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44 Cool Spiders in Idaho

There are 44 different species of spiders in Idaho. Some species are more secretive and aren’t commonly observed while others you can probably find within your own home.

In this article, we will go over the 44 most commonly found spiders in Idaho and interesting facts about their appearance, habitat, and diet. If you’re interested in learning about spiders or need help identifying a species keep reading.

Due to the wide variety of species and the similar appearance of some it can be easy to confuse deadly spiders with non-deadly spiders. This list can be used to help identify species and whether they are dangerous for humans or animals.

Along with identifying spiders here you can read where to find each species and what they eat which can be great for spider enthusiasts. Now let’s look at the 44 species of spider found in Idaho.

Spiders in Idaho

1. Marbled Orbweaver 

Marbled Orbweaver (Araneus marmoreus) hanging from a twig in Novosibirsk, Russia
Marbled Orbweaver (Araneus marmoreus) hanging from a twig in Novosibirsk, Russia. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Araneus marmoreus
  • Other Names: Pumpkin spider 
  • Adult Size: 9 to 22 mm (0.35 to 0.86 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 

The marbled orbweaver can be found in most of the United States but is most commonly found in the eastern United States. In Idaho, these spiders are not common but have been spotted in northwestern areas of the state.

Marbled orb weavers make their homes in moist, wooded, grassy habitats and are frequently spotted along the banks of streams. They make their webs vertically in large shrubs, trees, and tall weeds.

Most marbled orbweavers have orange abdomens with brown, red, or black coloring. However, this species has been found in multiple color morphs including white, yellow, red, or reddish-brown abdomens with dark markings.

Typically, these spiders have light almost translucent legs with black, red, brown, or dark orange bands on them. Males are smaller than females and the bands around the legs are usually more pronounced. 

Like other orbweaver species, the marbled orbweaver builds vertical webs. On these webs is what’s known as a signal thread attached to the center used to alert the spider when prey is captured.

This species’ diet consists of small flying insects and they are mostly preyed upon by birds and wasps. 

2. Arabesque Orbweaver 

Arabesque Orbweaver (Neoscona arabesca) on a leafy plant in Jefferson County, Idaho, USA
Arabesque Orbweaver (Neoscona arabesca) on a leafy plant in Jefferson County, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Neoscona arabesca
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 7 mm (0.19 to 0.27 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Arabesque orbweavers are common all across the United States including Idaho. They make their vertical webs in trees, shrubs, or tall weeds.

Habitats, where this species can be found, include fields, gardens, forests, and sometimes human structures. Like other orbweavers, the arabesque orbweaver makes vertical webs to catch prey but hides in a retreat, like a curled and tied leaf, until alerted by their web of caught prey. 

This species of orbweaver can be found in multiple color morphs including white, yellow, red, reddish brown, brown, and gray. They can be identified by the distinct dark-colored markings on their abdomen.

These markings are dark swirls found on either side of the abdomen along the light-colored vertical stripe going down its back. Males of this species can be identified by their smaller abdomens. They are usually smaller than females but not by very much.

Due to the high-up location of their webs, the typical diet of an arabesque orbweaver is made up of flying insects like flies, mosquitos, moths, and the occasional butterfly. Their most common predators are birds, wasps, and larger spiders.

The bite of this species is not medically significant and has effects similar to a bee sting.

3. Furrow Orbweaver 

Furrow Orbweaver (Larinioides cornutus) on its web in flash photography somewhere in North Carolina, USA
Furrow Orbweaver (Larinioides cornutus) on its web in flash photography somewhere in North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Larinioides cornutus
  • Other Names: Foliate spider 
  • Adult Size: 10 to 12 mm (0.39 to 0.47 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Furrow orbweavers or furrow spiders, are located all across the United States and can be found in many different habitats in Idaho. These spiders prefer to live in lowlands amongst vegetation near or on the ground.

They are most commonly found living in moist areas, especially on the banks of rivers, lakes, and streams. They build their webs between blades of grass or among the leaves in shrubbery but are also known to build their webs on buildings as well.

The furrow orbweaver commonly has either brown, gray, olive, or reddish-brown coloration but can also be found with cream or yellow-colored abdomens. They have distinct zigzag patterned markings along the length of the abdomen that are typically dark brown or black. Females can grow to almost double the size of males and have rounder more robust abdomens while males usually have longer legs.

These spiders like to hide during the day but can sometimes be spotted on their webs. However web building or repairing as well as eating happens at night.

Their diet consists of small insects, mostly flying ones like gnats, mosquitos, and moths. This species is unlikely to bite humans unless provoked and their bite has no medical significance.

4. Shamrock Spider

Shamrock Orbweaver (Araneus trifolium) making its webs among stems in Caribou County, Idaho, USA
Shamrock Orbweaver (Araneus trifolium) making its webs among stems in Caribou County, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Araneus trifolium
  • Other Names: shamrock orbweaver 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 40 mm (0.2 to 1.57 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 

The shamrock spider can be found all throughout the United States. In Idaho, this spider is not spotted often but it can be found in a variety of habitats.

This species likes to live in places like forests, grasslands, gardens, fields, and other areas with lots of shrubs and low foliage. They are most often spotted outdoors but can sometimes be found living in moist places indoors.

Shamrock spiders can have various colors but are most often spotted with gray, beige, or brown coloration. However, they can also be yellow, orange, or greenish-gray.

Their legs are typically white, pale brown, or pale orange with around two or three thick dark brown, reddish brown, or black bands. This species can be differentiated from other orb weaver species by the white or pale yellow spots on the abdomen. Normally there are four large spots and multiple small spots.

Like most orb-weaver species the shamrock spider makes vertical webs that are used to catch prey with small retreats off to the side of the web. While they are in the retreat they are connected to their web by a single thread of silk to alert the spider when prey is caught.

Shamrock spiders like to feed at night and prefer to eat flying insects like moths, mosquitos, and gnats.

5. Western Spotted Orbweaver

Western Spotted Orbweaver (Neoscona oaxacensis) on its web in front of a rocky area in Ada County, Idaho, USA
Western Spotted Orbweaver (Neoscona oaxacensis) on its web in front of a rocky area in Ada County, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Neoscona oaxacensis
  • Other Names: Zig-zag Spider
  • Adult Size: 4 to 18 mm (0.15 to 0.7 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Western spotted orb weavers are common in warmer states in the southwest but have been spotted in warmer areas of Idaho.

While this spider is not common it can sometimes be found in open areas with sparse foliage. Unlike other orbweavers these spiders don’t sit in retreats; they hang upside down from the center of their web waiting for prey.

