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Spiders in Georgia 

There are more than 50 different spider species in Georgia and around 3,000 species that live in the United States.

Many of the spiders that you find in Georgia can also be found in other parts of the country, and some even across the globe. With so many different species each spider you come across gives you something new to learn and appreciate.

In this article, you will discover the most common spiders in Georgia. Many of the species in the state are extremely similar, while others have minor differences.

Learning about a spider’s behavior, appearance, and habitat is how you can identify different species. Most spiders are sexually dimorphic, and even the same species can have major differences between the sexes. 

Orbweavers, jumpings spiders, widows, and wandering spiders are just some of the variety of arachnids that live in Georgia. On this list, you will find many of the spiders that live in Georgia.

The mountains, marshes, valleys, and coastal plains spread across the Georgian landscape make perfect habitats for spiders. Let’s learn about the types of spiders you can find in Georgia. 

Table of Contents

  1. Spiders in Georgia
    1. Twin-Flagged Jumping Spider
    2. White-jawed Jumping Spider
    3. Bold Jumping Spider
    4. Sylvana Jumping Spider
    5. Canopy Jumping Spider
    6. Magnolia Green Jumping Spider
    7. Dimorphic Jumping Spider
    8. Gray Wall Jumping Spider
    9. Regal Jumping Spider
    10. Starbellied Orbweaver
    11. Giant Lichen Orbweaver
    12. Marbled Orbweaver
    13. Yellow Garden Spider
    14. Banded Garden Spider
    15. Mabel Orchard Orbweaver
    16. Orchard Orbweaver
    17. Furrow Orbweaver
    18. Spiny-backed Orbweaver
    19. Hentz Orbweaver
    20. Tropical Orbweaver
    21. Lined Orbweaver
    22. Missing Sector Orbweaver
    23. Arabesque Orbweaver
    24. Shamrock Orbweaver
    25. Red-femured Spotted Orbweaver
    26. Golden Silk Orbweaver
    27. Arrow-shaped Micrathena
    28. Spined Micrathena
    29. White Micrathena
    30. Joro Spider
    31. Ravine Trapdoor Spider
    32. White-banded Fishing Spider
    33. Dark Fishing Spider
    34. Six-spotted Fishing Spider
    35. Eastern Parsons Spider
    36. Huntsman Spider
    37. Southern House Spider
    38. Common House Spider
    39. Triangulate Combfoot
    40. Rabbit Hutch Spider
    41. False Black Widow
    42. Bowl and Doily Spider
    43. Brown Widow
    44. Northern Black Widow
    45. Southern Black Widow
    46. Brown Recluse
    47. Running Crab Spider
    48. Deadly Ground Crab Spider
    49. Green Lynx Spider
    50. Long-bodied Cellar Spider
    51. American Nursery Web Spider
    52. Dotted Wolf Spider
    53. Tiger Wolf Spider
    54. Spitting Spider
    55. American Grass Spider
    56. Red-spotted Ant Mimic Spider
    57. Long-palped Ant Mimic Spider
    58. Southeastern Wandering Spider
    59. Northern Yellow Sac Spider
    60. Leaf-curling Sac Spider
    61. Woodlouse Spider
    62. Broad-faced Sac Spider
  2. FAQ
  3. Conclusion

Spiders in Georgia 

1. Twin-Flagged Jumping Spider 

Twin-flagged Jumping Spider (Anasaitis canosa) on a green surface in Bibb County, Georgia, USA
A Twin-flagged Jumping Spider (Anasaitis canosa) on a green surface in Bibb County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Anasaitis canosa
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 5 to 6 mm ( 0.19 to 0.23 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: $15

The twin-flagged jumping spider is a species that lives in Georgia and is a common species across the southern United States. Jumping spiders like this species are active during the day, and at night they create a silk nest to rest in.

In leaf litter, and on vertical surfaces like walls are where this species can be found. It does not use silk to make webs like other spiders, but they use it as a tether to safely jump around. 

The twin-flagged jumping spider is named after the pattern of two markings that appear on its head, which look similar to two pennants. Males are dark in color but are slightly smaller than females.

This species is mostly black but has white and tan markings on its body. As a member of the Salticidae family, they share traits similar to other species, like legs designed for jumping, and binocular vision. 

The twin-flagged jumping spider feeds on small insects like ants, flies, and beetles is what this spider eats. Like a cat, they stalk their prey and wait for the perfect time to strike.

When hunting animals that can potentially attack them they are much more careful in how they hunt. 

2. White-jawed Jumping Spider 

White-jawed Jumping Spider (Hentzia mitrata) hanging onto a thin leaf in Athens, Georgia, USA
A White-jawed Jumping Spider (Hentzia mitrata) hanging onto a thin leaf in Athens, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Hentzia mitrata
  • Other Names: Crowned Hentzia 
  • Adult Size: 3 to 5 mm ( 0.11 to 0.19 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a

White jawed jumping spiders are a harmless species that inhabit Georgia, and other areas in North America. This spider’s primary range is within the eastern half of the United States.

The best time to find these spiders is at the peak of spring. Common in highly vegetated areas, they are often seen in trees, shrubs, and other plant life. 

The white-jawed jumping spider is snow white, and males and females are around the same size. Females are usually all white and may have mottled markings on the back of their abdomen.

Males may have an orange coloring on their back, and atop their heads. When young males look similar to females but can get tan, and orangish markings on them as they age.

The front two legs of the male are the easiest way to distinguish their sex, as males’ two front legs are longer than females. 

Small insects are actively preyed on by this spider. Like other jumping spiders they spend their time hunting during the day, eating insects like moths, worms, and flies.

Smaller prey that does not have any fangs or pincers is what this species prefers to prey on. With some of the best eyesight in spiders, they use it with their long jumps to ambush prey. 

3. Bold Jumping Spider 

Bold Jumping Spider (Phidippus audax) on a leaf in Lowndes County, Georgia, USA
A Bold Jumping Spider (Phidippus audax) on a leaf in Lowndes County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus audax 
  • Other Names: Daring jumping spider 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 19 mm (0.23 to 0.74 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

Bold jumping spiders are a vibrant species of Salticidae and are found across the US. This species is all black and is covered in white tufts of hair.

Males are slightly smaller, and have darker colors, with white tufts of hair above their eyes. The chelicerae of this spider are green and iridescent. Orange or white spots are present on the back of this species’ abdomen. 

Spring is when jumping spiders become active, and can be found in a variety of habitats. They are active during the day and spend most of their time hunting on vertical surfaces.

The bold jumping spider prefers open areas, like grasslands, fields, and urban areas. Jumping spiders use silk to make nests for eggs or to rest, but do not make large webs. 

Jumping spiders are quick, and are able to be around 10 to 50 times the length of their body. Oftentimes they are found on vertical surfaces since it helps them spot prey easily.

Bold jumping spiders feed on small insects and use their venom to neutralize the prey they pounce on. A bite from this species and other jumping spiders is harmless to humans.

The cute look of this spider is why so many love them, and how the Bold Jumping Spider became the state spider of New Hampshire.

4. Sylvana Jumping Spider 

Sylvana Jumping Spider (Colonus sylvanus) on a leaf in Bibb County, Georgia, USA
A Sylvana Jumping Spider (Colonus sylvanus) on a leaf in Bibb County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Colonus sylvanus 
  • Other Names: Woodland jumping spider 
  • Adult Size: 7.55 mm (0.29 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

The Sylvana jumping spider is also known as the Woodland jumping spider and is a species found in the United States and Panama. A spider you can find in Georgia, this spider is most active in spring and summer.

Vegetated habitats are where this species prefers to live, but they are also common in urban areas. Active during the day, the Sylvana jumping spider spends most of its time hunting or looking for a mate. 

Males and females have similar body shapes but are colored differently. Males of this species have a small pointed abdomen, with a bright red head.

Their abdomen is grayish tan, with white markings, and their legs are all black. Females are a cream color, with a slightly larger abdomen. They have black dots covering their abdomen and translucent-like appendages. 

The Sylvana jumping spider hunts in highly vegetated areas, and may even make its way indoors looking for food. They eat small insects and are great at controlling the population of insects nearby. 

5. Canopy Jumping Spider 

Canopy Jumping Spider (Phidippus otiosus) on a leaf in Athens, Georgia, USA
A Canopy Jumping Spider (Phidippus otiosus) on a leaf in Athens, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus otiosus 
  • Other Names: n/a  
  • Adult Size: 8 to 16 mm (0.31 to 0.62 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

The canopy jumping spider is native to the southern United States and is a common species in Georgia. This species lives in woodland and deciduous habitats.

This spider is a tree-dwelling species. It is mostly seen in the spring and summer. Jumping spiders are active during the day, and spend this time hunting, and looking for a mate.

Males will try to mate with any female they come across, and attempt to court females with an arm-waving dance. 

Canopy jumping is one of the larger species of jumping spiders, and is covered in fur. Males have black coloring, with white tufts of hair.

They look similar to the bold jumping spider and have reddish spots on the back of their abdomen.

Females look similar but have an orange or tan coloring. Canopy jumping spiders have iridescent chelicerae that look green or purple. 

