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Frogs in Iowa

There are 17 species of frogs in Iowa. The 17 species all have unique things to learn about them and inhabit different areas of the state.

Frogs vary in look, but some can look the same. With over 5,000 frog species in the world, the variety that you can find is outstanding.

Iowa only has 17 species, but they are an important part of the state’s habitat. They are food for predators and help control the population of pest insect species.

The 17 species are found all over the state in a variety of habitats. Freshwater sources are important for some species to breed, but others may rely on more temporary waters.

In the trees, on the floor, in the trees or even underground are where frogs can be found. Knowing about each species can help you identify one from the next, and easily locate them in the wild.

In this article, you will find the 17 frog species in Iowa, and interesting facts to know about each one. Their range, habitat, and features are all helpful in identifying the local species.

Some frogs on this list can even make great pets, and live for long periods. Let’s go over and learn about the 17 frog species in Iowa.

Frogs in Iowa 

1. American Toad

American Toad (Anaxyrus americanus) on someone's hand at Cedar Lake, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, USA
An American Toad (Anaxyrus americanus) on someone’s hand at Cedar Lake, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus americanus
  • Other Names: Eastern American toad 
  • Adult Size: 2 to 3.5 inches 
  • Lifespan: 2 to 10 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30

American Toads are found all over Iowa and are one of 4 toad species in the state. Forests with plenty of leaf litter are the main habitat they live in, but they can also be found in fields, grasslands, and areas with sandy soil.

This species spends most of its time on land but needs shallow fishless waters to breed. When not breeding some may wander far from water. In spring and fall, they are active in the day but become nocturnal in hot periods. 

An American Toads’ colors can vary from gray, red, or green. Warts cover their body, as well as dark spots. In these spots around two warts are located, which can help identify them from other toads.

Small yellow, or red dots are sometimes present on their body. Down the center of their back runs a faint mid-dorsal stripe. Their bellies are white, or yellow with a mottled pattern.

Insects, small invertebrates are the prey this species eats. American toads catch prey with their tongue and are useful in controlling insect populations in areas they inhabit.

In the parotoid glands behind their eyes, they produce a bufotoxin that can be harmful if ingested by a predator. When threatened they also puff up their bodies.

2. Great Plains Toad

Great Plains Toad (Anaxyrus cognatus) on rocky sand in Manitoba, California, USA
A Great Plains Toad (Anaxyrus cognatus) on rocky sand in Manitoba, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus cognatus
  • Other Names: Rana pipiens
  • Adult Size: 3.5 to 4.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $15

Great Plains toad is a burrowing species that lives in open, damp areas. Grasslands, wetlands, and fields are some of the places they inhabit.

In Iowa, they are found near the western edge of the state. Breeding for this species occurs in temporary wetlands, ditches, and streams.

Summer rains encourage these species out of the burrows and cause them to gather for breeding. In winter they remain inactive in their burrow but dig deeper to stay below the freezing line.

Great Plains Toads have round thick bodies. They are covered in warts and blotches. Gray, brown, and green are common colors for this species. Great Plains toads have large eyes with a rounded snout. Their bellies are white, with a mottled pattern.

This species is nocturnal but comes out randomly during the breeding season. They feed on insects and small animals.

Behind their eyes are parotoid glands, where they release toxins from. Not harmful to humans, their toxins can harm small animals if ingested.

3. Fowler’s Toad

Fowler's Toad (Anaxyrus fowleri) on sand near the Mississippi River, Iowa, USA
A Fowler’s Toad (Anaxyrus fowleri) on sand near the Mississippi River, Iowa, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus fowleri
  • Other Names: Bufo fowleri 
  • Adult Size: 2 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $20 

Fowler’s toads live in the plains of southeastern Iowa, and other areas in the southeastern United States. Habitats they live in are forests and mountains near freshwater sources.

Spring to summer is when this species breeds, in places like wetlands or ditches. They are nocturnal and become most active during the summer season.

Fowler’s toads are medium-sized with round bodies. Their skin is dry and covered with warts.

They look similar to the American Toad but have 3 warts within their darts instead of two. Brown to gray is their skin color, with dark blotches covering their back and legs.

A faint green dorsal stripe can be seen running down their back. Short legs and a white or yellow belly with a mottled pattern are also traits of this species.

Fowler’s toads call when mating, which sounds similar to a sheep’s bleat. At night is when you likely come across this species hunting for food. Insects and other small invertebrates are what they feed on.

Snakes, mammals, and birds are animals that feed on this toad. They are able to produce a toxin from their skin that is weaker than other toads but is still dangerous to small animals.

