to 96 
  • Lifespan: 10-20 years
  • Average Price Range: $150-$200

Speckled Kingsnakes have smooth glossy scales with small dots on each scale. This speckled pattern is unique to this kingsnake subspecies. They are blueish black and have yellow bellies. Their spots are yellow, sometimes white.

This snake lives in forests, hillsides, prairies, and swamp habitats. They are active mostly at night and spend their day under debris or underground. Spring to late fall is when the snake is most active, then it hibernates in the winter.

 The speckled kingsnake is immune to other snakes’ venom and will eat other species. Fish and small animals also help make up their diet. These snakes are not venomous but will shake their tail as a threat to predators. They are a calm species and will not usually bite.

52. Desert Kingsnake

Desert Kingsnake (Lampropeltis getula splendida)
Desert Kingsnake (Lampropeltis getula splendida)
  • Experience Level: Beginner to Intermediate 
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: lampropeltis splendida
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 36 to 48 inches
  • Lifespan: 15 to 20 years
  • Average Price Range: $175 to $250 

The desert kingsnake is native to Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico. It can be found in forests, prairies, woodlands, and riparian-type areas. They are found more often in areas with a running water source. In spring they mate and lay eggs up to a foot deep to keep them moist. It can take up to 60 days for young snakes to hatch.

Black or darkly colored is their dorsum. They have white or yellow specks that form black bands on their body. Their scales are smooth and shiny-looking. The king snake’s head is small and pointed. Their sides and stomach are yellow.

Lizards and smaller snakes are what this species generally eats. This species is docile and calm-natured. When confronted they will lay on their back and play dead. Kingsnakes are beneficial in keeping a balanced ecosystem since they feed off other snakes and can help keep venomous populations stable.

53. Louisiana Milk Snake

  • Experience Level: Beginner to Intermediate
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Lampropeltis triangulum amaura
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 16 to 24 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 to 20 years
  • Average Price Range: $100-$200

The Louisiana milk snake lives in moist sandy habitats with mild vegetation. Some people will confuse this species with coral snakes, but they are not venomous. Milk snakes burrow and hide under debris during the day. They are nocturnal and will emerge above ground at night.

These snake patterns can vary but they usually have large red blotches with tan coloring. The blotches are bordered by black. The Louisiana milk snake is one of the smaller species of Lampropeltis. Their color helps them blend in better at night and camouflage.

Large snakes, large rodents, bullfrogs, hawks, and skunks are some of the species that prey on this snake. They feed off of mice and lizards, occasionally other snakes. Milk snakes enjoy cool temperatures and move faster in them.

54. Mexican Milk Snake 

Mexican Milk Snake (Lampropeltis triangulum annulata)
Mexican Milk Snake (Lampropeltis triangulum annulata)
  • Experience Level: Beginner to Intermediate
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Lampropeltis triangulum annulata
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 24 to 30 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 to 20 years
  • Average Price Range: $100-$200 

This Milk Snake is native to Mexico and has a range that stretches out to southern Texas. This milk snake is nocturnal and will hide under debris during the day. Summer is when they are least active due to the heat. Occasionally they may come out in the day for a short bask in the sun. These snakes live in semi-arid vegetated areas with sandy soil.

Milk Snakes have red, black, and cream-colored banding. The Mexican milk snakes have darker and wider yellow and red bands. They are a small species of milksnake.

Lizards, rodents, and other snakes are what this species eats. Any creature is small enough they will try to feed off of. Normally docile, they will not try to bite when handled. Releasing a musk is one way it defends itself.

55. New Mexico Milk Snake

New Mexico Milksnake (Lampropeltis triangulum celaenops)
New Mexico Milksnake (Lampropeltis triangulum celaenops)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Lampropeltis triangulum celaenops
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 16 to 24 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 to 12 years
  • Average Price Range: $100-$200

The NewMexico milk snake has smooth glossy scales and is the smallest species of milk snake in Texas. They live in west Texas in sandy areas with a brush. They are nocturnal and spend most of their time on land and underground. They are most active in spring and that is when they mate.

Milk Snakes look similar to coral snakes, but these smaller species are not venomous. They have bands in red, yellow, and black that run down its body. Their mouths are black and their stomach is a checkered black and white color.

This species is docile and kept as pets for its small size. The right environment and food will allow this snake to thrive in captivity. Lizards, skinks, and mice are prey they enjoy eating. In the wild, they may eat other smaller snakes.

56. Central Plains Milk Snake

Central Plains Milk Snake (Lampropeltis triangulum gentilis) by Andrew DuBois
Central Plains Milk Snake (Lampropeltis triangulum gentilis) by Andrew DuBois
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Lampropeltis triangulum gentilis
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 16 to 36 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 to 12 years
  • Average Price Range: $100 to $200

The Central plains milk snake can be found in Central Texas in open plains, prairies, and in rocky sandy habitats. In spring they are most active and they are nocturnal. In winter they disappear and are inactive for three months. You will most likely find this snake crossing roads at night, under rocks and other natural debris.

This milk snake has large red bands followed by black and white bands. Their scales are smooth and shiny. The underside is all white. Milk Snakes can have bands or blotches and their pattern can vary.

Rats, other snakes, lizards, and other small animals are what this species eats. Milk Snakes move slowly unless but faster in cold temperatures. Their small teeth make them harmless but sometimes they may shake their tail like a rattlesnake.

57. Northern Cat-eyed Snake

Northern Cat-eyed snake (Leptodeira septentrionalis) in brush
Northern Cat-eyed snake (Leptodeira septentrionalis) in brush
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Leptodeira septentrionalis
  • Other Names: Cat-eyed snake 
  • Adult Size: 17 to 26 inches 
  • Lifespan: N/A
  • Average Price Range: &150 to $250

Northern cat-eyed snakes live in the southern part of Texas. They are mildly venomous but only harmful to small animals. In Texas, they can be found in semi-arid regions next to water sources. As nocturnal creatures, they roam and hunt at night. It’s rare to see one during the day but they can be found under rocks and other dark hiding spaces.

The eyes of this species look similar to cats since they have vertical ellipticals. They have large heads and eyes, similar traits to venomous species. They can be yellow, orange, tan, and have large brown.l blotches going down its back. Their belly is orange and gets brighter towards its tail. Juvenile snakes have a similar appearance but are brighter.

Cat-eyes snakes are rear-fanged, which they use to administer venom to their prey. Frogs are the main part of this species diet but lizards and other small animals are preyed on by this species. Birds will prey on this species but nightlife helps avoid most predators. If threatened they will try to look bigger and may lunge at enemies. Biting is rare and the last resort.