The western spotted orbweaver looks similar to the furrow orbweaver but can be told apart by its legs. Western spotted orb weavers have very spiny legs and are much longer than furrow orbweaver legs.

They are most commonly seen in either black, brown, pale yellow, or red-orange. They have distinctive white zig-zag markings on their abdomen.

The western spotted orbweaver waits in the center of its web for prey. They eat anything that gets entangled in their web including beetles, flies, moths, lice, and mosquitos.

These spiders will bite if provoked though their venom is unlikely to cause severe damage to humans or animals. A bite from this species may cause slight swelling or itching to the affected area.

6. Starbellied Orbweaver

Starbellied Orbweaver (Acanthepeira stellata) hanging among leaves on threads of its web in Maryland, USA
Starbellied Orbweaver (Acanthepeira stellata) hanging among leaves on threads of its web in Maryland, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Acanthepeira stellata
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 5 to 15 mm ( 0.19 to 0.59 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20

Starbellied orbweavers are named after their abdomen, which has around 12 star-like protrusions. This spider lives in prairies and open sunny habitats.

They create large circular webs that are supported by vegetation and are found up to 4  feet above the ground. This spider is active during the day and sits in the center of its web with its head down.

The coloring of this spider ranges from tan to gray, and a mottled pattern covers them. They have spikey bodies and bands that appear on their legs. Males are smaller and not seen often, but still, have a spiky appearance, and are identifiable by their large pedipalps.

Starbellied orb weavers use their large web to catch flying insects. They ambush their prey and use vibrations to know where they are at.

Venom is used to neutralize prey, but this spider’s bite is harmless to humans.

7. Black and Yellow Garden Spider 

Black and Yellow Garden Spider (Argiope aurantia) hanging in its web on Palomar Mountain, California, USA
Black and Yellow Garden Spider (Argiope aurantia) hanging in its web on Palomar Mountain, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Argiope aurantia
  • Other Names: Yellow garden spider  
  • Adult Size: 5 to 28 mm ( 0.2 to 1.1 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: $8

Black and yellow garden spiders are a large orbweaver in Idaho, active mostly in the summer and fall months. Garden spiders like this species are not only found in gardens but also live in meadows, urban areas, and other humid vegetated environments.

This spider has black and yellow coloring on its abdomen and a silver carapace. Their legs are long, with black and yellow bands on them, and their bodies are very bulbous. Males are around ¼ the size of females and are not seen unless mating.

This spider creates large webs that reach up to two feet in diameter. These spiders are also called zig-zag spiders since they make a zig-zag pattern down the center of their web.

The zig-zag pattern is called a stabilimentum and is used to make their webs more stable, and visible to flying birds. Black and yellow garden spiders feed on small insects like butterflies, moths, bees, and other similar insects active during the day.

8. Banded Garden Spider

Banded Garden Spider (Argiope trifasciata) hanging upside-down in its web in Canyon County, Idaho, USA
Banded Garden Spider (Argiope trifasciata) hanging upside-down in its web in Canyon County, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Argiope trifasciata
  • Other Names: Banded orb-weaving spider 
  • Adult Size: 15 to 25 mm (0.59 to 0.98 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Banded garden spiders are found across North America, and are one of the biggest orbweavers in Idaho.

This spider is active in summer and in moist and vegetated environments. They live in grasslands, forests, gardens, and other similar habitats.

Banded garden spiders create large circular webs supported by vegetation. They are active during the day, and sit in the center of their web, with their body in an X shape.

Banded garden spiders have oval-shaped abdomens with a pointed web and spindly legs. This spider has yellow, white, and black coloring, with bands covering its body. Males are much smaller than females and are rarely seen unless mating.

Despite their size, this spider is harmless to humans. They are beneficial in gardens, feeding on pest insects like grasshoppers, mosquitoes, and flies.

Banded garden spiders use their large webs to trap prey. Wasps and birds are this spider’s main predators.

9. Cellar Spider

Cellar Spider (Psilochrous imitatus) on a white wall in Canyon County, Idaho, USA
Cellar Spider (Psilochrous imitatus) on a white wall in Canyon County, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Pholcidae
  • Scientific Name: Psilochrous imitatus
  • Other Names: Daddy Long-Legs
  • Adult Size: 6.35 to 7.84 mm (0.25 to 0.31 inches)
  • Lifespan: 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Cellar spiders are a common species in the United States, and Psilochrous imitatus is the species that live in Idaho.

This species makes messy webs, placing them in areas like under fences, and the sides of houses, and oftentimes they make their webs indoors. Cellar spiders are active year-round, and are found in places like cellars, basements, and kitchens.

Cellar spiders are also called daddy long legs due to their long and thin legs, but other animals also hold this name. This spider has tan coloring and a small body.

Despite their size, they can take out much larger spiders, and use their long legs to wrap up prey in silk. Their messy webs are used to catch prey like flies, beetles, and roaches.

10. Western Black Widow 

Western Black Widow (Latrodectus hesperus) making its web near a dirt in Boise, Idaho, USA
Western Black Widow (Latrodectus hesperus) making its web near a dirt in Boise, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Latrodectus hesperus
  • Other Names: Western Widow 
  • Adult Size: 7 to 15 mm (0.27 to 0.59 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20 

Western black widows are the only Latrodectus species that live in Idaho and are the most dangerous spider that lives in the state. Western black widows are active mostly in the summer and fall months.

This species is nocturnal and hides in a secluded area during the day. They create messy cobwebs made of thick silk, placing them in secluded areas like under outdoor furniture, toys, water spouts, and other similar places.

Western black widow females are large and black, while males are smaller and harmless. Adults have a glossy black coloring, with a red hourglass on their abdomen.

When young they may have red, or white markings before completing their last molt. Males are identifiable by their larger pedipalps, smaller size, and the marbled pattern on them.

At night this spider hangs upside in their web, waiting for prey. They use vibrations to know when prey falls into their web and wrap them up in silk.

Western black widow silk is one of the strongest spiders in Idaho. Their bites are extremely venomous, with potent venom, and bites cause symptoms like nausea, sweating, and body aches.

11. False Black Widow

False Black Widow (Steatoda grossa) on a large rock among a rocky area in Boise, Idaho, USA
False Black Widow (Steatoda grossa) on a large rock among a rocky area in Boise, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Steatoda grossa
  • Other Names: brown house spider, cupboard spider 
  • Adult Size: 10 to 14 mm (0.39 to 0.55 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 to 6 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

As their name suggests the false black widow spider is commonly thought to be a real black widow, but this species is a part of the Steatoda genus and not Latrodectus.