Canopy jumping spiders spend most of their time in the treetops, and hunt for small insects. In winter most of the adults die off, but the egg sacs and sub-adults of this species overwinter until the spring comes. 

6. Magnolia Green Jumping Spider

Magnolia Green Jumping Spider (Lyssomanes viridis) on a leaf in Bibb County, Georgia, USA
A Magnolia Green Jumping Spider (Lyssomanes viridis) on a leaf in Bibb County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Lyssomanes viridis 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 8 mm (0.19 to 0.31 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Native to North America, the Magnolia green jumper is a unique species of jumping spider you may come across in Georgia.

This spider is translucent, and green, with some thinking it looks like a miniature green lynx spider. The magnolia green jumper is a glow-in-the-dark green.

Even the large two front eyes of this spider are green, while the rest are black. On the top of the head is an orangish, white, or black mark. Males have more orange coloring and extremely large legs. 

Magnolia green jumpers are most common in the southern United States. They live in highly vegetated habitats and use their coloring to blend into their habitat.

As its name suggests, this spider prefers to inhabit the leaves of the magnolia tree. 

The magnolia green jumper is an ambush hunter similar to other salticidae. This spider has a shorter jumper compared to other members of its family, as its legs are much longer.

They feed on small insects like mites, worms, and flies. 

7. Dimorphic Jumping Spider 

Dimphoric Jumping Spider (Maevia inclemens) on a leaf in White County, Georgia, USA
A Dimphoric Jumping Spider (Maevia inclemens) on a leaf in White County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Maevia inclemens 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 4.75 to 8 mm (0.187 to 0.31 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

The dimorphic jumping spider is a species native to the Central United States, but this spider is also common in Georgia.

They live in urban areas and are often found on vegetation like bushes or trees. Spring and summer are when this species is most active, and as the year goes on they are seen much less.

Maevia inclemens is named the dimorphic jumping spider because of the two appearances this species comes in. The two appearances of this spider come in extremely different and are based on the gender they are.

Males are slightly smaller in size and have an all-black, or mottled body and head. Females have a more tannish color, with a much larger abdomen, and are also hairier. 

It is easy to confuse the male and females of this spider to be two different species. Dimorphic Jumping spiders are quick and are able to leap large distances.

They feed on small insects and ambush prey when they get close enough. 

8. Gray Wall Jumping Spider 

Gray Wall Jumping Spider (Menemerus bivittatus) on a white wall in Savannah, Georgia, USA
A Gray Wall Jumping Spider (Menemerus bivittatus) on a white wall in Savannah, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Menemerus bivittatus 
  • Other Names: Gray jumping spider 
  • Adult Size: 8 to 10 mm (0.31 to 0.39 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Originally native to Africa, the gray wall jumper is a jumping spider you may find in Georgia. Active during the day, this species is common to find in urban areas.

Gray wall jumpers spend most of their time alone and are most active in spring and early summer. Males of this species are equipped with a stridulatory organ that can create a sound.

This is used to attract a female and mate. Females lay up to 40 eggs, laying them in a secluded area, and enclosing them in a silk sac.

This species has a gray coloring, but males are much darker than females. Dark bands cover this species’ legs.

Male gray wall jumpers have a bold stripe that runs through the middle of their abdomen that separates as it gets to their carapace. Females have a black marking that runs around the edge of their dorsal. 

Gray wall jumpers feed on mostly flies and other insects that are active in the spring. In Africa, they have been documented sitting at the entrance of bee hives and pouncing on the ones coming home.

Their hunting ability and hardiness are what helped this species spread its population across the globe. 

9. Regal Jumping Spider 

Regal Jumping Spider (Phidippus regius) on bark in Long County, Georgia, USA
A Regal Jumping Spider (Phidippus regius) on bark in Long County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus regius 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 18 mm ( 0.23 to 0.70 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: $30 

The regal jumping spider is a common species found across the US and in Georgia. This species belongs to one of the largest and has vibrant colors.

This species lives in warm habitats with plenty of moisture. They are common in the southeastern US and are commonly found across Georgia. This species is most active from spring to summer. 

Regal jumping spiders are sexually dimorphic, with females being slightly larger than the males. Males are black, with thoughts of white hair on them, and white markings on their abdomen.

Females have an orange coloring on the top of their heads and abdomen. Tan small hairs cover the female’s body and legs, with bright orange blotches on the abdomen. 

Regal jumping spiders are one of the most common Salticidae kept as pets because of their large size, vibrant colors, and availability. Jumping spiders are easy to keep, and only require a small terrarium to live in.

Flies and other small insects are what this species feeds on. They are great hunters, using their excellent eyesight and fast leaps to take down prey. 

10. Starbellied Orbweaver 

Starbellied Orbweaver (Acanthepeira stellata) on a leaf in Cherokee County, Georgia, USA
A Starbellied Orbweaver (Acanthepeira stellata) on a leaf in Cherokee County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Acanthepeira stellata 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 15 mm ( 0.19 to 0.59 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: $20 

The star-bellied orb weaver is a common species found across North America. They live in vegetated and sunny areas, and females create large circular webs.

This species is nocturnal and hides in a secluded area at night. Summer and fall are when this species is seen most often, and in winter most of these spiders will die. Eggs laid by the star-bellied orb weaver in hidden areas are over winter, then hatch in the spring. 

The star-bellied orb weaver is named after the shape of its abdomen, which is covered in star-like spikes.

Females have a much larger abdomen, with thicker spines. Males of this species also have spikes on their back, but their abdomen is much larger, and their legs longer. Tan to orangish is the color this species appears in. 

Starbelleid orbweavers hide in the corner of their web, and when something falls into it they rush to take down their prey. This species is mildly venomous but only dangerous to the small insects it eats.

Moths, mosquitoes, and other flying insects are what they primarily feed on. 

11. Giant Lichen Orbweaver 

Giant Lichen Orbweaver (Araneus bicentenarius) on a green leaf in Bibb County, Georgia, USA
A Giant Lichen Orbweaver (Araneus bicentenarius) on a green leaf in Bibb County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Araneus bicentenarius
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 10 to 30 mm ( 0.39 to 1.18 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a

On the eastern half of the United States, and in Georgia lives the giant lichen orbweaver. This species is active from summer to fall.

They build large circular webs, with some of them being as large as 8 feet. Woodlands and forests are the habitats this species lives in. This spider is associated with and lives near lichens, which is a type of fungus. 

Giant lichens orbweavers may not be the largest species of Araneidae, but they are one of the heaviest. They have a greenish to gray body, with a mottled pattern of white and dark markings on their body.

Their legs are covered in orange and black bands. Females have a large round abdomen, and males are slightly smaller than them. The color of their body looks similar to the fungus and moss found in their habitat, and their abdomen has a round hump on it.

This spider is nocturnal and does not sit in the center of its web often like other orbweavers. They hide in the corner of their web and wait to ambush insects that get caught in their trap.

Birds commonly feed on this species, which is why the giant lichen orbweaver is cautious and hides often. 

12. Marbled Orbweaver 

Marbled Orbweaver (Araneus marmoreus) on its web in Troup County, Georgia, USA
A Marbled Orbweaver (Araneus marmoreus) on its web in Troup County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Araneus marmoreus 
  • Other Names: Pumpkin spider 
  • Adult Size: 9 to 22 mm (0.35 to 0.86 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 

Grassy habits with a variety of plant life are where the marbled orbweaver can be found. They are common in moist habitats and make their webs near rivers and creeks.

This spider makes large webs in areas with high insect traffic and creates a silk retreat to stay out of sight of predators. Like most other orbweavers the marbled orb weaver is common to find near the end of summer, and fall. 

The pumpkin spider is another name for Araneus marmoreus, because of its orange coloring and large round abdomen. This species also appears in other colors like black, yellow, tan, gray, and white.

They have a marbled pattern on their body, and dark bands covering their legs. Males of this species have much smaller abdomens than females and long legs. Sitting in a female’s web is where males are often seen. 

Insects are what this species primarily preys on. Being nocturnal they can be seen sitting on their web at night, and waiting for insects to get caught in their web.

The bite from the marbled orbweaver is venomous but harmless to humans. 

13. Yellow Garden Spider 

Yellow Garden Spider (Argiope aurantia) on its web in greenery in Augusta, Georgia, USA 
A Yellow Garden Spider (Argiope aurantia) on its web in greenery in Augusta, Georgia, USA . – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Argiope aurantia 
  • Other Names: Black and Yellow garden spider  
  • Adult Size: 5 to 28 mm ( 0.2 to 1.1 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: $8

One of the most common garden spiders in the United States, the black and yellow garden spider has a large range spread across North America.

This species lives in highly vegetated areas like gardens, fields, and forests. They build large webs, and in the center is a stabilimentum.

The webs stabilimentum is in a zig-zag pattern and is a trait found in the Argiope genus of orbweavers. It is theorized the stabilimentum keeps its webs strong, and lets birds avoid hitting it when flying. 

This species has black and yellow coloring. Females are much larger than males, but both look similar to each other.

They have long spindly legs, and an oval-shaped abdomen. When sitting in their webs they are in the shape of an X and have their head pointed to the ground. 

