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Tarantulas In Arizona

There are 16 different types of tarantulas in Arizona and can be found throughout the state. Tarantulas are big beautiful spiders that are very docile, and they make fantastic pets for anyone looking to have an arachnid friend. 

Tarantulas here prefer to live in arid or semi-arid climates, and they are primarily found in dry desert-like habitats. They like to live in underground burrows but live in trees or under rocks and logs. 

Every species of tarantula found in Arizona is relatively docile and non-aggressive, but some may become agitated quickly or prefer not to be handled. This article will provide information about each species and their appearance, diet, habitat, and breeding behavior.

Tarantulas In Arizona

1. Texas Brown Tarantula

Texas Brown Tarantula (Aphonopelma hentzi) on a rock in Big Bend National Park, Alpine, Texas, USA
A Texas Brown Tarantula (Aphonopelma hentzi) on a rock in Big Bend National Park, Alpine, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Theraphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma hentzi
  • Other Names: Missouri tarantula, Oklahoma tarantula
  • Adult Size: 2.5 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: Females: 20 to 40 years/Males 5 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $30 to $100 

The Texas Brown tarantula is currently only found in the southeastern portion of Arizona in Greenlee county. This species populates dry, rocky areas with loose, well-drained soil.

They can be found in burrows under rocks, logs, and natural crevices in rocky terrain. These tarantulas have been found to exhibit different characteristics at different elevations. They are larger with a more robust body in lower elevations, and in higher elevations, they are smaller with thinner legs.

Tarantulas of this species typically have dark brown bodies and a light brown or pale tan head, though shades vary between individuals. This species leg span can reach upwards of 4 inches.

They are covered in tiny black or brown hairs with long red/orange hairs interspersed on their abdomen. They also have urticating hairs on their core that they kick out when they feel threatened.

The Texas brown tarantulas’ main predator in Arizona is the tarantula hawk. However, they have many predators like birds, lizards, and coyotes. Like most tarantula species, the Texas Brown is a very docile spider and non-aggressive unless threatened.

2. Aphonopelma Parvum

Aphonopelma Parvum (Aphonopelma Parvum) on dry rocks and a stick somewhere in Cochise County, Arizona, USA
An Aphonopelma Parvum (Aphonopelma Parvum) on dry rocks and a stick somewhere in Cochise County, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Theraphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma parvum
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 24 to 48 inches
  • Lifespan: Females: 20 to 40 years/Males 5 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $300

Aphonopelma parvum is a relatively newfound tarantula species. They are only found in the southeasternmost corner of Arizona, and they’ve only been spotted a few times.

They’ve been found in the following counties; Cochise, Graham, and Greenlee. This species is rarely seen, but if you visit these regions during late winter/early fall, you may be lucky enough to see a male wandering around searching for a female.

These spiders are found in abandoned rodent burrows, though they may be hard to spot. Unlike other tarantulas, this species doesn’t build mounds of dirt around the entrance to their home.

A. parvum females are noticeably larger than the males while also being lighter in color. Males are usually entirely black, while females have black bodies and brown legs. These tarantulas are covered in tiny gray and long red/orange hairs.

Some hairs on the abdomen are used as a defense mechanism against threats. These hairs can cause itching and rash for humans and, in rare cases, severe allergic reactions.

These tarantulas breed in November and December, so males can be seen out of their burrow during this time. Like most tarantulas, this species is a nocturnal hunter, meaning they do not use their webs to catch food.

They come out of their homes at night and wait for prey to cross their path to grab them and inject them with their venom. Their venom is not harmful to humans.

3. Aphonopelma Prenticei

Aphonopelma Prenticei (Aphonopelma Prenticei) on rocks near E Fackly Springs Rd, Hackberry, Arizona, USA
An Aphonopelma Prenticei (Aphonopelma Prenticei) on rocks near E Fackly Springs Rd, Hackberry, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Theraphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma Prenticei
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: Females: 20 to 40 years/Males 5 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Aphonopelma Prenticei is only found in the west and southwest areas of Arizona. They have been spotted in the following counties; La Paz, Maricopa, Mohave, Yavapai, and Yuma.

