Best Pet Chameleons for Beginners

If you’ve been wonder what the best pet chameon is, then you’ve come to the right place.

Below we break down the top 10 Chameleons for beginners as pets.

One cool thing they are known for is that they can change their colors depending on their environment and mood. It’s one of the best parts about owning one.

Watching a chameleon catch prey with their projectile tongues is also a very cool experience! Chameleons can also swivel their eyes in different directions, whilst most have prehensile tails that allow them to cling securely to the branches in their enclosures.

However, chameleons are sensitive reptiles and can have quite involving care requirements. They are easily stressed and some species cannot tolerate changing conditions, even minutely. Most chameleons aren’t well suited to being handled and are best just being observed.

Chameleons will also need relatively large, vertical enclosures that replicate arboreal jungle environments. You’ll need to provide plenty of climbing branches as well as live plants. They also need several basking areas in their enclosures that produce different temperatures, which can be tricky to get right.

These strange reptiles will primarily eat live insects. While they won’t drink from water bowls, they will ingest droplets of water from leaves, so you’ll need to either mist the enclosure two times a day or provide some form of drip or misting system.

Chameleons will change color when experiencing different moods. The darker a chameleon turns, the more stressed it is feeling. This can help placate your reptile and fine-tune its conditions. Chameleons aren’t ideal reptiles for novice keepers, and even if you’re a relatively accomplished herpetology enthusiast, they can be tricky.

Not every chameleon is suited to being kept as a pet, so we’ve devised a list of the ten best pet chameleons, ranking each species from Beginner to Expert.

10 Best Pet Chameleons

1) Veiled Chameleon

Veiled Chameleon eating crickets
Velil
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Chameleonidae
  • Scientific Name: Chamaleo calyptratus
  • Other Names: Cone-headed Chameleon, Yemen Chameleon
  • Adult Size: Between 10 and 25 inches
  • Lifespan: Between 6 and 8 years
  • Average Price Range: Between $40 and $100

Quick Care Requirements

  • Enclosure Size: 4ft H x 3ft L x 3ft D
  • Food: Insects
  • UVB Lighting: Needed
  • Ambient Temperature: Between 72 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Basking Spot Temperature: Between 85 and 95 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Humidity: About 50%

As far as chameleons go, Veiled chameleons are one of the best species for new chameleon keepers. They are relatively hardy compared to other species and come from a drier climate in parts of Saudi Arabia and Yemen.

These impressive chameleons have distinctive cone-like protrusions jutting from their heads. Their basic colors range from green to lime with stripes ranging from white or tan to blue or yellow. They may also show mottling patterns.

The enclosure should have an arboreal setup and should be as well ventilated as possible. Mesh on three sides of the enclosure should ensure adequate airflow. Because they come from relatively dry forest regions, Veiled chameleons require a basking temperature of around 85 degrees Fahrenheit using a reflected bulb or ceramic heat lamp.

As with all chameleons, Veiled chameleons will need both UVA and UVB lights that cover the whole spectrum. These will need to run for 12 hours a day, but the bulbs should be placed at least six inches away from your chameleon’s closest climbing spot outside of the enclosure. Humidity levels should be kept low, at around 50%.

Gut-loaded crickets, locusts, and mealworms should form the bulk of your Veiled chameleon’s diet. You can also provide fruits and vegetables such as kale, collard greens, red pepper, or pears. Dust two or three insect meals per week with calcium supplements, and once a week with multivitamins.

Veiled chameleons do not like to be handled, so it’s best to avoid touching them where possible. They should also be solitary pets as they will likely attack other chameleons.

2) Panther Chameleon

panther chameleon on branch
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Chameleonidae
  • Scientific Name: Furcifer pardalis
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: Between 10 and 18 inches
  • Lifespan: Between 5 and 7 years
  • Average Price Range: Between $250 and $500

Quick Care Requirements

  • Enclosure Size: 4ft H x 3ft L x 3ft D
  • Food: Insects
  • UVB Lighting: Needed
  • Ambient Temperature: Between 75 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Basking Spot Temperature: Between 90 and 95 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Humidity: Between 60% and 85%

Panther chameleons are one of the most popular chameleon species to be kept as pets. They are relatively hardy and come in several bright, vivid colors. They are also widely bred and there is plenty of information and infrastructure for them in the reptile community.