4. Woodhouse’s Toad

Woodhouse's Toad (Anaxyrus woodhousii) on gravel near Beaver Dam Wash National Conservation Area, Mohave County, Arizona, USA
A Woodhouse’s Toad (Anaxyrus woodhousii) on gravel near Beaver Dam Wash National Conservation Area, Mohave County, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus woodhousii 
  • Other Names: Western Woodhouse’s toad 
  • Adult Size: 2.5 to 5 inches
  • Lifespan: 12 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Woodhouse toads can be found in Iowa on the western border of Iowa. Their range reaches from Washington to Texas in the U.S. Woodhouse toads live in wooded habitats, grasslands, prairies, lakes, forests, and dry areas.

They are primarily active at night and can be seen more often in rainy weather. If not active they burrow underground or hide in natural debris like logs.

This species can sometimes be seen far from water since they have a mucous gland used to keep their skin moist. In winter they are not active and hibernate until spring.

Woodhouse toads have a prominent light-colored stripe running down their back and can have gray, olive, or yellowish skin. Their body is dry and covered in warts.

A round and fat body gives them a similar look to a hockey puck. Two parotoid glands are located behind their eyes to help protect them from predators.

Snakes, skunks, birds, and raccoons are some of the animals that prey on this species. The glands on their body excrete toxins that are capable of poisoning predators that eat them, or even irritating human skin.

Insects and small invertebrates are what the woodhouse toad eats. At night when hunting near lights is when this toad is seen most often.

5. Boreal Chorus Frog

Boreal Chorus Frog (Pseudacris maculata) in leaf litter at Robinson Wildlife Area, Story County, Iowa, USA
A Boreal Chorus Frog (Pseudacris maculata) in leaf litter at Robinson Wildlife Area, Story County, Iowa, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris maculata
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A 

Boreal chorus frogs live in forests next to freshwater ponds, with a scattered population across the state of Iowa. In some urban areas, they may be seen and can survive peacefully. In spring they breed in fishless waters. They are active until fall, which is when they hibernate.

This species is nocturnal but becomes more active in the breeding season, or heavy rain. This species can survive being frozen during the winter, but may still only live up to 3 years. 

Small in size, some maybe around the same size as a quarter. Brown, olive, reddish or gray, or common colors you may see them in.

Dark blotches over their back, and their belly is a plain tan or white color. No warts can be seen on them, as their skin is smooth and moist.

Pointed heads and slender bodies can help identify this species. Their feet are small and equipped with tiny toe pads.

Boreal chorus frogs spend most of their time on the ground, as they cannot climb very well. For food they feed on small invertebrates they find on the forest floor.

Larger animals feed on this species, and humans may also use them for bait. Being so small you may not see this species often, but they are regularly heard.

6. Gray Tree Frog

Gray Treefrog (Dryophytes versicolor) in grass and dirt somewhere near Story City, Iowa, USA
A Gray Treefrog (Dryophytes versicolor) in grass and dirt somewhere near Story City, Iowa, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner to Intermediate 
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Dryophytes versicolor
  • Other Names: Northern Gray Treefrog
  • Adult Size: 1.25 to 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 7 to 9 years
  • Average Price Range: $20

Gray Tree frogs are one of two species of gray treefrogs living in Iowa. They live in moist woodlands and swamps. Most of the time they spend their lives in trees but come into the water to breed.

Breeding occurs from spring to fall, and females lay eggs attached to vegetation in the water. During the day they hide in shrubs, and vegetation, but are active in trees at night.

Gray tree frogs look identical to the cope’s gray treefrog but have less bumpy skin. Their body varies in color, as they can change their shade.

Brown, green, and gray are common colors, with a slightly mottled pattern. Orange can be seen in between their legs. Trees and bark are what this species can easily blend into.

Small insects are what gray tree frogs eat, and they hunt at night. They move from branch to branch to take down their prey.

A large amount of glycerol they produce gives them the ability to freeze during the winter and survive. This species is common to find and has a healthy population within their range.

7. Cope’s Gray Treefrog

Cope's Gray Treefrog (Dryophytes chrysoscelis) on dark pavement near Soper's Mill, Iowa, USA
A Cope’s Gray Treefrog (Dryophytes chrysoscelis) on dark pavement near Soper’s Mill, Iowa, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner to Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Dryophytes chrysoscelis  
  • Other Names: Southern Gray Treefrog 
  • Adult Size: 1.25 to 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $20

In the eastern U.S and Iowa, the cope’s gray tree frog is a common tree frog to find. They live in wooded habitats and spend their time high in the trees.