58. Gulf Crayfish Snake

Gulf Crayfish Snake (Liodytes rigida sinicola)
Gulf Crayfish Snake (Liodytes rigida sinicola)
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Liodytes rigida sinicola
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 20 to 30 inches
  • Lifespan: N/A
  • Average Price Range: $40

Gulfs crayfish snakes are aquatic and live in water sources in Texas. Swamps, ponds, rivers, and streams are places they can be found. They live in places where crayfish are common since that is their main source of food. These snakes can be active in the day or night. When it rains they come out more. They are rare to see due to their secretive native.

These snakes are dark brown to olive-colored with shiny scales. Two stripes run down its side and a yellow stripe on its first scale. Their stomach is yellow and they have large round eyes.

While crayfish are their main source of food they also eat other things like amphibians. This species gives birth to live young instead of eggs.

59. Eastern Coachwhip

Eastern Coachwhip (Masticophis flagellum flagellum)
Eastern Coachwhip (Masticophis flagellum flagellum)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Masticophis Flagellum
  • Other Names: Whipsnake
  • Adult Size: 50 to 72 inches
  • Lifespan: 12 to 20 years
  • Average Price Range: $100 to $190

The eastern coachwhip is one of the larger snakes in Texas. They are nonvenomous but can be aggressive. This species is active during the day. Open fields, prairies, and desert scrubs are habitats they prefer but they can also be found in ravines, marshes, and creeks.

This species color can range from brown, black, red, yellow, and pink. Their head and neck are black. They have smooth scales that look similar to a braided whip.

Smell and sight are how it tracks down its prey. It lifts its head from the ground to watch for prey and locks onto its target. Birds, large insects, lizards, and other snakes are things it preys on. When encountered by a human they will flee first. If trapped they will bite repeatedly.

60. Western Coachwhip

Western Coachwhip (Masticophis Flagellum Testaceus)
Western Coachwhip (Masticophis Flagellum Testaceus)
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Masticophis Flagellum Testaceus
  • Other Names: Whip snake 
  • Adult Size: 39 to 59 inches 
  • Lifespan: 12 to 20 years
  • Average Price Range: $100 to $190

The western Coachwhip lives in flat hillsides, prairies, sandhills, and woodland habitats in Texas and the U.S. They are a large species and some have been seen to get as big as 100 inches. Vegetation and leaf litter is used as this species to hunt and hide. They are active during the day. To escape the heat and sleep they will go underground.

Olive brown, tan, black and yellow are common colors in this species. They can also be reddish and their head is darker than their tail. Their bellies can be similar colors as their body and also white.

Small mammals, rodents, and other animals are what this species preys upon. They hold their heads up high to look for prey. September to November is when they get ready for hibernation.

61. Schott’s Whipsnake

Schott’s Whipsnake (Masticophis schotti)
Schott’s Whipsnake (Masticophis schotti) – source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Masticophis schotti
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 39 to 59 inches
  • Lifespan: 12 to 20 years
  • Average Price Range: $100 to $190

Schott’s whip snakes live in sandy, dry open areas. Texas and Mexico are the regions they live in. Woodlands, fields, and areas with high vegetation are also places they inhabit.

Gray to blueish gray is their dorsal color. Four stripes run down their sides and backs. Orange with spots is the pattern on their throat. The schotts whip snake’s belly is multicolored, with red, yellow, and white coloring. They have large round eyes and brown heads.

Lizards, smaller snakes, mice, and birds are what this species eats. They are great hunters and use their fast speed to catch prey. This snake is a constrictor and suffocates its prey before eating it.

62. Ruthven’s Whipsnake

Ruthvens Whipsnake (Masticophis schotti ruthveni)
Ruthvens Whipsnake (Masticophis schotti ruthveni) by Natalie McNear
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Masticophis schotti ruthveni
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 36 to 70 inches 
  • Lifespan: 12 to 20 years 
  • Average Price Range: $100 to $200 

Ruthven’s whipsnake can be found mostly in Mexico but has a population in Texas. They live in sandy and dry open areas. Its population in Texas is next to the Rio Grande. This species has no protection in Texas.

Ruthven’s whipsnake is large like other species of whipsnake. They have roughly keeled scales that look similar to a braided whip. Their dorsal color is tan to olive green. Whip snakes have large eyes which help them spot prey. Their chin is orange and their belly is lightly colored in white. Near the end of their tail is reddish on their underside.

Rodents, mice, birds, and other small animals are what this species eats. They are not aggressive but they may bite repeatedly if captured.

63. Central Texas Whipsnake

  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae  
  • Scientific Name: Masticophis taeniatus girardi
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 30 to 72 inches  
  • Lifespan: 10 to 20 years 
  • Average Price Range: $100 to $200 

Central Texas whipsnake live in Texas and the Central Texas regions. Dry sandy areas are where this species generally lives. They are agile and constantly moving. They do not make good pets as they travel long distances and can bite repeatedly if they feel threatened.

Tan, olive green, and dark brown are common colors of this species. They are long and have roughly keeled scales. Stripes run down this species’ sides and back but some have no pattern. Their underside is white and has red coloring towards its tail.

Holding their heads up high they search for prey with a keen sense of smell and vision. They will eat anything they can find like mice, toads, and birds. This species is faster than most snakes and uses its speed to dominate its prey.

64. Desert Striped Whipsnake

Desert Striped Whipsnake (Coluber Masticophis taeniatus taeniatus) curled up
Desert Striped Whipsnake (Coluber Masticophis taeniatus taeniatus) curled up
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Coluber taeniatus taeniatus
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 24 to 67 inches 
  • Lifespan: 10 to 20 years 
  • Average Price Range: $50 to $150

Desert striped whip snakes have a large range in the Western United States and Mexico. It can be found in a variety of habitats in Central and Western Texas. They are active during the day and can travel long distances. Grasslands, canyons, sagebrush flats, and woodlands are some of the places they inhabit. Rocky streams will attract this species.

Grey, black, and dark brown are their possible dorsal colors. Four stripes run down its dorsal and a white stripe runs across its side. This snake’s underside is multicolored with white being near the head and red being near its tail. Their bellies are cream or yellowish.

Burrows and vegetation are where this species hides when not traveling. Their fast metabolism allows them to constantly eat and move. Frogs, lizards, birds, insects, and small mammals are what this species will eat. They will eat anything they can find and are not picky eaters.