This vibrant species hails from Madagascar, where different colors identify chameleons from different regions. The color spectrum ranges from blue to green and orange to red. Males are often more brightly colored than females.

Again, you’ll need an arboreal enclosure with plenty of branches to climb on and well ventilated with mesh sides. Live plants are also a crucial component as your Panther chameleon will lick water droplets from the leaves. These branches and plants should vary in size and need to be placed in different temperature areas.

Provide both a basking spot and UVA and UVB light from external bulbs. A 12-hour day/night cycle should be used for ultraviolet lights. Humidity needs to be pretty high for Panther chameleons, somewhere between 60% and 85%. Use an automated misting system or spray the enclosure yourself twice a day.

Crickets will be the main component of your chameleon’s diet. Butterworms, mealworms, and grasshoppers can add variety. You can also offer some vegetation such as collard greens or sugar snap peas. However, some chameleons will prefer to eat insects the majority of the time. Calcium supplements should be employed twice a week, alongside one dose per week of multivitamins.

Panther chameleons are a relatively calm species, but still do not like to be handled often. It’s often best to simply observe them. If your chameleon does tolerate handling, use a branch to lead them onto your arm to avoid stressing them out too much.

3) Flap-necked Chameleon

Flap necked chameleon walking in sand
Flap necked chameleon walking in sand
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Chameleonidae
  • Scientific Name: Chameleo dilepis
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: Between 10 and 14 inches
  • Lifespan: Between 5 and 8 years
  • Average Price Range: Between $40 and $50

Quick Care Requirements

  • Enclosure Size: 3ft H x 2ft L x 1½ ft D
  • Food: Insects
  • UVB Lighting: Needed
  • Ambient Temperature: Between 74 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Basking Spot Temperature: Between 88 and 95 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Humidity: Between 50% and 60%

Flap-necked chameleons are a larger chameleon that is suitable for beginner keepers. Their needs are relatively easy to accommodate compared to other species. These chameleons can be found across sub-Saharan regions of Africa.

They are mostly brown, green, or yellow with light cream markings on their sides. This species is unique because of its brightly colored neck flaps behind their heads, which can be extended.

An arboreal habitat comprised of both artificial and live plants and some branches, with ventilation provided by mesh sides, is ideal for Flap-necked chameleons. A temperature gradient is necessary to allow your lizard to regulate its body temperature. Use a basking bulb along with a UVB light that has a 12-hour day/night cycle. Position these two bulbs over one side of the enclosure.

An automated misting system, or manual misting twice a day, will help keep the humidity high and also provide your chameleon with a drinking source. As for food, a steady diet of gut-loaded crickets, dubia roaches, and mealworms is ideal. Adults should eat every other day, with calcium supplements being used on alternating feedings.

Like most chameleons, Flap-necked chameleons aren’t fond of being handled. Some individuals may tolerate it, but don’t force it on them. If they do allow handling, they may climb on top of your head as these chameleons like high perches.

4) Jackson’s Chameleon

Jackson's Chameleon on stick (jacksonii jacksonii xantholophus)
Jackson’s Chameleon on stick (jacksonii jacksonii xantholophus)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Chameleonidae
  • Scientific Name: Trioceros jacksonii
  • Other Names: Three-horned Chameleon
  • Adult Size: Between 7 and 13 inches
  • Lifespan: Between 5 and 10 years
  • Average Price Range: Between $80 and $180

Quick Care Requirements

  • Enclosure Size: 4ft H x 2ft L x 2ft D
  • Food: Insects
  • UVB Lighting: Needed
  • Ambient Temperature: Between 70 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Basking Spot Temperature: Between 83 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Humidity: Between 50% and 80%

Jackson’s chameleons are an impressive species thanks to their three distinctive horns protruding from their brows. There are native to areas of east Africa such as Kenya but have also been introduced in states such as Florida and Hawaii. Only male Jackson’s chameleons possess horns. These reptiles are commonly green but can display other colors such as yellow or blue.

A well-ventilated arboreal enclosure with mesh sides will suit Jackson’s chameleons. Climbing branches and vines and live plants should also be provided. Avoid substrates that can be swallowed. Use a basking light or ceramic heater to keep the temperature at the correct levels throughout the enclosure.