These spiders make their homes in burrows in the ground, and they surround the entrance to their home with piles of dirt and webbing that are called turrets. They are the most widespread turret-building spider in the U.S.

These tarantulas are one of the smaller species found in Arizona. They can be black, dark brown, or gray. Females of this species are usually larger and lighter in color than males.

These spiders have light brown/gray hairs covering their legs and body. Some of the hairs on their abdomen are used as a defense mechanism when these spiders feel threatened. 

A. Prenticei has a diet consisting of small creatures like other spiders, beetles, cockroaches, and crickets.

Their mating season occurs in autumn between September and November when male tarantulas can be found out of their burrow in daylight hours. Their burrows are surrounded by mounds of soil and webbing and can look similar to other species in the region.

4. Paloma Dwarf Tarantula

Paloma Dwarf Tarantula (Aphonopelma paloma) on white rocks near Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ajo, Arizona, USA
A Paloma Dwarf Tarantula (Aphonopelma paloma) on white rocks near Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ajo, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Theraphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma paloma
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 2 inches
  • Lifespan: Females: 20 to 40 years/Males 5 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $150

The Paloma Dwarf tarantula is found in lower elevations of Arizona’s southern and southwestern areas. They have been found in the following counties; Maricopa, Pima, and Pinal. These spiders prefer arid to semi-arid regions that receive less than ten inches of rain a year.

They have very distinct burrows. They are the only tarantula species that have been observed to create crescent-shaped mounds surrounding the entrance to their homes.

Paloma dwarf tarantula females are larger and lighter colored than males. The males tend to be black or gray with long legs, while the females are a golden brown, gray, or pale tan with shorter, thicker legs. These spiders are covered in short black or gray hairs with long red/orange hairs interspersed on their abdomens.  

These tarantulas are very secretive and are unlikely to be seen outside their burrows except during their breeding season and occasionally at night. This species’ breeding season occurs during November and December.

Females can be aggressive when guarding their eggs, so it’s not recommended to try and get a tarantula out of its burrow. Though their fangs do contain venom, their bite is harmless to humans. 

5. Aphonopelma Mareki

Aphonopelma mareki (Aphonopelma mareki) on someone's wrist near Hualapai Peak, Kingman, Arizona, USA
An Aphonopelma mareki (Aphonopelma mareki) on someone’s wrist near Hualapai Peak, Kingman, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Theraphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma mareki
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2 inches
  • Lifespan: Females: 20 to 40 years/Males 5 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The Aphonopelma Mareki is found in Central and western central Arizona. They have been found in counties like; Coconino, Gila, Maricopa, and Yavapai.

Their breeding season occurs from September to November. During these months, the males of this species can be seen outside of their burrow searching for females.

Tarantulas of this species are black, brown, or gray with darker legs. The females are usually larger and lighter colored than males. These spiders are covered in tiny soft gray hairs with long orange/red hairs interspersed.

They use the hairs on their abdomen as a defense mechanism against threats. They can cause skin irritation and rash in humans and sometimes allergic reactions.

This species survives off a diet of small insects such as grasshoppers, beetles, and crickets.

They are nocturnal, and unlike other spiders, they hunt for their food rather than catching it on their web. They use webs covering the entrance to their home as a sort of alarm system to detect passing prey or potential threats.

6. Aphonopelma Saguaro

Aphonopelma saguaro (Aphonopelma saguaro) on a rock on Mica Mountain, Pima County, Arizona, USA
An Aphonopelma saguaro (Aphonopelma saguaro) on a rock on Mica Mountain, Pima County, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Theraphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma saguaro
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 24 to 48 inches
  • Lifespan: Females: 20 to 40 years/Males 5 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Aphonopelma Saguaro is most commonly found in Saguaro National Park. They live in the foothills and lower canyons of the Santa Catalina and Ricon Mountains.