False black widows are a member of the same family as the black widow and create messy webs like them. This spider is found all over North America, including Idaho.

The coloring of this spider ranges from black to reddish brown. They lack the red hourglass that most true widow spiders have, but have a large bulbous abdomen, and spindly legs similar to other cobweb spiders.

Males of this species have much smaller abdomens but long legs. This species may have cream markings on them.

Spring through fall is when this spider is active most, and they spend this time breeding. They lay up to 200 eggs in a sac.

Indoors this spider is active year-round, and outdoors they hibernate or die off in the cold. Outside they live in logs, foliage, and other similar areas.

12. Common House Spider

Common House Spider (Parasteatoda tepidariorum) walking along a rocky wall in Kootenai County, Idaho, USA
Common House Spider (Parasteatoda tepidariorum) walking along a rocky wall in Kootenai County, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Parasteatoda tepidariorum
  • Other Names: American house spider
  • Adult Size: 3 to 5 mm (0.11 to 0.19 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Idaho is not the only place where the common house spider is found. This species is very common in the United States and has a global range.

They live in man-made structures like garages, sheds, and in homes. Messy webs are made by this species to live in. They use their webs to sense when prey or predators are near, relying on their silk’s vibrations.

Common house spiders look similar to other tangle web spiders and have a large bulbous abdomen with spindly legs. Their colors range from black to tan, sometimes appearing orange. A mottled pattern covers them, helping them stay camouflaged.

Common house spiders feed on grasshoppers, roaches, flies, and other similar house insects. They use venom to neutralize their prey, but for humans, their bites only cause mild symptoms.

This species is a benefit to humans since their small size makes them unnoticed, and their webs are made in places that get lots of insects.

13. Triangulate Cobweb 

Triangulate Combfoot (Steatoda triangulosa) on a flower pot in Pocatello, Idaho, USA
Triangulate Combfoot (Steatoda triangulosa) on a flower pot in Pocatello, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae
  • Scientific Name: Steatoda triangulosa
  • Other Names: Triangulate bud spider
  • Adult Size: 3 to 6 mm (0.1 to 0.23 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The triangulate cobweb spider is one of the many species in the Theridiidae family that live in Idaho.

This spider creates messy webs, and since they have poor eyesight, they rely on their silk’s vibrations to sense things. Triangulate cobweb spiders are found across North America, and other regions of the globe like Russia, Europe, and New Zealand.

This species has a dark brown coloring, with a bulbous abdomen and spindly legs. A cream marking appears on their abdomen which looks like zigzags, and dark brown bands appear on their legs. This spider is sexually dimorphic, with males having much smaller abdomens than females.

Triangulate cobweb spiders use their messy webs to feed on small insects and other tiny invertebrates. They ambush prey that they sense in their silk and use their venom to neutralize them.

Only one case of envenomation has occurred from this spider, and they are only dangerous if allergic.

14. Rabbit Hutch Spider

Rabbit Hutch Spider (Steatoda bipunctata) walking a long a large rocky surface in Whatcom County, Washington, USA
Rabbit Hutch Spider (Steatoda bipunctata) walking along a large rocky surface in Whatcom County, Washington, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Theridiidae
  • Scientific Name: Steatoda bipunctata
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 16 mm (0.75 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a  

The rabbit hutch spider is named after their appearance in the cages of rabbits and other animals. This species creates messy webs, in dark and secluded areas with lots of insects.

Rabbit hutch spiders live near humans in structures like basements, sheds, and garages. They are found often in animal pens since they have large access to fleas and flies. 

This species is dark brown and has a cream stripe on its abdomen. Small dimples appear on their dorsal, and a symbol that looks like an infinity sign appears on the underside of their abdomen. Females are much larger than males and have a glossy coloring.

Rabbit hutch spiders while related to the black widow are harmless to humans and pets. Their bites are not strong enough to pierce human skin, and they help relax rabbits by getting rid of pests insects.

15. Candy-striped Spider

Candy-striped Spider (Enoplognatha ovata) in the sunlight on a leaf in Lewiston, Idaho, USA
Candy-striped Spider (Enoplognatha ovata) in the sunlight on a leaf in Lewiston, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Enoplognatha ovata
  • Other Names: Common candy striped spider
  • Adult Size: 3.5 to 7 mm (0.13 to 2.7 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Native to Europe, candy-striped spiders are a spider introduced to North America and are one that lives in Idaho.

This species lives in grasslands, gardens, meadows, and other vegetated habitats. They are not often found near humans and create messy webs in plant life to inhabit.

Candy-striped spiders have white, gray, or greenish coloring. They have bulbous abdomens and spindly legs. They have a red V-shaped marking that appears on their abdomen. Their coloring helps them hide in vegetation.

Living in messy webs, this small species is capable of killing prey up to twice their size. They feed on small insects and are active most from May to October.

This spider is harmless to humans, with their venom not being medically significant.

16. Bold Jumping Spider

Bold Jumping Spider (Phidippus audax) walking down a leaf in Spalding, Idaho, USA
Bold Jumping Spider (Phidippus audax) walking down a leaf in Spalding, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus audax
  • Other Names: Daring jumping spider 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 19 mm (0.23 to 0.74 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

The bold jumping spider is native to North America, and they are one of the most common Salticidae. This spider’s range covers most of America, and they are a species found in Idaho.

Bold jumping spiders live in open woodlands, fields, agricultural fields, and urban areas. They prefer temperate climates and are terrestrial spiders that spend their day wandering.

This species is all black, with vibrant green chelicerae. They have white tufts of hair on their joints, and there are three spots that appear on their abdomen that are orange, or white. When young this spider’s abdomen may be colored orange, or white, changing after they molt.

Bold jumping spiders are active during the day, and jumping spiders are most active in the spring and summer months. They spend their day hunting, feeding on insects, and terrestrial arthropods.

This species is one of the most common spider pets because of their larger size, and docile nature.

17. Red-backed Jumping Spider

Johnson's Jumping Spider (Phidippus johnsoni) walking along a rocky sandy area in Boise, Idaho, USA
Johnson’s Jumping Spider (Phidippus johnsoni) walking along a rocky sandy area in Boise, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus johnsoni
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 9 to 14 mm (0.35 to 0.55 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: $35

The red-backed jumping spider lives in woodland habitats and is sighted in the spring to summer months.

They jump around during the day on vertical surfaces and build a silk sac to rest at night. This species hides under rocks, logs, crevices, and under leaf litter in bad weather, or at night.