A misting system is ideal for providing your chameleon with water, or you can mist the enclosure twice a day. Humidity for a Jackson’s chameleon should range between 50% and 80%. As for ultraviolet light, both UVA and UVB should be provided on a 12-hour day/night cycle.

As insectivores, Jackson’s chameleons should primarily eat gut-loaded cricket. Variation can be offered in the form of mealworms or flies and grasshoppers. Using calcium supplements two or three times a week and multivitamins once per week will help your chameleon stay healthy.

Jackson’s chameleons don’t like to be handled as they will become stressed a turn a darker color. They should also be kept alone away from other chameleons.

5) Carpet Chameleon

Carpet Chameleon (Furcifer lateralis) basking on plant stem
Carpet Chameleon (Furcifer lateralis) basking on plant stem
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Chameleonidae
  • Scientific Name: Furcifer lateralis
  • Other Names: Jeweled Chameleon, White-lined Chameleon
  • Adult Size: Between 6 and 10 inches
  • Lifespan: Between 3 and 5 years
  • Average Price Range: Between $230 and $350

Quick Care Requirements

  • Enclosure Size: 3ft H x 1½ ft L x 1½ ft D
  • Food: Insects
  • UVB Lighting: Needed
  • Ambient Temperature: Between 76 and 82 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Basking Spot Temperature: Between 85 and 88 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Humidity: Between 50% and 60%

Carpet chameleons are one of the most brightly colored species on the market, especially females. Native to the forests of Madagascar, males tend to be a vivid light green with yellow markings, whilst females have intricate markings in various colors ranging from orange to yellow and white.

These small, beautiful chameleons need a more specific setup to thrive, even though they do not live as long as other chameleons. A full-screen arboreal enclosure allows for good ventilation and should be fitted with plenty of climbing branches and log perches. This gives your chameleon a choice of different basking spots. Live plants can also be used.

A relatively thick substrate with a drainage layer topped with some soil and dead leaves. Heat lamps and ultraviolet light must also be provided. You can also position your chameleon’s enclosure to allow access to natural sunlight. Watch for overheating, which is indicated by an open mouth and blanching of the skin. If this happens, coax your chameleon into the shade and give them water.

A diet of live insects, mainly crickets and flies, will suit your Carpet chameleon. Feed almost daily, no more than six insects at a time. Use calcium and multivitamin supplements as well. For drinking water, an automatic misting system or spray bottle will do just fine. Refrain from handling your Carpet chameleon, as this is likely to stress them out.

6) Fischer’s Chameleon

Fischers Chameleon (Kinyongia fischeri)
Fischers Chameleon (Kinyongia fischeri)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Chameleonidae
  • Scientific Name: Kinyongia fischeri
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: Between 12 and 19 inches
  • Lifespan: Up to 5 years
  • Average Price Range: Between $50 and $130

Quick Care Requirements

  • Enclosure Size: 4ft H x 2ft L x 2ft D
  • Food: Insects
  • UVB Lighting: Needed
  • Ambient Temperature: Between 75 and 85 degrees
  • Basking Spot Temperature: Up to 90 degrees
  • Humidity: Approximately 70% to 80%

Fischer’s chameleons are one of the more distinctive species thanks to the spear-like protrusions jutting from their noses. Native to Tanzania, this species is usually green in color, with yellow or white markings. They are a relatively secretive species and will most likely hide a lot.

The arboreal setup for a Fischer’s chameleon should include dense foliage, especially at the back of the enclosure. They need well-ventilated but humid conditions, which can be provided through a screen enclosure and an automatic misting system.

The temperature gradient should run from the higher temperatures at the top basking area down to cooler areas at the bottom of the enclosure. UVB light must also be provided. A misting and drip system will also provide your Fischer’s chameleon with its drinking water.

Fischer’s chameleons mainly eat live insects such as crickets or dubia roaches. Apply dusted calcium supplements daily as well as multivitamins no more than twice per week. Avoid handling your Fischer’s chameleon as they are extremely secretive and nervous. They may even hiss or bite.