65. Salt Marsh Snake

Mangrove Salt Marsh Snake (Nerodia clarkii compressicauda) by FWC
Mangrove Salt Marsh Snake (Nerodia clarkii compressicauda) by FWC
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced  
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Nerodia clarkii
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 15 to 30 inches 
  • Lifespan: 15 to 20 years 
  • Average Price Range: $125 to $150

The salt marsh snake can be found in salt marshes as its name suggests. Along the Gulf of Mexico in Texas and other states are where this species is commonly found.

Medium in size their pattern and color can vary. Olive, brown, tan, and orange are some of their possible colors. Cottonmouths are often confused for this species since they are both water snakes. Saltmarsh snakes are not venomous and docile.

Fish, shrimp, and other water creatures are what this snake eats. They catch prey near shallow water. Saltmarsh snakes are not constrictors and use their strong jaws to swallow their prey.

66. Gulf Salt Marsh Snake

Gulf Salt Marsh Snake (Nerodia clarkii) coiled up in habitat
Gulf Salt Marsh Snake (Nerodia clarkii) coiled up in habitat
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Nerodia clarkii clarkii
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 38 to 51 inches
  • Lifespan: 15 to 20 years 
  • Average Price Range: $125 to $150

The gulf salt marsh snake lives in marshes, swamps, and other saltwater habitats in Texas. The Gulf Coast is their most common living area. Habitat loss and population threatens this species since their habitat is specific to them. This species is rare and hard to find so not many studies have been done.

Gulf Salt marsh snakes are black with roughly keeled scales. Their stripes help them be easily identifiable from other species and water snakes. Four stripes run down its back and sides that are brownish. Their belly is brown or red with light spotting.

This snake lives in saltwater so it gains water from the prey it eats. Frogs, shrimps, crabs, and crayfish are some of the animals it preys upon.

67. Mississippi Green Watersnake

Mississippi Green Water Snake (Nerodia cyclopion)
Mississippi Green Water Snake (Nerodia cyclopion) – source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Nerodia cyclopion
  • Other Names: Green water snake 
  • Adult Size: 30 to 45 inches 
  • Lifespan: 8 to 15 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $50 

Mississippi green water snakes live in marshes, streams, ponds, and other water sources in Texas. This nonvenomous snake can be found in fresh or brackish water.

Scales around its eyes help identify it from other water snakes. Olive, dark green, and brown are its possible colors. Markings can appear but as they age they darken to all black. Half-moon markings appear on a yellow belly.

Crayfish, frogs, and amphibians are what this snake eats. This snake is harmless but is often confused with cottonmouths. If threatened they will lash out and bite repeatedly.

68. Plain-bellied Water Snake

Plain Bellied Water Snake (Nerodia_erythrogaster)
Plain Bellied Water Snake (Nerodia_erythrogaster)
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Nerodia erythrogaster flavigaster
  • Other Names: Red-bellied watersnake
  • Adult Size: 30 to 48 inches 
  • Lifespan: 8 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $50

The plain-bellied water snake lives in fresh and brackish waters in Texas. Forests, rivers, swamps, and coastal plains are some of the habitats they live in. They are aggressive when handled and try to flee if approached. You can sometimes see them basking in the sun if not in water.

The plain bellied watersnake can be identified by its yellow bellies but it can also be red. It has no pattern on its body and is dark brown to black. Around their mouth and throat is reddish shading. Their bodies are thick with strongly keeled scales.

This watersnake gets most of its food from the water including prey like crayfish, fish, and salamanders. They will swim in the water with their mouths open, waiting for something to come along. Water Snakes are preyed on by both land and aquatic life. Snakes, bass, and other bird species will hunt this snake. The plain bellied watersnake will go on land to escape predators, unlike the common water snake.

69. Blotched Water Snake

Blotched Water Snake (Nerodia erythrogaster transversa)
Blotched Water Snake (Nerodia erythrogaster transversa) – source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Nerodia erythrogaster transversa
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 24 to 36 inches
  • Lifespan: 9 years
  • Average Price Range: $50

Blotched water snakes live in the southwestern United States and inhabit waterways in Texas. They are found near permanent water sources like a lake, pond, or stream. This species is often mistaken for cottonmouth but they are not venomous. Biting repeatedly and enlarging its head are ways it tries to defend itself.

This watersnake ranges from tan, gray-brown to gray and has dark blotches covering its side and back. Their underside can be yellow, red, or green and has minimal markings.

Being mostly aquatic this species will feed off of water life like frogs and fish. They have sharp teeth to grip slippery prey. Similar to other water snakes they give birth to live young.

70. Broad-banded Water Snake

Broad-banded Water snake
Broad-banded Water snake
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Nerodia fasciata confluens
  • Other Names: Southern water snake
  • Adult Size: 22 to 42 inches
  • Lifespan: 8 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $50 

Broad-Banded water snakes live in North America and waterways within Texas. Slow-moving waterways like marshes, swamps, and streams are common living areas for this species. These snakes are mostly nocturnal but can be seen in the day.  Hanging off trees, basking in the sun and swimming is what they enjoy.

Broad Banded water snakes have large dark bands that cover their body with orange, yellow, or tan coloring in between. Their bands are larger and more prominent than other species of the water snake. Their bellies are yellow with dar spots.

Fast swimming and sharp teeth make them great hunters. These snakes catch prey like fish, frogs, and other small animals. It is not venomous and if threatened it will flatten out its body to seem larger.

71. Florida Water Snake

Florida Green Water Snake (Nerodia floridana)
Florida Green Water Snake (Nerodia floridana) – source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Nerodia floridana
  • Other Names: Congo snake
  • Adult Size: 30 to 55 inches
  • Lifespan: 9 years
  • Average Price Range: $50

Florida water snakes live in highly vegetated still water in Texas. Bayous, lakes, swamps, and ponds make perfect habitats for this species. They are active in the day and can be aggressive if frightened.

These snakes are heavy-bodied and medium-sized. Dark green, olive, or brown is their back color. Their stomachs are yellow and their scales are roughly keeled. The scales around its eyes help identify it from other water snake species.

This species will usually only bite if harassed. Frogs, fish, and small animals are what this species eats. Watersnake does not make good pets since they don’t enjoy being handled and are willing to bite.