This species is named after its red, or orange-colored abdomen. They have dark black coloring on the other parts of their body. This spider has the same colorings as the black widow, which may confuse some, but they have the same body shape and behavior as other Salticidae.

Jumping spiders like this species are able to leap up to 6 inches to catch their prey. They feed on moths, flies, caterpillars, and other insects.

Jumping spiders have great vision. Males attract females by waving their arms in a dance to get a mate.

18. Zebra Jumping Spider 

Zebra Jumping Spider (Salticus scenicus) on a white background in Canyon County, Idaho, USA
Zebra Jumping Spider (Salticus scenicus) on a white background in Canyon County, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Salticus scenicus
  • Other Names: Zebra Spider 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 9 mm (0.19 to 0.35 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30

Zebra jumping spiders are a common species, with a large range covering North America, Europe, North Asia, and across the Holarctic.

They are active during the day and spend their time on vertical surfaces like large plants, walls, fences, and the sides of houses. Their agility allows them to make their way into homes through windows.

This spider gets their name from their black and white coloring and zebra markings appear on them. Zebra jumping spiders are covered in white hairs, but males do not have as many as females. Females have brown markings on them also and are lighter colored.

Mosquitoes, other spiders, and other invertebrates up to 3 times their size is what this spider eats. They use their great eyesight to stalk prey and attach a thread to surfaces they are jumping from to prevent falling.

Zebra jumping spiders have a jumping velocity between 2.1 to 2.6 feet per second. Having some of the best eyesight among spiders, zebra jumping spiders can see nearly 360 degrees, and their curious nature is why they sometimes watch humans.

19. Bronze Jumping Spider

Bronze Jumping Spider (Eris militaris) on a grey surface in Moscow, Idaho, USA
Bronze Jumping Spider (Eris militaris) on a grey surface in Moscow, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Eris militaris
  • Other Names: Bronze lake jumper 
  • Adult Size: 4.7 to 8 mm (0.18 to 0.31 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 6 months to 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The United States and Canada are where the bronze jumping spider lives and this spider has been sighted in Idaho. Near homes, woodlands, and meadows are where this spider lives, but they are often not noticed due to their small size.

Males of this species have dark cephalothorax and white bands on them. Females are lighter colored and lack the bands. This spider is small and is named after their bronze coloring.

Bronze jumping spiders are active during the day, and this species is seen most in the spring and summer. This spider creates a silk sac to rest in at night and also rests in their sacs during winter unless dying.

Their days are spent hunting for small insects. The venom from this spider bite is harmless. If not allergic their bites are just a small sting, and there are no symptoms.

20. Putnam’s Jumping Spider

Putnam's Jumping Spider (Phidippus putnami) on a leaf in Warrenton, Virginia, USA
Putnam’s Jumping Spider (Phidippus putnami) on a leaf in Warrenton, Virginia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus putnami
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 5 to 13 mm (0.19 to 0.51 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Putnam jumping spiders live in gardens, parks, woodlands, and open fields.

They are a native species to the United States, inhabiting Idaho and other states. This spider is diurnal and creates a silk sac in bark, leaf litter, or other hidden areas.

Putnam jumping spiders are sexually dimorphic with females being slightly larger and hairier. This spider is black, with tan hair covering its legs and abdomen.

Males have white markings on their bodies, while females have tan markings.  Four black hairs stick out the top of this spider’s head.

Putnam jumping spiders use their excellent eyesight to track prey and pounce on them when they get close enough. This spider hunts during the day, feeding on small insects, and invertebrates.

Putnam jumping spiders paralyze their prey with their bites, but like other jumping spiders they are not aggressive to humans.

21. California Flattened Jumping Spider

California Flattented Jumping Spider (Platycryptus californicus) on wooden bark in Spokane, Washington, USA
California Flattented Jumping Spider (Platycryptus californicus) on wooden bark in Spokane, Washington, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Platycryptus californicus
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 6 to 11 mm
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The California flattened jumping spider is found in North and Central America.

This species is one of the many types of spiders that live in Idaho. California flattened jumping spiders are native to North America and are sometimes spotted during the day.

This small species is black, with a mottled pattern on them. They have a gray leaf-like pattern that runs from their carapace to their abdomen. This species easily blend into surfaces like rocks and trees.

Their days are spent hunting small insects, and at night they create a silk sac to rest in. Not much is known about this species due to limited studies, but their lifestyle is believed to emulate other jumping spiders.

22. Coppered White-cheeked Jumping Spider

Coppered White-cheeked Jumping Spider (Pelegrina aeneola) on a rock in Latah County, Idaho, USA
Coppered White-cheeked Jumping Spider (Pelegrina aeneola) on a rock in Latah County, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Pelegrina aeneola
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 5.5 mm (0.19 to .21 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Coppered white-cheeked jumping spiders live in the western regions of North America in highly vegetated areas.

They are a native spider to Idaho and one of the many types of Salticidae in the state. Coppered white-cheeked jumping spiders like other jumping spiders are active during the day, spending their time hunting in vegetation.

Small in size, males and females look slightly different. Males have black legs, and pedipalps, with a dark brown carapace.

Their abdomens have light brown coloring, with white markings. Females of this species are white, with some brown on the top of their abdomens. Small hairs cover them.

Tiny insects and their eggs are what this spider eats. They, like other jumping spiders, are harmless and use their jumps to catch prey, and escape predators.

23. Striped Lynx Spiders

Striped Lynx Spider (Oxyopes salticus) eating its prey on the stems of white flowers in Massachusetts, USA
Striped Lynx Spider (Oxyopes salticus) eating its prey on the stems of white flowers in Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Oxyopidae
  • Scientific Name: Oxyopes salticus
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 4 to 7 mm (0.15 to 0.27 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Native to North America, the striped lynx spider is a common species in Idaho and other parts of their range.

This spider lives in grassy areas, with lots of vegetation. Lynx spiders are active during the day and are sighted most from spring to summer.

Striped lynx spiders have tan to cream coloring and a dark brown striped pattern that appears on their body. This spider is covered in thick hair, and their abdomens are very pointed. Lynx spiders have eight eyes that are arranged in a circle on their head, with two smaller eyes separate from the rest below the circle in the center of their face.

Their cat-like movements and hunting ability are why they are called lynx spiders. Silk from this species is not used to make webs but used to travel and make egg sacs.

Striped lynx spiders’ egg sacs are flat, and they guard their young until the spiderlings are ready to disperse.

