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Snakes in Thailand

There are many snakes in Thailand that are both exotic and interesting. Whether you are planning a trip to the tropical country or are interested to know what species of snakes roam it, you have come to the right place.

Thailand has over 200 different snake species, but we will mostly cover the most common ones as well as some interesting species that you can find in the country.

In Thailand, endangered and poisonous snakes are not allowed to be sold, kept, and traded. The sale, import, trade, or purchase of any protected Thai wildlife is illegal.

If you are bitten by a poisonous snake, there should be antivenom available at the nearest hospital as snakes are not a rare thing to come by in the country of Thailand. 

Snakes can be found in yards and even randomly while driving around you can encounter them.

Keep yourself safe and learn to identify the poisonous ones to the non-venomous ones. Here are some species of snakes you can find in Thailand.

Table of Contents

  1. Common Snake Species
    1. Colubridae – Colubrid Snakes
    2. Homalopsidae – Water Snakes
    3. Xenopeltidae – Sunbeam Snakes
    4. Typhlopidae – Blind Snakes
    5. Pythonidae – Pythons
  2. Venomous Snake Species
    1. Viperidae – Pit Vipers
    2. Elapidae – Cobras
      1. Kraits
      2. Coral Snakes
      3. Sea Kraits
      4. Olive Sea Snakes
      5. Sea Snakes
  3. FAQ
  4. Conclusion

Common Snake Species in Thailand

Here are some common snakes that roam the country:

Colubrid Snakes (Colubridae) in Thailand

1. Green Cat Snake 

Green Cat Snake (Boiga cyanea) on a leaf and twigs near Khao Yai National Park, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand
A Green Cat Snake (Boiga cyanea) on a leaf and twigs near Khao Yai National Park, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Boiga cyanea
  • Adult Size: 45 to 75 inches (114 to 190 cm) 
  • Lifespan: Unknown

This long, thin, green, nocturnal, arboreal, terrestrial snake might sometimes have a gray or blue tint to it and a brown or red head when they’re younger. 

While these can be found in all of Southeast Asia, they can also be found in China and South Asia. 

These snakes like to live in the trees and bushes of flatlands, lowland rainforests, or plantations.

Green Cat Snakes are carnivorous, feeding on frogs, birds, lizards, and smaller snakes. They use their venom to paralyze these smaller animals.

2. Javan Wart Snake

Javan File Snake (Acrochordus javanicus) in mud in Bangka-Belitung, Indonesia
A Javan File Snake (Acrochordus javanicus) in mud in Bangka-Belitung, Indonesia. – Source
  • Experience Level: Expert
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Acrochordus javanicus
  • Other Names: Elephant Trunk Snake, Javan File Snake
  • Adult Size: up to 5 feet (152 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 12 to 15 years

Javan Wart Snakes are typically brown to dark brown with a pale yellow underside and light brown blotchings sometimes.

They are native to the coastal areas of Sri Lanka and India. They can also be found throughout the Indo-Australian islands. They like to live near rivers, lagoons, and bays where they can be near brackish habitats or freshwater.

They typically feed on aquatic animals like frogs or fish.

3. Golden Tree Snake

Golden Tree Snake (Chrysopelea ornata) on a treetrunk in Ratchathewi, Bangkok, Thailand
A Golden Tree Snake (Chrysopelea ornata) on a treetrunk in Ratchathewi, Bangkok, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Chrysopelea ornata
  • Other Names: Gliding Snake
  • Adult Size: 0.38 to 4.27 feet long (11.5 to 128 cm)
  • Lifespan: 10 years

These snakes are lime green and pale yellow with a black, almost checkered pattern as well as darker horizontal striping along their body throughout their length. Some individuals may also have red within their striping.

These arboreal snakes have the unique capability of gliding. They are super quick, nervous creatures and are mildly venomous.

You can find these snakes in Southeast and South Asia where they roam the trees of the forest, plantations, gardens, and house walls. 

They typically feed on small lizards like geckos, rodents, bats, and other small prey.

4. Striped Kukri Snake

Striped Kukri Snake (Oligodon taeniatus) on sand and leaves in Pathum Thani, Thailand
A Striped Kukri Snake (Oligodon taeniatus) on sand and leaves in Pathum Thani, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Oligodon taeniatus
  • Adult Size: 2 feet (60 cm) 
  • Lifespan: Unknown

Kukris are beautiful with their light brown, almost sleek grey coloration with black and orange stripes along the length of their body.

You can find these small, nocturnal snakes in Singapore, West Malaysia, some Indonesian islands, and the Philippines. 

They like to roam farmlands, forests where they hide under leaf litter on the grounds to catch frogs and lizards.

5. Indochinese Rat Snake 

Indo-Chinese Rat Snake (Ptyas Korros) in red and gray rocks at Khlonh Phanom National Park, Surat Thani, Thailand
An Indo-Chinese Rat Snake (Ptyas Korros) in red and gray rocks at Khlonh Phanom National Park, Surat Thani, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Ptyas Korros
  • Other Names: Indo-Chinese Rat Snake, Chinese Rat Snake
  • Adult Size: 3 to 6 feet (91 to 182 cm) 
  • Lifespan: Unknown

Indochinese Rat Snakes are typically brown or olive-colored with pale yellow undersides. Some individuals might have cream spots throughout their bodies or yellow bars.

These snakes are native to Southeast Asia, where they roam agriculturally landscapes, palm oil plantations, and grasslands. 

As you can tell from their name, they help control the rat and mice population wherever they do reside. 

6. Long-nosed Whip Snake 

Long-nosed Whipsnake (Ahaetulla nasuta) slithering through leaves in Ratnapura, Sri Lanka
A Long-nosed Whipsnake (Ahaetulla nasuta) slithering through leaves in Ratnapura, Sri Lanka – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Ahaetulla nasuta
  • Other Names: Long-nosed Tree Snake, Green Vine Snake
  • Adult Size: about 6.5 feet (198 cm)
  • Lifespan: Unknown

Long-nosed Whip Snakes are long, slender, and green with an elongated head almost shaped like an arrow, forming a pointed nose, giving them their unique look.

They are endemic to Sri Lanka originally and inhabit shrubs and trees of forests and agricultural land. They typically feed on lizards, birds, and frogs.

7. Oriental Whip Snake

Oriental Whipsnake (Ahaetulla prasina) on some branches with leaves in Tak, Thailand
An Oriental Whipsnake (Ahaetulla prasina) on some branches with leaves in Tak, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Not Recommended
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Ahaetulla prasina
  • Other Names: Asian Vine Snake, Boie’s Whipsnake, Gunther’s Whipsnake
  • Adult Size: 6.2 feet (188.9 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 7 to 10 years

These dangerous, rear-fanged snakes are typically slender with a pointed snout. They might be brown, yellow lime-green, or even fluorescent green.

They like to make homes out of trees, shrubs, forests, and agricultural lands where they mostly feed on birds, frogs, and lizards.

They occur in Thailand, of course, along with many other Asian countries including China, Laos, Cambodia, Malaysia, The Philippines, Indonesia, Singapore, Vietnam, Bhutan, Burma, Bangladesh, India, and Brunai.

8. Arboreal Rat Snake

Arboreal Ratsnake (Gonyosoma oxycephalum) slithering down a road in Narathiwat, Thailand
An Arboreal Ratsnake (Gonyosoma oxycephalum) slithering down a road in Narathiwat, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Gonyosoma oxycephalum
  • Other Names: Red-tailed Racer, Red-tailed Green Ratsnake
  • Adult Size: Almost 8 feet (243 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 20 years

This snake has a smooth, scaley belly that has adapted to incredible climbing capabilities. They are typically light or bright green with scales that create a dark net-like pattern.

Only in Panay, the Philippines is there is a morph that is gray in color and has a yellow head.

Males are typically a little smaller than their female counterparts with brighter coloration.

These snakes can be found throughout Southeast Asia, but are most prominent on the Philippine Islands.

They typically make homes out of both primary and secondary forests and are arboreal, causing them to feed primarily on birds, their eggs, bats, and lizards that they can find in the treetops.

In captivity, they can also consume mice or rats after some getting used to them.

9. Radiated Rat Snake 

Radiated Ratsnake (Coelognathus radiata) hissing in grass at Tai Rom Yen National Park, Surat Thani, Thailand
A Radiated Ratsnake (Coelognathus radiata) hissing in grass at Tai Rom Yen National Park, Surat Thani, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Colubridae 
  • Scientific Name: Coelognathus radiata
  • Other Names: Copperhead Racer, Copper-headed Racer 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 7.5 feet (152 to 228 cm) 
  • Lifespan: Unknown

The radiated rat snake is found in Thailand, and other regions near South Asia like Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Indonesia, Singapore, South China, and more.

They are a terrestrial species, living in forests, dry grasslands, farmlands, and rain forests. Humid areas with dry hiding places are habitats preferred by them. 

They are active during the day and night and are kept as pets for exotic reptile owners. Breeding for them can occur all year, and a female can lay up to 11 eggs, which hatch in around 2 months. 

The radiated rat snake is a long species and is appreciated for the vibrant colors they showcase.

Yellow, tan with white, black, and purple markings makes them a colorful species. Their underside is a pale cream color.

Climbing is a skill this species possesses, but they spend most of their time on the ground. The radiated rat snake is fast, moving quickly on the ground.

They feed on small rodents that they find, and are not venomous. When scared they will hiss, and take a defensive posture. A bite from them is not deadly, but they are aggressive when agitated. 

10. Oriental Rat Snake

Oriental Rat Snake (Ptyas mucosa) in dry leaves at Khao Yao National Park, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand
An Oriental Rat Snake (Ptyas mucosa) in dry leaves at Khao Yao National Park, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Ptyas mucosa 
  • Other Names: Indian rat snake 
  • Adult Size: 96 to 144 inches (243 to 365 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 15 years 

Oriental rat snakes are also called the Indian rat snake, or Darash.

They live in Southeast Asia, and South Asia. Thailand is one of the regions that have this species, but their information about their population is unknown.

In China, they are considered endangered and are a common species sold in the pet trade.

This species lives in a variety of habitats and is mostly terrestrial. They are great climbers and will occasionally sleep in trees. Rice paddies, farmland, jungles, grasslands, and suburban areas are some of the places they live.

This species is the largest of all rat snakes and has large eyes to match its size. They have brown to orange colored bodies, and thin crossbands running down them.

Their heads are narrow, and their tails are thin. The scales of this species are slightly keeled, and they have a pale underside.

 Ornamental rat snakes are an aggressive species to both humans and other animals. If they feel in danger they will not hesitate to bite repeatedly.

Rats make up a large portion of their diet, but they feed on other animals like bats, frogs, and smaller snakes. They kill their prey by suffocating them against a hard surface.

11. Common Bridle Snake

Common Bridal Snake (Lycodon davisonii) rolled up on the ground near Khao Yai National Park, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand
A Common Bridal Snake (Lycodon davisonii) rolled up on the ground near Khao Yai National Park, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Lycodon davisonii 
  • Other Names: Bridle snake 
  • Adult Size: 36 inches (91.4 cm) 
  • Lifespan: n/a 

Common bridle snakes are found in Asia, inhabiting the regions of Thailand, Vietnam, Myanmar, Laos, and China. This species spends a lot of its time in the ground, but they are semi-arboreal.

Habitats with plenty of trees and vegetation are preferred for climbing. They are not seen very often, since they are more likely to come out at night.

Bridle snakes are named after their appearance since they look like the bridle or headgear that a horse wears.

They are slender and have long tails. Black, is the color of their back, and they have white and green crossbands and stripes.

Their underside is white, and they have smooth-looking scales. The head of this species is small and narrow, covered in black and white patterns. 

Lizards, other snakes, and small mammals are what this species usually eats. Geckos make up a majority of their diet, but this species is also prayed upon by larger snakes.

They are not venomous, and rarely bite if they are threatened. The species name for this snake is in honor of William Ruxton Davison, and why they are called davisonii. 

12. Oriental Wolf Snake

Oriental Wolf Snake (Lycodon capucinus) curled up on dirt and grass in Samut Prakan, Thailand
An Oriental Wolf Snake (Lycodon capucinus) curled up on dirt and grass in Samut Prakan, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Lycodon capucinus 
  • Other Names: common wolf snake 
  • Adult Size: 36 inches (91.4 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 10 years 

The Oriental wolf snake is a species found in a plethora of regions near the Indo-Australian Archipelago. They are found in places like Thailand, China, Hong Kong, India, Sumba, Komoda, and more.

Oriental wolf snakes enjoy climbing in trees, but can also be found burrowing underground. Some of the habitats they live in include forests, fields, and urban areas, preferring a more tropical environment. Mostly active at night, they can sometimes be spotted during the day. 

This species is slender and is medium in length. They have a tan, black, reddish-brown, or gray coloring, and are covered in small blotches.

Around their neck is a white blotch that looks similar to a collar. The head of this snake is small and narrow, equipped with round black eyes.

Oriental wolf snakes are mildly venomous, but a bite will only cause mild discomfort. They are not deadly but are nervous, and quick to bite.

They feed on small animals like geckos, skinks, and frogs.

The destruction of this species’ habitat is the biggest threat the oriental wolf snake faces, and why in some areas they are becoming endangered.

13. Laotian Wolf Snake

Laotian Wolf Snake (Lycodon laoensis) on a large rock on Doi Suthep Mountain, Chiang Mai, Thailand
A Laotian Wolf Snake (Lycodon laoensis) on a large rock on Doi Suthep Mountain, Chiang Mai, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Lycodon laoensis
  • Other Names: Yellow-barred wolf snake 
  • Adult Size: 20 inches (20.8cm) 
  • Lifespan: 10 years 

Laotian wolf snakes are a species found in Asia, living in countries like China, Malaysia, Pakistan, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, India, and Thailand. In Thailand, they can be found all over the country, preferring rocky areas and hilly habits.

The areas where they live have plenty of natural debris like logs, leaf litter, and rocks since this species prefers to stay in hiding. They are active at night and are shy around humans. 

Laotian wolf snakes are small and slender. Its body is dark brown or black and is covered in crossbands. The crossbands go until their tail and are bright white or yellow.