They can live in burrows under rocks or logs and other natural crevices. Males are found outside their homes during mating season, which takes place in November and December.

Females of this species are usually larger and lighter in color. In comparison, males are darker with smaller bodies and longer legs.

This spider has either a dark gray head and legs with a black body or a black body, head, and legs. The A. Saguaro is covered in tiny brown hairs with longer orange/red hairs on the abdomen.

These spiders are known to be a bit more aggressive than other tarantulas. Tarantulas will stand up on their back legs when they feel threatened.

If provoked, they will kick hairs on their abdomen at the threat and bite if further provoked. The tarantula’s bite is harmless but can be painful.

7. Superstition Mountain Tarantula

Superstition Mountains Tarantula (Aphonopelma superstitionense) on red rocks off The Apache Trail, Apache Junction, Arizona, USA
A Superstition Mountains Tarantula (Aphonopelma superstitionense) on red rocks off The Apache Trail, Apache Junction, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Theraphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma superstitionense
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.5 inches
  • Lifespan: Females: 20 to 40 years/Males 5 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The Aphonopelma Superstitionense lives in the southcentral area of Arizona. They can be found in Maricopa County and Pinal County.

They are most commonly seen in and around the foothills of the Superstition Mountains and are present near the Pinal Mountains. These spiders live in woven shelters in cracks or natural crevices and logs and under rocks.

These spiders vary in color between black, dark brown, brown, light brown, and tan. Females are typically light brown or tan, while males are dark brown or black.

Like most tarantulas, the females tend to be larger and lighter in color than males. Males have smaller bodies and longer legs.

It’s rare to see one of these tarantulas. They’re nocturnal, so they only leave their homes at night to hunt.

Their breeding season occurs during November and December. You can spot the males during this time when they abandon their dens to search for a female mate.

8. Grand Canyon Black Tarantula

Grand Canyon Black Tarantula (Aphonopelma marxi) on a rock at Slide Rock State Park, Coconino County, Arizona, USA
A Grand Canyon Black Tarantula (Aphonopelma marxi) on a rock at Slide Rock State Park, Coconino County, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Theraphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma marxi
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 3 to 5 inches
  • Lifespan: Females: 20 to 40 years/Males 5 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $250

The Grand Canyon Black tarantula is widely found within the higher elevation areas of Northern Arizona, and they are commonly spotted in Grand Canyon National Park. This species likes to make their home in habitats like deserts and sagebrush steppes.

These spiders prefer to live in underground burrows, underneath rocks, inside logs, and other natural crevices in desert-like habitats. 

This species can be differentiated from others in the region by its large size. A. Marxi is typically black or dark brown coated in small black or brown hairs with some long red/orange hairs on its abdomen. Females of this species typically have larger bodies and thicker legs, and males are usually small with longer legs.

This species is usually found in silk webbed burrows with small hills of excavated dirt and webbing surrounding the entrance. The entrances of their homes are covered in webbing as well.

They use this webbing to detect passing prey or potential threats. These spiders are non-aggressive, and it’s unlikely you will get bitten by one. Bites are generally harmless as their venom is not medically significant to humans.

9. Santa Catalina Mountain Tarantula

Santa Catalina Mountain Tarantula (Aphonopelma Catalina) on leaves near Rose Canyon Lake, Pima County, Arizona, USA
A Santa Catalina Mountain Tarantula (Aphonopelma Catalina) on leaves near Rose Canyon Lake, Pima County, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Theraphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma Catalina
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.25 to 0.5 inches
  • Lifespan: Females: 20 to 40 years/Males 5 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $100 to $500

The Santa Catalina Mountain tarantula is a very secretive species and rarely seen. They have only been found in the Santa Catalina Mountains in Pima County.