24. Spitting Spider

Common Spitting Spider (Scytodes thoracica) walking through dry grass and shrub in Caldwell, Idaho, USA
Common Spitting Spider (Scytodes thoracica) walking through dry grass and shrub in Caldwell, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Scytodidae 
  • Scientific Name: Scytodes thoracica
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 18 mm (0.25 to 0.75 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1.5 to 4 years 
  • Average Price Range: $30

Spitting spiders live in Idaho, and across North America, and have a global range.

This spider lives around homes, and other buildings, and prefers cool and dark environments. Forests are where this species also lives, and they are nocturnal spiders. Spitting spiders may hide near debris like rocks, logs, or leaves.

Spitting spiders are tan colored, and may have bands on their legs, and a dark mottled pattern covering them. Their legs are extremely long and thin, with their front legs being longer to help them aim. Spitting spiders only have six eyes, arranged in pairs of two, in a triangular shape.

To take out predators this spider is able to spit liquid silk and venom to entangle their prey. They move slowly and aim with their front legs, shooting their substance at a speed of up to 28 meters per second.

They can shoot accurately around 0.39 to 0.79 inches away from them. Spitting spiders are harmless to humans, and prey on small insects.

25. Black-footed Yellow Sac Spider 

Agrarian Sac Spider (Cheiracanthium inclusum) sitting on orange flowers in Washington, USA
Black-footed Yellow Sac Spider (Cheiracanthium inclusum) sitting on orange flowers in Washington, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Cheiracanthiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Cheiracanthium inclusum
  • Other Names: Agrarian Sac Spider
  • Adult Size: 6.3 to 9.5 mm (0.2 to 0.37 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Black-footed yellow sac spiders live across North America, including Idaho. Yellow sac spiders are nocturnal and create silk sacs to rest in during the day.

Originally they were thought to have necrotic venom, but further research into this spider bite shows that they are not as dangerous as once believed. Their bites can be painful but only cause mild swelling. Females are more aggressive than males and may bite if provoked.

This spider has yellowish coloring and long legs with black coloring on the tip of their feet. Yellow sac spiders’ eyes glow in the dark when shined with a light, but they still do not have great vision since their tapetum lucidum is curved, unlike wolf spiders.

A faint stripe runs down the top of their abdomen, which is where their heart is located.

26. Long-legged Sac Spider

Northern Yellow Sac Spider (Cheiracanthium mildei) climbing along tall leaves in Meridian, Idaho, USA
Northern Yellow Sac Spider (Cheiracanthium mildei) climbing along tall leaves in Meridian, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Cheiracanthiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Cheiracanthium mildei
  • Other Names: Northern Yellow Sac Spider
  • Adult Size: 4 to 10 mm (0.15 to 0.39 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Long-legged sac spiders are a nocturnal species that are active mostly in the spring months. During the day this spider creates a silk sac for it to rest in, making them in leaf litter or secluded areas.

Long-legged sac spiders sometimes make their way indoors and hide under objects like dirty laundry or cardboard. Originally this spider is from Europe but has been introduced to the United States. 

This spider is cream, tan, or yellow, and is named after its long legs. This spider is very similar to the black-footed sac spider and only has very slight differences.

Long-legged sac spiders have a greenish hue and a light yellow color on their cephalothorax. Their fangs are large and black, and their long legs are covered in tiny hairs.

Yellow sac spiders are prowling spiders that spend their night hunting for small insects, and other invertebrate prey. Lizards, larger spiders, and birds are this spider’s main predators.

Their bites can cause infection since their fangs are large, but their venom is not known to be medically significant.

27. Leaf-curling Sac Spider

Leaf-curling Sac Spider (Clubiona abboti) on a wood-colored surface in Russia
Leaf-curling Sac Spider (Clubiona abboti) on a wood-colored surface in Russia. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Clubionidae
  • Scientific Name: Clubiona abboti
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 6 to 10 mm (0.24 to 0.39 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Leaf curling sac spiders are found all over the United States, including Idaho.

They are a part of the Clubiona genus, and it is estimated there are around 49 members of spiders classified as this. Leaf curling sac spiders live in places with lots of vegetation, and are active from the spring to fall months.

This spider is smaller in size and has yellow to tan coloring. They are covered in tiny velvet hairs, and their fangs are large and black. This spider gets its name from the leaves that it curls.

They lay their eggs in these curled leaves, and after laying them they die. This spider is a wandering species that look for small insects to ambush.

28. Red-spotted Ant-mimic Spider

Red-spotted Ant-mimic Sac Spider (Castianeira descripta) climbing up a cave-like wall near Hidden Springs, Idaho, USA
Red-spotted Ant-mimic Sac Spider (Castianeira descripta) climbing up a cave-like wall near Hidden Springs, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Corinnidae 
  • Scientific Name: Castianeira descripta
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 13 mm (0.51 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Red-spotted ant mimic spiders are found in the United States and Canada. This species’ coloring, and behavior copy ants. Parks, gardens, meadows, and woods are where the ant-mimic spider is found.

The spring and early summer are when this spider is found most. These spiders are active during the day and have peak activity at noon.

Some may confuse the red-spotted ant mimic spiders for black widows since they have similar colorings, but they have bodies more similar to sac spiders. This species has a glossy black appearance and a red marking that appears on the back of its abdomen.

This spider mimics ants by lifting up their two front legs to copy antennas. They move very slowly and trick prey into thinking they are an ant.

The red-spotted ant mimic spider is very quick and ambushes predators that get close. These spiders are not dangerous to humans, despite their coloring which looks like a black widow.

29. Barn Funnel Weaver

Barn Funnel Weaver (Tegenaria domestica) on white flowers in Meridian, Idaho, USA
Barn Funnel Weaver (Tegenaria domestica) on white flowers in Meridian, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner  
  • Family: Agelenidae 
  • Scientific Name: Tegenaria domestica
  • Other Names: Domestic house spider 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 11.5 mm (0.24 to 0.45 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 5 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The barn funnel weaver is found in North America and is a spider that lives in Idaho.

This species has a global range that lives in places like North Africa, the Middle East, Central Asia, and Europe. Barn funnel weavers create funnel-shaped webs, making them in barns, the sides of buildings, on fences, under rocks, on grass, and around other debris. 

This spider has tan to orange coloring. Dark stripes cover their legs, and their abdomen has a grayish-mottled pattern. This spider was once in the Eratigena genus but was moved out of that classification.

Their abdomen has a spinneret that helps create their funnel-shaped web. Males have longer legs since they spend more time wandering. 