Their underside is all white and has no pattern. Laotian wolf snakes closely resemble a sea krait, which is extremely venomous and deadly. 

Mildly venomous, a bite from this species is only dangerous if you are allergic to their venom. They are shy around humans, and will only bite if actively provoked.

This species is generally harmless, hunting frogs, small lizards, and insects in the night. Being smaller snakes, they are very susceptible to predators like large birds, snakes, and carnivorous mammals. 

14. Yellow-spotted Keelback

Yellow-spotted Keelback (Fowlea flavipunctatus) on a rocky surface near Kaeng Krachan National Park, Phetchaburi, Thailand
A Yellow-spotted Keelback (Fowlea flavipunctatus) sticking out its tongue on a rocky surface near Kaeng Krachan National Park, Phetchaburi, Thailand . – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Fowlea flavipunctatus 
  • Other Names: Common keelback 
  • Adult Size: 20 to 47 inches (50.8 to 119.38 cm)
  • Lifespan: 5 to 6 years 

Yellow-spotted keelbacks are aquatic snakes found in South Asia as well as other regions. Thailand, China, Malaysia, Laso, Vietnam, Indonesia, and India are just some areas that are in this snake’s range.

Slow-moving freshwaters like lakes, ponds, marshes, swamps, and rice paddies are habitats they live in. The yellow-keeled back has a wide range and will be active during the day.

Yellow, brown, green, gray, and red are some colors they can be found in. Dark black blotches covering their sides and back, going all the way to their tail.

Their eyes are slightly large, with black markings underneath them. The head shape of the yellow-spotted keelback is larger than its body, and its scales are roughly keeled. 

Being aquatic this snake feeds on frogs, and fishes it finds while swimming. Rodents are also the main part of their diet, and they are beneficial in controlling the pest population.

Yellow-spotted keelback snakes will eat their prey alive and have live animals living in their body until they are digested. This snake is not vennelus but will bite if provoked.

15. Buff-striped Keelback

Buff-striped Keelback (Amphiesma stolatum) in dry leaves in Kaeng Krachan National Park, Phetchaburi, Thailand
A Buff-striped Keelback (Amphiesma stolatum) in dry leaves in Kaeng Krachan National Park, Phetchaburi, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level:  Advanced
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Ampiesma stolatum
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 16 to 20 inches (40.6 to 50.8 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 5 to 6 years 

With a large range across Asia, the buff-striped keelback is a common species in its range but is rarely encountered. They have a large range covering Thailand, India, Pakistan, and Cambodia, which are just some places they inhabit.

This snake is terrestrial, but can sometimes be seen swimming in the water. They are active during the day and inhabit hills, woodlands, and moist habitats.

Buff-striped keelbacks are long and slender and have a similar appearance to a garter snake. They have olive-brown to gray coloring, and dark blotches covering their back.

Two yellow stripes also run down the buff-striped keelbacks’ bodies, and they have roughly keeled scales. Their belly is a pale color and has dark markings around its border.

Frogs and toads are what this snake eats most, but they will eat other small animals they come across. If frightened they will inflate their body to make themselves seem larger, but they are non-venomous and harmless.

This species is very common but during hot periods they aestivate and become inactive.    

16. Chequered Keelback

Chequered Keelback (Xenochrophis piscator) in mud in Chiang Kong District, Chiang Rai, Thailand
A Chequered Keelback (Xenochrophis piscator) in mud in Chiang Kong District, Chiang Rai, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Xenochrophis piscator
  • Other Names: Asiatic water snake, Checkered Keelback
  • Adult Size: 68 inches (172 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 5 to 6 years

The checkered keelback is a common species in South Asia, Pakistan, and India. In Thailand, they are found in the north and central regions of the country.

This species is aquatic and lives in freshwater habitats like rice paddies, marshes, ponds, lakes, and slow-moving streams.

This species was once thought to be the same species as the Yellow-spotted keelback (Fowlea flavipunctatus), but has slight differences in appearance and range. They are now two different species.

 Olive, brown, yellow, and gray are colors this species appears on. They are named after the pattern found on their back, which is black blotches that form a checkered pattern.

On some snakes, the blotches may come to form bigger blotches. They also have an inverted V marking on the back of their head.

The eyes of this species are large, and their head is bigger than their body. Young Checkered keelbacks have bright yellow markings on their neck, but as they age it goes away. 

Frogs, fish, and small mammals are what these snakes eat. They are not venomous but can deliver a painful bite.

This species is quite hardy and can survive in water conditions that other water snakes are not able to tolerate. This has caused them to live closer to humans, and why they can be found in urban areas. 

17. Red-necked Keelback

Red-necked Keelback (Rhabdophis subminiatus) in rocks at Kaeng Krachan National Park, Petchaburi, Thailand
A Red-necked Keelback (Rhabdophis subminiatus) in rocks at Kaeng Krachan National Park, Petchaburi, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Rhabdophis subminiatus 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 27 to 35 inches (68.5 to 88.9 cm)
  • Lifespan: 5 years

The red-necked keelback is a snake found across Asia. They can be found in Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Bhutan, Nepal, Malaysia, and other areas in Asia.

This species is generally found near ponds but also lives in heavily wooded areas. They are active during the day and are a terrestrial species. 

The red-necked keelback snake is named after the red marking on its neck. They have olive green coloring on the rest of the back and are covered in a black checkered pattern.

This species has roughly keeled scales and large round eyes. The underside of their body is a cream color and has a yellow hue surrounding it. 

This species of snake is mildly venomous, but not harmful. They feed mainly on frogs and toads and are not aggressive unless provoked.

Caution should be taken when handling this species since they are able to secrete a toxin from their body like a toad. From the glands on the red section of their body, they can secrete a poison that they get from eating poisonous toads.

18. Painted Bronzeback

Painted Bronzeback sticking out its tongue hanging from a tree in Kanchanaburi, Thailand
A Painted Bronzeback sticking out its tongue hanging from a tree in Kanchanaburi, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Dendrelaphis pictus
  • Other Names: Common Bronze-back 
  • Adult Size: 23 to 47 inches (58.4 to 119 cm) 
  • Lifespan: n/a 

The painted bronze back is a species that can be found in Thailand, Singapore, Sumatra, Indochina, Java, and Borneo. They live in a variety of habitats like parks, gardens, and forests.

They prefer to live in areas with plenty of vegetation. Active during the day, they are often seen climbing in trees and bushes.

The painted bronze back is a medium-sized species, with a narrow body. They have large eyes and are named after the bronze coloring on their body.

Their heads are brown, and black and tan stripes run down their body. The painted bronze back has mildly keeled scales and a cream-colored belly.  

This species will feed on lizards it finds on the forest floor, but they will also eat other animals like frogs and small mammals.

If in danger, they will inflate their body to look large, but bright blue coloring is also located under their scales, which can potentially scare off predators when they are inflated. When spotted they are usually seen in trees, and will even sleep in them.

19. Jodi’s Pipe Snake

Jodi's Pipe Snake (Cylindrophis jodiae) on a wooden a ledge by a lake at Chatuchak, Bangkok, Thailand
A Jodi’s Pipe Snake (Cylindrophis jodiae) on a wooden a ledge by a lake at Chatuchak, Bangkok, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Cylindrophis jodiae
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 20 to 29 inches (50.8 to 73.6 cm) 
  • Lifespan: n/a

Jodi’s pipe snake is found all across Thailand, but can also be found in Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos. They live in moist and humid habitats like rice paddies, swamps, forests, and fields.

They enjoy digging, so they require soft soil. Water is always present where they live, and they can also tolerate brackish waters. 

The pipe snake gets its name from its body shape since it looks similar to the shape of a pipe. They have small heads and short tails.

Black and brown are the colors they are found in. Tan stripes run down their sides, but some snakes are plain. Their belly is black and white with a banded pattern, and near their tail is orange coloring. 

When scared, Jodi’s pipe snake will change its shape to flatten its body. They are rear-fanged and have mild venom, but are not dangerous to humans.

Frogs, small snakes, eels, and worms are just some animals this species eats in the wild.

20. Chanard’s Mud Snake

Chanard's Mud Snake (Enhydris chanardi) on concrete at night.
Chanard’s Mud Snake (Enhydris chanardi) on concrete at night.
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Enhydris chanardi 
  • Other Names: Sind River Snake, Sind River Mud Snake
  • Adult Size: 10 inches (25.4 cm) 
  • Lifespan: n/a 

Chanard’s mud snake is a species found in Central Thailand. They live in freshwater habitats and are always found near water.

This species is rare, and few studies have been done, and the destruction of their natural habitat has made it harder to observe them.

Chanard’s mud snake is a short and small species. They have gray, brown, or olive-colored skin, and black blotches covering them. Their belly is pale yellow and has a zig-zag pattern on its edges.

Fish and frogs are what this species eats in the wild. Like other rear-fanged snakes, they are mildly venomous but harmless to humans.

Being such a small species they are vulnerable to the variety of predators found in Thailand like larger snakes, frogs, mammals, birds, and monitor lizards.

Water Snakes (Homalopsidae) in Thailand

21. Plumbeous Water Snake

Plumbeous Water Snake (Hypsiscopus plumbea) on a rock at Bore Klueng Hot Springs in Ratchaburi, Thailand
A Plumbeous Water Snake (Hypsiscopus plumbea) on a rock at Bore Klueng Hot Springs in Ratchaburi, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Homalopsidae
  • Scientific Name: Hypsiscopus plumbea 
  • Other Names: Rice Paddy Snake 
  • Adult Size: 28 inches (71 cm) 
  • Lifespan: n/a 

The plumbeous water snake is also known as the rice paddy snake, because of its abundance in rice paddies. They are found in Thailand, Myanmar, southern China, Taiwan, and other south Asian regions.

This species prefers to live in wet habitats and fields. They are only common in specific habitats and rely on muddy areas and shallow waters to effectively hunt.

The plumbeous water snake is olive green and has no pattern. Their bellies are yellow, but the underside of their head is white.

Separating their backs and sides is yellow coloring. They have round eyes and are a small species.

This species is mildly venomous, but not extremely deadly. They are rear-fanged, and their venom only causes mild discomfort. The plumbeous water snake relies on mud and water to hunt.

They will bury themselves in the mud, or lay in shallow water, waiting for prey to pass by. Fish and amphibians make up a majority of their diet.

This species is quick to bite if provoked and will defecate to ward off predators. When escaping they will occasionally do a jumping motion to try to be quicker.

22. Jagor’s Water Snake

  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family:  Homalopsidae
  • Scientific Name: Enhydris jagorii
  • Other Names: Bangkok Mudsnake
  • Adult Size: 26.7 inches (67.8cm) 
  • Lifespan: n/a 

The jagor’s water snake can be found in Thailand, living in floodplains, swamps, and other wetland-type habitats. This species is semi-aquatic, and can even be found in man-made habitats like rice fields.

This species is not abundant in Thailand, but its current range varies depending on the source. Similar species of water snakes are often confused for the Jagor’s Water snake, as Thailand is abundant with wetlands habitats and aquatic snakes. 

Jagor’s water snakes are grayish to brown and are covered in dark blotches. The bothex cover their sides and back and are usually black.

They have a pale underside and smooth scales. The head and tail of this species are thin, but they have a robust body. 

Fish are what the Jagor water snake mostly eats. They are preyed on by larger snakes, monitor lizards, and aquatic birds. This snake is mildly venomous but is not harmful to humans. They are quick to bite if provoked or handled in the wild. 

23. Rainbow Water Snake

Rainbow Mud Snake (Enhydris enhydris) in sand and rocks at Bangkhutien, Thailand
A Rainbow Mud Snake (Enhydris enhydris) in sand and rocks at Bangkhutien, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Homalopsidae
  • Scientific Name: Enhydris enhydris 
  • Other Names: Rainbow mud snake 
  • Adult Size: 38 inches  (96.5 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 10 years 

Rainbow water snakes are a species found in southeastern Asia, found in areas like Thailand, Vietnam, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Eastern India, and other regions.

They live in freshwater habitats like ponds, marshlands, wetlands, and rice paddies. Freshwater is needed for this species, as they are not capable of living in brackish waters.

Rainbow water snakes are a common species in Thailand, but their numbers have decreased due to humans hunting them.

Rainbow water snakes have narrow heads and thick bodies. Brown to greenish is their body, but their heads are olive.

Tan stripes run down their body, and they have a pale underside with dark stripes running on their belly. To help see when swimming their eyes are located at the top of their head. They also have nostrils that are capable of closing when underwater. 

This species is active during the day and spends the majority of its time hunting. They will wait near the edges of the shore to hide in vegetation, waiting for prey.

They eat fish, frogs, and other amphibians. This species has mild venom similar to other water snakes, but a bite is not deadly.

24. Tentacled Snake

Tentacled Snake (Erpeton tentaculatum) on concrete in Prawet, Bangkok, Thailand
A Tentacled Snake (Erpeton tentaculatum) on concrete in Prawet, Bangkok, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Homalopsidae
  • Scientific Name: Erpeton tentaculatum 
  • Other Names: Tentacle snake 
  • Adult Size: 19.6 inches (49.7 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 10 to 20 years 

Tentacled snakes are aquatic snake species found in Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam. A majority of their life is spent in freshwater and can move well on land. Lakes, streams, rice paddies, and other types of murky waters are where they prefer to live.

Tentacled snakes can live in freshwater, brackish water, or saltwater. In dryer conditions they will go onto land, to bury themselves in the mud. They are able to stay underwater for around 30 minutes, but then must come up for air.

This species is small and is named after the two tentacles that come out of its head. No other snake species have these tentacles on their head, and their main purpose is for sensory.

Gray to brown is the color of the tentacled snake, and they will either have stripes or blotches on them.

Fish are the only animal this snake eats, and that is why they live in waters with a healthy fish population. Tentacled snakes are venomous, but their venom is only effective on fish.

A bite on a human is harmless, but they do have large fangs. This species is also ovoviviparous and gives birth to their young underwater.