They live in oak grasslands, and their burrows are extremely difficult to find. Males can be found a bit easier during their breeding season in late autumn to early winter days. During the mating season, males will abandon their homes and wander around searching for a mate.

This species is usually dark brown or black covered in short and long reddish hairs. Males are smaller and have more hair on their abdomen than females. Like most tarantula species, females are noticeably larger than males.

These spiders eat various insects like grasshoppers, cockroaches, and crickets.

They are nocturnal hunters and will wait for prey to cross their paths so they can grab it and subdue it with their venom. Their venom also helps liquefy its prey to help with digestion.

10. Madera Canyon Tarantula

Madera Canyon Tarantula (Aphonopelma Madera) on rocks and sand near Madera Canyon, Pima County, Arizona, USA
A Madera Canyon Tarantula (Aphonopelma Madera) on rocks and sand near Madera Canyon, Pima County, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Theraphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma Madera
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 3 to 5 inches
  • Lifespan: Females: 20 to 40 years/Males 5 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $60 to $75

The Madera Canyon Tarantula is commonly found in Madera Canyon, Huachuca, Pajarito, and Santa Rita Mountains. These are the only tarantula species found in the higher elevations of these mountains.

They live in oak grasslands, oak woodland, and pine-oak woodland habitats. These spiders breed from late October to December. During the breeding season, males can be seen wandering around during the day. 

Males are a dark shade of black, while females are a light shade of black or a dark brown. Females of this species are covered in brown/orange hairs, while males are covered in black hairs, with a few long red/orange hairs found on their abdomen. 

Madera Canyon tarantulas are very docile and have become popular in the pet trade. Though they are non-aggressive, they might bite or kick urticating hairs from their abdomen at you if they feel threatened.

Their venom is not harmful, but their bites may be slightly painful. The urticating hairs can cause itching, rash, or an allergic reaction.

11. Chiricahua Tarantula

Chiricahua Tarantula (Aphonopelma chiricahua) climbing a rock at Chiricahua National Monument, Fort Grant, Arizona, USA
A Chiricahua Tarantula (Aphonopelma chiricahua) climbing a rock at Chiricahua National Monument, Fort Grant, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Theraphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma chiricahua
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: Females: 20 to 40 years/Males 5 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $500

Aphonopelma Chiricahua only lives in the Chiricahua Mountains in Cochise County, Arizona. The habitats they have been found in include; oak woodland, pine-oak woodland, and conifer communities.

They are the only tarantula species found in the higher elevations of the Chiricahua Mountains. This species likes to live in shallow burrows found under rocks.

Unlike other species, these tarantulas don’t cover the entrance of their burrows with webbing.

Females and males of this species look very similar though the females are slightly bigger. These spiders are ebony black or dark brown with short brown hairs and long red/orange hairs coating their body and legs. This species is docile but will bite if captured.

A. Chiricahua’s diet consists of insects and small spiders. They are nocturnal hunters and will exit their burrow and wait for prey to cross their path.

Their venom helps subdue and liquefy their prey. Their venom is not harmful to humans though they are more likely to bite than other species found in the state.

12. Peloncillo Tarantula

Peloncillo Tarantula (Aphonopelma peloncillo) on dry land and grass somewhere in Pearce, Arizona, USA
A Peloncillo Tarantula (Aphonopelma peloncillo) on dry land and grass somewhere in Pearce, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Theraphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma peloncillo
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 3 to 5 inches
  • Lifespan: Females: 20 to 40 years/Males 5 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $200 to $300

The Aphonopelma Peloncillo is only found in the mid to lower elevations of the Peloncillo Mountains in southeastern Arizona. Their breeding season takes place from July to August during the summer monsoon season. Mid to late summer is an excellent time to go looking for males wandering around outside their burrows.

This species looks very similar to others in overlapping areas. They are found in a variety of colors like tan, light brown, black and brown, or all black. They are covered in light brown or black hairs all over the head and legs, and their abdomen is covered in long red/orange hairs.