72. Brazos Water Snake

  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Nerodia harteri
  • Other Names: Harters water snake
  • Adult Size: 16 to 32 inches
  • Lifespan: 9 years
  • Average Price Range: 

The Brazos water snake has the smallest range of any snake in Texas and can only be found in the rocky areas along the Brazos River. This species is close to being threatened and is rare to see. This snake will take cover in vegetation and under rocks. They hunt and are active during the day.

Their coloring is a mix of brown and gray. They have four rows of spots that paint it with a checkered pattern. Orage with a pink line down the middle is their belly color. Frogs, salamanders, and crayfish are preyed on by this species. The remote location of this species has made it harder to study than other species.

73. Concho Water Snake

Concho Water Snake (Nerodia paucimaculata)
Concho Water Snake (Nerodia paucimaculata) – source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Nerodia paucimaculata
  • Other Names: N/A 
  • Adult Size: 3 feet
  • Lifespan: 9 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The Concho water snake is one of the smallest water snakes that inhabit Texas. Flowing water sources like streams and rivers is where this species lives. They prefer a rocky permanent water habitat. They are active in spring through fall. In summer they will avoid the hottest part of the day.

This water snake is small and only reaches up to 3 feet. They are tan with dark reddish-brown blotches covering their body. Small fish like minnows and shad make up most of its diet. Pollution and habitat loss has caused the decline of this species population.

74. Diamondback Water Snake

Diamondback Water snake (Nerodia rhombifer) on light gray gravel
Diamondback Water snake (Nerodia rhombifer) on light gray gravel
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Nerodia rhombifer
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 30 to 63 inches
  • Lifespan: 9 years
  • Average Price Range: $50

Diamondback water snakes live in the Central United States near slow-moving waters like ponds, streams, rivers, and lakes. This species is one of the most common to find within its range.

Gray, light yellow, and tan are its back colors. They have dark blotches spread over their backs in the shape of a diamond. Their bellies are yellow with a moon pattern. Their scales are roughly keeled.

Diamond-backed water snakes have sharp teeth to hold onto fish, frogs, and other water life. They sometimes hang from trees and hunt above the water. These snakes are not venomous but a bite will be painful. They will try to flee and release a smelly musk to defend themselves before biting first.

75. Rough Green Snake

Rough green snake (Opheodrys aestivus) in defensive position while crossing road
Rough green snake (Opheodrys aestivus) in defensive position while crossing road
  • Experience Level: Intermediate-Advanced
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Opheodrys aestivus
  • Other Names: Grass snake, Green grass snake
  • Adult Size: 22-32 inches
  • Lifespan:  8 years
  • Average Price Range: $10-$30

The rough green snake is one of two species of green snake that lives in texas. Coastal plains, forests, fields, and even on residential lawns are areas this species lives in. Greens snakes are active in the day and can be seen with a keen eye. 

The rough green snake is a slender and small species. Their green back and yellow bellies allow them to easily blend into green foliage. The smooth green snake is a species Somali to the rough green snake but the rough green snake has roughly keeled scales.

Rough green snakes eat insects, invertebrates, and small tree frogs to survive. Their coloring helps avoid many common predators like birds, frogs, and larger snakes. This species has a strong population and can be found in abundance in the wild.

76. Smooth Green Snake

Smooth Green Snake, Liochlorophis (Opheodrys) vernalis basking on mountainside rock near flower
Smooth Green Snake, Liochlorophis (Opheodrys) vernalis basking on mountainside rock near flower
  • Experience Level: Intermediate-Advanced
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Opheodrys vernalis
  • Other Names: Grass snake
  • Adult Size: 14-20 inches
  • Lifespan: 6 years
  • Average Price Range: $30

Smooth Green snakes or grass snakes can be found in Texas in high vegetation areas. This species is abundant and collected in large numbers. Marshes, meadows, grassy woodlands, and near the edges of water habitats are some of the places this snake lives. They are active in the day and use their coloring to camouflage, avoiding predators.

This snake is small and slender. Its dorsum is bright green and its belly is yellow. Juveniles can be olive green or gray but after it sheds it becomes bright green. Smooth green snakes have smooth scales. When they die they turn blue.

Insects are this species’ main source of food. Birds, other snakes, frogs, and large rodents are predators of this species.

77. Sonoran Gopher Snake 

Sonoran Gopher Snake (Pituophis catenifer affinis) on gravel
Sonoran Gopher Snake (Pituophis catenifer affinis) on gravel
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Pituophis catenifer affinis
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2 to 9 feet long 
  • Lifespan: 12 to 15 years 
  • Average Price Range: $200

The Sonoran gopher snake is found from Texas to the south-central U.S and has a range within the southeastern region. It lives primarily in sandy deserts and forested habitats.

Sonoran Gopher Snakes are often mistaken for rattlesnakes. They are tan with dark reddish-brown saddle blotches down their back. They are a large species that can reach up to 6 feet.

Pocket gophers are the main source of this species’ diet. When threatened gopher snakes will hiss and shake their tail. Their hiss is louder than other snakes due to their mouth shape. Rodents are also eaten and used for their burrows. In winter this snake will be in animals’ burrows underground.

78. Bull Snake

Bull snake (Pituophis catenifer sayi)
Bull snake (Pituophis catenifer sayi)
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Pituophis catenifer
  • Other Names: Gopher snake 
  • Adult Size: 48 to 72 inches 
  • Lifespan: 12 years 
  • Average Price Range: $120 to $200

Bull Snakes are one of the largest snakes in North America and are a sub-species of Gopher snakes. They live in open fields, prairies, and areas with sandy soil. With humans, they will get defensive but can be tamed. They will try to make themselves large or rattle their tail as a defensive posture.

Bullsnakes can be up to 8 feet and their colors are brown, white, black, and reddish with blotching. Large blotches go down its side and back. Bands go down their tails. This species survives on rodents, birds, and other small animals. They are active until winter and can sometimes be seen basking in the sun.

79. Louisiana Pine Snake

Louisiana pinesnake (Pituophis_ruthveni)
Louisiana pinesnake (Pituophis_ruthveni) – source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Pituophis ruthveni
  • Other Names: Pine snake 
  • Adult Size: 3 to 5.5 feet
  • Lifespan: 20 years
  • Average Price Range: $200 to $450

Louisiana pine snakes can be found in open pine forests with sandy soils. Baird’s pocket gophers are essential to their living area since they use their holes as burrows. This species spends more than half its life underground. In spring and late morning is when this species is most active.

Yellow with dark brown blotches in the dorsal pattern. Their heads are pointed and their underside is brown. These snakes are medium in size and have keeled scales.