7) Four-horned Chameleon

Four horned chameleon (Trioceros quadricornis)
Four horned chameleon (Trioceros quadricornis)
  • Experience Level: Expert
  • Family: Chameleonidae
  • Scientific Name: Trioceros quadricornis
  • Other Names: Eisentraut’s Chameleon
  • Adult Size: Between 10 and 14 inches
  • Lifespan: Between 3 and 7 years
  • Average Price Range: Between $200 and $250

Quick Care Requirements

  • Enclosure Size: 4ft H x 2 ½ ft L x 2 ½ ft D
  • Food: Insects
  • UVB Lighting: Needed
  • Ambient Temperature: Between 55 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Basking Spot Temperature: 77 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Humidity: Between 80% and 90%

Four-horned chameleons are a cold-weather species that presents advanced challenges for a keeper. This species has very exact requirements that must be catered to. Four-horned chameleons hail from cloud forests in Cameroon and Nigeria.

Males have four horns on their snouts and sport beard-like flaps of skin under their chins. They have a tall sail-like ridge protruding from their backs. Females have one or two horns.

An arboreal enclosure with plenty of foliage will suit Four-horned chameleons. However, the humidity must never drop below 50%, whilst the temperature must never rise higher than 80 degrees Fahrenheit. This species lives in colder climates than other chameleons and will not tolerate extremes of dryness or heat.

Avoid exposing your chameleon’s enclosure to direct sunlight. Light can be provided by a UVB light and a low-wattage heat bulb. To maintain humidity, lay down a substrate that can retain moisture but isn’t small enough for your chameleon to swallow. Use a misting system to provide water.

Four-horned chameleons are insectivores and should be fed a staple diet of crickets and mealworms with flies for variety. Adult chameleons should eat every two or three days, and calcium and multivitamin supplements should also be provided through dusting meals.

8) Senegal Chameleon

Senegal Chameleon (Chamaeleo senegalensis)
Senegal Chameleon (Chamaeleo senegalensis)
  • Experience Level: Expert
  • Family: Chameleonidae
  • Scientific Name: Chamaleo senegalensis
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: Between 6 and 8 inches
  • Lifespan: Up to 5 years
  • Average Price Range: Between $35 and $40

Quick Care Requirements

  • Enclosure Size: 2ft H x 1½ ft L x 1½ ft D
  • Food: Insects
  • UVB Lighting: Needed
  • Ambient Temperature: Between 75 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Basking Spot Temperature: Between 85 and 90 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Humidity: Between 60% and 90%

One of the most popular species of pet chameleon, Senegal chameleons are often misunderstood. These calm but shy chameleons have specific requirements that make them suitable for advanced keepers only. This species is critically endangered in its native habitats of Senegal and other areas of West Africa.

Senegal chameleons are not as outlandishly colorful as other species but have much more subtle shades and mood colors. Most specimens are plain colors such as light brown or green, with curled tails and small neck flaps unique to the Senegal chameleon. This species displays dark spots when calm.

Provide an arboreal enclosure with a combination of tall artificial and live plants. A simple substrate of reptile carpet or newspaper works well. The enclosure will need good ventilation with mesh sides and a consistent temperature gradient. Use a basking bulb alongside a UVB light on a 12-hour day/night cycle.

Humidity and water must be kept at the correct levels for Senegal chameleons. Use an automatic misting system or spray the enclosure two or three times a day. This species drinks a lot, so having easy access to running water is a must for them.

For food, provide live crickets or dubia roaches every other day. Two or three times a week, dust these with calcium supplements, as well as multivitamins once a week. Try and handle your Senegal chameleon as little as possible as they are very shy creatures. It’s far more entertaining to observe them climbing and feeding.

9) Oustalet’s Chameleon

Oustalet's Chameleon
Oustalet’s Chameleon
  • Experience Level: Expert
  • Family: Chameleonidae
  • Scientific Name: Furcifer oustaleti
  • Other Names: Giant Madagascar Chameleon, Malagasy Giant Chameleon
  • Adult Size: Between 12 and 27 inches
  • Lifespan: Between 5 and 8 years
  • Average Price Range: Between $80 and $100

Quick Care Requirements

  • Enclosure Size: 4ft H x 3ft L x 3ft D
  • Food: Insects
  • UVB Lighting: Needed
  • Ambient Temperature: Between 70 degrees and 100 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Basking Spot Temperature: Around 120 to 130 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Humidity: 70%

Oustalet’s chameleons are one of the largest types of chameleon. They have some advanced care requirements partially due to their size. They come from Madagascar and usually prefer forest environments. These large reptiles have rows of small spikes running along their backs and underbellies and have a crest on the top of their head. They are usually brown or gray.