During the breeding season, they are easier found and mate in fishless waters. Breeding lasts until fall, and their loud calls can be heard through the season. At night they are active and hide in tree holes during the day.

Cope’s gray tree frogs are able to change their shade to be able to better blend into their environment. It can change its colors in a few seconds, and hide from predators.

They are small and range from gray to brown. In the cold or dark they have a darker shade. They have a mottled pattern and orange coloring between their hind legs.

The gray tree frog and Cope’s gray tree frogs are identical in appearance. The only difference is their call, where the Cope’s Gray treefrog is faster and has slightly bumpy skin.

Small insects are what this species feeds on most, hunting in the night. Grasshoppers, moths, crickets, beetles, and moths are some of the species they eat.

From their skin, they are able to secret a toxic substance that can irritate the skin. This toxin is not deadly but can cause discomfort if eaten by small animals.

8. Blanchard Cricket Frog

Blanchard's Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans blanchardi) on rocks at Mississippi Palisades State Park, Polsgrove, Iowa, USA
A Blanchard’s Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans blanchardi) on rocks at Mississippi Palisades State Park, Polsgrove, Iowa, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner-Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Acris crepitans blanchardi
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.625 to 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Blanchard cricket frogs are found all over Iowa and have a range covering other mid-western states in the United States. They live in areas with fresh water like ponds, streams, and rivers.

They prefer permanent bodies of water unlike other species of tree frogs. Most of the time they can be spotted near the edge of the water, and jump into the water when threatened.

A small species, they come in brown, green, and gray coloring. Blotches over their backs and they have a mid-dorsal stripe running down their center. Warts cover their moist skin. This species has long legs that give them a powerful jump.

Tiny insects make up a majority of their diet. Birds, reptiles, and bullfrogs are animals that eat this species. In some areas in the U.S., they are endangered because of habitat loss and pollution.

This species is one of the most aquatic tree frogs and relies on clean water to keep a healthy population.

9. Spring Peeper 

Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) on a mossy log near Otter Creek Sportsmans Club, Iowa, USA
A Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) on a mossy log near Otter Creek Sportsmans Club, Iowa, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris crucifer 
  • Other Names: Spring peeper
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.25 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $20

Spring Peepers are found in the eastern half of Iowa and are a common species in the U.S. They live in woodland habitats, that are next to bodies of water. Spring through fall they are active.

Spring peepers are one of the first frogs to become active in the spring, and their call is a sign that spring is here.

Spring peepers are a small species and come in colors of gray to brown. They have an X mark on their back, and dark marks covering them.

Their belly is plain, and they have tiny toe pads to help them climb. Their shade can sometimes be changed to help them blend into their environment.

Small invertebrates are what this frog eats, hunting mostly at night. Being so small they get eaten by a large variety of animals like birds, large frogs, insects, and snakes.

In Iowa, they were formerly listed as a threatened species, but have been found in more areas of the state.

10.  Crawfish Frog

Crawfish Frog (Lithobates areolatus) on concrete near City Lake Park, Benton County, Arkansas, USA
A Crawfish Frog (Lithobates areolatus) on concrete near City Lake Park, Benton County, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates areolatus 
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2.5 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 7 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Crawfish frogs are an endangered species found in Iowa. They live in fields, pastures, grasslands, prairies, and rivers.

Crawfish frogs are named since they are usually found near areas that have crawfish. They rely on crawfish for their burrows and take refuge in these holes.

In spring they breed in pools of water, and when they can be seen outside of their burrows. This species is secretive and not seen often due to their lifestyle.

Brown, light gray, and tan are common colors for this species. They are painted in dark blotches which are bordered in light coloring.

A dorsolateral ridge is present on their body, which is yellow in males, and yellow coloring in between their hind legs. Crawfish frogs have a plain belly with no pattern.

Disease, habitat loss, and pollution are the main reasons this species has become endangered. Crawfish, insects, and other small animals are what this species eats.

Since they are endangered, finding one is rare. Documenting them in the wild can help protect the areas they live in and give more opportunities to learn about this rare species.

11. Plains Leopard Frog

A Plains Leopard Frog (Lithobates blairi) on a white rocky surface near Fellowship Forest, Iowa, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates blairi
  • Other Names: Blair’s leopard frog
  • Adult Size: 2 to 4.25 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $30

In the southern half of Iowa, and the plains of the U.S you may be able to come across the plains leopard frog. They live in most areas with freshwater sources like ponds, rivers, wetlands, and streams.

They move on land and try to find different water sources to breed in. In spring they breed and males produce a chuckling sound to call a mate. Plains leopard frogs are one of the most common species in southern Iowa and come out more in warm rainy seasons.