They seem to be a bit hairier than other tarantulas in their region, which might help distinguish them from other species. Males are usually black or dark brown, while females are light brown, tan, and sometimes dark brown.

This species is not currently considered endangered, but there is a concern for habitat degradation due to grazing and other modes. They are very docile, and it’s rare for one to bite or kick urticating hairs. Venom from this species is harmless to humans, but a bite may cause discomfort and swelling for a few days.

13. Tucson Bronze Tarantula

Tucson Bronze Tarantula (Aphonopelma vorhiesi) on dry dirt in Tombstone, Cochise County, Arizona, USA
A Tucson Bronze Tarantula (Aphonopelma vorhiesi) on dry dirt in Tombstone, Cochise County, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Theraphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma vorhiesi
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: Females: 20 to 40 years/Males 5 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $50 to $100

The Tucson Bronze tarantula can be found across the southeastern portion of Arizona. They have been observed in Cochise County, Graham County, Pima County, and Santa Cruz County.

These spiders live in burrows in the ground or under rocks and logs. They line the inside and entrance of their burrows with silk webbing and surround their entrance to the homes with mounds of dirt and webbing. They make their home in habitats like pine-oak woodlands, oak woodlands, and deserts.

The males of this species are considered very attractive in the tarantula trade. The males are typically a black velvet color with tiny black hairs coating the body and a few long red/orange hairs on their lower abdomen.

The females are usually light brown or dark brown but are considerably lighter in color than the males. The female is larger and has thicker legs, while the male has a smaller body and longer legs.

Tucson Bronze tarantulas are very secretive and will remain inside their homes for most of their lives. These spiders only leave their homes at night to hunt, and they usually stay near their burrow and capture any insect that crosses its path.

Males will abandon their homes during the breeding season when they reach sexual maturity to wander in search of a mate.

14. Desert Tarantula

Desert Tarantula (Aphonopelma iodius) on dry rocky desert land at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ajo, Arizona, USA
A Desert Tarantula (Aphonopelma iodius) on dry rocky desert land at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ajo, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Theraphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma iodius
  • Other Names: Great basin blonde, Fresno County blonde, Salt Lake City brown, Northern blonde
  • Adult Size: 4.5 to 5.5 inches
  • Lifespan: Females: 20 to 40 years/Males 5 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $30 to $50

The Desert tarantula can be found all throughout Arizona but are mainly located in the north and northwestern areas.

These tarantulas prefer desert habitats with loose, well-drained soil. They inhabit abandoned burrows underground or make their own webbed burrow under rocks and logs and inside tree trunks.

The breeding season for these tarantulas occurs from late fall to early summer. The males abandon their homes from August to November to search for a mate.

Females of this species are typically tan with a dark brown or black abdomen, while the males are a medium shade of brown with a black abdomen. You can easily distinguish the females from the males by the females’ larger size, lighter color, and dark tips on their legs.

Desert tarantulas eat a large variety of creatures, from insects to small birds and lizards. These tarantulas are docile but are more likely to bite or kick urticating hairs than other species in the area. They make great pets but shouldn’t be handled frequently.

15. Arizona Blond Tarantula

Desert Blonde Tarantula (Aphonopelma chalcodes) in arid sand by Mica Mountain, Pima County, Arizona, USA
A Desert Blonde Tarantula (Aphonopelma chalcodes) in arid sand by Mica Mountain, Pima County, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Theraphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma chalcodes
  • Other Names: Western desert tarantula, Mexican Blond tarantula
  • Adult Size: 4.5 to 5.5 inches
  • Lifespan: Females: 20 to 40 years/Males 5 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $30 to $50

Arizona Blond tarantulas are the most common tarantula species in Arizona. They live throughout the state but are primarily found in Arizona’s southeastern and central areas.