Barn funnel weavers are not aggressive, and if provoked they retreat into their web. This spider only bites if threatened. Their webs trap insects and let the spider know when to strike.

30. Hobo Spider 

Hobo Spider (Eratigena agrestis) crawling along a rocky surface in Moscow, Idaho, USA
Hobo Spider (Eratigena agrestis) crawling along a rocky surface in Moscow, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Agelenidae 
  • Scientific Name: Eratigena agrestis
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 6.35 to 12.7 mm (0.25 to 0.5 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Hobo spiders are native to the United States, and their range covers part of the northwestern region of the country. Hobo spiders are a type of funnel weaver that builds a web with a funnel for them to live in.

They create their webs around human structures, near ground level, and in basements. Hobo spiders are spotted from spring to fall. Males are spotted most during the fall, wandering around looking for a mate.

This spider has tannish coloring, with a gray mottled pattern on its abdomen. They are medium-sized and have a spinneret at the end of their abdomen.

Male hobo spiders have large pedipalps that look like gloves, and their abdomens are slightly smaller. To distinguish this spider from others within the Eratigena genus a microscope is required.

Hobo spiders 1990 were reported as a venomous species that caused necrosis, but in 2017 the CDC changed their status and they are no longer listed as venomous. The potency of their venom has been debated, but recent studies have shown these spiders are harmless unless allergic.

Hobos spiders rely on vibrations to sense when the prey gets near. Roaches, ants, flies, and other house insects are what these spiders eat.

31. Woodlouse Spider

Woodlouse Spider (Dysdera crocata) on a rocky surface near Mora, Idaho, USA
Woodlouse Spider (Dysdera crocata) on a rocky surface near Mora, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Dysderidae 
  • Scientific Name: Dysdera crocata
  • Other Names: Woodlouse hunter, sowbug killer 
  • Adult Size: 9 to 3 mm (0.35 to 0.59 inches)
  • Lifespan: 2 to 5 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Woodlouse spiders are believed to have originated from the Mediterranean region but are found in places like Eurasia, North America, South Africa, Australia, South America, and New Zealand.

Woodlouse spiders are nocturnal and create a silk sac to rest during the day. This spider inhabits areas that woodlice live in since they regularly feed on them.

The legs and carapace of this spider are reddish-orange, and its abdomens are gray. This spider has large fangs to pierce the exoskeleton of the animals they eat. Woodlouse spiders have six eyes, arranged in a small oval on their face.

The venom from this spider is harmless, but their bites can be painful, and leave an infection since they feed on dead, decaying matter. Despite their name, this spider feeds on a variety of prey and not just woodlice.

They are nocturnal hunters, feeding on other spiders, millipedes, and small invertebrates they find.

32. Patterned Ant-mimic Ground Spider

Common Patterned Ant-mimic Ground Spider (Sergiolus montanus) climbing up a brown wall in Custer County, Idaho, USA
Common Patterned Ant-mimic Ground Spider (Sergiolus montanus) climbing up a brown wall in Custer County, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Gnaphosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Sergiolus montanus
  • Other Names: Common Patterned Ant-mimic Ground Spider
  • Adult Size: 13 mm ( 0.51 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Sergiolus montanus is a member of the ground spider family, found in North America.

This spider lives in Idaho and has also been sighted in other states like California, Colorado, Oregon, Arizona, Utah, and Washington. Spring is when this spider is active most, and when found they are usually captured in homes.

This ground spider is medium-sized and has black coloring. The tips of their legs are brown, and white markings appear on their carapace and abdomen. This spider is covered in small hairs and has a tail-like spinneret at the end of their abdomen.

Ground spiders are a wandering species that hunt during the day. They are not dangerous but sometimes wander into homes looking for food.

This spider is harmless to humans and often goes unnoticed.

33. Mouse Spider

Mouse Spider (Scotophaeus blackwalli) on a tan surface in Delhi, India, Asia
Mouse Spider (Scotophaeus blackwalli) on a tan surface in Delhi, India, Asia. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Gnaphosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Scotophaeus blackwalli
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 9 to 12 mm (0.35 to 0.47 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Mouse spiders are found in Idaho, and also live in other states within the U.S. like California, Washington, Oregon, and Colorado. This species is sighted often in the spring, summer, and fall months, and is rarely seen in the winter.

They are native to Europe and are a spider that was introduced to North America. Around homes, sheds, garages, and gardens are where this spider is typically found. 

Mouse spiders have tan to reddish brown legs and carapace. Their abdomens are black, and small velvety hairs cover this species. They are medium-sized and are called mouse spiders due to the mouse-like hairs that cover their body.

Mouse spiders are nocturnal, and you will usually see them in your homes, on walls or ceilings looking for food. They are ambush predators that feed mainly on small insects.

This spider is not harmful to humans, and their venom is only useful for taking out small insects or invertebrate prey.

34. Goldenrod Crab Spider

Goldenrod Crab Spider (Misumena vatia) on the stem of a flower in Latah County, Idaho, USA
Goldenrod Crab Spider (Misumena vatia) on the stem of a flower in Latah County, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Thomisidae 
  • Scientific Name: Misumena vatia
  • Other Names: Flower crab spider 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 10 mm (0.20 to 0.39 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Goldenrod crab spiders are found in North America and Europe. These spiders live in grasslands, meadows, prairies, and other habitats with lots of flowers.

Goldenrod crab spiders are seen most on plants like goldenrod, thistle weed, trillium, daisies, and white fleabane. A temperate climate is preferred for this species and they are active mostly during the fall and summer seasons.

Goldenrod crab spiders are members of the Thomisidae crab family, which are named after their movements, and legs which resemble a crab. Males have tiny abdomens, and longer legs, while females have a larger bulbous abdomen.

Their coloring is either white, or yellow, and they are able to change between the two. This species changes its color slowly over time, which takes between a week to a month. They have reddish markings on their bodies, and their colors can even change based on what they eat

Camouflage is how this spider hunts, staying hidden on flowers until insects come close. They grab their prey with their two strong front legs and use venom to neutralize them.

Pollinating insects like bees, flies, butterflies, and moths are what this spider feeds on.

35. Ground Crab Spider

Ground Crab Spider (Xysticus sphericus) at the end of a small leaf in Moscow, Idaho, USA
Ground Crab Spider (Xysticus sphericus) at the end of a small leaf in Moscow, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Thomisidae 
  • Scientific Name: Xysticus sphericus
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 3 to 9 mm ( 0.11 to 0.35 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Xysticus sphericus is a part of the ground crab spider genus, which was first described in 1835. This spider has a large range that covers North America, including Idaho.