25. Jack’s Water Snake

Jack's Water Snake (Homalopsis mereljcoxi) on wet rocks at Khao Sok National Park, Surat Thani, Thailand
A Jack’s Water Snake (Homalopsis mereljcoxi) on wet rocks at Khao Sok National Park, Surat Thani, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level:  Advanced
  • Family: Homalopsidae
  • Scientific Name: Homalopsis mereljcoxi 
  • Other Names: Jack’s masked water snake 
  • Adult Size: 53 inches (134 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 10 years 

Jack’s water snake is a species found in Thailand, Vietnam, and Cambodia.

This snake is aquatic and lives in a variety of freshwater habitats. Swamps, rice paddies, ditches, lakes, and rivers are just some places they inhabit.

This species is active at night, and in the day they will burrow, or hide in other animals’ holes. In Thailand, this species is common and widespread throughout the region.

This water snake species is long and robust. They are black or dark brown, with light tan stripes running down their body. On top of their head is a dark V-shaped mark. Their bellies are pale or yellow and are covered in small dark spots.  

Fish are what the Jacks water snakes eat most, but they will also feed on frogs and other aquatic life. They are eaten by birds, larger snakes, and mammals that come by.

This species is not venomous and is not dangerous to humans since they rarely bite.

Even though they have a strong population, it has been on the decline since humans use these snakes for their skin or food for other animals. 

26. Bocourt’s Water Snake

Bocourt's Water Snake (Subsessor bocourti) in wet leaves and branches in Vĩnh Cửu, Tỉnh Đồng Nai, Vietnam
A Bocourt’s Water Snake (Subsessor bocourti) in wet leaves and branches in Vĩnh Cửu, Tỉnh Đồng Nai, Vietnam – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Homalopsidae 
  • Scientific Name: Subsessor bocourti
  • Other Names: Bocourt’s Mud Snake 
  • Adult Size: 48 inches (121 cm) 
  • Lifespan: n/a 

Bocourts water snakes have a range in South Asia, found in areas like Thailand, and Vietnam. They live in freshwater, slow-moving habitats like swamps, ponds, lakes, rice paddies, and other types of freshwater.

In rainy periods they are sometimes spotted traveling on land. They are mostly active at night, and during the day will hide under natural debris near water.

Bocourts water snakes are one of the largest water snakes in Thailand, and they have large heads. Brown bars cover their back, boarded with black coloring.

A yellow or tan band pattern also covers their back. Their underside is a pale cream color and has dark bars. They have large red eyes and a black stripe that looks like a mask.

When young this species is vibrant, but as they age they lose their pattern and become a uniform dark color.

Being aquatic, Bocourt’s water snakes have a diet of fish and frogs.

They are venomous, but it only affects the small prey they eat and is not strong enough to harm humans. When threatened, this snake will release a smell and feces.

Being so large, this snake is caught to be harvested for food.

27. Dog-faced Water Snake

Dog-faced Water Snake (Cerberus rynchops) in mud and wet leaves in Krabi, Thailand
A Dog-faced Water Snake (Cerberus rynchops) in mud and wet leaves in Krabi, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Homalopsidae 
  • Scientific Name: Cerberus rynchops
  • Other Names: Bockadam snake, New Guinea bockadam, Asian Bockadam 
  • Adult Size: 29 to 47 inches (29 to 119 cm) 
  • Lifespan: n/a 

The dog-faced water snake is a species found in southeast Asia, and in Thailand can be found on the western coast. The habitats they live in include mudflats, ponds, streams, wetlands, and other moist habitats.

This species is semi-aquatic, and also enjoys burrowing itself in the mud. Dog-faced water snakes will breed all year and are viviparous. 

This species is named after its jaw, which is similar to the snout of a dog. They have long heads and small eyes.

Gray is the most common color they come in, but they can also be tan. Dark blotches run along their back, and their scales are mildly keeled.

Their noses have valves that will open and close, to help prevent water from going into their lungs when swimming.

The dog-faced water snake was one of the first species of snakes to be seen jumping and uses a sidewinding motion to do so. This snake also has a prehensile tail, which it uses to hang onto trees.

Another use for this snake’s tail is to hunt, using it like a fisherman uses bait. Fish make up a majority of their diet, but they feed on other animals near the water bank.

28. Keel-bellied Water Snake

Keel-bellied Water Snake (Bitia hydroides) in arid sand
Keel-bellied Water Snake (Bitia hydroides) in arid sand taken from Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Homalopsidae 
  • Scientific Name: Bitia hydroides 
  • Other Names: Keel-bellied mud snake, Gray’s Water Snake
  • Adult Size: 35 inches (88.9 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 7 to 9 years 

Keeled-bellied water snakes are a species found in South Asia, living in Thailand, Malaysia, Myanmar, and the Straits of Malacca. In Thailand, this species is rare to find and has been documented in the country a limited number of times.

They live in coastal rivers and mudflats. Most of the time this species will hide in its burrow. 

Keeled-bellied water snakes are long, with grayish and yellow coloring. They have tan striped blotches running until their tail, and no pattern on their head.

Their scales are roughly keeled, and their belly is a cream color with no markings. Their appearances slightly resemble a sea snake, but they are not as venomous. 

This snake is rear-fanged, and only produces mild venom, which is harmless to humans. They feed on fish and travel into deeper waters to find a large source.

Keeled-bellied water snakes are rare to find in the wild because of their secretive lifestyle.

Sunbeam Snakes (Xenopeltidae)  in Thailand

29. Asian Sunbeam Snake

Asian Sunbeam Snake (Xenopeltis unicolor) in sand and straw at Khao Sam Roi Yot National Park, Prachuap Khiri Khan, Thailand
An Asian Sunbeam Snake (Xenopeltis unicolor) in sand and straw at Khao Sam Roi Yot National Park, Prachuap Khiri Khan, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Xenopeltidae 
  • Scientific Name: Xenopeltis unicolor 
  • Other Names: iridescent earth snake 
  • Adult Size: 36 to 48 inches (91 to 121cm) 
  • Lifespan: 10 to 15 years 

Sunbeam snakes are found in Thailand and other regions in Southeast Asia. They have a natural presence in areas like China, Cambodia, Vietnam, the Philippines, East Indies, and the Malay Peninsula.

Two species of Xenopeltidae exist which are called sunbeam snakes, but Xenopeltis unicolor is the species found in Vietnam. 

Sunbeam snakes are fossorial and are hidden from view for most periods. Open habits like rice paddies, forest clearing, and gardens are some places they are found. This species is not venomous and is most active in the early morning. 

Sunbeam snakes are popular and named after their iridescent scales. They are medium-sized and have brown, black, or reddish coloring.

Their underside is all white with no pattern. Like a rainbow boa, their scales are highly iridescent and look like they are changing colors. 

The sunbeam snake remains underground, but when feeding early in the morning they will come out from hiding. Frogs, reptiles, and other small animals are what this species eats.

They are non-venomous and kill by using constriction. The sunbeam snake is also not aggressive and will not usually bite humans. They will rattle their tail, and try to escape when threatened. 

Blind Snakes (Typhlopidae) in Thailand

30. Brahminy Blind Snake 

Brahminy Blindsnake ( Indotyphlops braminus) in dirt near Thonburirom Park, Pathum Wan, Bangkok, Thailand
A Brahminy Blindsnake ( Indotyphlops braminus) in dirt near Thonburirom Park, Pathum Wan, Bangkok, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Typhlopidae
  • Scientific Name: Indotyphlops braminus
  • Adult Size: 2 to 6.5 inches (5.08 to 16.5 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 4 years

These small, thin, worm-like snakes are usually shiny silver-gray, or sometimes purple-looking with a blunt head and tail which look very similar.

They like to live in urban and agricultural areas and live underground most of their lives. They often frequent ant burrows and termite hills where they will eat these insects as well as their eggs, pupae, and larvae.

They like to live in areas like dry jungles, abandoned buildings, city gardens, and wet forests. They will be found hiding under logs, stones, leaves, and wet debris.

They are non-venomous and are completely harmless to humans.

They are found quite often in Hawaii, predicted to have been brought over in the ’30s through potting soil from the Philippines. Although there was an eruption of the species after they were brought over, there has never really been any effect on the ecosystems due to them.

31. Slender Worm Snake

Slender Worm Snake (Indotyphlops porrectus) on concrete floor near Chatuchak, Bangkok, Thailand
A Slender Worm Snake (Indotyphlops porrectus) on concrete floor near Chatuchak, Bangkok, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Typhlopidae
  • Scientific Name: Indotyphlops porrectus
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 11.2 inches (28.4 cm)
  • Lifespan: 4 years

Found in South Asia, the slender worm snake is a small and slender species of snake. They can be found in Thailand, Bangladesh, India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, and Pakistan.

Forests, agricultural areas, and urban habitats are where they can be found. Not usually in the open, this species will take shelter under natural debris like logs.

They are a burrowing species, and on rainy humid nights will come out from underground.

This species is long and slender and has a similar appearance to an earthworm. They are brown or reddish and have two small eyes on their head.

At the end of their tail is a spine. Slender worm snakes have small smooth scales, and can even move similarly to an earthworm.

This species can be difficult to find in Thailand because it spends the majority of its life underground. They feed on small insects, larvae and help control unwanted pests.

Burrowing snakes are the main predators this species faces, and to defend themselves they will try to stab predators with their spiny tails.

Pythons (Pythonidae) in Thailand

32. Reticulated Python

Reticulated Python (Malayopython reticulatus) on a branch in the dark at Khao Pu Khao Ya National Park, Trang, Thailand
A Reticulated Python (Malayopython reticulatus) on a branch in the dark at Khao Pu Khao Ya National Park, Trang, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advance 
  • Family: Pythonidae
  • Scientific Name: Malayopython reticulatus
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 49 to 252 inches (124.4 to 640 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 12 to 20 years

The reticulated python is a common and popular python species endemic to the south and southeast Asia. Thailand, India, Laos, Vietnam, Malaysia, Singapore, and Indonesia are just some places they are found.

Rainforests, woodlands, grassland and are habitats they are found in. A fresh water source like a river or stream is present in the areas they live. They are terrestrial but are also great swimmers.

Reticulated pythons are the largest snake found in Thailand, and is also one of the largest snakes in the world. They have narrow heads and long bodies that are capable of growing up to 18 feet long.

Reticulated pythons come in a variety of colors and patterns. Olive, green, yellow, and brown are colors they come in, but some are also albino. They are covered in irregular blotches that run down their body.

Reticulated pythons are one of the largest snakes in the world, and their size is what makes them dangerous to find. Cases of humans being eaten by this snake have occurred, but most of the time they are harmless if left alone.

Reticulated pythons are becoming more popular as pets because of their size, and variety of color morphs.

33. Burmese Python

Burmese Python (Python bivittatus) on a road near Ta Phraya National Park, Nakhon Rathasima, Thailand
A Burmese Python (Python bivittatus) on a road near Ta Phraya National Park, Nakhon Rathasima, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level:Intermediate to Advanced 
  • Family: Pythonidae
  • Scientific Name: Python bivittatus 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 192 to 276 inches (192 to 701 cm)
  • Lifespan: 20 years 

Burmese pythons are found in Southeast Asia and live in Thailand and other regions. This species is popular in the pet trade and is invasive in tropical areas like Florida due to them being released in the wild.

A permanent water source is present in the areas they live in. Grasslands, foothills, woodlands, marshes, and river valleys are some of the places they inhabit.

They are found on the ground but are also great climbers and swimmers.

Long and robust, the Burmese python is a large constrictor species. Tan is a common color, and they are covered in dark blotches.

On their head is a dark blotched pattern and their bellies are cream-colored with no pattern. 

Burmese pythons are one of the largest snakes in the world and have a diet of birds and mammals. They bite their prey repeatedly and wrap their large bodies around them to swallow them whole.

This snake feeds once every two months and can fast for as long as a year and a half. 

Venomous Snake Species in Thailand

Here is a list of the most venomous snakes that roam the country:

Pit Vipers (Viperidae) in Thailand

34. White-lipped Pit Viper

White-lipped Pitviper (Trimeresurus albolabris) hanging onto a tree branch at Kaeng Krachan National Park, Phetchaburi, Thailand
A White-lipped Pitviper (Trimeresurus albolabris) hanging onto a tree branch at Kaeng Krachan National Park, Phetchaburi, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Trimeresurus albolabris
  • Other Names: White-lipped tree viper
  • Adult Size: 24 to 32 inches (60 to 81.2 cm)
  • Lifespan: 10 years 

In South Asia, the white-lipped viper is a venomous species that dwell in trees. Thailand, Bangladesh, Myanmar, and China are some regions this snake can be found in.

They live in wooded habitats and spend their time dwelling in tree branches. This species is mainly sedentary but will move quickly to attack.

The white-lipped viper is bright green, and they have large, yellow, catlike eyes. They have roughly keeled scales, and males have a white-colored stripe running down their sides.

The bellies of this snake range in colors from yellow to green. Females of this snake are usually longer than males.

Birds, lizards, and other small animals are what this species feeds on. When hunting they will bite, and hold onto their prey until it dies.

They are venomous, and if injected with a decent dose of venom, they can kill if untreated.

35. Malayan Pit Viper

Malayan Pit Viper (Calloselasma rhodostoma) rolled up in dry leaves in Khao Sok National Park, Surat Thani, Thailand
A Malayan Pit Viper (Calloselasma rhodostoma) rolled up in dry leaves in Khao Sok National Park, Surat Thani, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Calloselasma rhodostoma
  • Other Names: Malayan moccasin 
  • Adult Size: 30 to 36 inches (76.2 to 91.4 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 20 years 

The Malayan pit viper is a highly venomous species found in South Asia. They Live in Thailand, Malaysia, Vietnam, Burma, Laos, Cambodia, Java, Sumatra, and China.

Habitats this species lives in include forests, farmland, grasslands, plantations,  and other dry, flat areas. This species is active at night but is sometimes seen during the day. They enjoy cool temperatures and rainy days.

Malayan pit vipers have large triangular-shaped heads, and catlike eyes similar to other venomous snakes. They are tan and have a thin tan stripe running down their back.

Triangular blotches appear on their back, and they have a cream-colored underside. Their coloring helps them blend into the ground, and why some may not see them when walking in the wild.

This species is responsible for a large number of venomous snake bites in Thailand since they will not move if they see a human approaching. They will bite and stand their ground if threatened.

In the wild, they feed on mice, frogs, and other small animals.