Pocket gophers are this species main source of food but they will also prey on rats and other small animals. Habitat loss and vehicle deaths have contributed to this species decline.

80. Graham’s Crayfish Snake

Gray Crayfish Snake (Regina grahamii) on rock in lake hunting
Gray Crayfish Snake (Regina grahamii) on rock in lake hunting
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Regina grahamii
  • Other Names: Graham’s queen snake
  • Adult Size: 14 to 24 inches
  • Lifespan: N/A
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Graham’s Crayfish snake is one of the Texas aquatic snake species. They are brownish to the gray snake, with a faint mid-dorsal stripe. The stripe is yellow, cream, or white-colored and matches the snake’s belly. These snakes inhabit rivers, streams, oxbow lakes, and marshes. Fresh or brackish water is what they can live in. Crayfish are essential to their living area. They can be quite secretive and hide in holes, under rocks, and in vegetation.

Crayfish are their main source of food but they will also eat other aquatic life like frogs or fish. They are docile and secretive, mostly coming out at night. It will try to avoid captivity and will bite repeatedly if captured. They will also release a musk or flee.

81. Texas Longnose Snake

Texas Long-nosed Snake (Rhinocheilus lecontei tessellatus) by Andrew DuBois
Texas Long-nosed Snake (Rhinocheilus lecontei tessellatus) by Andrew DuBois
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Rhinocheilus lecontei tessellatus
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 22 to 36 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $70

The Texas longnose snake can be found in parts of Mexico and Texas. These snakes are nocturnal and during the day you can find them under debris. In Texas, this species is not endangered but it is in Kansas and Oklahoma.

This snake is tricolored with white, black, and red blotches on it. Its long snout is what gives it its name. The snout is sharp and has a slight upward tilt. Its underside is a white cream color.

This burrowing species survives by hunting lizards, amphibians, and smaller snakes. It is docile and will not normally bite. Releasing blood or musk is a way it tries to ward off predators.

82. Big Bend Patchnose Snake

Desert Patch-nosed Snake (Salvadora hexalepis deserticola) by JN Stuart
Desert Patch-nosed Snake (Salvadora hexalepis deserticola) by JN Stuart
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Salvadora hexalepis deserticola
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 22 to 47 inches
  • Lifespan: 14 years
  • Average Price Range: $70

The big bend patchnose snake is a species of patch nose that lives near the Big Bend region in Texas. Desert and rocky areas are where this species prefers to live. They will also inhabit woodlands and mountains. Active in the day they often hide in cracks to avoid predators.

The patchnose snake is tan to darkly colored. Stripes run down its back that is yellow or orange. Its belly is white. The large scale on its nose helps it dig out prey and is a unique feature to the snake.

Lizards, eggs, and snakes are some of the things eaten by this species. They are fast-moving and can tolerate high temperatures. Their climbing helps them maneuver easier.

83. Mountain Patch Nose Snake

Mountain Patchnose Snake (Salvadora grahamiae grahamiae)
Mountain Patchnose Snake (Salvadora grahamiae grahamiae)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Salvadora grahamiae grahamiae
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 22 to 47 inches
  • Lifespan: 14 years 
  • Average Price Range: $70 to $100

The mountain patch nose is a subspecies of western patches nosed found in Texas. They are active during the daytime inhabiting forests, mountains, and rocky terrains.

They are tan to black with stripes running down their back. Their scales are roughly keeled and they are medium in length. The large scale on its nose is this snake’s most identifiable feature.

These snakes will hide in the crevices of rocks to avoid predators. Birds of prey, larger snakes, and large mammals are what preys on this species. Patch-nosed snakes will eat lizards and small rodents.

84. Texas Patchnose Snake

Texas Patch-nosed snake (Salvadora grahamiae lineata) (1)
Texas Patch-nosed snake (Salvadora grahamiae lineata) – source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Salvadora grahamiae lineata
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 26 to 40 inches 
  • Lifespan: 14 years 
  • Average Price Range: $70 to $100

The Texas patch-nosed snake can be found from the Edwards plateau to South Texas. This species is active during the day. Prairies, savannahs, woodlands, farms, and grassland are some of the habitats to find this species. They mate in spring and eggs are hatched in fall.

This snake is medium with a dark-colored dorsal. A stripe runs down its back that is tan. The patchnose snake gets its name from the large scale on its nose.

Lizards, snakes, and rodents are what this species generally eats. They are harmless and would rather flee than bite. Its snout helps it get food it finds from the ground.

85. Ground Snake

Western Ground Snake (Sonora semiannulata) in Western Texas
Western Ground Snake (Sonora semiannulata) in Western Texas
  • Experience Level: 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Sonora semiannulata
  • Other Names: Variable ground snake, Western ground snake 
  • Adult Size: 8 to 15 inches 
  • Lifespan: 12 years 
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The ground snake can be found in Texas and prefers dry rocky areas with loose soil. This snake appears in many areas within the western two-thirds of Texas. Ample cover is needed where it lives to take cover and hide from the elements. Ground snakes are small with their average size being 8 inches.

The ground snake has the most diverse range of color patterns within the U.S. Brown, red, orange, and black are some of its colors. They can have banding, stripes, or be solid colored. Their bellies are white in all snakes. They have smooth scales and large eyes.

This species is nocturnal and can be found under debris during the day. They hunt for insects like spiders and worms. They have a strong population even though they are preyed on by many animals like birds and larger snakes.

86. Dekay’s Brown Snake

Marsh Brown Snake (Storeria dekayi limnetes) on deck
Marsh Brown Snake (Storeria dekayi limnetes) on deck – source
  • Experience Level: Beginner  
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Storeria dekayi limnetes
  • Other Names: Marsh’s brown snake 
  • Adult Size: 10 to 16 inches 
  • Lifespan: 7 years 
  • Average Price Range: $30 to $50 

The Dekay’s brown snake is a nonvenomous species that is endemic to the eastern United States and can be found in eastern Texas. These snakes prefer moist habitats. Forests, floodplains, urban areas, edged habitats, and grasslands are some of the places to find this species. These species are active from spring to fall. Mating occurs in spring and they give birth to live young.

Grey, brown, and reddish-brown or some of its dorsal color possibilities. They have dark spots that run down its back and their heads are darkly colored. Their bellies are pinkish with dots scattered across.

Earthworms, snails, spiders, small amphibians, and fish are some of the things this species will eat. They are often found in dirt in cemeteries, gardens, and other places near humans. A bite is harmless and rare.