Active in the day, this species feeds on flying insects like bees, flies, and butterflies. They may hide to avoid predators and use vibrations to know when something is caught in their trap.

The web this species makes is large, and the silk strong. Being so large this spider has been shown to eat larger animals like birds and bats whenever it gets the chance. 

14. Banded Garden Spider 

Banded Garden Spider (Argiope trifasciata) on its web near leaves in Athens, Georgia, USA
A Banded Garden Spider (Argiope trifasciata) on its web near leaves in Athens, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Argiope trifasciata 
  • Other Names: Banded orb-weaving spider 
  • Adult Size: 15 to 25 mm (0.59 to 0.98 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The banded garden spider lives across the United States, and Canada. They live in grassy areas like prairies, gardens, swamps, and woodlands.

Only living around a year, winter is when most of these spiders die off. Their eggs are laid in the fall survive the winter, then hatch during the spring.

Summer and fall are when the banded garden spider is seen most often, since that is when most are mature, and trying to mate. 

Banded garden spiders are a large species with black, yellow, and white bands covering their body. They have large round abdomens and black spindly legs.

Males are much smaller than females and are usually seen sitting in a female’s web. Active during the day, this spider is often seen sitting in the center of its web. They sit with their head facing the ground and hold their legs in an X pattern. 

Flying insects like flies, wasps, grasshoppers, and cicadas are just a few of the animals they eat. Large webs are created to capture the variety of insects that live near them.

In the center of their web is a zig-zag pattern. While large, the bite from this species is harmless to humans. 

15. Mabel Orchard Orbweaver

Mabel Orchard Orbweaver (Leucauge argyrobapta) on a web in Savannah, Georgia, USA
A Mabel Orchard Orbweaver (Leucauge argyrobapta) on a web in Savannah, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Tetragnathidae 
  • Scientific Name: Leucauge argyrobapta 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 3.5 to 7.5 mm ( 0.13 to 0.29 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Mabel orbweaver is a species of long-jawed orbweaver that inhabit Georgia and other areas within North America. This species lives in large circular webs it creates, and are found in highly vegetated areas.

Woodlands, meadows, gardens, and orchards are common places. This spider is seen from spring until the end of fall. 

Mable orchard orbweavers have green bodies, with silver, red, and yellow coloring. They have long spindly legs, and oval-shaped abdomens. The head of this species is extremely small compared to the rest of its body.

Mable orchard orbweavers were first discovered by Charles Darwin in Brazil. This spider uses its large webs to catch a variety of insects.

They have mild venom to neutralize prey and use it to take down humans. This species is harmless, and one of the most beautiful spiders to examine in the wild.

Birds are the main animal that preys on this spider, as they are active during the day. 

16. Orchard Orbweaver 

Orchard Orbweaver (Leucauge venusta) in its web at the Atlanta Botanical Garden, Gainesville, Georgia, USA
An Orchard Orbweaver (Leucauge venusta) in its web at the Atlanta Botanical Garden, Gainesville, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Tetragnathidae
  • Scientific Name: Leucauge venusta 
  • Other Names: Orchard spider 
  • Adult Size: 3.5 to 7.5 mm (0.13 to 0.29 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 

The orchard orbweaver is a long-jawed orb weaver species that lives in Central America, and parts of Canada. This spider is also seen in Georgia and can be found throughout the state’s variety of vegetated habitats.

Grasslands, gardens, meadows, and orchards are the most common places this spider is seen. They create large circular webs and are active during the day.

Orchard orbweavers have an oval-shaped abdomen and long spindly legs. They are emerald green in color and have markings of red, silver, white and yellow covering their body.

Males are much smaller than females and have a light green coloring. They are usually seen sitting in the female’s web. 

Orchard orbweavers are active mostly in the summer and fall. They feed on the variety of insects that get caught in their web in this period.

Orchard orbweavers lay eggs at the end of fall, which takes all winter to hatch during the spring. 

17. Furrow Orbweaver

Furrow Orbweaver (Larinioides cornutus) in its web in Wyomia Tyus Olympic Park, Griffin, Georgia, USA
A Furrow Orbweaver (Larinioides cornutus) in its web in Wyomia Tyus Olympic Park, Griffin, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Larinioides cornutus 
  • Other Names: Furrow Spider
  • Adult Size: 10 to 12 mm (0.39 to 0.47 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The furrow spider is an orbweaver species found all across the United States. This spider is seen sitting in the large circular webs they make and is most active from spring to fall.

Furrow spiders are nocturnal, and make their web near houses, water, and other man-made structures. At night you may occasionally see them sitting in the center of their web. 

Furrow spiders have tan coloring, with dark bands running down their legs. They are named after the grayish to tan furrow pattern that appears on their back.

This spider has a large abdomen and spindly legs. Small hairs cover this spider’s body, and they have dark bands that run down their legs. 

Furrow orb weavers eat the small flying insects that get caught in their web. Porches and other well-lit areas are where they commonly make their web since light attracts insects.

Furrow orbweavers are active at night to avoid birds and other day predators. 

18. Spiny-backed Orbweaver 

Spinybacked Orbweaver (Gasteracantha cancriformis) on its web in Watkinsville, Georgia, USA
A Spinybacked Orbweaver (Gasteracantha cancriformis) on its web in Watkinsville, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Gasteracantha cancriformis 
  • Other Names: Crab-like Orbweaver 
  • Adult Size: 2 to 9 mm (0.07 to 0.35 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The spiny-backed orbweaver is a spider native to North America and is a species you can find in Georgia. They live in woodlands, gardens, and other shrubby areas.

For this species, it is common for them to live in large colonies, and coexist with each other. They create large circular webs and are active at night. 

Spiny orbweavers are named after the spines that protrude from their body. They have a possibility of white, red, black, yellow, red, and orange coloring.

Their spikes are usually black or red. Black dimples cover their oval-shaped abdomen. Their legs and small carapace are jet black in color. 

The spiny orb weaver eats a variety of insects and waits for them to get caught in their web. This species has mild venom similar to other orbweavers, and a bite from this spider is similar to a bee sting.

The spikes on their back are flashy, but also help to deter predators. 

19. Hentz Orbweaver 

Hentz Orbweaver (Neoscona crucifera) in its web in Cumming, Georgia, USA
A Hentz Orbweaver (Neoscona crucifera) in its web in Cumming, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneida 
  • Scientific Name: Neoscona crucifera 
  • Other Names: Spotted orb weaver 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 20 mm (0.19 to 0.78 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The Hentz orbweaver is one of the most common members of the Araneidae spiders that can be found in the United States. In yards, gardens, fields, parks, and on the sides of man-made structures are where this species lives.

They create circular webs to live in and are nocturnal. In the morning this spider takes down its web by eating it, which receives the spider’s silk.

Taking down their web helps hide from predators easies, but they may also hide in a secluded area and leave up their web. 

Hentz orbweavers have a tan coloring which helps them blend into wooded habitats. This spider has a mottled pattern and thick hairs that cover its legs.

They have large abdomens, and spindly legs, similar to other orbweavers. Red coloring on this spider’s leg can help identify this species. 

Insects are the main food source for this spider, and they build their webs in moist, well-lightened areas. Flies, mosquitoes, moths, and other flying insects are what this species eats. 

20. Tropical Orbweaver 

Tropical Orbweaver (Eriophora ravilla) on a leaf in Lowndes County, Georgia, USA
A Tropical Orbweaver (Eriophora ravilla) on a leaf in Lowndes County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Eriophora ravilla 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 20 mm ( 0.23 to 0.78 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: $20 

The tropical orbweaver is a species common across the United States and inhabits Georgia. Grassy fields, gardens, forests, and wetlands are some of the areas this species lives.

Females build large circular webs similar to other orbweaver spiders. Implied in its name, this spider prefers to live in a tropical environment.

They are active at night, taking down their web when the sun begins to rise. A trait common in some of the other members in the orbweavers family, this spider eats its silk to recycle it. 

Tropical orbweavers look similar to the Hentz orbweaver, and can easily be confused for that species. This spider is tan and covered in small thick hairs.

They have a pattern of spots, a white line, or a green blotch that appears on their back. Males are similar to females but are small and thinner. 

The tropical orb weaver feeds on a variety of insects that appear at night. Moths, mosquitoes, and other flying insects are what they feed on the most.

In warmer states, this species can be active year-round, but when the temperatures get too cold most begin to die off until spring. 

21. Lined Orbweaver 

Lined Orbweaver (Mangora gibberosa) on a yellow flower petal in Winterville, Georgia, USA
A Lined Orbweaver (Mangora gibberosa) on a yellow flower petal in Winterville, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate   
  • Family: Araneae 
  • Scientific Name: Mangora gibberosa 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 6 mm (0.2 to 0.25 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

In the eastern half of the United States, the lined orbweaver is a common species to find. This spider lives in highly vegetated areas like woodlands, grasslands, fields, and gardens.

They create large circular webs in these areas. In the center of their web, they use thick silk to create a stabilimenta circle. 

A medium-sized spider, that lined orbweaver is named after the line marking that appears on its abdomen. They have a white abdomen, covered in tan markings.

Their body and legs have a translucent green coloring. Males of this species have thinner abdomen, but longer legs. 