Because of their size, it is recommended to try and house an Oustalet’s chameleon in a custom outdoor enclosure, as long as your region reflects their natural conditions. However, they can also be housed inside. A large arboreal screened enclosure is essential for ventilation.

If housed indoors, provide a UVB light as well as a basking bulb. A part of the enclosure should receive direct sunlight a few hours a day. Use a misting system to provide drinking water and retain humidity. You will likely need to “shower” your Oustalet’s chameleon once a week, especially if keeping them outside and your humidity levels are below 70%.

Live insects will be the primary diet for your Oustalet’s chameleon. Adults should be fed once every two days. If your chameleon has an outdoor enclosure, it can also catch wild insects. Use calcium and multivitamin supplements as well. These chameleons can be fairly active and can be enjoyed through observation without the need for stressful handling.

10) Meller’s Chameleon

Mellers Chameleon (Trioceros melleri) on branch with black background
Mellers Chameleon (Trioceros melleri) on branch with black background
  • Experience Level: Expert
  • Family: Chameleonidae
  • Scientific Name: Trioceros melleri
  • Other Names: Giant One-horned Chameleon
  • Adult Size: Between 18 and 24 inches
  • Lifespan: Up to 12 years
  • Average Price Range: Between $125 and $200

Quick Care Requirements

  • Enclosure Size: 6ft H x 6ft L x 4ft D
  • Food: Insects
  • UVB Lighting: Needed
  • Ambient Temperature: Between 65 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Basking Spot Temperature: Between 80 and 90 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Humidity: Between 50% and 90%

Meller’s chameleons are a large species that are suitable only for advanced chameleon keepers. They require a lot of room and should ideally be housed in a roaming or outdoor setup. Meller’s chameleons are native to mainland Africa, preferring savanna forest areas.

These large chameleons are usually a dark brown or green color with striking white banded markings. They have a crest on top of their heads and a prehensile tail. Females are usually larger than males, which is unusual among chameleons.

Even if housing these lizards in a roaming setup, you must still provide adequate lighting and temperature conditions. Humidity is key for these giants and they will sometimes need as much as 90% humidity. A misting system is a must, with some longer soaks from a misting bottle as well throughout the day.

Whether you have a cage, outdoor, or roaming setup, provide plenty of climbing areas. Any lamps should be at least ten inches away from the chameleon in case they burn themselves. This species can easily become stressed, especially from the traveling they experience during importation.

When feeling unnerved they will display dark spots across their body. Handling is not advised as this will likely cause great stress.

Insects will be the main food for your Meller’s chameleon. Crickets and dubia roaches are the best food sources. Feed a couple of large live insects to your chameleon around twice a day, but no less than every other day. UVB light should also be provided to help maintain a healthy chameleon.

FAQ’s about Pet Chameleons

Is it legal to have a pet chameleon?

In the United States, most chameleons are illegal to take from the wild, especially those classified as a Prohibited Dealing animal under the Biosecurity Act 2015, specifically listing Veiled Chameleons, Panther Chameleons, Jackson’s chameleons, and other common chameleon species.

However, most are allowed to be kept as pets, bred, and sold in all states except Maine as long as you have a permit, also known as CITES papers.

Are chameleons good pets?

Although we don’t recommend chameleons for beginners or children, they can make really rewarding pets for those who are willing to put in the extra effort required to care for these sensitive beings.

They are beautiful creatures that are entertaining to watch and feed and can be quite pleasant to look at when you are bored.

While they aren’t the most cuddly pets and don’t typically enjoy being handled, they are suitable for owners who are looking for just that. So the real question should be: is a chameleon the right pet for you?

Is a chameleon a good pet for a child?

We highly recommend that an adult care for their complicated, specific needs. Chameleons need proper air ventilation, specific humidity numbers, multiple showers, and all that might just be way too much work for a child to handle.

This is why, along with many other reasons, we don’t recommend children care for chameleons alone without an adult being the main caretaker or supervising handling sessions.

Which species is the best chameleon for a pet?

The answer to this question will depend on your experience level, what kind of chameleon you want, what you’re ready to commit to, what you are willing to spend on your pet, and how much space you have in your home for a pet.

All around, the most beginner-friendly and most recommended pet chameleon is probably the Veiled Chameleon due to its adaptability to many environments, including captive conditions.