36. Cardamom Pit Viper

Cardamom Mountains Green Pitviper (Trimeresurus cardamomensis)on a branch at Mu Koh Chang National Park, Koh Chang, Trat, Thailand
A Cardamom Mountains Green Pitviper (Trimeresurus cardamomensis)on a branch at Mu Koh Chang National Park, Koh Chang, Trat, Thailand – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Trimeresurus cardamomensis
  • Other Names: Cardamom Mountains Green Pitviper 
  • Adult Size: 24 to 30 inches (60.96 to 76.2 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 18 years 

Caramon pit vipers can be found in eastern Thailand, and are also present in Cambodia. This pit viper is only found in mountain habitats in the ranges they occur. They are highly venomous, preferring areas with dense habitats.

The Cardamom pit viper is bright green and has roughly keeled scales. They have thin necks and large triangular-shaped heads.

The eyes of this snake are deep yellow and have cat-shaped pupils. They have a white line running under their eye, and a pale ventral.

This pit viper was discovered recently and is named after the Cardamom Mountains in which they inhabit. They feed on small animals and have a bite capable of administering extremely deadly venom. 

37. Gumprecht’s Pit Viper

Gumprecht's Pitviper (Trimeresurus gumprechti) on a branch at Phu Suan Sai National Park, Loei, Thailand
A Gumprecht’s Pitviper (Trimeresurus gumprechti) on a branch at Phu Suan Sai National Park, Loei, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Trimeresurus gumprechti
  • Other Names: Gumprecht’s green pit viper
  • Adult Size: 51 inches (129.54 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 20 years 

Gumprecht’s green pit viper is a species native to Asia. They can be found in Thailand, Vietnam, China, Myanmar, and Laos.

This species is a venomous pit viper species and was found to be its own species in 2002. Green vipers can be found in forests, and enjoy living in areas with high vegetation.

Gumprecht’s green pit vipers have similar traits to other green pit vipers like triangular heads, bright green coloring, roughly keeled scales, and cat-like eyes.

This species has red coloring on its tails, sides, and on its eyes. They have black or bluish coloring in between their scales and have a pale underside.

Green pit vipers are highly venomous, and they feed on rodents, birds, and lizards. Their fangs are designed to administer venom deep into their prey.

To hunt they will stay in one spot, and wait for their victim to pass by. If bitten their venom not only affects your blood but also your nervous system.

38. Guo’s Green Pit Viper

Guo’s Green Pit Viper (Trimeresurus guoi) on a branch in a tree at Doi Inthanon National Park, Chiang Mai, Thailand
A Guo’s Green Pit Viper (Trimeresurus guoi) on a branch in a tree at Doi Inthanon National Park, Chiang Mai, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Trimeresurus guoi
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 30 inches (76.2 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 20 years 

The guo’s viper is a species found in South Asia and can be found in Northern Thailand. Forests are where they live, but they can also be found in agricultural fields and edged habitats.

In higher elevations, they are more common and enjoy spending time in the trees.

Guo’s green viper is bright green but has red coloring on its tail. Their eyes are bright red instead of yellow like other pit vipers, but they still have cat-shaped pupils.

The scales of this species are roughly keeled, and their underside is yellowish-green.

This species of a pit viper is highly venomous, and its bite is extremely painful. Their venom kills the flesh within a few hours, it is not immediately threatened.

If not treated, death can occur from their bite, but it takes longer to kill when compared with other venomous species. Their venom also helps them eat frogs, lizards, and other small animals in their range.

39. Hagen’s Pit Viper

Hagen's Pitviper (Trimeresurus hageni) hanging from a small tree in Yala, Thailand
A Hagen’s Pitviper (Trimeresurus hageni) hanging from a small tree in Yala, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Trimeresurus hageni
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 39 to 55 inches (99.06 to 139.7 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 20 years

Hagen’s pit viper is a species found in southeast Asia and is classified as a green pit viper. This species inhabits areas within Peninsular Thailand and other nearby regions.

They live in lowland forests and prefer low vegetation. They are nocturnal and spend the time they are actively hunting.

Hagen’s pit vipers are robust and are brightly colored green. They have a white stripe running on their side, and their underside is yellowish-green.

These snake scales are roughly keeled and have black closing within them. On some snakes, small dots appear on their sides, and the underside of their tail is red.

Birds and rodents are what this snake feeds on. They use their color to blend into vegetation and wait for prey to come by.

This snake is extremely venomous and causes the death of flesh with its venom. It gets its name from the naturalist Dr. Bernhard Hagen.

40. Kanburi Pit Viper

Kanburi Pit Viper (Trimeresurus kanburiensis) on a rock near Erawan National Park, Kanchanaburi, Thailand
A Kanburi Pit Viper (Trimeresurus kanburiensis) on a rock near Erawan National Park, Kanchanaburi, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Trimeresurus kanburiensis
  • Other Names: Tiger pit viper
  • Adult Size: 30 inches (76.2 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 12 to 18 years 

Kanburi pit vipers are an endangered species that is rare to come across in Thailand. They live in forests, woodlands, and open habitats.

Kanburi pit vipers are arboreal and will spend their days in trees. They are active at night, but may sometimes bask in the sun during the day.

In hot weather, they will spend the day hiding under natural debris.

The Kanburi pit viper is brown and has blotches running down its body. They have cat eyes that are gray. Like other pit vipers, they have two pits on the side of their head.

This snake has roughly keeled scales and a robust body. It was originally thought to be the species Trimeresurus venustus, the beautiful pit viper, but is declared its own species.

Birds and small mammals are what this snake hunts. This species is solitary, and will only meet with other snakes to breed.

They give birth to live young, and these young snakes can hunt from birth.

41. Kui Buri Pit Viper

Kui Buri Pit Viper (Bitia hydroides) on a branch
Kui Buri Pit Viper (Bitia hydroides) on a branch taken by Rushen
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: 2
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 19 to 27 inches (48.2 to 68.5 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 12 to 18 years 

The Kui Buri pit viper inhabits Peninsular Thailand and is one of the most colorful types of green viper. This species lives in woodland and forest habitats.

Vegetation and natural debris are preferred in the habits of this species. When young they enjoy climbing small vegetation and boulders. They will mate after rain, and are mostly active at night.

Kui Buri pit vipers are bright green but have red markings painted on their backs. They also have reddish eyes, with the pupil of a cat.

Their red markings cover their back and become more prominent towards the end of their tail. They have triangular-shaped heads and a white stripe running down their side.

The scales of this species are roughly keeled, and their underside is a pale cream color.

This species of a pit viper is not aggressive, even when handled. They still have an extremely dangerous venom, capable of causing the death of flesh and muscle tissue.

At night is when they are most active and will hunt for food.

42. Kramer’s Pit Viper

Kramer's Pit Viper (Trimeresurus macrops) in a tree at Khao Yai National Park, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand
A Kramer’s Pit Viper (Trimeresurus macrops) in a tree at Khao Yai National Park, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Trimeresurus macrops
  • Other Names: Big-eyed green pit viper, Large-eyed Pit Viper
  • Adult Size: 27.9 inches (70.8 cm)
  • Lifespan: 20 years 

The large-eyed pit viper is a species named after its prominent eyes and can be found in Thailand. They live in forests, plains, gardens, shrublands, and other vegetated habits.

They are great climbers and can be found in trees, but will also be in other plants like bushes. 

The eyes of this species are bright yellow, and they have a large black cat-like pupil. They are green, with triangular-shaped heads, and pits between their eyes to sense heat.

Their color ranges from dark to blueish green, beneath their throat and belly, and they have roughly keeled scales.

The large-eyed pit viper is venomous and is responsible for a large portion of venomous snake bites in Thailand. They can cause the death of flesh and tissues with their venom, and a bite must be treated to prevent death.

They also use their venom to eat frogs, lizards, and small animals, biting their prey and holding onto them until they are dead.

43. Cameron Highlands Pit Viper

Cameron Highlands Pitviper (Trimeresurus nebularis) hanging from a branch in Pahang, Malaysia
A Cameron Highlands Pitviper (Trimeresurus nebularis) hanging from a branch in Pahang, Malaysia. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Trimeresurus nebularis
  • Other Names: Clouded pit viper 
  • Adult Size: 39 inches (99.06 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 15 to 20 years 

The Cameron highlands pit viper is a species of green pit viper, found in Thailand, and West Malaysia.

They are named after the Cameron highlands in Malaysia since that is where a majority of their population is located. Like other green pit vipers, they are arboreal and spend a majority of their time in trees.

The Cameron highlands pit viper is bright green, and covered in roughy keeled scales. They have a dark black or blue hue in between their scales, and a light green belly.

Their tail is red, and long to help them climb trees. This species’ eyes are green, and their pupils are thin. They have triangular heads, and pits between their eyes to sense predators.

This species is highly venomous but is not deadly if treated in time. Locals living near the range of this species are bitten, and a specific anti-venom has not yet been created for the Cameron highlands pit viper.  

44. Phuket Pit Viper

Phuket Pit Viper (Trimeresurus phuketensis) hanging from a green stem in the dark at Khao Phra Thaeo Non-Hunting Area, Phuket, Thailand
A Phuket Pit Viper (Trimeresurus phuketensis) hanging from a green stem in the dark at Khao Phra Thaeo Non-Hunting Area, Phuket, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Trimeresurus phuketensis
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 12 inches (30.48 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 16 years 

Many new snakes are always being discovered, and the Pucket pit viper is an example of how new species are discovered. This snake was discovered in 2009, in the Thaew Wildlife Sanctuary.

They live in rainforest-type habitats and are arboreal. This species is only known to be found on Phuket island, the largest island in Thailand.

This species is similar to the pope’s pit viper and has green coloring. Red stripes cover their body, and red markings also appear on this snake’s sides and face.

They have roughly keeled scales, and red, cat-like eyes. One of the most unique differences of the Phuket pit viper is their scales, which are thicker than other green vipers.

Rodents and lizards are what this snake eats, and they will grab them off the floor from trees. Like other green vipers, the Phucket’s pit viper is venomous, but their venom is slightly less potent.

Some of these snakes also have a white tail, which they use to lure in their prey.

45. Pope’s Pit Viper

Pope's Tree Viper (Trimeresurus popeiorum) hanging on a tree in Ratchaburi, Thailand
A Pope’s Tree Viper (Trimeresurus popeiorum) hanging on a tree in Ratchaburi, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Trimeresurus popeiorum
  • Other Names: Popes bamboo pit viper
  • Adult Size: 30 inches (76.2 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 14 years 

Pope’s pit viper is a species that lives in forests and mountain habitats. They are found in Thailand, Malaysia, Vietnam, northeast India, and parts of Indonesia.

They are nocturnal and spend the majority of their lives in the trees. Matting occurs in spring, and they give birth to live young and are viviparous.

The pope’s pit viper is green, and their belly is pale green. They have a line that separates their belly from their back, which can be orange, brown, or white.

Snakes with red stripes running down their body can also have bright red eyes, but some will have orangish eyes. Their scales are roughly keeled and are colored to help them blend into their environment.

This species is venomous and relies on its bite and camouflage to defend itself. They feed on birds, frogs, lizards, and small mammals.

Their bite is extremely painful, and deadly venom is administered by hollow fangs. They will bite before fleeing if they are agitated.

46. Mangrove Pit Viper

Mangrove Pit Viper (Trimeresurus purpureomaculatus) on a tree trunk in Satun, Thailand
A Mangrove Pit Viper (Trimeresurus purpureomaculatus) on a tree trunk in Satun, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Trimeresurus purpureomaculatus
  • Other Names: shore pit viper
  • Adult Size: 26 to 35 inches (66.04 to 88.9 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 20 years 

Mangrove pit vipers inhabit Thailand, Bangladesh, Singapore, Burma, and other areas in Southeast Asia. Like their name suggests they live in mangroves and other types of coastal habitats.

They enjoy climbing trees and can be seen in vegetation above water sources. This species may move further upstream, to other freshwater habitats. 

Brown, gray, olive, and green are the colors this species comes in. They have dark blotches covering their back, but some can be black or have white coloring mixed in them.

They have roughly keeled scales, and large eyes similar to a cat. Their underside is pale and has no pattern.

The bite of a Mangrove pit viper is venomous, and similar in strength to other pit vipers. They feed on frogs, lizards, and mammals that come near their area.

Death from this species is rare, but a bite can cause necrosis, and severe pain if not treated.

47. Sabah Bamboo Pitviper

Sabah Bamboo Pitviper (Trimeresurus sabahi) on a tree branch at Khao Sok National Park HQ, Surat Thani, Thailand
A Sabah Bamboo Pitviper (Trimeresurus sabahi) on a tree branch at Khao Sok National Park HQ, Surat Thani, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Trimeresurus sabahi
  • Other Names: Toba pit viper, Sabah Pit Viper
  • Adult Size: 24.4 inches (61.97 cm)
  • Lifespan: 25 years 

The sabha pit viper is a snake native to the island of Borneo, and other areas in Southeast Asia.

This species lives in mountain regions, at high altitudes of 1,000 m. They live in vegetated areas, with plenty of natural low-lying plant life.

The Sabah pit viper is green and has no pattern like stripes or blotches. In female Sabah pit vipers, their stripes are white, or yellowish.

The eye of this snake is red or orange, and they have a white or orange stripe running along their side. Their tail is also red, and they have a pale green underside.

Frogs, lizards, and rodents make up a majority of these snakes’ diets. Like other vipers, they are toxic, and extremely dangerous if bitten.

They will hide in trees, and low vegetation, using its camouflage as a defense. If approached they will not flee and will bite if threatened.

48. Sumatra Pit Viper

Sumatra Pit Viper (Trimeresurus sumatranus) hanging from a tree at Matang Wildlife Centre, Sarawak, Malaysia
A Sumatra Pit Viper (Trimeresurus sumatranus) hanging from a tree at Matang Wildlife Centre, Sarawak, Malaysia. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Trimeresurus sumatranus
  • Other Names: Sumatran tree viper
  • Adult Size: 60 inches (152.4 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 15 years 

Sumatra pit vipers live in southern Thailand and other regions in southeastern Asia like Malaysia and Indonesia. They live in forests, at elevations below 800 meters.