Small insects make up the majority of the lined orbweavers diet. They eat anything that gets caught in their web, including animals like small frogs.

Summer and fall are when this species and its web is at their largest. Males rarely spin webs and spend most of their time looking for a female to mate with. 

22. Missing Sector Orbweaver

Missing Sector Orbweaver (Zygiella x-notata) on a threaded surface in Macon County, Georgia, USA
A Missing Sector Orbweaver (Zygiella x-notata) on a threaded surface in Macon County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Zygiella x-notata 
  • Other Names: Silver-sided Sector Spider 
  • Adult Size: 15 mm (0.59 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 5 to 7 months 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The missing sector orb weaver lives across the globe and is a common Araneidae species. This spider inhabits the southeastern and western states, including Georgia.

They live in areas that have little human traffic and build their webs in highly vegetated areas. Spring to fall is when this spider can be found in Georgia, and most die when winter comes. 

Missing sector orb weavers have silver, black, white, and yellow coloring. They have a mottled pattern on their round abdomen. Females are larger than males, but showcase fewer patterns, and have a smaller cream-colored abdomen. 

This species gets its name from its web, which has a missing sector in its middle. Insects like gnats, flies, and other flying bugs are what they primarily eat. The bite from this spider is venomous but harmless. 

23. Arabesque Orbweaver 

Arabesque Orbweaver (Neoscona arabesca) on a leaf in Millen, Georgia, USA
An Arabesque Orbweaver (Neoscona arabesca) on a leaf in Millen, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Tetragnathidae
  • Scientific Name: Neoscona arabesca 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 7 mm (0.19 to 0.27 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The arabesque orbweaver is a common species found across the United States. This spider lives near bushes, trees, and other vegetation.

It is common for them to build their homes near man-made structures. This spider is not aggressive and is only active at night. During the day they can be seen sitting in the center of their web.

Arabesque orbweavers are named after the pattern on their pattern. They have swirls and curls on them and appear in brown, tan, orange, black, or gray coloring.

This species has a similar body shape compared to other orbweavers. They are medium to small in size and are covered in thick hairs.

The arabesque orbweaver feeds on the insects that get caught in their web at night. They use vibrations to know when something is caught in their trap.

This spider is venomous but only harmful to the small insects they feed on. Birds are the main predator of this species, which they try to avoid by only being active at night.  

24. Shamrock Orbweaver

Shamrock Orbweaver (Araneus trifolium) climbing a leaf at Moss Beach, California, USA
A Shamrock Orbweaver (Araneus trifolium) climbing a leaf at Moss Beach, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Araneus trifolium 
  • Other Names: Shamrock Spider 
  • Adult Size: 19 mm (0.74 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Shamrock spiders are native to North America and are a member of the orb weaver family. They live in tropical climates filled with vegetation, which is why they enjoy Georgia.

Shamrock spiders can be found in gardens, woodlands, parks, and near man-made structures. They use plant life and other vegetation to support their web. 

The shamrock spider may be white, red, purple, yellow, or tan, and varies greatly in appearance. It is common for them to have a white, or light-colored mottled pattern.

The shamrock spider’s abdomen is round, and its legs are spindly. Shamrock spider legs are lightly colored, with dark bands running down them.

This spider is also called the pumpkin spider because of their rounded body, and vibrant orange coloring. 

Insects are the main food this spider eats, waiting for them to get trapped in their web. Their eyesight is not the best, but they use vibrations to know if something is in their web. 

25. Red-femured Spotted Orbweaver 

Red-spotted Orbweaver (Araneus cingulatus) on a leaf in Georgia, USA
A Red-spotted Orbweaver (Araneus cingulatus) on a leaf in Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Tetragnathidae
  • Scientific Name: Araneus cingulatus 
  • Other Names: Red-spotted orbweaver 
  • Adult Size: 5 mm ( 0.19 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The red-femured spotted orb weavers live across the eastern United States and are a small orb-weaving species. Georgia and other dates with tropical-type habitats are where they are common.

These spiders create large circular webs similar to catching insects and living in. Females create large webs and males rarely do. When mating occurs males hang around a female’s web, and wait to breed. 

Red-femured spotted orb weavers are known for their color. This species has black on its back, and legs, as well as bright red.

They are covered in small hairs and have spots that cover them. The spots that appear on them, and their red legs help distinguish them from other orbweavers. 

This species is often found near well-lightened man-made buildings. They feed on a variety of bugs like moths and flies. They have a moldy venomous bite similar to a bee. 

26. Golden Silk Orbweaver 

Golden Silk Spider (Trichonephila clavipes) on its web near Waverly Hall, Georgia, USA
A Golden Silk Spider (Trichonephila clavipes) on its web near Waverly Hall, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Trichonephila clavipes 
  • Other Names: Banana Spider 
  • Adult Size: 24 to 50 mm (0.94 to 1.96 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 6 months to a year
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The golden silk orbweaver is a large garden spider found across the globe. This species has a large range within America and can be found in Georgia.

Tropical habitats are where this species prefers to live. They make large webs that have a golden hue that shines in the sun. Summer and fall are when these spiders are seen most often. 

The golden silk orbweaver females are large, but males are much smaller. They have an elongated abdomen with long spindly legs.

Red, black, yellow, and white are some of the colors that appear on this spider. Bands are seen on their legs, and their abdomen has small white spots. 

Golden silk orbweavers may be large and colorful, but they are not dangerous to humans. Their bite is harmless, and only small animals are impacted by their venom.

Small insects, hummingbirds, and bats are some of the things they eat. Their large webs catch a variety of flying insects and allow this spider to feed. 

27. Arrow-shaped Micrathena 

Arrow-shaped Orbweaver (Micrathena sagittata) on someone's finger along with their web in Walton County, Georgia, USA
An Arrow-shaped Orbweaver (Micrathena sagittata) on someone’s finger along with their web in Walton County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Arneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Micrathena sagittata 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 9 mm (0.20 to 0.35 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a  

The arrow-shaped micrathena is one of the most unique-looking spiders living in Georgia. This species lives in habitats with an abundance of vegetation.

Forests, fields, gardens, and marshes are some of the places this spider lives. Females create large webs to sit on and are active during the day.

Males are not seen often and spend most of their life looking for a female to mate with. 

Micrathena sagittata are named after their body shape, which looks like the end of an arrow. They have small heads and long legs that are colored red.

Their abdomen has two large spikes protruding from the end of its abdomen that is black. The rest of their abdomen is yells, with dimple holes on it. 

The spikes on this species are believed to help ward off predators like other spiders, birds, and lizards. When active during the day this spider feeds on the small insects that get caught in its web.

This species bites its prey to neutralize with venom, but this venom is relatively harmless to humans. 

28. Spined Micrathena 

Spined Micrathena (Micrathena gracilis) climbing onto a leaf in Rockdale County, Georgia, USA
A Spined Micrathena (Micrathena gracilis) climbing onto a leaf in Rockdale County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Micrathena gracilis 
  • Other Names: Castleback orbweaver 
  • Adult Size: 4 to 10 mm (0.15 to 0.31 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The spined micrathena is native to North America and is a species you can find in Georgia. This spider is common next to bodies of water like lakes and rivers.

They inhabit forests and other moist woodland habitats. Summer and fall are when the spined micrathena is seen most often and creates large circular webs to live in. Males do not make these webs and only use their silk to mate. 

The spined micrathena is also called the castle back orbweaver. This species has around ten spines that protrude from its body, but males lack this trait.

Males are much smaller than females, and not seen often. Spined micrathenas come in colors like white, yellow, black, or brown. They have a mottled pattern covering them. 

Spined micrathena eat flying insects like mosquitoes, gnats, and flies. Birds and reptiles are the main predators this species faces.

The large spines help to deter predators, but birds will also use these spider webs to help make their nests. 

29. White Micrathena 

White Micrathena (Micrathena mitrata) on a fuzzy leaf in Athens, Georgia, USA
A White Micrathena (Micrathena mitrata) on a fuzzy leaf in Athens, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Micrathena mitrata 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 3 to 6 mm ( 0.11 to 0.23 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year  
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The white micrathena is a species found in Georgia that inhabits forests, and woodland areas near fresh bodies of water. This species creates large circular webs and is active at night.

They are constantly fixing the center of their web, but the outer layer is untouched unless severely damaged. White Micrathena are active mostly in the summer and fall. 

White Micrathena have an abdomen shape similar to a brain. They are white, with sharp spines that are pictured out of their bulbous abdomen.

The spider’s legs and carapace are reddish browns. This species can easily be confused for the spined micrathena, as they have a similar appearance to this species.

Only small spines come out of the top of this species’ abdomen, which can help distinguish it from similar-looking Micrathenas.

Insects are the main food source eaten by the white micrathena. They primarily feed on plant-eating insects and make their web near vegetation that attracts different bugs.

To neutralize the prey that gets caught in their web they inject them with mild venom that is harmless to humans. 