87. Texas Brown Snake

Texas Brown Snake (Storeria dekayi texana)
Texas Brown Snake (Storeria dekayi texana) – source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Storeria dekayi texana
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 12 to 19 inches 
  • Lifespan: 7 years 
  • Average Price Range: $30 to $50

Texas brown snakes are a subspecies of Storeria dekayi that can be found in Texas. These snakes live in moist woodlands. Hiding under rocks, logs, and other natural debris they tend to be secretive. In urban areas, they are often found in gardens and flower beds.

The Texas brown snake has a reddish-brown dorsal with two rows of black spots. Around their eyes are black spots. Their underside is lightly colored.

This small secretive snake eats slugs, earthworms, and other soft-bodied insects. These snakes give birth to live young. They usually remain secretive to avoid predators like birds, other snakes, and large rodents. If our to explore they will venture during the evening or night.

88. Redbelly Snake

Redbelly Snake (Storeria occipitomaculata)
Redbelly Snake (Storeria occipitomaculata)
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Storeria occipitomaculata
  • Other Names: Fire snake 
  • Adult Size: 4 to 10 inches
  • Lifespan: 4 years 
  • Average Price Range: $50

Redbelly snakes can be found in the extreme East in Texas in forests, woodlands, marshes, bogs, and moist habitats. Secretive and shy they spend most of their time hiding under debris and rock. They are fossorial and can sometimes be found in urban areas.

Gray, tan, yellow, or brown are its dorsal colors. Stripes run down their backs. A bright red belly is its most identifiable trait but sometimes it can be yellow. Black dots go around its neck, sometimes forming a ring.

Soft-bodied insects like slugs make up this species’ diet. It will also eat other insects. They are rear-fanged and have mild venom to neutralize small prey. Redbelly snakes are harmless to humans and can often be found in gardens eating insects.

89. Mexican Blackhead Snake

Mexican Black-headed snake (Tantilla atriceps) by Michael Price
Mexican Black-headed snake (Tantilla atriceps) by Michael Price
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Tantilla atriceps
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 7 to 8 inches 
  • Lifespan: 10 years 
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Mexican black-headed snakes can be found in Texas. They live in hilly regions and wooded habitats. Moist soil and leaf litter are where they spend most of their time. These snakes are nocturnal and secretive.

Mexican black-headed snakes have blackheads and smooth brown bodies. They are small and have tiny heads. Their underside is a light cream color.

Blackheaded snakes eat various specimens like scorpions, beetles, centipedes, and spiders. Their large diet helps keep pest populations low. These snakes are harmless and more beneficial. Being so small they are eaten by birds of prey and other predators.

90. Big Bend Blackheaded Snake

Big Bend Blackheaded Snake (Tantilla cucullata) by Ptexis
Big Bend Blackheaded Snake (Tantilla cucullata) by Ptexis
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Tantilla cucullata
  • Other Names: Blackhead snake 
  • Adult Size: 7 to 8 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Big bend black-headed snakes can only be found in Texas. They live near the eastern parts of Trans-Pecos by the del Rio Grande and the big bend region. These snakes are shy and secretive. They hide in the crevices of rocks to avoid predators. Hillsides and rocky deserts are habitats they prefer.

These snakes have blackheads and brown bodies. They are small and have smooth shiny scales. Some snakes have a light ring around their neck and their bellies are light cream-colored.

Hawks, large rodents, and other snakes will commonly feed off of this species. Big bend black-headed snakes survive off of insects. They can be handled easily and will not bite humans often.

91. Flathead Snake 

flathead snake (Tantilla gracilis) out in the woods
flathead snake (Tantilla gracilis) out in the woods
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Tantilla gracilis
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 7 to 8 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Flathead snakes can be found in Texas in gardens, urban areas, and other moist habitats. This species is common and can be collected legally in Texas with a license. They are mostly found in the central and eastern portions of the state.

An all-black head is this species’ most identifiable feature. They are small, only growing up to 8 inches. Their bodies are brown with smooth scales. Their underside is a pinkish-red color.

Underground and under debris is where this species can be found. They eat insects and other small invertebrates. This species is harmless to humans but is mildly venomous. Rear fangs are used to paralyze prey.

92. Southwestern Blackhead Snake

Smith's Black-headed Snake (Tantilla hobartsmithi)
Smith’s Black-headed Snake (Tantilla hobartsmithi)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Tantilla hobartsmithi
  • Other Names: Smiths blackhead snake 
  • Adult Size: 7 to 15 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years 
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Southwestern blackhead snakes are a small species found in deserts, shrublands, grasslands, and forests. They are found all over the southwestern United States. They are nocturnal and spend most of their time underground.

This snake black head is its most identifiable feature. They are brown with a tan ring around their neck. Their underside has a reddish stripe. The blackhead snake scales are smooth and shiny.

Mild venom is produced in the rear fangs of this snake. It is harmless to humans but helps neutralize arthropods and other small insects. Soft-bodied insects and centipedes are what this snake preys upon.

93. Plains Blackhead Snake

Plain black headed snake (Tantilla nigriceps)
Plain black headed snake (Tantilla nigriceps)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Tantilla nigriceps
  • Other Names: Plains black-headed snake 
  • Adult Size: 7 to 15 inches 
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The plains blackhead snake is a secretive and small species found in Texas. They live in rocky areas, grassy prairies, and hillsides. Moist soil is common in all their living areas. In houses and residential areas are also places they can be found. At night is when this snake is active and during the day they hide underground and in debris. This species is common and listed as the least concern.

This species is brown to tan with smooth scales. Their heads are black and small. Their underside is white, pink, or orange colored. This species can lack the collar markings around its neck.

August is when this species is most active and they rely on moisture to survive. Small invertebrates and bugs are what this species eats.

94. Blackneck Garter Snake

Blackneck Garter Snake (Thamnophis cyrtopsis ocellatus) by Ken-ichi Ueda
Blackneck Garter Snake (Thamnophis cyrtopsis ocellatus) by Ken-ichi Ueda
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Thamnophis cyrtopsis ocellatus
  • Other Names: Black-necked garter snake 
  • Adult Size: 20 inches 
  • Lifespan: 10 to 15 years 
  • Average Price Range: $50

The black neck garter snake is a species of garter snake that lives in Texas and other parts of the U.S. They inhabit desert scrub, grasslands, chaparral, woodland, and other areas with a source of water. These snakes are most active during the day and at twilight. They hibernate in the winter and mate from spring to summer.