They are most active at night but are sometimes spotted during the day. Mangroves, swamps, and wetland habitats are places where this species can also be found.

They are encountered most often in vegetation low to the ground.

This species is green and has a red tail. They have roughly keeled scales, with black coloring in between each scale.

A white or yellow line separates their back from their belly. Their stomach is a pale green color, and they have dark gray eyes.

Small mammals, frogs, and birds are what the Sumatra pit viper hunts, waiting for them to pass the vegetation they hide in. Using their tail they will sometimes lure unsuspecting prey near so they can eat them.

Like other pit vipers, this species is extremely venous, and deaths have occurred from their bite. 

49. Beautiful Pit Viper

Beautiful Pitviper (Trimeresurus venustus) clinging onto a stick in Krabi, Thailand
A Beautiful Pitviper (Trimeresurus venustus) clinging onto a stick in Krabi, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Trimeresurus venustus
  • Other Names: brown-spotted pit viper 
  • Adult Size: 19 to 27 inches (48.26 to 68.58 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 12 to 18 years 

Beautiful pit vipers are one of the most vibrantly colored viper species. They live in woodland habitats and can be found in Southeast Asia.

This species is also called the brown-spotted viper and is highly venomous.

Beautiful vipers have green and reddish brown striped blotches running down their body. The reddish blotches also appear on the green head, and their tail becomes a mix of green and red.

This species also has similar traits to other vipers like their eye, body, and head shape.

Rodents, lizards and other small animals are what they feed on. Their coloration is a good warning for predators not to bother this snake, and they are equipped with deadly viper venom. 

50. Vogel’s Pit Viper

Vogel's Pit Viper (Trimeresurus vogeli) clinging onto intertwined branches of a tree at Haew Su Wat Waterfall at Khao Yai National Park, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand
A Vogel’s Pit Viper (Trimeresurus vogeli) clinging onto intertwined branches of a tree at Haew Su Wat Waterfall at Khao Yai National Park, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Trimeresurus vogeli
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 31 to 43 inches (78.74 to 109.22 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 25 years 

The Vogel’s pit viper is named after German herper Gernot Vogel. This species is a venomous green pit viper found in Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, and Laos.

Forests, grasslands, and savannas are where they live, and can be found in elevations as high as 1,200 meters.

With roughly keeled scales, Vogel’s pit vipers are bright green. They have black coloring in between their scales, and orange eyes.

Their bellies are pale green, and a white line separates this species’ dorsum from its ventral. Females of this species are larger than males, and the tail of this snake has reddish coloring.

Frogs, lizards, and other animals are what the Vogel’s pit viper preys on, and they are beneficial in controlling the rodent population. Vogel’s pit vipers are venomous and have large hollow fangs to administer the venom.

Deforestation and the destruction of their habitats are the main threat this species faces.

51. Wirot’s Pit Viper

  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Trimeresurus wiroti
  • Other Names: Leaf-nosed Pit Viper, Palm Pit Viper
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 35 inches (88.9 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 25 years 

Wirot’s pit vipers are arboreal snakes that live in Thailand, in Peninsular Malaysia.

They live in forests and are found in altitudes up to 1,200 meters high. This species is also oviparous and gives birth to live young that hatch from inside the mother.

Brown is the color of this species to help it camouflage into trees. The snout of this snout is blunt, but they have a triangular head. The underside of this species is also brown, and they have no body markings on them.

Wirot’s pit vipers spend their time in trees but are sometimes spotted on the ground. They are active at night and are a venomous species.

Check out this video of this beautiful viper:

52. Wagler’s Palm Pit Viper

Wagler's Pit Viper (Tropidolaemus wagleri) sitting on a branch at Khao Sok National Park HQ, Surat Thani, Thailand
A Wagler’s Pit Viper (Tropidolaemus wagleri) sitting on a branch at Khao Sok National Park HQ, Surat Thani, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Tropidolaemus wagleri
  • Other Names: temple viper 
  • Adult Size: 29 to 39 inches (73.66 to 99.06 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 10 to 20 years 

Wagler’s palm pit viper is a venomous species, also called the temple viper since it is found near the snake temple in Malaysia.

They inhabit southeastern Asia and can be found in southern Thailand. They live in forests in altitudes up to 1,300 feet.

This species can be in a variety of colors like black, brown, or green. They have bands that run down their back and roughly keeled scales. A colored stripe runs through their eye, and their scales are very keeled. 

Walger’s pit vipers spend a majority of their time in trees and can stay sitting in the same branch for a prolonged period of time. They eat rats, birds, and other animals, swooping down on them from the trees.

54. Omkoi Lance-headed Pit Viper

Omkoi lance-headed Pit Viper (Protobothrops kelomohy) on a large dry leaf in greenery at an unknown location
An Omkoi lance-headed Pit Viper (Protobothrops kelomohy) on a large dry leaf in greenery at an unknown location. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Protobothrops kelomohy
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 51 inches (129.54 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 15 years 

Omkoi lance-headed pit vipers are a species inhabiting parts of northern Thailand.

They live in dry forested habitats but are a rare species to come across. More research is needed for this species, as not a lot is known about their range and population in Thailand.

Omkoi lance-headed pit vipers have tan coloring and are covered in dark blotches. Their underside is a cream color, and they have no underlying pattern. Their color helps them blend into their environment, and avoid being seen.

This species is rare to find in Thailand and is not encountered often by humans. They are venomous, but with treatment, a bite won’t cause death.

55. Brown-spotted Pit Viper

Brown-spotted Pit Viper (Protobothrops mucrosquamatus) curled up on some wet rocks in Guangdong, China
A Brown-spotted Pit Viper (Protobothrops mucrosquamatus) curled up on some wet rocks in Guangdong, China. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Protobothrops mucrosquamatus
  • Other Names: Taiwanese habu, pointed-scaled pit viper 
  • Adult Size: 44 to 45 inches (111.76 to 114.3 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 15 years 

The brown spotted viper has a large range across Asia and can be found in Northern Thailand, Taiwan, Vietnam, China, Laos, and other regions. Woodlands, grasslands, and mountains are the most common habitats they live in, and heavy rain will cause this species to become more active.

Brown-spotted pit vipers are gray, olive, or tan, and are covered in dark brown blotches. The blotches are usually brown and have black edges.

They have cat-like pupils and brown coloring around their eyes. Their belly is white but is painted with a tan mottled pattern.

Bites from this species are extremely dangerous, but anti-venom is widely distributed in the areas where this snake lives. They feed on small lizards, frogs, and rodents within their habitat.

Brown-spotted vipers are mostly active at night and can be aggressive if approached.

56. Indo-Malayan Mountain Pit Viper

Indo-Malayan Mountain Pit Viper (Ovophis convictus) in greens and mud at an unnamed location
An Indo-Malayan Mountain Pit Viper (Ovophis convictus) in greens and mud at an unnamed location. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Ovophis convictus
  • Other Names: Chinese pit viper 
  • Adult Size: 20 to 43 inches (50.8 to 109.22 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 10 to 20 years 

Found in Asia, the Indo-Malayan Mountain viper has a large range. They live in Thailand, Laos, Bangladesh, Cambodia, and other areas in southeast Asia.

Damp habitats with plenty of vegetation are habitats they prefer to live in. In altitudes of up to 2,000 meters, this species can be found.

Indo-Malayan mountain vipers have short, wide bodies and smooth scales. They have tan coloring and brown blotches on their back and sides.

Their heads are triangular-shaped and are dark brown. Their tail is thin and has brown coloring with no pattern on it.

This species is venomous and survives off a diet of rodents, lizards, birds, and other snakes within its range. Rainfall is when this species is most active, and seeing them can be difficult since they camouflage on the forest floor.

57. Chinese Mountain Pit Viper

Chinese Mountain Pit Viper (Ovophis monticola) on wet rocks in Champasak, Laos
A Chinese Mountain Pit Viper (Ovophis monticola) on wet rocks in Champasak, Laos. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Ovophis monticola
  • Other Names: Mountain Pit Viper 
  • Adult Size: 30 inches (76.2 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 10 to 20 years 

Mountain vipers are found across Southeast Asia and can be found in Thailand. Mountains and forests are some of the habitats they live in.

This species is highly venomous, but only one death has been recorded from them.

Mountain vipers are brown and covered in black blotches. They have smooth scales, thick bodies, and a short snout.

They have sensory pits in their face, and their coloring helps them camouflage into the ground, and avoid predators.

If provoked this species will bite, as they prefer to be left alone. Their camouflage also helps them catch prey like rodents, small lizards, and other snakes. 

58. Siamese Russell’s Viper

Siamese Russell's Viper (Daboia siamensis) curled up at Yushan National Park, Taiwan
A Siamese Russell’s Viper (Daboia siamensis) curled up at Yushan National Park, Taiwan. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Daboia siamensis
  • Other Names: Eastern Russell’s viper 
  • Adult Size: 48 to 72 inches (121.92 to 182.88 cm)
  • Lifespan: 15 years 

Eastern Russell’s viper is a venomous species found across Southeast Asia. They inhabit Thailand, as well as Myanmar, Cambodia, China, Indonesia, and parts of India.

Open plains, grasslands, urban areas, and farms are habitats they are found in. Areas with plenty of natural debris and vegetation give them plenty of areas to hide.

Eastern Russell’s viper can be gray, olive, or tan. They have large tan blotches that cover their back, and smaller spots also. This species looks similar to Russell’s viper, but its range can help differentiate the two.

The venom for this species is extremely deadly, but antivenom is common and regularly produced in Thailand.

Land crabs, rodents, insects, arthropods, and small reptiles are what this species eats. They camouflage well into the ground, and can easily be missed by a predator, or someone walking by.

Cobras (Elapidae) in Thailand

59. Monocellate Cobra

Monocellate Cobra (Naja kaouthia) on a concrete road at Khao Luang, Nakhon Si Thammarat, Thailand
A Monocellate Cobra (Naja kaouthia) on a concrete road at Khao Luang, Nakhon Si Thammarat, Thailand – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Naja kaouthia
  • Other Names: Indian spitting cobra 
  • Adult Size: 48 to 60 inches (121.9 to 152 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 20 to 25 years 

Monocled cobras are found in South and Southeast Asia. They live in Thailand and other regions.

Wetlands, rice paddies, swamps, grasslands, forests, mangroves, and shrublands are habitats this species can be found in. They prefer moist habitats and will live up to 1,000 meters in elevation.

The monocled cobra has a hood, with an O-shaped white mark on it. In the mark is a black dot, and some may have white circular markings that go down their back.

Black, yellow, brown, and gray are some of the common colors this species comes in. Like other cobras, they can move quickly with their heads raised.

This species is venomous, and their fangs are capable of spitting venom, which can cause blindness if it gets into your eyes. They are most active in the dusk and will hide in burrows during other periods.

They feed on fish, smaller snakes, and small mammals. When in danger they will raise their head, and can quickly strike if you are in their range.

60. Indo-Chinese Spitting Cobra

Indo-Chinese Spitting Cobra (Naja siamensis) in forest litter near Mun Bon, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand
An Indo-Chinese Spitting Cobra (Naja siamensis) in forest litter near Mun Bon, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Naja siamensis
  • Other Names: Thai spitting cobra 
  • Adult Size: 36 to 51 inches (91.44 to 129.54 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 20 years 

The Indo-Chinese spitting cobra is also known as the Thai spitting cobra and can be found in Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos. They live in hills, plains, woodlands and are attracted to areas with a large rodent population for feeding.

This cobra is medium-sized and slender. They come in a variety of colors like gray, black, white, and brown.

Black and white colorings are common in Thailand. They have a hood like other cobras, and a pale white or cream underside.

This cobra is a true spitter and can spit its venom at things it thinks are threats. They can spit over 3 feet which can cause blindness if it gets in the eyes, but a bite from them is also deadly.

This species is active mostly at night, but if seen during the day they are more docile. They feed on a variety of small animals like mice, and other rodents.

61. Equatorial Spitting Cobra

Equatorial Spitting Cobra (Naja sumatrana) in rocks at Sankalakhiri Mountain, Yala, Thailand
An Equatorial Spitting Cobra (Naja sumatrana) in rocks at Sankalakhiri Mountain, Yala, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Naja sumatrana
  • Other Names: Black spitting cobra, Golden spitting cobra 
  • Adult Size: 154 to 192 inches (391.16 to 487.6 cm)
  • Lifespan: 15 to 20 years 

Equatorial spitting cobras are a species located in Southeast Asia and are a species you may come across in Thailand.

They live in forests and jungle habitats but can be found in gardens and other urban areas. They are terrestrial, and active during the day.

A black and yellow coloring exists for this species, but black is the type that is more commonly seen in Thailand. The Equatorial spitting cobra has a hood, but no marking on it. They have small heads and can sit up.

This species of cobra is able to spit venom that can irritate skin, eyes and cause a burning discomfort. They have deadly venom if bitten, but most bites are dry.

This species is not aggressive, and will only attack if it feels cornered. They feed on small animals they find like rodents, lizards, and frogs.

62. King Cobra

King Cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) in the grass at Khao Sok National Park HQ, Surat Thani, Thailand
A King Cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) in the grass at Khao Sok National Park HQ, Surat Thani, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level:  Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Ophiophagus hannah
  • Other Names: Hamadryad snake 
  • Adult Size: 118 to 157 inches (299.7 to 398.7 cm)  
  • Lifespan: 20 years 

King cobras are cobra species found in Thailand and other regions in Southeast Asia. This species is the largest cobra, and also one of the largest venomous snakes in the world.

This species is not aggressive towards humans and will try to flee if spotted. King Cobras are listed as a vulnerable species due to habitat destruction and poaching.

King cobras are extremely long and are olive-colored with black bands. Colors may vary, but they are recognizable by their size and hood.

King cobras are not only named king for their size but also because their diet consists of mostly other snakes. They will also eat reptiles and can unhinge their jaw to swallow large prey.

They are very long, capable of striking from far distances, but they also have extremely deadly venom. 