30. Joro Spider 

Joro Spider (Trichonephila clavata) on its web in Georgia, USA
A Joro Spider (Trichonephila clavata) on its web in Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Nephilinae 
  • Scientific Name: Trichonephila clavata 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 7 to 76 mm ( 0.27 to 3 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The Joro spider is an invasive species in the United States and is native to Japan. This spider was discovered in Georgia in around 2013 and has managed to spread to other southern states.

The hardiness of this species is one of the reasons it has become invasive. Georgia is the perfect area for this species to live, as it prefers warm and humid habitats with a variety of vegetation. They build large webs and are most active in the summer and fall. 

This species is extremely large, and some grow to the size of a human palm. They have yellow and black coloring, with yellow bands on their legs.

The abdomen of this species is oval-shaped, with yellow, white, silver, and grayish coloring on it. Their legs are spindly, with black yellow bands running down them. 

Joro spiders are feared because of their large size, but they are harmless. Even though they are invasive this spider has not shown to impact the new environment it leaves in.

Birds and other spider-eating animals benefit from having this large food source around. Joro spiders also help control insect populations by feeding on them in their large web.

31. Ravine Trapdoor Spider 

Ravine Trapdoor Spider (Cyclocosmia truncata) on concrete in Powder Springs, Georgia, USA
A Ravine Trapdoor Spider (Cyclocosmia truncata) on concrete in Powder Springs, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Ctenizidae 
  • Scientific Name: Cyclocosmia truncata 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 19 to 30 mm (0.75 to 1.2 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 5 to 12 years 
  • Average Price Range: $60 

The ravine trapdoor spider can be found in Georgia, as well as Alabama and Tennessee. They live in damp habitats and create their home near the edges of ravines or rivers.

This species spends most of its time in its burrow and is not seen often. Their burrow is built in sandy soil, which males leave when mature to find a mate. 

The ravine trapdoor spider is dark brown and known for its uniquely shaped abdomen. This species’ abdomen looks similar to an acorn and is hardened with spines. It can be used to block the entrance to its burrow to protect it from flooding and predators. 

This spider eats crickets, beetles, and other insects that wander too close to its burrow. They are nocturnal and use the vibrations on their sil to know when something is near.

Debris is used to camouflage their burrow and make it look unsuspecting to prey passing by. Predatory wasps and birds are the main animals that hunt this species. 

32. White-banded Fishing Spider 

White-banded Fishing Spider (Dolomedes albineus) clinging onto a flower bud in Screven County, Georgia, USA
A White-banded Fishing Spider (Dolomedes albineus) clinging onto a flower bud in Screven County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Pisauridae 
  • Scientific Name: Dolomedes albineus 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 18 to 23 mm (.7 to .9 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: $40 

The white-banded fishing spider is a Nursery web spider found in Georgia. This species lives in habitats like cypress swamps.

Like other fishing spiders, they are semi-aquatic and can walk on the surface of the water. The white-banded fishing spider is nocturnal and is active from spring to fall.

In summer is when this species lays its eggs, and the mother carries them around the sac to protect it. They watch the young after they hatch, until the first molt when the spiderlings are ready to fend for themself.

White-banded fishing spiders have long thin legs, and a rounded abdomen. They are covered in fur and have a white band below their eyes.

The color of this spider ranges from white to brown. They are larger than most spiders and have dark bands running down their legs. 

This species is an active hunter similar to a wolf spider. Since they are able to walk on water they feed on fish, and other small aquatic animals. This spider also eats insects and other smaller animals. 

33. Dark Fishing Spider 

Dark Fishing Spider (Dolomedes tenebrosus) on the treetrunk hole in Dawson County, Georgia, USA
A Dark Fishing Spider (Dolomedes tenebrosus) on the tree trunk hole in Dawson County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Pisauridae 
  • Scientific Name: Dolomedes tenebrosus 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 6.8 to 25.4 mm (0.27 to 1 inch)
  • Lifespan: 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Dark fishing spiders are semi-aquatic spiders, common in Georgia, and other areas within North America. Fresh water is present in the habitats they live in.

They are common in swamps, marshes, and moist forests. The unique trait of this species, and other spiders, is their ability to walk across water. They put very little pressure on the water’s surface.

Dark fishing spiders are a very similar species to the Six-spotted fishing spider that is also found in Georgia. They do not have spots on the underside of their abdomen.

They have gray to dark tan coloring, and a dark mottled pattern on their body. They have chevron markings on their abdomen, and long legs to help them move quickly. 

Dark fishing spiders are active hunters, very similar to the wolf spider. This species is able to walk on water, which helps it have more options to hunt.

Insects, tadpoles, and small fish are some of the prey they feed on regularly. 

34. Six-spotted Fishing Spider 

Six-spotted Fishing Spider (Dolomedes triton) on a lilypad in Screven County, Georgia, USA
A Six-spotted Fishing Spider (Dolomedes triton) on a lilypad in Screven County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Pisauridae 
  • Scientific Name: Dolomedes triton 
  • Other Names: Dock Spiders 
  • Adult Size: 15 to 60 mm (0.59 to 2.3 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20 

Six-spotted fishing spiders live all across North America and are a common species in Georgia. They live near bodies of water like marshes, wetlands, and moist forests.

They glide over the surface of the water and move quickly over land. Near a freshwater habitat like a lake, or pond is where this species lives. 

The six-spotted fishing spider has gray to brown coloring and two cream stripes that run down its sides. They have spots on their back, but also on their abdomen which gives them their name.

Females are larger than males and live much longer than them. Younger spiders look the same as their older counterparts. 

Fishing spiders eat aquatic animals like tadpoles or fish, but also small animals they find on land. Fishing spiders are active hunters, only using their silk for their egg sacs.

Active at night, it is common to see them near docks, or ponds. 

35. Eastern Parsons Spider 

Eastern Parson Spider (Herpyllus ecclesiasticus) on a cream wall in Murray County, Georgia, USA
An Eastern Parson Spider (Herpyllus ecclesiasticus) on a cream wall in Murray County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Gnaphosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Herpyllus ecclesiasticus 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 12.7 mm (0.2 to 0.5 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The eastern parson spider is a ground spider found in a variety of habitats. This species lives near vegetation like woodlands or forests.

They are also common in urban areas, and sometimes make their way into homes. This ground spider is very active at night, and during the day hides under debris. 

Eastern parsons spiders are black with cream markings on their bodies. They have long brown legs and are covered in small hairs. This species is found in the eastern half of the United States and has other species that look similar to it. 

This species is an active hunter and feeds on a variety of small insects. They are preyed on by snakes, frogs, lizards, and birds. Their bite is not dangerous, but they do produce mild venom. 

36. Huntsman Spider 

Huntsman Spider (Heteropoda venatoria) on a dark green leaf in Chai Wan, Hong Kong
A Huntsman Spider (Heteropoda venatoria) on a dark green leaf in Chai Wan, Hong Kong. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Sparassidae 
  • Scientific Name: Heteropoda venatoria 
  • Other Names: Huntsman spider, Crane Spider, Pantropical Huntsman Spider 
  • Adult Size: 22 to 28 mm (0.86 to 1.1 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2.5 years 
  • Average Price Range: $40 

The huntsman spider is one of the largest spiders in the US and Georgia. This species lives in tropical habitats and is mostly active at night.

Huntsman spiders are very quick and often make their way indoors. This species is harmless but its large size makes some fear them. 

Huntsman spiders have tan coloring, with small hairs on them. Their legs are extremely large, but males have larger legs than females. This spider’s body is flat which allows them to fit into small crevices. 

Huntsman spiders are amazing hunters. Their quick speed and keen vision give them the ability to feed on a variety of prey. Insects, small lizards, and frogs are some of the things they eat. 

37. Southern House Spider 

Southern House Spider (Kukulcania hibernalis) on a stick in Augusta, Georgia, USA
A Southern House Spider (Kukulcania hibernalis) on a stick in Augusta, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Filistatidae 
  • Scientific Name: Kukulcania hibernalis 
  • Other Names: Southern crevice spider 
  • Adult Size: 9 to 19 mm (0.35 to 0.74 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 8 years 
  • Average Price Range: $30 

The southern house spider inhabits the southern United States. This species can be found in Georgia, and it is common for them to make their way into homes.

This spider is often confused for the brown recluse but is not as dangerous. Southern house spiders have brown coloring and do not have a violin-shaped mark on their back. They have long legs, but males have much longer legs.

This spider only has six eyes rather than eight. Their web is velcro-like and has a wooly appearance.

The southern house spider is often found in man-made structures like barns, and garages. They feed on small insects. Bites from this spider may cause swelling, and symptoms usually only last a few days. 

38. Common House Spider 

Common House Spider (Parasteatoda tepidariorum) on its web at the Chattahoochee River, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
A Common House Spider (Parasteatoda tepidariorum) on its web at the Chattahoochee River, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Parasteatoda tepidariorum 
  • Other Names: American house spider 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 8 mm (0.19 to 0.31 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The American house spider lives near, and inside human structures. This spider builds a messy cobweb to live in and is a common spider found across the globe.

The southern house spider is harmless and uses its web to capture insects. Some leave these alone when found inside since they feed on a variety of pests. 

The southern house spider has a large rounded abdomen and spindly legs. This spider has reddish-brown coloring, with a cream mottled pattern covering them.