This species lives in trees or underground in burrows, and they. They live in abandoned rodent burrows or in tree trunks. They line their inside and entrance to their homes with webbing to help detect passing prey.

Their breeding season occurs from July to September, during the summer monsoon season. During these months, males are easily spotted wandering around looking for females.

Like most tarantulas, the females of this species are larger and lighter in color than males. Males tend to have smaller bodies and longer legs. These spiders are typically dark brown, brown, or a pale tan shade.

Males can easily be differentiated from females by their dark brown or black long thin legs. These tarantulas look similar to the Desert tarantula but are distinguished by their darker colors.

The Arizona Blonde is known for being very docile and would make an amazing pet for beginners.

It’s very rare to be bitten by one though it’s recommended not to hold it too close to your face as their urticating hairs can cause irritation of the eyes and nose.

16.  Chiricahuan Gray Tarantula

Chiricahuan Gray Tarantula (Aphonopelma gabeli) on pebles and arid land near Silver Peak Mountain, San Simon, Arizona, USA
A Chiricahuan Gray Tarantula (Aphonopelma gabeli) on pebles and arid land near Silver Peak Mountain, San Simon, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Theraphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma gabeli
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 3 to 5.5 inches
  • Lifespan: Females: 20 to 40 years/Males 5 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $25 to $100 

The Chiricahuan Gray Tarantula is only found in the Chihuahuan desert in southeastern Arizona. This species prefers dry desert habitats with loose, well-drained soil.

They like to use abandoned shallow rodent burrows as homes but will sometimes make their own home out of webbing under rocks or inside logs and other natural crevices.

These tarantulas breed during late spring and early summer. The male tarantulas can be found outside their homes wandering, searching for a mate from June to August.

These tarantulas are typically dark brown or tan with some black coloring on the legs. The females of this species are noticeably larger and a few shades lighter than males. These spiders are covered in short and long light brown hairs and a couple of long red/orange hairs on the abdomen.

These spiders have a diet consisting of insects, small birds, mice, and small lizards. They eat almost anything that crosses their path.

These tarantulas are nocturnal hunters, so they leave their homes at night to find food, but they don’t go very far. They usually stay just outside the entrance to their home and wait for food to cross their path.

These tarantulas are non-aggressive, but if they feel threatened, they might bite or kick urticating hairs from their abdomen.

FAQ’s

How common is it to see wild tarantulas in Arizona?

Depending on the area and season, tarantulas can be frequently seen. Tarantulas are secretive spiders most of the year, but when breeding season comes around, it’s common to see males walking around during the day. Breeding seasons differ for every species.

Are tarantulas in Arizona endangered?

Currently, there are no endangered species of tarantula in Arizona. Though some habitats are in danger of habitat degradation due to human activity.

Are tarantulas in Arizona dangerous?

It’s a common misconception that tarantulas are dangerous. None of the species in Arizona are considered dangerous they are, in fact, very docile and make great pets. Most wild tarantulas don’t even mind if you try to handle them. 

Wrapping up

Tarantulas can look extremely similar, and it can be difficult to differentiate each species even with the proper experience.

Arizona is home to 16 different species spread across the state. Some species are rarely seen, and some are much more common.

Tarantulas are generally non-aggressive and safe to handle, but some can get agitated quickly, so it’s always best to observe rather than handle if you’re unsure of the species. These spiders are secretive and don’t leave their homes often.

They are nocturnal hunters, so they wait outside their homes for any small enough creature to cross its path. Tarantulas don’t need to eat very often. They can be fed as little as once a month if the meal is big enough.

Tarantulas in Arizona are harmless to humans. Their fangs do contain venom, but their venom is not medically significant to humans.

Every species of tarantula in Arizona has urticating hairs on its abdomen that they use as a defense mechanism. These hairs can cause itching, rash, and possible allergic reaction.

Holding tarantulas too close to your face can cause these hairs to irritate your eyes and nasal passages.

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