Black neck garter snakes are tan to olive color. They have three stripes running down their back. The middle stripe that runs down its spine is yellow or orange. The other stripes running down its side are a white or cream color. This snake is identified from other garter snakes in the black markings around its neck. Its belly is cream white and its scales are roughly keeled.

The black neck garter snakes communicate with the use of pheromones. If threatened they will not bite unless provoked. They will make themselves larger, flee or release a smelly musk to defend themselves.

95. Checkered Garter Snake

Marcy's Checkered Gartersnake (Thamnophis marcianus marcianus) by Andrew DuBois
Marcy’s Checkered Gartersnake (Thamnophis marcianus marcianus) by Andrew DuBois
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Thamnophis marcianus
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 18 to 40 inches 
  • Lifespan: 10 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $25 to $50

The checkered garter snake is a species of garter snake found in Texas. They live in grassland and desert habitats that are close to water. They are semi-aquatic and active at most during the day. In winter they may come out on warm days and are active from spring through fall.

These snakes are greenish with a checkered black pattern on their back. They have light-colored stripes that run down their back and sides. The checkered pattern is what helps distinguish it from other garter snakes.

Small fish, frogs, earthworms, and toads are the main part of this species’ diet in the wild. The checkered garter snake is one of the best species of garter snake to keep as a pet. They adapt well to handling and will eat mice and rodents given to them. Wild snakes will bite or flee when threatened but can adapt to captivity.

96. Arid Land Ribbon Snake

Arid Land Ribbon Snake (Thamnophis proximus diabolicus)
Arid Land Ribbon Snake (Thamnophis proximus diabolicus)
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Thamnophis proximus diabolicus
  • Other Names: Ribbon snake 
  • Adult Size: 18 to 48 inches 
  • Lifespan: 10 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $50 

The arid land ribbon snake is highly adaptive and inhabits different habitats in Texas. Woodlands, grasslands, and tropical regions are areas they live in. They are attracted to permanent water sources like lakes, marshes, and ponds. They are active in the day and can be seen on land or in the water.

Arid land ribbon snakes are medium and slender. They range in colors from tan to black and have roughly keeled scales. They have dorsal stripes that can be orange, yellow, or red. Their bellies are white and lack markings.

This snake hunts in the water and catches frogs, fish, and tadpoles. It will also eat rodents, lizards, insects, and scavenge for food. These snakes are rear-fanged and produce a mild venom harmless to humans. If frightened then will retreat into the water and release a musk.

97. Gulf Coast Ribbon Snake

Gulf Coast Ribbon Snake, Thamnophis proximus orarius by J. Maughn
Gulf Coast Ribbon Snake, Thamnophis proximus orarius by J. Maughn
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Thamnophis proximus orarius
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 20 to 30 inches 
  • Lifespan: 10 to 25 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $50

The gulf coast ribbon snakes a subspecies of ribbon snakes that can be found in Texas. Deserts, woodlands, and coastal marshes are habitats they live in. They are active during the day and in summer or hot climates, they become nocturnal.

The gulf coast ribbon snake is a small and slender species. They have a brown to black base color, with stripes running along their sides. The stripes are bright yellow. This species has keeled scales.

Fish, tadpoles, frogs, rodents, birds, and other small animals are what it eats. Ribbon snakes are fast swimmers and great climbers. Large birds, other snakes, and larger mammals are what preys on this species.

98. Western Ribbon Snake

Western Ribbon Snake (Thamnophis proximus)
Western Ribbon Snake (Thamnophis proximus)
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Thamnophis proximus
  • Other Names: Ribbon snake 
  • Adult Size: 16 to 35 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 20 years
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $50

The western ribbon snake is a species of garter snake that inhabits a large range of Texas. They live in deserts, woodlands, marshes, and other habitats. A source of water is common in all areas it lives in. This species is not protected and with a legal license can be collected. This species can make a great pet and is widely available. In hot habitats, they may become nocturnal.

This snake has a brown to black coloring. Three stripes run down its back. The most common stripe color for this species is an orange stripe down its back and two yellow stripes on its side. The species is medium and has a large head compared to its thin neck. They have thinner bodies than other ribbon snake species.

Ribbon snakes feed off of amphibians, fish, and other creatures they find. It uses its toxic saliva to neutralize prey. They will bite and flee if approached in the wild.

99. Redstripe Ribbon Snake

  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family:  Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Thamnophis proximus rubrilineatus
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 47 to 53 inches 
  • Lifespan: 10 to 25 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $50

The red stripe ribbon snake is a subspecies of western ribbon snakes that can be found in West Texas. This species is semi-aquatic and lives near edged habitats. It is endemic to the Edwards coast in Texas. They are great swimmers and can make great pets for a beginner snake owner.

Red Stripe ribbons snakes are small and medium length. The red stripe down the center of its back helps distinguish it from other species. Its base color is green to olive-colored. They have two yellow stripes running down their sides.

Amphibians are the main source of this snake’s diet but it will also eat lizards and small rodents. They will also eat fish they find while swimming. This species may bite if handled and release a smelly musk.

100. Plains Garter Snake

Plains Garter snake on dirt curled up (Thamnophis radix)
Plains Garter snake on dirt curled up (Thamnophis radix)
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Thamnophis radix
  • Other Names: N/A 
  • Adult Size: 36 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 to 25 years
  • Average Price Range: $25 to $100

Plains garter snakes can be found in Texas and parts of North America. Why live in meadows, prairies, and other habitats next to water. They are active in the day and are often seen basking in the sun. They are also active on warmer winter days and are colder tolerant than other snakes.

Plains garter snakes are long with stripes running down their body. Their base color is brown to dark green. The stripes that run down their back are yellow or orange. On their sides is some red pigmentation. A row of black dots can be seen on their belly and sides. Their scales are roughly keeled.

Plains garter snakes are common and untreated. Birds, large snakes, and rodents prey on this species. Fish, amphibians, and small rodents are the main part of their diet. These snakes are harmless and have been found near residential and gardens. Pesticides and killings have reduced their presence near humans.

101. Texas Garter Snake

Texas Garter Snake (Thamnophis sirtalis annectens)
Texas Garter Snake (Thamnophis sirtalis annectens) – source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Thamnophis sirtalis annectens
  • Other Names: 
  • Adult Size: 18 to 55 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 to 25 years
  • Average Price Range: $25 to $100

The Texas garter snake can be found primarily in Texas but has some small populations in Kansas and South Dakota. They are a terrestrial species and are found near a water source. Woods, meadows, and prairies are habitats that this species lives in. They are rarely found in large numbers and can hide under logs, rocks, and other debris.