Males are much smaller than females. Some may confuse this spider for a black widow, but they are only a part of the same family.

Bites from the American house spider are rare, and only mild effects occur from their venom. They use vibrations to know when something is caught in their web.

Some even enjoy keeping them in their homes to feed on the pest insects nearby. 

39. Triangulate Combfoot

Triangulate Combfoot (Steatoda triangulosa) on a tree twig in Lawrenceville, Georgia, USA
A Triangulate Combfoot (Steatoda triangulosa) on a tree twig in Lawrenceville, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Steatoda triangulosa 
  • Other Names: Triangulate bud spider, Triangulate Cobweb Spider 
  • Adult Size: 3 to 6 mm (0.1 to 0.23 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The triangulate cobweb spider is a widespread species found across the globe. This spider lives in North America, Russia, New Zealand, and Europe, and is a common species you can find in Georgia.

This spider lives in or around man-made structures as protection from predators, and as a reliable food source is why they thrive in man-made habitats. This spider builds cobwebs to live in and is active most of the year.

Triangulate cobweb spiders have brown coloring, with a cream pattern on their body. Their abdomen is round and bulbous. Their legs are long and spindly and are covered in yellow bands. 

This spider feeds on a variety of insects that get caught in its web. Their eyesight is poor, which is why they build messy webs.

The small hairs on their body help them sense vibrations and know when something is in their web. This species is generally harmless and only has mild venom.

40. Rabbit Hutch Spider 

Rabbit Hutch Spider (Steatoda bipunctata) on leaves in Bauvin, France
A Rabbit Hutch Spider (Steatoda bipunctata) on leaves in Bauvin, France. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Steatoda bipunctata
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 16 mm (0.75 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Rabbit hutch spiders get their common name from their tendency to create their homes in the hutches of rabbits. This species is common in Georgia but is Native to Spain’s canary islands.

They have a large range across the globe and are most active from spring to fall. This spider creates messy webs in the corners of areas. 

Rabbit hutch spiders are brown, gray, or black in color. They have a cream mottled pattern on them and large bulbous abdomens.

Females are much larger than males and are darker, but they both are relatively similar. Like other members of its family, this spider has long spindly legs.

The rabbit hutch spider feeds on small insects like gnats, mosquitoes, and flies. When living in rabbit cages they may bring the rabbit peace since they help get rid of annoying insects.

The bite from this species is harmless, and only has mild effects on humans. 

41. False Black Widow 

False Black Widow (Steatoda grossa) on a wood surface in Atlanta, Georgia, USA
A False Black Widow (Steatoda grossa) on a wood surface in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Steatoda grossa 
  • Other Names: brown house spider, cupboard spider 
  • Adult Size: 10 to 14 mm (0.39 to 0.55 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 to 6 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The false black widow is not a real black widow but is a part of the same family as that species.

This spider lives across North America and is a common species in Georgia. This species creates messy webs, and commonly makes its homes in man-made structures. 

This species looks similar to the black widow in body shape but lacks the red marking on its abdomen. Males have smaller abdomen than females but have long legs.

Females are reddish brown and have cream markings on their backs. This species has markings on its underside to help identify compared to other steatoda spiders. 

False black widows can go months without eating but need access to water. They feed on small insects like flies and other things that get caught in their web.

This species’ bite can be painful, and have mild effects, but is not deadly. 

42. Bowl and Doily Spider 

Bowl-and-doily Spider (Frontinella pyramitela) on a leaf in Atlanta, Georgia, USA
A Bowl-and-doily Spider (Frontinella pyramitela) on a leaf in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Linyphiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Frontinella pyramitela 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 4 mm (0.16 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The bowl and doily spider is named after the unique web it creates. This spider builds a bowl like a web, with a flat top to help it catch its prey.

The bowl and doily spider sits on the bottom of its web and waits to pull insects into its bowl. It is common for this species to cohabit with others of the same species. 

The bowl and doily spider is a small species, with white and brown coloring. They have long spindly legs and are most identifiable by their web. Their webs are built near vegetation, and spring to fall is when they are most active. 

Small flying insects are what this spider primarily feeds on. Birds are the most common predator this spider faces in the wild.

Bowl and doily spiders are not the most common, and mostly inhabit forests, woodlands, and other forest habitats. 

43. Brown Widow

Brown Widow (Latrodectus geometricus) on white pebbles in Atlanta, Georgia, USA
A Brown Widow (Latrodectus geometricus) on white pebbles in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Latrodectus geometricus 
  • Other Names: Brown button spider 
  • Adult Size: 8 to 14 mm ( 0.3 to 0.5 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20 

The brown widow is a common widow spider in Georgia and other areas within the southern United States. Near human structures are common areas where this spider lives.

This spider is native to Africa but has managed to find its way around the globe. Warmer climates and habitats are where this species prefers to live. 

Brown widows have brown coloring, with a rounded abdomen. They have an hourglass on the bottom of their abdomen, and long legs with dark bands on them. This species looks similar to other widow spiders but is lighter in color. 

Brown widows make messy webs out of strong silk. They feed on the insects in their web and kill them with their powerful venom. 

44. Northern Black Widow 

Northern Black Widow (Latrodectus variolus) walking on a large stick in Canton, Georgia, USA
A Northern Black Widow (Latrodectus variolus) walking on a large stick in Canton, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Latrodectus variolus 
  • Scientific Name: Latrodectus variolus 
  • Other Names: Northern Widow 
  • Adult Size: 12.7 to 15.24 mm (0.5 to 0.6 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20

Northern black widows live in the eastern United States and are an abundant species in Georgia. Northern black widows live in areas with high debris.

They are often seen near logs, trash, and other dark secluded places. Black widows are active at night and sit on their web. During the day they hide in a secluded area. 

This spider is all black, with a glossy look. They have large abdomens and spindly legs.

The hourglass on the bottom of their abdomen is the easiest way to identify them. The red hourglass has a break in it. 

Northern black widows have one of the strongest webs of all spiders. They feed on the variety of insects that fall in their web.

This spider’s venom is one of the strongest in Georgia but is rarely deadly. Bits may need medical attention if symptoms get serious. 

45. Southern Black Widow 

Southern Black Widow (Latrodectus mactans) on some leaves in Kennesaw, Georgia, USA
A Southern Black Widow (Latrodectus mactans) on some leaves in Kennesaw, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Latrodectus mactans 
  • Other Names: Shoe-button spider 
  • Adult Size: 8 to 13 mm (0.3 to 0.5 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20 

Southern black widows live in the southeastern United States and are common in Georgia. This species creates its web in secluded areas near man-made structures.

Summer and fall are when this species is most active. They create messy webs in areas like woodpiles, flower pots, and outside furniture. 

The female southern black widow has a black glossy body, with a red hourglass on their abdomen. Unlike the northern black widows, this spider’s hourglass is complete. The males are smaller than females and are often eaten after mating. 

Black widows have some of the strongest webs amongst spiders, with scientists saying it is as strong as steel. They also have some of the most dangerous bites, since their strong venom affects the nervous system.

Deaths are rare, and symptoms vary from their bite. Nausea, swelling, and fever are common after being bitten. The black widow’s venom is mostly used to neutralize the small insects that land in their web. 

46. Brown Recluse 

Brown Recluse (Loxosceles reclusa) on brown paper in Murray County, Georgia, USA
A Brown Recluse (Loxosceles reclusa) on brown paper in Murray County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Sicariidae 
  • Scientific Name: Loxosceles reclusa 
  • Other Names: Violin spiders 
  • Adult Size: 7 mm (0.27 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Brown Recluse is a native species in Georgia and is found in the southern areas of the state. Brown recluses are also common in other states in central and southern America.

Most fear this spider for its bite and often confuse other species for this spider. They are nocturnal and hide in secluded areas during the daytime. 

Brown recluses are identifiable by the dark violin pattern found in their carapace. They have brown coloring and look similar to other recluse spiders.

Their abdomen is plump, and larger in females. Males are smaller but have longer legs. 

The bite from a brown recluse is necrotic, and one of the most painful in Georgia. If untreated death of skin cells is possible and medical treatment is recommended.

No populations of this spider have been found out of its native range, but they occasionally find their way into new areas. This species tends to live in wooded areas and hunts small insects during the night.

47. Running Crab Spider 

Crab Spider (Philodromus spp.) on the end of a leaf in Bibb County, Georgia, USA
A Crab Spider (Philodromus spp.) on the end of a leaf in Bibb County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Philodromidae 
  • Scientific Name: Philodromus spp. 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 38 mm (1.5 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

 Running crab spiders live in areas with high vegetation, which makes Georgia a perfect home. Spring and summer are when they are most active. On trees,  bushes, and other plants where they are often found. 

Small and brown are traits of this species. They have a mottled pattern that helps them blend into their environment.

They camouflage well into trees and other wooden environments. Their small eyes help them see their prey, and they have dark bands on their legs. 

This spider feeds on small insects. They have strong legs and use them to grab their food. Running crab spiders are stealthy, and use speed to take down their prey. 