Kraits

63. Blue Krait

Blue Krait (Bungarus candidus) slithering in sand and leaves in Ta Phraya National Park, Prachin Buri, Thailand
A Blue Krait (Bungarus candidus) slithering in sand and leaves in Ta Phraya National Park, Prachin Buri, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Bungarus candidus
  • Other Names: Malayan krait 
  • Adult Size: 43 inches (109.22 cm)
  • Lifespan: 9 to 13 years 

Blue kraits are a species found in Southeast Asia. They live in various habitats like forests, wetlands, and marshes. They enjoy rocky waterways and are sometimes found in urban areas.

Blue kraits have smooth scales and white coloring. They have black blotches that cover their back and go into their tail. Their heads are all black, and the underside is white. Some snakes may be all black, but this is rare.

This species is docile and is active in the daytime. They will not generally bite but will try to hide instead. They have deadly venom and should be left alone, but they usually only bite what they are hunting.

64. Banded Krait

Banded Krait (Bungarus fasciatus) in wood and leaves in Chumphon, Thailand
A Banded Krait (Bungarus fasciatus) in wood and leaves in Chumphon, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Bungarus fasciatus
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 72 to 84 inches (182.8 to 213.36 cm)
  • Lifespan: 9 to 13 years 

Banded kraits can be found in southeast Asia, and are a species that you may come across in Thailand.

They live in various habitats like forests, and agricultural fields. In areas near humans, they may also be found since there is usually a large rodent population where humans go.

This species is covered in bands that alternate from yellow to black to red. They are a large species and have a head shaped like an arrow. Their underside is pale, and they have a black head with yellow lips.

This species is most active at night. They are not aggressive and will try to hide if harassed. They feed on fish, frogs, lizards, and other small animals.

65. Red-headed Krait

Red-headed Krait (Bungarus flaviceps) in moss and green in Khao Pu Khao Ya National Park, Phatthalung, Thailand
A Red-headed Krait (Bungarus flaviceps) in moss and green in Khao Pu Khao Ya National Park, Phatthalung, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Bungarus flaviceps
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 48 to 60 inches (121.92 to 152.4 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 10 years 

The red-headed krait is a fossorial species, easily identifiable, and named after its red head. They have a black body and can grow a large 7 feet long. This snake is nocturnal and is extremely active at night.

Red-headed kraits are found in Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, and other parts of Southeast Asia.

They live in rainforest and mountain regions. This snake is fossorial but is also partially aquatic.

They eat lizards, frogs, eggs, and small mammals. While venomous, not much is known about how dangerous they are since they rarely bite.

It is thought that bites from that species can cause symptoms similar to other kraits, and is possibly deadly.

66. Red River Krait

  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Bungarus slowinskii
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 49 inches (124.46 cm)
  • Lifespan: 10 to 15 years 

Red river kraits are a species native to southeast Asia. They live in forest and wetland habitats.

In Thailand, this species can be found in the Northern area of the country. This snake Bungarus slowinskii is named after the herpetologist Joseph Bruno Slowinski.

Red river kraits have black scales and are covered in white bands. They also have white markings near their faces. They have a pale underside and are long for a krait.

Red river kraits are venomous and can kill if a bite goes untreated. They can cause paralysis, and most bites occur at night in the dark. Other snakes, lizards, and rodents are what this snake usually feeds on. 

67. Many-banded Krait

Many-banded Krait (Bungarus multicinctus) in grassy dirt in Hong Kong
A Many-banded Krait (Bungarus multicinctus) in grassy dirt in Hong Kong. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Bungarus wanghaotingi
  • Other Names: Chinese krait, Taiwanese krait 
  • Adult Size: 42 to 60 inches (106.68 to 152.4 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 9 to 13 years 

The many-banded krait is a species found in southeast Asia. They are active at night and live in lowland humid habitats.

Thailand is just one region this species is found in. Marches, streams, rice paddies, rivers, and other water habitats are where they can be found.

Black is the most common color for this species, and they are named after the many white bands that cover their body. They have smooth moist skin, and white bellies.

Like other krait species, this snake is venomous. They feed on snakes, fish, rodents, frogs, eels, and lizards. It is active for most of the year but will hibernate in winter in cold areas.

Coral Snakes

68. Malaysian Blue Coral Snake

Malaysian Blue Coral Snake (Calliophis bivirgatus) on a brown table at Narathiwat, Thailand
A Malaysian Blue Coral Snake (Calliophis bivirgatus) on a brown table at Narathiwat, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Calliophis bivirgatus
  • Other Names: Blue coral snake 
  • Adult Size: 20 inches (50.8 cm)
  • Lifespan: 15 years 

Blue coral snakes are found in Thailand, Indonesia, Brunei, Bruma, Singapore, and Malaysia.

They are terrestrial species and live in forest habitats. Leaf litter, rocks, logs, and other natural debris are used for hiding in the day, and they are active at night.

Blue coral snakes are a small and slender species. They have black or blue bodies, and bright red heads and tails. Their bright colors help show that they are deadly.

This species is venomous and can kill humans with their venom. They are not aggressive and will usually flee before trying to bite. They will also flash their colors if they feel in danger.

69. Malaysian Banded Coral Snake

Malaysian Banded Coral Snake (Calliophis intestinalis) against a white background near Namtok Si Khit National Park, Surat Thani, Thailand
A Malaysian Banded Coral Snake (Calliophis intestinalis) against a white background near Namtok Si Khit National Park, Surat Thani, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Calliophis intestinalis
  • Other Names: Malaysian striped coral snake 
  • Adult Size: 19 inches (48.26 cm)
  • Lifespan: 7 years 

The Malaysian banded coral snake is a species found in South Asia. They are terrestrial and live in moist habitats.

This species inhabits Thailand, the Malay Peninsula, Java, Sumatra, Singapore, Borneo, and the Philippines.

This snake is small and has a brown base color. Their scales are keeled, and they also have a reddish stripe running down their body.

Their underside is black and white, with a bright red tip of their tail, which they can show to scare predators.

This snake is highly venomous and has killed humans with its bite. If seen they should be left alone, but their bright coloring also acts as a warning to stay away.

70. Speckled Coral Snake

Speckled Coral Snake (Calliophis maculiceps) on the ground at Nakhon Si Thammarat, Thailand
A Speckled Coral Snake (Calliophis maculiceps) on the ground at Nakhon Si Thammarat, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Calliophis maculiceps
  • Other Names: Small-spotted Coral Snake
  • Adult Size: 13 inches (33.02 cm)
  • Lifespan: 7 years 

Small spotted coral snakes are a nocturnal species that can be found all over Thailand.

They live in other countries as well, preferring habitats with plenty of natural debris. Loose dirt, leaf litter, and rocks are used so they can hide under them.

The small-spotted coral snake is a small species, rarely growing over 35 centimeters. They have thin bodies, and tan, yellow or orange coloring.

Their heads are all black, and their bellies have bright red coloring. Small spots as seen on some snakes’ backs, and they are sometimes confused for a worm.

This species is highly venomous and can kill with its bite. Being so small they are harmless unless handled or provoked.

Even though they are venomous, they are kept as pets since their size makes them generally harmless.

71. MacClelland’s Coral Snake

MacClelland’s Coral Snake (Sinomicrurus macclellandi) on greenery near Nameri National Park and Forest Reserve, Arunachal Pradesh, India
A MacClelland’s Coral Snake (Sinomicrurus macclellandi) on greenery near Nameri National Park and Forest Reserve, Arunachal Pradesh, India. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Sinomicrurus macclellandi
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 16 to 31 inches (40.64 to 78.74 cm)
  • Lifespan: 10 years 

McClelland’s coral snake is named after John McClelland and is a species found in south and east Asia.

They are terrestrial and live in forests with plenty of debris. They are most active at night and will hide under debris during the day.

This snake is small and thin. They are brown and have bars found on their back.

Their stomachs are white. They have a small head that has black coloring on it.

Like other coral snakes, this species has a potent venom, which is also harmful to humans. A bite can cause death, but it rarely happens.

McClelland’s coral snakes use their venom to feed on small animals in their habitat.

Sea Kraits

72. Banded Sea Krait 

Banded Sea Krait (Laticauda colubrina) on the rocky ocean floor at Krabi, Thailand
A Banded Sea Krait (Laticauda colubrina) on the rocky ocean floor at Krabi, Thailand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Laticauda colubrina
  • Other Names: Yellow-lipped sea krait, Colubrine Sea Krait
  • Adult Size: 34.4 to 56 inches (34.4 to 142 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 10 years 

The colubrine sea krait is also called the yellow-lipped sea krait and lives in the Indo-Pacific ocean. They are widespread in the ocean and have a healthy population in the habitats they live in.

This species has a yellow upper lip and is painted in black and white bands. They have a yellowish belly and have a flat tail.

They can also have blue or gray coloring with their black bands. This species is easily recognizable because of its yellow lip.

While not aggressive, the Thai species has neurotoxic venom, but it mainly uses it on the prey it hunts. Fish and eels are what they eat.

Occasionally the yellow-lipped sea krait can be seen sitting on a rock near the ocean.

73. Brown-lipped Sea Krait

Brown-lipped Sea Krait (Laticauda laticaudata) on rocky sand West Java, Indonesia
A Brown-lipped Sea Krait (Laticauda laticaudata) on rocky sand West Java, Indonesia. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Laticauda laticaudata
  • Other Names: Chinese sea snake, Black-banded Sea Krait
  • Adult Size: 28 to 31 inches (71.12 to 78.74 cm)
  • Lifespan: 20 years 

Black-banded sea kraits are marine snakes that are found off the coast of Thailand, and other areas in southeastern Asia. They live in tropical waters, and will commonly explore the coral reefs.

This species is medium-sized and has smooth scales. They have a similar scale appearance to a fish, and are tan, with black bands along their body. Their eyes are circular and their heads are rounded.

The bite from this krait is highly venomous and can cause paralysis. They feed on fish but are slow swimmers so they find fish hiding in rocks.

The black-banded sea krait is not aggressive, and will only attack humans if it is provoked.

Olive Sea Snakes

74. Spine-tailed Sea Snake

Spine-tailed Sea Snake (Aipysurus eydouxii) in wet sand in Singapore
A Spine-tailed Sea Snake (Aipysurus eydouxii) in wet sand in Singapore. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Elapidae 
  • Scientific Name: Aipysurus eydouxii
  • Other Names: Marbled sea snake, Eydoux’ Sea Snake
  • Adult Size: 39.6 inches (100.5 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years 

Spine-tailed sea snakes live in shallow bays and inhabit the waters near Australia, Thailand, Indonesia, Peninsular Malaysia, and the South China Sea. They are a species of sea snake but have no fangs, and venom glands that are useless.

Spine-tailed sea snakes have smooth scales and a slender neck. Cream or pinkish are the colors they can be, with some having cross bands on their body. They have a uniform body size to help them swim. 

Eggs are what this species primarily feeds on, and why they lost their fangs since they did not need them. Spine-tailed sea snakes breed in spring and will give birth in around 6 months. 

Sea Snakes

75. Annadale’s Sea Snake

Annadale's Sea Snake (Hydrophis annandalei) on a light backgound taken by Indraneil Das
Annadale’s Sea Snake (Hydrophis annandalei) on a light backgound taken by Indraneil Das.
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis annandalei
  • Other Names: Bighead Sea Snake
  • Adult Size: 20 inches (50.8 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

Annadale’s sea snakes live in muddy coastal waters and can be found in Thailand, Indonesia, and Vietnam. This species is named after Nelson Annandale, who was a Scottish herpetologist.

This species is medium-sized and covered in dark crossbands. They have a gray, white, or blue coloring. They have narrow heads, and a fin-like tail to help them swim in the ocean.

This species gives birth to live young in the ocean, but their breeding season is unknown. Since they spend so much time at sea, studying them can be difficult.

Sea snakes have one of the strongest venoms in the world for snakes, which can kill if you are bitten by one.

76. Anomalous Sea Snake

  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis anomalus
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 20 to 40 inches (50.8 to 101.6 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

The anomalous sea snake lives in the ocean and inhabits waters near Thailand and South Asia.

The ocean is where this snake spends most of its life, and coming in contact with humans is rare. They can spend months at sea without getting a drink of water or going near the shore.

They are medium-sized but have robust bodies to help them swim. They are white with a pattern of dark bold stripes running down their back.

This species primarily feeds on fish and is extremely venomous.

They do not bite humans often, because of their solely marine lifestyle. Bites can occur for people who venture into the water often like divers, fishermen, and swimmers.

77. Black-headed Banded Sea Snake

Black-headed Banded Sea Snake (Hydrophis atriceps) pinned down for science on a black background
A Black-headed Banded Sea Snake (Hydrophis atriceps) pinned down for science on a black background. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis atriceps
  • Other Names: Black-headed Sea Snake
  • Adult Size: 38.9 inches to 43.3 inches (98.8 to 109.9 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

Blackheaded sea snakes are a species found in the tropical waters in Southeast Asia. Thailand, Singapore, Indonesia, Australia, New Guinea, and the Philippines are areas where they can be found in the sea waters.

This species is medium-sized and is identifiable by its black head. They are cream, with dark blue or black bands going down their body.

They have a paddle-like tail, small head, and robust midsection to help them swim in the ocean’s depths.

The black-headed sea snake can dive underwater, but it will come up to breathe on the surface. They feed on fish and the eggs of fish in the ocean.

Fishing boats are the main threat of this species, as they occasionally will catch with them in their nets.

78. Faint-banded Sea Snake

Faint-banded Sea Snake (Hydrophis belcheri) curled up on the ground
A Faint-banded Sea Snake (Hydrophis belcheri) curled up on the ground. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis belcheri
  • Other Names: Belcher’s sea snake 
  • Adult Size: 20 to 40 inches (50.8 to 101.6 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

Faint-banded sea snakes are ocean-dwelling snakes that can be found near the coast of Thailand and in other tropical waters. They are a timid species that can hold their breath for up to 8 hours and are well adapted to live in the ocean.

This species is small in size and has a slender body. They are green or yellowish in color and have dark crossbands going down their body.

The scales of this snake overlap each other, and out of the water, they are covered in a yellow hue.

Being so small a bite from this snake will not hurt, but they are equipped with deadly venom. Bites are rare, and the faint-banded sea snake will only bite if it is being harmed.

They are timid and try their best to avoid humans. Small sea life like fish is what this snake eats.