You can also check out care sheets for Jackson’s Chameleons, Senegal Chameleon for its small size, Panther Chameleons for their amazing looks, and any other chameleon you might be interested in in case you accidentally find the right one for you.

What is the easiest chameleon to take care of?

For beginner chameleon lovers, we will have to give this one to the Veiled Chameleons. They aren’t as fussy as other species and adapt quickly to most environments and conditions, as long as you are meeting their simple needs.

Do pet chameleons change color?

Yes and no. All chameleons have the ability to do so, let’s say, but not for the reasons people typically believe and not as fast as they seem to in movies.

It’s a common misconception that they do it to blend in with their surroundings in order to hide from predators, but that is actually not the case. In reality, chameleons will change their color to regulate their body temperature or communicate.

To maintain a favorable body temperature, chameleons will grow darker in color to absorb more heat in cold temperatures and will turn paler to reflect the sun’s heat in hotter temperatures. This is called thermoregulation.
They might be changing color to woo a possible mate, males might do it to signal at other males to stay away, and females might use their color change to show interest in mating.

What chameleons change color?

All chameleons have the ability to change color. Some are known for their ability to do so, such as the Panther Chameleon with its vivid hues.

The theory is that tree-dwelling chameleons are more likely to change into vivid colors to communicate through the lush treetops, whereas leaf litter ground-dwelling chameleons want to stay hidden, keeping their color changes limited or just not changing color at all.

The theory may also correlate to how they regulate their temperatures but there is simply not much research to tell, although there are multiple theories, this one being the most substantial.

How long do chameleons live as pets?

Typically, pet chameleons will live between 3 to 10 years, which is a lot longer than they would live in the wild, where they could become prey to other animals in their natural habitat.

How much does it cost to own a chameleon?

A chameleon may be priced anywhere from $30 to $300 depending on the shop you’re buying from, age, and its species. These prices are for just the chameleon itself, not including their enclosure, lighting, food, and supplements.

An enclosure can cost anywhere from $50 to $300 dollars, lighting will be at least $100, and depending on what kind of watering system you use, it can be as cheap as $30 to as high as $130. If you include plants, which you should, that can bring in another $100 or so.

After you’ve paid the possible $300 to $600 for equipment, you will need to replenish their food every month and purchase their supplements often. Food may cost you $10 to $25 a month and supplementation might be about $10 to $12 or so whenever you need to restock.

This doesn’t include the cost of visits to the vet and such. Overall, you should be prepared to spend anywhere from $300 to $1500 on your chameleon every year, depending on how you will budget and choose your equipment.

Where can I buy a chameleon?

You can either go to your local reptile store or look for some online.
Do your research and find a reputable breeder or pet shop that only sells captive-bred chameleons because most wild-caught chameleons will, unfortunately, carry parasites and may also have stress-related illnesses.

Avoid getting wild-caught chameleons. When you are serious about buying, take your time to watch its movements and actions before going through with the deal to make sure that it is a healthy chameleon.
There are tons of reputable shops online such as https://www.cbreptile.com/chameleons-for-sale/ and many more.

How much is a baby chameleon?

A baby chameleon may cost you $20 or $50 less than the average pricing of $30 to $100, depending on the species, age, and where you get it from.

What is the smallest pet chameleon?

The smallest chameleon that can be kept as a pet is the Pygmy Chameleon, averaging at a length of about 3 inches or so. They are very tiny and don’t really mind being handled, are docile, and are great with having cage mates.

Conclusion

If their specific requirements are met, chameleons can be fascinating and rewarding pet reptiles. In this list, we’ve covered ten of the best pet chameleons across a variety of species. While all chameleons require some experience with reptiles, some are more suitable for beginners than others.

Veiled and Panther chameleons are the two most commonly found species in the pet trade, and as such are more suitable for beginners. Their care requirements are relatively easy to get used to, especially compared to other chameleons. Flap-necked chameleons are also a good choice if you want something larger.

For intermediate chameleon keepers, Jackson’s chameleons can make impressive pets. Their care requirements are certainly achievable with the right setup. Like most chameleons, handling should be avoided wherever possible. But these are still rewarding pets.

Expert chameleon owners can consider several challenging species. If you want a large, impressive reptile consider getting an Oustalet’s chameleon. For something a little more mainstream, Senegal chameleons make a good choice.

If you enjoyed this list and are considering one of these chameleons as your next pet, feel free to comment below!

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