48. Deadly Ground Crab Spider 

Deadly Ground Crab Spider (Xysticus funestus) on a leaf on Ruffner Mountain, Alabama, USA
A Deadly Ground Crab Spider (Xysticus funestus) on a leaf on Ruffner Mountain, Alabama, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Thomisidae 
  • Scientific Name: Xysticus funestus 
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 5 to 10 mm (0.2 to 0.4 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The deadly ground crab spider is a species found across the United States. Unlike other ground spiders, this species lives on the ground.

It does not build webs but lives in areas with natural debris. Forests, woodlands, and marshlands are some of the habitats they live in. Fall is when this species is most active.

The deadly crab ground spider has a crab-like carapace and legs, with a large rounded abdomen. This species is tan to dark brown, which helps it blend into the ground. Males have smaller abdomens, but larger legs.

This species hunts in the soil for small insects. They are beneficial to gardens and farms, as they feed on insects that normally feed on vegetation.

Their camouflage is helpful in snaking up on prey. Even though death is in their name, their bite is harmless to humans. 

49. Green Lynx Spider 

Green Lynx Spider (Peucetia viridans) on little white flowers in Bibb County, Georgia, USA
A Green Lynx Spider (Peucetia viridans) on little white flowers in Bibb County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Oxyopidae 
  • Scientific Name: Peucetia viridans 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 12 to 22 mm (0.47 to 0.86 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: $5

Green lynx spiders are vibrant green and have translucent coloring. They are known for their green appearance and use it to camouflage into highly vegetated habitats.

This spider is common around North America and Georgia. They are active hunters and do not build webs like other spiders. 

Insects are the main food source of this species. Active during the day they spend most of their time hunting.

Like spitting spiders, this species is able to spit venom mixed with silk to take down its enemies. They are harmless to humans and can be beneficial in gardens, taking down many pest species. 

50. Long-bodied Cellar Spider 

Long-bodied Cellar Spider (Pholcus phalangioides) on a white wall in Statesboro, Georgia, USA
A Long-bodied Cellar Spider (Pholcus phalangioides) on a white wall in Statesboro, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Pholcidae 
  • Scientific Name: Pholcus phalangioides
  • Other Names: Skull spider, Daddy long-leg spider 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 10 mm (0.23 to 3.9 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 0.5 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Long-bodied cellar spiders are one of the most common spiders in America. They are active year-round and are usually close to humans.

This spider builds loose webs, and some may even live in colonies together. The long-bodied cellar spider moves loose webs and hides them in the corners of homes or backyards. 

Long-bodied cellar spiders have long legs, which is why some call them daddy long legs. Their legs make up most of their body, and allow them to quickly wrap up their prey. This species has a small abdomen and head in an oval shape. 

Long-bodied cellar spiders are harmless and feed on a variety of insects. They are great at killing other spiders, which is why some choose to keep them around.

This species injects its prey with venom, but its fangs are usually too weak to puncture human skin. 

51. American Nursery Web Spider 

American Nursery Web Spider (Pisaurina Mira) on a leaf in Athens, Georgia, USA
An American Nursery Web Spider (Pisaurina Mira) on a leaf in Athens, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Pisauridae 
  • Scientific Name: Pisaurina Mira 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 15 mm (0.59 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: $10 

American nursery web spiders are a common species in Georgia and other parts of North America.

This spider does not make webs like orb weavers but uses its silk to carry around its egg sac. Areas with dense vegetation and plenty of food sources are where this species is common. 

American nursery spiders are medium-sized species and are often confused for the wolf spider as they are both similar.

This species has a thin body, with long legs. They have tan bodies, and bold stripes running across them. Small hairs cover this spider’s body. 

Gnats, flies, beetles, and other insects are hunted by this quick species. They are active hunters and take down their prey. The bite from this species is not deadly, swelling but comes with minor symptoms. 

52. Dotted Wolf Spider 

Dotted Wolf Spider (Rabidosa punctulata) on a furry leaf on Camp Creek Greenway Trail, Georgia, USA
A Dotted Wolf Spider (Rabidosa punctulata) on a furry leaf on Camp Creek Greenway Trail, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Lycosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Rabidosa punctulata 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 12 to 16 mm ( 0.47 to 0.62 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20 

The dotted wolf spider is a small species of lycosidae found in Georgia, and other parts of North America. This spider lives in woodlands, grasslands, and other vegetated habitats.

They are active during the day and roam around looking for food at night. This spider lives in a burrow or may hide under debris like a rock, or a log. 

The dotted wolf spider is tan with dark bold stripes running down its back. It is very similar to the American grass spider but is slightly larger. This spider has small dots on the underside of its abdomen which can help tell it apart from other wolf spiders and similar species. 

Dotted wolf spiders are active hunters, and feed on a variety of small insects. Frogs, birds, snakes, and other small mammals are the main predator they have to look out for.

While a bite from this species is not deadly, its large fangs can make it quite painful. 

53. Tiger Wolf Spider 

Tiger Wolf Spider (Tigrosa helluo) on concrete in Fayetteville, Georgia, USA
A Tiger Wolf Spider (Tigrosa helluo) on concrete in Fayetteville, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Lycosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Tigrosa helluo 
  • Other Names: Wetland Giant Wolf Spider 
  • Adult Size: 13 to 21 mm (0.511 to 0.82 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 4 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $40 dollars 

Tiger wolf spiders are a large species found in Georgia, and other states across the US, as they are a member of the Lycosidae family. This species lives in forests and grassland habitats.

Tiger wolf spiders are wandering spiders, moving around at night. They are nocturnal and only move around in the safety of night. 

Tiger wolf spiders are large and similar in appearance to other wolf spiders. They have orange markings on their body and are covered in thick fur.

They have robust bodies, able to take down a variety of sized prey. Their eyes are located on the front of their face, and they have excellent vision. 

Tiger wolf spiders are active hunters and stalk their prey like a wolf. This spider is able to kill things like roaches, beetles, other spiders, and small frogs.

Tiger wolf spiders watch their young until they are able to fend for themselves. This spider is great at killing things with its venom, and large fangs. 

54. Spitting Spider

Spitting Spider (Scytodes thoracica) in Kennesaw, Georgia, USA
A Spitting Spider (Scytodes thoracica) on a white wall in Kennesaw, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Scytodidae 
  • Scientific Name: Scytodes thoracica 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 18 mm (0.25 to 0.75 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1.5 to 4 years 
  • Average Price Range: $30 

Spitting spiders live across the United States, and are widespread spiders found across the globe.

Shady tropical areas are where this species prefers to live. Marshes, forests, and vegetation grasslands are places you may see this species.

Active at night, this spider may find its way into houses looking for food. During the day spitting spiders rest, and take shelter in a secluded area. 

Scytodes thoracica is one of the most common species of spitting spiders to be found. This spider has tan coloring and is covered in dark tan markings.

They have long legs, but their two front legs are exceptionally long to help this spider aim. Unlike most species, this spider only has six eyes. Their abdomens and head are very round and near the same size.

Spitting spiders are nocturnal hunters, and unlike most spiders are able to spit to trap their prey. Venom and liquid silk are what this species spits at its prey, entrapping it in quickness.

Spitting spiders are able to spit four, to six times their body length, which is useful for feeding on a variety of insects. 

55. American Grass Spider 

Grass Spider (Agelenopsis) in its web in Bibb County, Georgia, USA
A Grass Spider (Agelenopsis) in its web in Bibb County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginners 
  • Family: Agelenidae 
  • Scientific Name: Agelenopsis 
  • Other Names: funnel weavers 
  • Adult Size: 9 to 20 mm (0.35 to 0.78 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The American grass spider is among the most common genus of spiders in the United States. This species lives in grassy habitats, and are funnel-weaving spiders.

They live in secluded areas and are most active from spring to fall. Finding them in your home is not uncommon, but you may also see many of their webs on your lawn.

The American grass spider dies in the winter, so during late fall, they attempt to move into man-made structures. 

Tan to dark brown is the color of the species. They vary in size, and some look very similar to wolf spiders.

American grass spiders have long thin legs which allow them to move quickly over their thin web. Dark bold stripes round down their head, and a mottled pattern covers their abdomen. 

American grass spiders feed on small insects that find their way onto their web. While their funnel web is not sticky, the vibrations let the spider know when prey is near. 

56. Red-spotted Ant Mimic Spider 

Red-spottted Ant-mimic Sac Spider (Castianeira descripta) on dry leaves in Bibb County, Georgia, USA
A Red-spottted Ant-mimic Sac Spider (Castianeira descripta) on dry leaves in Bibb County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Corinnidae 
  • Scientific Name: Castianeira descripta 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 13 mm (0.51 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Red-spotted ant mimic spiders are a common spider that lives in the United States. Found all across the US, they are known to mimic an ant to make it easier to feed on them.

To mimic ants this spider lifts its two front legs and moves slowly. The front legs mimic antennae and allow the spider to get close to ants. 

Some may think the red-spotted ant mimic spider is related to the black widow because of their coloring. This species is mostly black and has a large rounded abdomen. On their back is a red marking. 

Even though they look similar to a black widow, this spider is not dangerous. Their bite and venom are similar to a bee sting.

Red-spotted ant mimic spiders are active during the day and commonly hunt on velvet ants. The coloring on their body is said to mimic velvet ants, which is how they gain their trust. 