Ground crab spiders live in grasslands or woodland habitats. They do not build webs and live more towards the ground, and in vegetation.

Ground crab spiders like other species in the Thomisidae family are named after their crab-like movements like legs. These spiders have tan coloring, with a rounded abdomen, and a mottled pattern covering them. Ground crab spiders of the Xysticus genus have a light-colored stripe on their carapace. 

These spiders are sit-and-wait hunters, using their camouflage for prey to get near. They may hide on plant-life, or near the ground in leaf litter.

Birds, reptiles, small mammals, and other larger spiders are the predators these spiders must worry about. Ground crab spiders can be spotted any time of the year, but are active mostly during the spring season.

36. Deadly Ground Crab Spider

Deadly Ground Crab Spider (Xysticus funestus) clinging onto the end of a small leaf someone's holding in Houston, Texas, USA
Deadly Ground Crab Spider (Xysticus funestus) clinging onto the end of a small leaf someone’s holding in Houston, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Thomisidae 
  • Scientific Name: Xysticus funestus
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 5 to 10 mm (0.2 to 0.4 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The deadly ground crab spider is native to North America and is one of the many spiders in Idaho.

This species does not build webs and spends most of its time on the floors of woodland habitats. Deadly ground crab spiders may hide under leaf litter and are active mostly during the late summer and fall months.

Tan to orangish is the coloring of this spider, and they have bulbous abdomens. Small orangish dots cover this species, and they have a light-colored stripe on their carapace.

This species’ front legs are curved, and each leg is shorter than the rest. Their legs shape a multidirectional movement resembling crabs.

Despite its name, the deadly ground crab spider is harmless to humans and is only deadly to the small insect prey they feed on. This spider is not seen often due to their camouflage, small size, and tendency to live in areas where humans are not.

37. Running Crab Spider

Running Crab Spider (Philodromus spp.) on a light thick-leafed plant in Kuna, Idaho, USA
Running Crab Spider (Philodromus spp.) on a light thick-leafed plant in Kuna, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Philodromidae 
  • Scientific Name: Philodromus spp.
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 38 mm (1.5 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Running crab spiders are found across North America and the globe.

These spiders live in woodland habitats with deciduous or conifer trees, sometimes found in desert habitats. Running crab spiders are active during the day, and spend their time wandering about.

Spiders in the Philodromus genus are not members nor considered true crab spiders but are members of the running crab spider family Philodromidae. These spiders get their name from their front legs which are oriented sideways like crabs. They typically have tan coloring, and a mottled pattern covering them.

Unlike true crab spiders, running crab spiders are ambush predators. They use their speed to chase down prey, feeding on small insects, and other invertebrates.

The coloring and pattern on this spider help them blend into tree or dirt surfaces and stay hidden. Running crab spiders are named after their quick speed, which not only helps them find food but also escapes predators.

38. American Grass Spider

American Grass Spider (Agelenopsis naevia) walking up a white painted surface in Meridian, Idaho, USA
American Grass Spider (Agelenopsis naevia) walking up a white painted surface in Meridian, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Agelenidae
  • Scientific Name: Agelenopsis naevia
  • Other Names: Funnel weavers, sheet web spiders, Dark-legged Grass Spider
  • Adult Size: 9 to 20 mm (0.35 to 0.78 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

American grass spiders are found all over the United States and are very common spiders in the spring.

These small spiders live in backyards, meadows, parks, and other vegetated areas. They build funnel-shaped webs, creating them on plants like grass, or flowers.

Grass spiders are medium-sized, and tan in color. They have two dark stripes that run down their dorsal and a mottled pattern on their abdomen.

This species has long legs covered in tiny hairs that let them sense vibrations in their funnel web. Their abdomens are pointed and have a tail-like spinneret. While some often confuse grass spiders for wolf spiders, their funnel-shaped webs, eye pattern, and spinneret can help distinguish the two spiders.

Grass spiders are nocturnal, and at night they wait near the edge of their funnel for food to pass near. They drag their prey into their web, feeding mainly on smaller insects.

Grass spiders lay their eggs near the edge of their funnel, and when the spiderlings hatch they disperse off to create their own webs.

39. Six-spotted Fishing Spider 

Six-spotted Fishing Spider (Dolomedes triton) walking near a lilypad on water in Bonner County, Idaho, USA
Six-spotted Fishing Spider (Dolomedes triton) walking near a lilypad on water in Bonner County, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Pisauridae 
  • Scientific Name: Dolomedes triton
  • Other Names: Dock Spiders 
  • Adult Size: 15 to 60 mm (0.59 to 2.3 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20 

Six-spotted fishing spiders are a member of the Pisauridae family, which are also known as nursery web spiders. This spider is found in Idaho, living in woodland habitats near water sources.

Six-spotted fishing spiders are able to walk on water, as their legs do not break the surface tension of the water. Active for most of the year, this spider is seen mostly during the summer.

The six-spotted fishing spider has tan coloring, with a white stripe that runs down the border of its abdomen. They have white spots on their abdomen but are actually named for the six spots that appear under their abdomen.

These spider legs are legs that stretch out the sides of their body. Other fishing spiders in the Dolomedes genus inhabit Idaho, but they are yet to be officially documented.

Six-spotted fishing spiders are active during the day and are sometimes seen sitting on the water, or debris like rocks or logs. They feed on aquatic animals like insects, tadpoles, frogs, and small fish.

Fishing spiders are even able to dive underwater, and their hydrophobic hairs prevent them from getting extremely wet. They are able to stay underwater for up to 30 minutes.

40. Stone Spider

Stone Spider (Pardosa lapidicina) on a large light-colored stone in Crestline, Ohio, USA
Stone Spider (Pardosa lapidicina) on a large light-colored stone in Crestline, Ohio, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Lycosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Pardosa lapidicina 
  • Other Names: Stone Spiders
  • Adult Size: 6 to 9 mm (0.23 to 0.35 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

There are about 2,300 wolf spider species, and Paradosa lapidicina is one of the many that live in Idaho.

This spider is native to the region, and in the state has been documented in the southeastern corner region. This species is mainly found near water and its overall range stretches from Mexico to Alaska.

This spider is a smaller wolf spider, and tannish gray in color. They have a mottled pattern on their abdomen and are covered in small thick hairs on their legs. Bands appear on the spider’s legs, and their coloring helps them blend into the rocky environments they live in.

This species of wolf spider hunts on things like small flying insects, amphipods, and springtails. They sit and wait, ambushing predators that get close.