79. Peters’ Sea Snake

Annulated Sea Snake (Hydrophis cyanocinctus) in pebbled sand by Point Pedro, Jaffna, Sri Lanka
An Annulated Sea Snake (Hydrophis cyanocinctus) in pebbled sand by Point Pedro, Jaffna, Sri Lanka. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis cyanocinctus
  • Other Names: Biturberculed Sea Snake, Annulated Sea Snake, Blue-banded Sea Snake
  • Adult Size: 44 inches (111.76 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

Peters sea snakes are Elapidae sea snakes inhabiting the Indian Ocean. They stay in the sea, and rarely ever go onto land.

They are great swimmers and can stay dehydrated for months until they come across water they can drink that is not ocean water.

This species is long and grayish-blue in color. They have narrow heads, thin necks, and robust bodies. Their underside is white, and they have a paddle tail. 

This species is rare, even for a sea snake and limited studies have been done on them. They have a strong venom like other sea snakes and eat small fish they come across. 

80. Brook’s Small-headed Sea Snake (Hydrophis brookii)

Brook's Small-headed Sea Snake (Hydrophis brookii) crawling into the ocean in Belait, Brunei
A Brook’s Small-headed Sea Snake (Hydrophis brookii) crawling into the ocean in Belait, Brunei. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis brookii
  • Other Names: Brook’s Sea Snake
  • Adult Size: 38 to 40 inches (96.5 to 101.6 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

Brooks sea snakes are an oceanic species inhabiting the Indian Ocean and Gulf of Thailand.

They are one of the species of sea snake that are found in freshwater habitats in Thailand. Sea snakes can make their way into freshwater by traveling from the ocean, and going upstream.

This species has a small head and a slender body. They are white, or blue with dark bands that go down its body. Their bellies are pale, and they have a paddle-like tail to help them navigate water.

Brook sea snakes rarely bite humans but are extremely venomous. Eels are the main food for brooks sea snakes eat, and they use their venom to neutralize their prey. 

81. Dwarf Sea Snake

Dwarf Sea Snake (Hydrophis caerulescens) in the sand in Maharashtra, India
A Dwarf Sea Snake (Hydrophis caerulescens) in the sand in Maharashtra, India. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis caerulescens
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 29 inches (73.66 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

Dwarf sea snakes live in the ocean waters, and in Thailand, they inhabit the gulf of Thailand. All of their life is spent in the sea, and it is rare for them to ever go onto land.

This species comes in a variety of colors like bluish, gray and yellow. They have crossbands that go down their body, and younger specimens have more defined patterns.

This species is small and only grows up to 2.5 feet. The head of this snake is black, and some may have a horseshoe pattern on their head.

Dwarf sea snake venom is much more deadly than most snake venoms that are found on land. Bites usually occur by accident, since sea snakes can move awkwardly on land, or not be seen in the water. 

82. Cantor’s Narrow-headed Sea Snake

  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis cantoris
  • Other Names: Cantor’s small-headed sea snake
  • Adult Size: 40 to 60 inches (101.6 to 152.4 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

Cantor’s narrow-headed sea snake lives in the neritic zone in the ocean and is named after the zoologist, Theodore Edward Cantor.

This species is found near Thailand, India, and other regions of the Indian Ocean. They spend all of their life in the water and are ovoviviparous.

A small head and long body are characteristics found in this species. They can be tan or olive-colored, and have stripes running down their body.

To survive in the ocean they have gained a variety of traits like the ability to stay underwater for hours, and to go prolonged periods without drinking water.

The venom of this species is extremely deadly like other sea snakes, but it is rare for bites to occur. People diving, fishing, or near the coastal region are more at risk for a sea snake bite. 

83. Shaw’s Sea Snake

Shaw's Sea Snake (Hydrophis curtus) on a porous rock at Shark Rock, Queensland, Australia
A Shaw’s Sea Snake (Hydrophis curtus) on a porous rock at Shark Rock, Queensland, Australia. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis curtus
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 38 inches (96.5 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

Shaw’s sea snake is found in the ocean waters and prefers to live in tropical habitats. They live in a variety of Oceans, but in Thailand, they are found in the Pacific Ocean.

This snake spends most of its life in the sea and has adapted for the lifestyle, like how they are able to sense the motion of water using their corpuscles on their heads.

Shorter than other species of sea snake, Shaw’s sea snakes have a thick body and big head.

They are a cream color and are covered in stripes that run down their body. The head and tail of this species have dark markings, and their tails are shaped like a fin.

This snake is smaller than other sea snakes which makes it easily identifiable, and which is also why they are called the short sea snake. This snake is harvested for its meat, skin, and medical uses

84. Striped Sea Snake

  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis fasciatus
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 38.9 to 40 inches (98.8 to 101.6 cm)
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

The striped sea snake is aquatic and lives in the Indian Ocean. It is found off the coast of many countries like Bangladesh, Pakistan, Thailand, India, Malaysia, and Myanmar. Like other sea snakes they are mostly aquatic and have traits like closable nostrils to help them live in the ocean.

Striped sea snakes are black, with white striped blotches running across their body. Their belly is cream-colored and has no pattern.

Their heads are narrow, body is robust, and their tail is shaped like a paddle to allow them to quickly travel through the depths of the ocean.

Sea snakes feed on fish in the ocean and can stay underwater for hours to catch their prey. They are extremely venomous, but this species is shy around humans, and not aggressive. 

85. Graceful Small-headed Sea Snake

Slender Sea Snake (Hydrophis fasciatus) in wet sand in Maharashtra, India
A Slender Sea Snake (Hydrophis fasciatus) in wet sand in Maharashtra, India. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: 3.5 to 10 years
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis gracilis
  • Other Names: Slender Sea Snake
  • Adult Size: 37.4 to 40.3 inches (94.9 to 102.3 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

The graceful small-headed sea snake is an aquatic snake found in the Indian Ocean, Persian Gulf, and on the coast of many southeastern countries.

Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam Nam, and the Philippines are oceanic areas they inhabit. This snake spends most of its time in the ocean like other water snakes and rarely goes to land. 

Compared to its body, and other sea snakes, the head of this species is extremely small, and that is where it gets its name. Their neck is slender, and their body is robust to help them swim in the ocean. Graceful small-headed sea snakes have white scales and are covered in gray stripes.

Fish, eels, and other ocean life are what this species feeds on. They are amazing swimmers and can spend hours in the ocean water.

They are also highly venomous and can kill with a bite.

86. Hardwicke’s Spine-bellied Sea Snake

Hardwicke's Spine-bellied Sea Snake (Hydrophis hardwickii) in sand
A Hardwicke’s Spine-bellied Sea Snake (Hydrophis hardwickii) in sand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis hardwickii
  • Other Names: Hardwicke’s Sea snake, Spine-bellied sea snake  
  • Adult Size: 36 inches (91.44 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

The Spine-bellied sea snake is a sea snake that is found near Thailand, preferring warm, tropical waters.

This snake inhabits the Indian Ocean, Persian Gulf, South China Sea, Pacific Ocean, and other oceanic habitats. Like other sea snakes, they are extremely venomous but are not found often.

They are extremely dangerous but almost never come to land or the shore. From summer to fall they are abundant in muddy estuaries when it rains. Babies do not come from eggs but are born in the water.

Hardwicke’s spine-bellied sea snake is medium-sized, and its body is compressed into its sides to help them swim. They also have an oar tail, and nostrils with valves to prevent water from entering while swimming.

Adult spine-bellied sea snakes have brown bodies and pale stomachs. They have striped patterns running across their body but as they age they can become plain.

Younger sea snakes are more brightly colored.

The spin-bellied sea snake is named after the roughly keeled scales on its belly, and they are also named in the honor of Thomas Hardwicke, an English naturalist. Like other sea snakes, they live on the seafloor.

87. Plain Sea Snake

  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis inornatus
  • Other Names: Inornate sea snake 
  • Adult Size: 18 to 30 inches (45.7 to 76 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

The plains sea snake is found in coastal waters in the south China sea, and also near Australia. In Thailand, they inhabit the waters within the Gulf of Thailand.

Like other sea snakes, this species has deadly venom, but bites from them are rare. Some sea snake species are aggressive, but the plains sea snake is docile, and will only attack if harmed.

They are also not seen very often, and almost never come in contact with humans. 

This sea snake has a long head and large eyes. Its neck is thick, and they have flat snouts. The body of the inornate sea snake is blueish gray, and its belly is white, or cream-colored.

They have light-colored cross bands that go to the end of their tail. This snake has a thick midsection, and a thin, paddle tail to help it swim in the ocean.

The inornate if not often seen, since it is so secretive. When hunting they swim at the bottom of the ocean, looking for fish to eat.

They may occasionally go into rivers but refer to living in the ocean.

88. Jerdon’s Sea Snake

Jerdon's Sea Snake (Hydrophis jerdonii) curled up on sand
A Jerdon’s Sea Snake (Hydrophis jerdonii) curled up on sand. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis jerdonii
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 39 inches (99.06 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

Jerdon’s sea snakes are named in honor of Thomas C Jerodn a British Zoologist and are a species that inhabits the Indian Ocean. The waters in the South China Sea, near Sri Lanka, the Gulf of Siam, and in the Gulf of Thailand.

Shallow coastal zones and wetland habitats are where this species primarily resides. They rarely go on land and have limited movements when not in water.

This species is also called the cone-nosed snake because of its head and mouth shape. They are medium-sized sea snakes, with olive coloring on their back.

They are covered in dark spots that go down their sides. These spots are more prominent in younger snakes.

The underside of this species is pale, or yellow. The muscles of this snake are thick, and they have a fin-like tail.

The venom of a sea snake is deadly, but bites from them are rare since they are shy. This species will only bite if immediately threatened, but they almost never come in contact with humans.

The fangs of this species are not as large as other venomous snakes, a bite can possibly cause death.

89. Kloss’ Sea Snake

Kloss' Sea Snake (Hydrophis klossi) pinned down on a black background
A Kloss’ Sea Snake (Hydrophis klossi) pinned down on a black background. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis klossi
  • Other Names: Cone nosed sea snake
  • Adult Size: 10 to 45 inches (25.4 to 114 cm) 
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

Living mostly in the Indian Ocean, Kloss’s sea snake is a venomous snake specialized to live in the ocean habitat.

This species is found near Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, and Cambodia. They are just one of many sea snakes living in the ocean and are named after Cecil Boden Kloss, a Singaporian museum director. 

This snake spends their life in the ocean and is scared of humans since they rarely come across them. Even though they live in saltwater they cannot drink it and can go months without a drink. 

Kloss sea snakes have an olive body with a yellow underside. They are covered in black rings that get narrower towards the bottom.

This species has a black head, covered in yellow spots. Kloss sea snakes have small heads, and a paddle tail to help them swim.

The Kloss sea snake is rare to find in the ocean since its population is so small. This species is listed as a “Threatened” and is one of the more rare species of sea snake.

They are extremely venomous like other sea snakes, and also give birth to live young. 

90. Lambert’s Sea Snake

Lamber's Sea Snake (Hydrophis lamberti) at the sandy bottom of the sea
A Lamber’s Sea Snake (Hydrophis lamberti) at the sandy bottom of the sea. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis lamberti
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 49.2 inches (124 cm)
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

Lambert’s sea snakes are a species of snake that lives in the ocean waters near Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Vietnam. This species can be found in ocean waters, occasionally coming near the shore.

They are listed as a species of “Least concern” and have a healthy population. Still, it is uncommon to come across this species unless doing ocean activities like diving, and fishing.

Lambert’s sea snakes have a similar body shape to other sea snakes. They have a flat body, narrow head, and paddle-shaped tail.

They are tan or brown on their top, with dark striped blotches running down their body. Their underside is white, and they have dark markings on their head.

This species is extremely venomous like other sea snakes but does its best to avoid humans. It feeds off small fish it finds on the ocean floor, but may occasionally travel into fresh water.

Lack of studies and a secretive lifestyle is why learning about this species can be difficult. This species shares many similar traits with other sea snakes like their ability to dive deep into waters.

91. Persian Gulf Sea Snake

Persian Gulf Sea Snake (Hydrophis lapemoides) on a sandy bottom at the Persian Gulf
A Persian Gulf Sea Snake (Hydrophis lapemoides) on a sandy bottom at the Persian Gulf. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis lapemoides
  • Other Names: Arabian Gulf sea snake 
  • Adult Size: 43.4 inches (110 cm)
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years 

Persian Gulf sea snakes are endemic to the Indian Ocean and are also located in Thailand. This marine snake spends most of its time in the ocean but may be found on the shores of the countries native to its area.

Even though it prefers the ocean, it can sometimes find its way into freshwaters, and stay there for prolonged periods. When breeding occurs for this species they can be seen congregating near the surface of the ocean.

Persian gulf sea snakes have yellow, olive, and gray coloring. Their underside is lighter in color, and they have dark bands covering their body.

They have small heads, and their bodies are compressed together to help them swim. The top of this snake’s head is dark, and its belly is pale. They have a paddle-shaped tail like other sea snakes to help them swim.

Small fish make up the majority of this species’ diet. They are extremely venomous but do not bite humans often.

They have a large range in the ocean but do not come across humans often. Dolphins will sometimes try to feed on this species when they congregate in large numbers.

92. Robust Sea Snake

Robust Sea Snake (Hydrophis melanosoma) swimming through anemone
A Robust Sea Snake (Hydrophis melanosoma) swimming through anemone. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis melanosoma
  • Other Names: Black Banded Robust Sea Snake 
  • Adult Size: 39 inches (99.06 cm)
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years 

The robust sea snake lives in the oceans near south Asia and is found in regions like Thailand, Indonesia, and Malaysia. They are highly aquatic and almost never are seen on land.

They are extremely venomous and can kill if a bite is not treated within a couple of hours. With treatment and therapy, it is possible to survive a bite from this species.

Robust sea snakes have thick bodies and large heads. Their body is wider than their tail and is flat to help them swim.

Their tail is also shaped like an oar and allows them to move through the ocean freely. This species is also called the black-banded robust sea snake because of the large black bands that cover its body. White is the color of the other parts of its body. 

This species spends most of its time in the ocean, so bites are rare. They are sometimes found along the seashore, in river banks, and coral reefs in the areas they live in.