57. Long-palped Ant Mimic Spider 

Long-palped Ant-mimic Sac Spider (Castianeira longipalpa) on a rocky concrete floor in Alpharetta, Georgia, USA
A Long-palped Ant-mimic Sac Spider (Castianeira longipalpa) on a rocky concrete floor in Alpharetta, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Corinnidae 
  • Scientific Name: Castianeira longipalpa 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 3 to 13 mm ( 0.11 to 0.511 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The long-palped ant mimic spider is found in most states in the United States but is more common in the east of the rocky mountains. This species is very small and attempts to mimic ants with its appearance and behavior.

Spring to fall is when this spider is active. In the winter older spiders die, but the eggs, and spiderlings overwinter. Long-paled ant-mimic spiders live in a variety of habitats but are common in areas with plenty of natural debris. 

This spider is mostly black, but changes in appearance as it molts. White, yellow, or gray markings appear on their body and legs.

The front legs of this species have brown coloring, and the others have bands running down them. Castianeira variata is another species that looks similar in appearance to this spider, and they can only be told apart by looking under a microscope. 

This spider feeds on a variety of insects, but ants are one of their main sources of food. As their name suggests they mimic ants’ behavior, so they can gain their trust and feed on them.

Moving slowly, and holding their two front legs in the air is how their ant mimicry is done. 

58. Southeastern Wandering Spider 

Southeastern Wandering Spider (Anahita punctulata) on a dry leaf in Atlanta, Georgia, USA
A Southeastern Wandering Spider (Anahita punctulata) on a dry leaf in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Ctenidae 
  • Scientific Name: Anahita punctulata 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 39 mm (0.2 to 1.56 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Active mostly during the spring season, the southeastern wandering spider is a species you may come across in Georgia. This spider is a member of the wandering spider family.

This species lives in burrows and is a species native to the southeastern United States. Fast-moving spiders, are nocturnal and wander about at night. Warmer climates are where they prefer to live. 

Similar to other wandering spiders, this species has very long legs. They are tan to dark brown in color and have small hairs covering them.

A mottled pattern covers their body. Males of this species are smaller in size and have a much shorter lifespan than females. 

The southeastern wandering spider wanders around at night and looks for insects to feed on. They hunt similarly to wolf spiders and ambush their prey.

The venom from this species is not significantly dangerous to humans but can cause swelling and other minor symptoms. 

59. Northern Yellow Sac Spider 

Northern Yellow Sac Spider (Cheiracanthium mildei) on a rocky surface in Rockdale County, Georgia, USA
A Northern Yellow Sac Spider (Cheiracanthium mildei) on a rocky surface in Rockdale County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Cheiracanthiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Cheiracanthium mildei 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 6.35 mm (0.25 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Northern yellow sac spiders are a common spider found all across the United States. This species is also found in other regions like Europe, and Africa.

The northern yellow sac spider lives in woodlands, and gardens, and is a spider that often makes its way into homes. They do not build webs but use their silk to construct small sacs to sleep in. 

The northern yellow sac spider has a beige, or cream yellow color. They have extremely large legs and a large rounded abdomen.

A faint beige stripe runs down the center of their back. Males and females of this species look very similar, but males have much larger legs and smaller abdomens. This spider’s color is near translucent, and pale. 

Northern yellow sac spiders are active hunters, and look for prey to kill at night. They feed on other spiders, insect larvae, roaches, beetles, and a variety of other insects they come across.

This spider often makes its way into homes looking for food. Their bite is painful, and the venom they administer is slightly more potent than other spiders.

Often this spider is confused for the brown recluse, but they are many players and lack the violin marking on their back. 

60. Leaf-curling Sac Spider 

Leaf-curling Sac Spider (Clubiona) on a white surface in Athens, Georgia, USA
A Leaf-curling Sac Spider (Clubiona) on a white surface in Athens, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Clubionidae 
  • Scientific Name: Clubiona  
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 12 mm (0.19 to 0.47 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Leaf curling sac spiders are a common species, with a large range across the US. This spider is most common in moist areas with plenty of vegetation.

Wetlands, marshes, and other moist woodlands are the habitat they live in. This spider is known to web and curls leaves to make a home. The curled leaf helps protect it, and its eggs from predators. 

Leaf curling sac spiders are small species, with a body shape similar to other sac spiders. They have large gray abdomens, with cream-colored legs. Small hairs cover their body, and they have large fangs to help take down their prey. 

Small insects found in the vegetation they live in are what this spider feeds on. They do not build large webs like other spiders, but only a sac for them, and their eggs to rest in.

Grasshoppers, ladybugs, ants, and other insects are what they feed on. Birds are this spider’s main predator. The curled leaf helps protect them, but also their eggs when the mother dies in the winter. 

61. Woodlouse Spider 

Woodlouse Spider (Dysdera crocata) in dirt and grass in Chadsworth, Georgia, USA
A Woodlouse Spider (Dysdera crocata) in dirt and grass in Chadsworth, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Dysderidae 
  • Scientific Name: Dysdera crocata 
  • Other Names: Woodlouse hunter, sowbug killer 
  • Adult Size: 9 to 3 mm (0.35 to 0.59 inches)
  • Lifespan: 2 to 5 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Woodlouse spiders can be found in the eastern half of the United States. They live in damp, and dark habitats.

Places with decaying vegetation and plenty of natural debris are areas they are drawn to. Woodlouse is one of the main food sources for this spider, and they are generally found in the same area as them.

This spider is nocturnal, and during the day will hide under natural debris. 

Woodlouse spiders look similar to other similar sac spider species. They have large round abdomens with tan coloring.

Their legs are extremely long and thin, with an orangish tint. The carapace of the woodlouse spider is large and red, with two large pincers fangs on its face. 

The venom from this species is harmless, but their large fangs give them a painful bite. Woodlouse is what this spider feeds on the most, but they do not have any preference for what they eat.

Woodlouse spiders hunt at night and may eat other animals like millipedes or beetles if they come across them. 

62. Broad-faced Sac Spider

Broad-faced Sac Spider (Trachelas tranquillus) on the stems of a leaf in Ontario, Canada
A Broad-faced Sac Spider (Trachelas tranquillus) on the stems of a leaf in Ontario, Canada. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Trachelidae 
  • Scientific Name: Trachelas tranquillus 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 10 mm (0.19 to 0.39 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The broad-faced sac spiders are native to the eastern half of the United States. This species is a wandering spider and lives in warm dry areas.

This species is nocturnal, and during the day can be found under various natural debris. At night they wander and spend most of their time hunting.

The broad-faced sac spider is most active in the summer and fall months. In winter they may die, or wander indoors looking for suitable shelter. 

The carapace of the broad-faced sac spider is extremely wide and has a reddish brown coloring. They have large rounded gray abdomens.

The legs of the broad, faced sac spider are long and red, or tan colored. Being active hunters they have large fangs useful in administering their venom and taking down prey. 

Bites from this species are painful due to their large fangs, and may also cause infection. This species feeds on a variety of insects, and also dead and decaying arthropods.

Their long legs are useful in traversing different areas and looking around vegetation. 

FAQ

What Is The Largest Spider In Georgia?

The Joro spider is the largest spider in Georgia, but it is not native to the State. Females are capable of reaching up to 3 inches long, while males of this species are significantly smaller.

Other large spiders in the state include wolf spiders, trapdoor spiders, and grass spiders. The largest spiders can be seen in the summer and fall months, as most spiders are fully mature at this time. 

In Georgia, When Are Spiders Most Active?

Spring to fall is when most spiders are active, and each species has its own preference for when they are out the most. In winter spiders are not seen as often, since most die in the cold.

Only species that make shelters in homes, or overwinter in the cold survive the harsh seasons, but most spiders are inactive at this time. 

What Dangerous Spiders Exist In Georgia? 

In Georgia most spiders are harmless, but species like the Northern and Southern Black Widow, Brown Recluse, and the Brown widow. These spiders have dangerous venom that can cause painful symptoms if bites occur.

Black widow’s venom affects the neurological symptoms, while recluse spiders have venom that is necrotic. Bites from these spiders usually do not cause death, but if receptive to their venom they can bring painful symptoms. 

Why Are Infestations In Georgia Common? 

Georgia’s variety of vegetated habitats and tropical climate make it a perfect home for many different species of spiders. Spider infestations are common since so many insects also live in the state.

With a reliable food source and suitable habitat that is abundant in Georgia, many spider species are able to thrive, and some may become invasive. 

Wrapping up

In Georgia, there are many species of spider you can find across the state. Spiders are very beneficial to the environments they live in.

They help control the insect population, primarily prey on many pest insect species. Spiders are also eaten by wild animals and are a reliable food source for many.

Birds, lizards, frogs, and small mammals all benefit from spiders and regularly feed on them.

With so many species of spiders in the world, it is a good thing to know that most are harmless. The bite from most spiders is harmless, and around the same pain, or less than a bee sting.

Georgia is home to many spiders, but in the world, there are over 45,000 different types. Each species has something interesting to learn about it.

By discovering and learning about the different spiders in Georgia, you can get an understanding of the different types that live across the globe. 

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