The Texas garter snake is greenish to dark grey. They have a bright orange stripe down the center of their back with two stripes on their side. This species is medium-sized and has a light-colored belly.

Texas garter snakes are harmless and will only bite if cornered. I picked up they will try to escape and will release a smelly musk. Mice, fish, amphibians, and other small animals are what they prey on. They can make good pets but should not be captured in the wild to keep a healthy population.

102. New Mexico Garter Snake

New Mexico Garter Snake (Thamnophis sirtalis dorsalis) by Michael Anderson
New Mexico Garter Snake (Thamnophis sirtalis dorsalis) by Michael Anderson
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Thamnophis sirtalis dorsalis
  • Other Names: Grass snake
  • Adult Size: 18 to 55 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 to 25 years
  • Average Price Range: $25 to $100

New Mexico garter snakes are a subspecies of garter snakes that can be found in Texas. They live in grasslands, woodlands, and forest habitats. They will generally live near a source of water like a pond, lake, or marsh. Garter Snakes produce a mild venom for prey. They cannot harm humans and administer it by chewing.

New Mexico garter snakes are brown to olive. They have side stripes that run down their body which can be yellow, orange, or white. They have spots and blotches on their side which are red and darkly colored. Their bellies are blueish to gray with roughly keeled scales covering their body.

Garter snakes feed off fish, rodents, frogs and other small animals they can find. They are great swimmers and can catch fish or flee into the water when being chased. Garter snakes can live near humans, and if picked up they may bite. They are kept as pets for their small size and beautiful colors, but should not be captured in the wild.

103. Valley garter snake

Valley Gartersnake (Thamnophis sirtalis fitchi) by GregTheBusker
Valley Gartersnake (Thamnophis sirtalis fitchi) by GregTheBusker
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Thamnophis sirtalis fitch
  • Other Names: Valley garter snake
  • Adult Size: 18 to 55 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 to 25 years
  • Average Price Range: $25 to $100 

Common Garter snakes can be found in Texas and live in a variety of habitats. Marshes, forests, fields, prairies, and meadows are habitats it lives in. This snake will generally live next to a body of water like ponds, streams, or lakes. They are diurnal but in summer they will try to avoid the heat. In warm climates, they will be active year-round and avoid hibernation.

Common garter snakes are thin and are medium-sized species. Red, black, gray, blue, yellow, and green are their possible base colors with yellow stripes running down their sides.

Amphibians, earthworms, rodents, and small birds are what garter snakes eat. They are great swimmers and can catch small fast fish. Garter snakes are rear-fanged, and produce a mild venom to stun prey. Large animals like foxes, frogs, fish, turtles, other snakes, birds and cats rely on this snake as a source of food. Garter snakes will try to flee if greeted by a threat.

104. Texas Lyre Snake  

Texas Lyre Snake (Trimorphodon biscutatus vilkinsonii) in rock crevice
Texas Lyre Snake (Trimorphodon biscutatus vilkinsonii) in rock crevice
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Trimorphodon vilkinsonii
  • Other Names: Lyre Snake
  • Adult Size: 39 inches 
  • Lifespan: 12 years
  • Average Price Range: $170

Texas Lyre snakes live in deserts and rocky areas. They inhabit Texas and the Big Bend region of the U.S. This species is secretive and hard to find. It was once listed as endangered but its population is now healthy. Most of this species lives on private and protected land.

Texas lyre snakes are medium-sized and can be gray, tan, or brown. They have dark blotches that run down their back and cat-like eyes. Lyre snakes have a V-shaped mark on their head but this subspecies lacks that trait.

Lyresnake is rear-fanged and produces a mild venom. Their venom is harmless to humans and they kill their prey by constricting them to death. When not hiding in crevices they will hunt for lizards, rodents, and bats.

105. Texas Lined Snake

Lined Snake (Tropidoclonion)
Lined Snake (Tropidoclonion)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Tropidoclonion lineatum texanum
  • Other Names: Dwarf Garter Snake
  • Adult Size: 8 to 15 inches
  • Lifespan: 3 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Texas line snakes are a small species native to Texas and the central United States. It can be found in grasslands and pastures. This snake is a burrowing species and will live in areas with loose soil and plenty of leaf litter. It will hide under garbage, piles of leaves, and in moist dark areas. This species is secretive and will spend most of its time underground.

Texas line snakes are closely related to garter snakes. They are olive green, dark brown, or tan. There is a yellow or light-colored line that runs down the center of its back. Two pale stripes run down its sides.  This species has small eyes and a light-colored stomach.

Lined snakes survive off earthworms but will eat other bugs like beetles or slugs. They are active in the day and will become nocturnal in the heat of summer. They are often found in urban areas but are harmless to humans.

106. Smooth Earth Snake 

Western Smooth Snake (Virginia valeriae elegans)
Western Smooth Snake (Virginia valeriae elegans)
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Virginia Valeriae
  • Other Names: Western Earth snake
  • Adult Size: 7-10 inches
  • Lifespan: 7-9 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Smooth earth snakes are fossorial and can be found living underground in Texas. They live in habitats with loose soil and leaf litter to burrow into. They are shy and not aggressive. Their small mouths make a threat of a bite nonexistent and they will release a smelly musk if they are handled and feel threatened.

These snakes are small and have widebodies. They are brown, tan, or gray. On their backs are small black spots and their stomachs are light tan. Smooth earth snakes blend well into the dirt and fallen leaves. They are not common to find but can be found easier in edged habitats. Their bodies are smooth and shiny.

When not underground they will appear above the surface to hunt or hide under objects. Earthworms are their main source of food, but they will eat other soft-bodied invertebrates. This species is more abundant in Texas than in other areas of its range.

Wrapping up

Texas has 106 snake species to find. Some are rare and others are common, but it is important to protect all species. Many of the species in Texas suffer from loss of habitat and population. Snakes are beneficial to the environment and knowing about what species are near you can help protect you and the many snakes.

Most snakes will only bite if provoked, so it is best to leave them alone in the wild. Snakes are often kept as pets, and many of the species on this list will make a good companion. Kingsnakes, rat snakes, and corn snakes are some of the species found in Texas that adapt well to captivity.

Texas has the most snakes in the U.S and there are a variety of beautiful species to find. All of the snake sun Texas help keep a balanced and healthy ecosystem. Unique and different with each species, there are many to enjoy.

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