They hunt both day and night, taking down multiple prey daily. This spider is most active from the spring to fall months.

41. Wandering Hunter Spider

Schizocosa mccooki in dried grass somewhere in Olivehurst, California, USA
Schizocosa mccooki in dried grass somewhere in Olivehurst, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Lycosidae
  • Scientific Name: Schizocosa mccooki
  • Other Names: Wolf Spider
  • Adult Size: 10 to 80 mm (0.39 to 0.89 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Schizocosa mccooki is a species native to North America and is one of the many wolf spiders that live in Idaho.

Information on this spider is limited, but their range is large, and they are found in habitats like meadows, woodlands, and prairie habitats. The summer and fall months are when this spider is active, and they inhabit burrows or hide under natural debris.

The Schizocosa mcooki wolf spider is medium-sized and has tan coloring. They have dark markings near the border of their carapace, as well as marks on their abdomen. Males and females look similar, but males have smaller abdomens.

Wolf spiders like this species are very defensive of their young. They carry their egg sacs, and young until they are ready to disperse.

Wolf spiders are nocturnal and pounce on their prey. They are named after their wolf-like hunting abilities, feeding on insects, and other small invertebrates.

42. Pirate Wolf Spider

  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Lycosidae
  • Scientific Name: Pirata insularis
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 6 to 9 mm (0.23 to 0.35 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: Beginner

The pirate wolf spider is found year-round in Idaho.

This spider has only been found in the central region of Custer County within the state. Pirate wolf spiders have a large range across North America, as they are also found in Canada, all the way up to Alaska, and in the southern United States.

This spider is small, and wolf spider species within the Pirata genus look nearly identical. They have tan to cream colorings on their legs and carapace.

Their abdomen is darker colored and has a mottled pattern. Their carapace has dark brown markings, and small hairs cover them.

The eyes of this spider are arranged similarly to other wolf spiders, with two four eyes on a button row, two in the center of their face, and two on the sides of their head. Little is known about spiders in the Pirata genus despite their large range in North America and Europe.

April to June is the peak for these spiders, which are more common in forest habitats near water.

43. Carolina Wolf Spider 

Carolina Wolf Spider (Hogna carolinensis) walking along a rocky surface in Bannock County, Idaho, USA
Carolina Wolf Spider (Hogna carolinensis) walking along a rocky surface in Bannock County, Idaho, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Lycosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Hogna carolinensis
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 19 to 25 mm (0.7 to 0.98 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 4 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Carolina wolf spiders are found across the United States. In Idaho, this spider is rare but has been spotted in the state.

Fields, meadows, and woodland habitats are where this spider lives, and they are more common in areas with loose soil. Carolina wolf spiders live in burrows that they make or take over from other animals.

Spiders within the Hogna genus are larger than any wolf spider. The largest wolf spider of all is Hogna carolinensis, which is also among the largest spiders in most states, including Idaho.

This spider has tan to dark brown coloring. Their large size is their most identifying trait.

Carolina wolf spiders are nocturnal and have excellent night vision. Their eyes glow at night due to the tapetum lucidum, which shines when flashed with light.

Wolf spiders have better eyesight than other spiders and have two larger eyes in the front of their face similar to wolf spiders. They use their night vision to hunt prey like smaller spiders, insects, and smaller prey like lizards.

44. Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider (Ummidia spp.) walking along concrete in the sun in Gainesville, Florida, USA
Trapdoor Spider (Ummidia spp.) walking along concrete in the sun in Gainesville, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate  
  • Family: Halonoproctidae 
  • Scientific Name: Ummidia spp.
  • Other Names: Cork lid spider 
  • Adult Size: (1 to 1.6 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 5 to 20 years 
  • Average Price Range: $30 

The trapdoor spider is a secretive species that lives all over the United States. Underground in tubular burrows is where this spider lives, spending most of their life underground.

Trapdoor spiders have long lifespans, and females are able to live up to 20 years. Silk is what their burrows are made with, and they cover their hole with a lid to keep themselves hidden from predators.

Trapdoor spiders have robust bodies, with coloring that ranges from dark brown to black. They have a glossy appearance, a round abdomen, and large fangs. Small hairs cover this spider’s body, which helps them sense vibrations around them.

Trapdoor spiders are one of the few types of spiders that balloon when a spiderling to dispersing, which is one of the reasons why they are so widespread. Trapdoor spider burrows are made with their chelicerae and take up hours to construct.

This spider is nocturnal, and at night waits near the edge of their burrow to pounce out at insects. This spider feeds on insects, other spiders, and small animals like lizards that pass through their burrows.

The trapdoor spider’s lid is held shut by their fangs to discourage predators from trying to eat them. Parasitic wasps are this species’ main predators, and they can chew through this spider’s silk lid.

FAQ

Are there dangerous spiders in Idaho?

The western black widow is Idaho’s most dangerous spider and has stronger venom than any other spider in the state.

Venom from this spider causes symptoms like nausea, fever, and body aches. Bites affect children, the elderly, and those with a weakened immune system more than anyone.

Spiders like the hobo spider and yellow sac spider live in the state and are thought to be medically significant by some. Recent studies show that this spider’s venom is not as strong as originally believed, but like other spiders, their bites can be dangerous for those who are allergic.

What are the most common spiders in Idaho?

Idaho is filled with a variety of spiders, and some of the most common in the state that you may come across include wolf spiders, orbweavers, jumping spiders, and tangle web spiders are the most common in the state.

Each species has its own preference for where it prefers to live, and most spiders are usually active from spring to fall. In the winter most spiders hibernate and die off, but spiders that live indoors are able to be seen year-round.

Which spiders in Idaho are the biggest?

Wolf spiders are some of the largest types of spiders in Idaho, and the Carolina wolf spider is the largest species of all that can be found in Idaho.

Carolina wolf spiders that are female have a body length of around 0.98 inches, while males are around 0.75 inches. The leg span of this spider grows up to 4 inches. Other large spiders in the state include fishing spiders and trapdoor spiders.

Wrapping up

Idaho is home to at least 44 spider species, but there are many more to be identified in the state. The United States has around 3,500 species of spiders, and more are always being discovered.

Spiders are beneficial since they help control many pest insect species that are found in gardens and agricultural fields. While many people fear spiders, most are harmless to humans.

There are many types that you may find in Idaho, and knowing how they look can help you know what species are dangerous. Spiders can even make fun pets, and they are easy to care for even for beginners.

Spiders are great for the environment and are a valuable food source for animals like lizards, birds, frogs, salamanders, and rodents.

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