Harmless like most other sea snakes, this species is only dangerous for people going into its habitats, like fishermen or divers.

93. Black-banded Sea Snake

  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis nigrocinctus
  • Other Names: Wall’s Sea Snake, Daudin’s Sea Snake
  • Adult Size: 42.5 inches (107.9 cm)
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

The black-banded sea snake is an aquatic species that inhabit the Indian Ocean, and also the Bay of Bengal. This species is found in Thailand, Sri Lanka, and off the coast of other Asian countries.

Like other sea snakes, this species spends a majority of its life in the ocean and has traits that other snakes lack to survive. They are able to breathe through their skin and have specialized nostrils for swimming.

Black-banded sea snakes have dark bands over their body. Their head is small, and their body is thin to help in swimming in the water.

Their tail is all black and shaped like a paddle to help them swim. Brown or tan is the color of their dorsal, and their bellies are yellow or cream.

The bands on this snake are thick and make the snake look almost all black. They also have dark markings on their head.

This sea snake is rare to come across, and why studies on this species are rare. They are not aggressive and bites on humans almost never occur.

They spend most of their time in the ocean and dive up to depths of 100 meters.

 94. Russell’s Sea Snake

  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis obscurus
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 48 to 72 inches (121 to 182 inches)  
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

The Russell’s sea snake is a species native to the Indian Ocean and can be found in India, Sri Lanka, and Thailand. Like other sea snakes, this species is very aquatic, and never strays too far from the ocean.

They are highly venomous but do not harm humans regularly, due to their aquatic lifestyle.

This species is named after Patrick Russells, who is a herpetologist who specializes in Indian venomous snakes. The Russels sea snake is long and has a dark body.

It is similar to other sea snake species as it has a paddle tail and other features that help in its lifestyle.

Not much is known about the Russells Sea snake because of the lack of studies done on the snake. This species has other similar qualities to other Hydrophis species, like eating fish, and its pelagic lifestyle.

Russell’s sea snake and Russell’s viper (Daboia russelii) are not the same species. Both of these species are found in Thailand, and are named after Patrick Russells but belong to two different snake families.

95. Ornate Reef Sea Snake

Ornate Sea Snake (Hydrophis ornatus) in dark, grainy, wet sand in Fujairah, United Arab Emirates
A nOrnate Sea Snake (Hydrophis ornatus) in dark, grainy, wet sand in Fujairah, United Arab Emirates. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis ornatus
  • Other Names: Gray’s sea snake
  • Adult Size: 19.6 inches
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

Ornate reef snakes are a species of sea snake found in the ocean near South Asia. They can be found off the coasts of China, Japan, Thailand, New Guinea, Vietnam, and other areas.

They live in shallow coastal waters, muddy waters, estuaries, and other aquatic locations near the coast.

This species of sea snake has a thick head and body. They have a uniform length, unlike other sea snakes that vary in size.

This species can be green, to gray, and is covered in dark bands. The bands in older snakes will begin to fade. The belly of this snake has white or yellow coloring.

Ornate reef snakes are venomous but are much more aggressive than other species of sea snakes. They can become aggressive easily, and their odd movement on land makes a bite more likely to occur.

Fishermen, divers, beachgoers, and others who regularly go into their habitat are more likely to get bitten. A bite feels harmless at first, but death can occur if not treated properly.

96. Spiny-headed Sea Snake

Spiny-headed Sea Snake (Hydrophis peronii) at the sandy bottom of Noumea, New Caledonia
A Spiny-headed Sea Snake (Hydrophis peronii) at the sandy bottom of Noumea, New Caledonia. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis peronii
  • Other Names: Horned sea snake, Peron’s Sea Snake
  • Adult Size: 48 inches (121 cm)
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

Spiny-headed sea snakes are also called the horned sea snake.

They live in the Pacific Ocean in the western tropical areas. They are found in areas like Thailand, Vietnam, Indonesia, Australia, and more.

This species of sea snake prefers to live in sandy beds with coral reefs. They are one of the species of sea snake that is viviparous and gives birth to live young.

The spiny-headed sea snake gets its name from the raised scales above its eyes, which look similar to horns. Dark crossband patterns are painted on their body.

Spiny-headed sea snakes have small heads, large bodies, and thick tails in the shape of a paddle to help them swim. The underside of this species is white, with a faint blotched pattern.

Small fish are the main food this snake eats. Like other species of sea snakes they are highly venomous, but no other species have horns near their eyes.

Most of the time this species is encountered in sandy wet beaches and muddy waters. This species is highly aquatic, rarely comes in contact with humans due to its lifestyle.

97. Yellow-bellied Sea Snake

Yellow-bellied Sea Snake (Hydrophis platurus) in wet sand and sea foam in Los Santos, Panama
A Yellow-bellied Sea Snake (Hydrophis platurus) in wet sand and sea foam in Los Santos, Panama. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis platurus
  • Other Names: Pelagic Sea Snake
  • Adult Size: 35 inches
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

The yellow-bellied sea snake lives in most tropical ocean environments but is rare in the Atlantic Ocean.

They are found in Thailand, and will occasionally wash up to shore. This species has a large range and is one of the most widely distributed species of snakes.

Yellow-bellied sea snakes spend a majority of their lives in the ocean and use drift lines to travel quickly across the sea.

This species is easily identifiable by its yellow belly and brown-colored back. They have minimal patterns and are well adapted to live in the ocean.

They have a paddle-tail to help them swim and nostrils that will stop saltwater from entering. Colors for these snakes will vary as some can have a dark belly with a yellow back, while for others it is the opposite.

The yellow-bellied sea snake is able to survive 7 months of dehydration since the ocean lacks fresh water. They mainly feed on fish and swim backward to capture them.

The venom of this sea snake is just as potent as other types of sea snake. They locate their prey by detecting vibrations in the water.

98. Beaked Sea Snake

Beaked Sea Snake (Hydrophis schistosus) laying in the sand in Tamil Nadu, India
A Beaked Sea Snake (Hydrophis schistosus) laying in the sand in Tamil Nadu, India. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis schistosus
  • Other Names: Hook-nosed sea snake, Valakadeyan sea snake
  • Adult Size: 43 to 60 inches (109 to 152 cm)
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

The beaked sea snake lives in the Indo-Pacific ocean.

They are one of the most common sea snakes to come across and have populations in South Asia in Thailand, Vietnam, and Myanmar. Beaked sea snakes live in coastal habitats, and are highly aquatic.

This species can stay underwater for around 5 hours and will eliminate excess salt from its skin.

They can live on wet beaches, muddy bottoms, estuaries, and river mouth habitats. Great swimmers, this species can travel as far as 100 meters underwater.

Beaked snakes have long bodies and small heads. They get their name from their slightly down-turned snout, similar to that of a beak.

Dark green, olive, and gray coloring are on this species’ back, while its underside is white.

Beaked sea snakes are extremely deadly, and are responsible for a large amount of sea snake bites. They feed on fish in the water but are an aggressive species that will quickly bite.

99. Yellow Sea Snake

Yellow Sea Snake (Hydrophis spiralis) sitting in the wet sand in Maharashtra, India
A Yellow Sea Snake (Hydrophis spiralis) sitting in the wet sand in Maharashtra, India. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Elapidae 
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis spiralis
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 63 inches to 108 inches (160 to 274 cm)
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

Yellow sea snakes are found in the Indian Ocean and also live near Thailand.

They are aquatic, and will occasionally travel into depths as much as 50 meters. This snake is rare to find because it only lives in the ocean, but will also hang around the bottoms of sandy areas.

This species of sea snake is one of the longest, and can sometimes reach lengths of 9.8 feet long. Like their name suggests they have yellowish skin but black bands also encircle their body.

When young this species has a black head, but adults have yellow heads. The underside of the yellow sea snake is cream, and they also have a paddle tail like other sea snakes.

A majority of the yellow sea snakes’ diet consists of eels. Hunting can occur in the day or night, and they will search for them at the bottom of muddy waters.

This species is extremely venomous but not dangerous due to its habitat location. Their venom is used for medical purposes and tumor research.

100. Stokes’s Sea Snake

Stokes's Sea Snake (Hydrophis stokesii) in wet sand at Hervey Bay, Queensland, Australia
A Stokes’s Sea Snake (Hydrophis stokesii) in wet sand at Hervey Bay, Queensland, Australia. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Elapidae 
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis stokesii
  • Other Names: Large-headed Sea Snake
  • Adult Size: 60 inches (152 cm)
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years 

Stokes’ sea snakes are named after Admiral John Lort Stokes and are found in the Indo-Pacific oceanic waters. They live in the waters near south Asia near Thailand.

This species is mainly aquatic, living in the ocean. They are sometimes seen migrating together in large numbers.

Heavy and stout, Stokes sea snakes are the heaviest of all sea snakes, and also have the largest fangs. Cream, brown, and black are some of the colors they come in.

Some snakes will have blotches, while others can have crossbands or rings covering them. The tail of this species is flat to help swim in the ocean.

Stokes sea snakes differentiate themselves from other sea snakes with their robust bodies and large heads.

Fishes and eels are what this species feeds on, similar to other sea snakes. Stokes sea snake is venomous but usually harmless.

They rarely come in contact with humans and have no deaths attributed to them.

101. West Coast Black-headed Sea Snake

  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Elapidae 
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis torquatus
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 40 inches (101cm)
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years

The west coast black-headed sea snake is an aquatic species that is found in southeast Asia. They are found along the coasts of countries in the coast of Thailand and are not able to move onto land. Most of their population is in the Gulf of Thailand.

Gray or white are the most common colors for this snake. They are known for their striped pattern that looks similar to collard, that runs down their body.

These stripes can be dark gray, white, or yellow, and their underside is always white. As this snake ages, it loses its pattern.

They have flat tails to help them swim, and their heads are all black like their name suggests.

The west coast black-headed snake is extremely rare to find, and not much research has been done about this species. Like other sea snakes, they are extremely venomous and spend most of their lives in the ocean.

Bites from most sea snakes species are rare since this is one of the rarest species to come across. 

102. Viperine Sea Snake

Viperine Sea Snake (Hydrophis viperinus) on coarse sand near Point Pedro, Jaffna, Sri Lanka
A Viperine Sea Snake (Hydrophis viperinus) on coarse sand near Point Pedro, Jaffna, Sri Lanka. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Elapidae
  • Scientific Name: Hydrophis viperinus
  • Other Names: Gray Sea Snake
  • Adult Size: 32 to 36 inches (81 to 91 cm)
  • Lifespan: 3.5 to 10 years 

Viperine sea snakes are rare but can be found in Thailand.

They inhabit the Indian and western Pacific oceans and are found along the coasts of many countries in South Asia. This species has a widespread distribution but is found in the ocean, and they cannot travel onto land like a water snake.

Viperine sea snakes have a dark gray, peach, or green coloring with white bellies. They have thick bodies and smooth scales.

The tail of this species is black and flat to help it swim. Some viperine sea snakes may have diamond blotches, while others have no pattern.

Eels, small fish, and other aquatic life are what this species eats. Viperine sea snakes have a deadly bite of very potent venom.

They are rare and not aggressive so bites on humans are low. Muddy areas and swamps near the coast are where this species is sometimes found.

They are highly aquatic like other sea snakes and can hold their breath for up to 8 hours.

FAQ

What kind of snakes are in Thailand?

In Thailand, there are over 200 different kinds of snake species, and around 60 of them are venomous. With there being so many species in the country, you can find all different kinds like water snakes, pythons, pit vipers, cobras, and more.

Are snakes common in Thailand?

Snakes are common to come across in Thailand since there are so many different species in the country. With over 200 different snakes you cross paths with them quite often.

Are there dangerous snakes in Thailand?

There are around 60 venomous species in Thailand. Some snakes are more dangerous than others, and some of the most dangerous types are vipers, cobras, and sea snakes.

Are there king cobras in Thailand?

King cobras live in Thailand, as well as other countries in Southeast Asia like Vietnam, Laos, and Bangladesh. King cobras are the largest cobra, but also the largest venomous snake in the world.

They can regularly grow up to 12 feet, but the largest of them grow up to 18 feet.

Are there anacondas in Thailand?

In Thailand, there are not any Anaconda species that are found in the country natively. Anacondas are endemic to South America, but pythons are found in the country.

Some people do try to smuggle anaconda into Thailand illegally.

What is the most dangerous snake in Thailand?

In Thailand, the most dangerous snake in the country is the Monocled Cobra, which is able to kill someone within an hour of biting them. Since the snake is the cause for the most fatalities due to snake venom in Thailand.

Snakebite in Thailand what to do?

If you are treated by a snake in Thailand you should get away from the snake as quickly as possible, and seek immediate medical treatment. The bite from some snakes are lethal, so you should seek treatment as soon as possible.

Conclusion

In Thailand, there are around 230+ snakes in the country. Having so many snakes in the country makes them common to come across, and some of them are extremely deadly.

Deadly snakes like cobras and vipers are feared, but most snakes are harmless if left alone. The abundance of snakes makes it dangerous to walk in tall grass, but they can always find their way out of the wild.

In this article, you got to learn about just 102 different species in Thailand, but there is much more that you can find in the country. In southeast Asia, snakes are a common animal, living in mountains, deserts, forests, cobras, wetlands, and many other types of habitats.

Please leave us a comment down below if you have any questions or inquiries.

References

https://www.en.siam-info.de/venomous_animals/snakes_common.html

https://www.saovabha.com/en/snakefarm_nonvenom.asp

https://www.thainationalparks.com/list-of-snakes-in-thailand

https://bangkokherps.wordpress.com/snakes/

https://www.thailandsnakes.com/thailand-snake-notes/most-common-snakes/

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William Dunlop

Sunday 6th of November 2022

Wondering if you can help identify a snake found in my garden. I know most types that visit u but cannot find any pictures if it and don’t have a picture, but can describe it. My Thai wife says it is dangerous. A small thin snake about a half metre long, slow moving, brown and tan stripes from head to tail, belly is white with red pattern.

Snaketracks

Sunday 6th of November 2022

If you can send us a pic, that will help a lot the next time you see it. But trust your wife and stay away as she may be right that it is dangerous.