Plains leopard frogs can be brown, gray, or olive-colored. They are dark blotches on their back and a bar pattern on their legs.

To differentiate them from other leopard frog species they have two dorsolateral ridges running down their back that are broken near their rear. Their bellies are pale with no distinguishing pattern.

Insects, worms, and other small animals are what this species eats. Diseases and habitat destruction have been the main causes of their decline.

Large animals like snakes, bullfrogs, and raccoons prey on this species. Plains leopard frogs are just one of three species of leopard frogs in Iowa, but around 10 species exist in total.

12. Northern Leopard Frog

Northern Leopard Frog (Lithobates pipiens) in shrubs near Des Moines, Winterset, Iowa, USA
A Northern Leopard Frog (Lithobates pipiens) in shrubs near Des Moines, Winterset, Iowa, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates pipiens
  • Other Names: Rana pipiens
  • Adult Size: 3.5 to 4.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $15

Northern  Leopard frogs are all over Iowa and have a large range across the U.S. They live in woods, grasslands, and wetlands near a source of fresh water. In spring Northern Leopard frogs breed in lakes, ponds, marshes, and other water sources, but by summer they may move further onto dry land.

Most of the time this species can be found on land next to water, hunting for prey. In winter they are not active and remain buried.

Northern Leopards have dark blotches on them and vary from tan to olive green. They have two dorsolateral folds running down their back, and thick legs. Unlike the southern leopard frog, this species’ blotches are more oval-shaped.

Moist and smooth skin cover them, and underneath is a yellow to white-colored belly. Coloring and pattern help blend into a mud-like environment to avoid predators.

Northern leopard frogs have no unique defenses but have powerful legs to hop from predators. Hunting by the edge of the water, they feed on insects, smaller frogs, and other small animals.

In the areas inhabited by this species, pollution and habitat loss has been the main factor that has affected them. Slowly, like other amphibians, they have been decreasing in population.

13. Southern Leopard Frog

Southern Leopard Frog (Lithobates sphenocephalus) in mud and grass near Carthage Lake, Iowa, USA
A Southern Leopard Frog (Lithobates sphenocephalus) in mud and grass near Carthage Lake, Iowa, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates sphenocephalus
  • Other Names: Rana sphenocephalus
  • Adult Size: 2 to 3.5  inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $15

Southern Leopard frogs are found in Southeast Iowa but are slowly expanding their range.

They are also common in other states within the eastern part of the U.S. Southern leopard frogs live near water sources like lakes, ponds, wetlands, and woodlands. When not breeding they move away from their water source onto land.

Leopard frogs breed in spring and can lay up to 5,000 eggs in freshwaters. In winter they bury themselves and become active until the next breeding season. 

Leopard frogs are named after the dark blotches covering their back and legs, which look like a leopard’s spots.  They are green to tan and have long legs used for escaping predators.

Two dorsolateral stripes run down their back or yellowish. Their bellies are pale with no pattern.

This species looks similar to a pickerel frog but it has more circular spots and is no orange in between its legs. The southern leopard frog also has a small white dot on its exposed eardrum, which the northern leopard frog lacks.

Southern Leopard frogs eat anything they can fit into their mouths, like fish, insects, and small rodents. Snakes, birds, and predatory mammals often prey on this species.

In Iowa, they only have a small range but have a healthy population in the areas they are found.

14. Green Frog 

Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans melanota) resting itself on a stick near Cedar River, Linn County, Iowa, USA
A Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans melanota) resting itself on a stick near Cedar River, Linn County, Iowa, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates clamitans melanota
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2.25 to 3.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 15 to 20 years
  • Average Price Range: $10

Green frogs inhabit the eastern border of Iowa, but can also be found in many other southeastern states within the United States. Freshwater ponds, swamps, lakes, vernal pools, and other shallow freshwater habitats are where they are commonly found. When seen they will often be near the edges of the water, but move into it when frightened.

Breeding occurs in permanent water sources, and as many as 7,000 eggs can be laid by females. In the day they are most active, but in summer they prefer the cooler temperatures of the night. 

Green frogs look similar to bullfrogs but are the smaller of the two species. They range from green to brown coloration and have thick folds running down their back.

On their belly is white, with a dark mottled pattern. On rare occurrences, some members of this species may have blue coloring, due to a genetic mutation.

Like bullfrogs, they have large eyes, and a circular eardrum exposed on the sides of their face. Dark spots are occasionally present on their back and legs.

 Slugs, snails, crayfish, spiders, shrimps, and snakes are some of the animals this species eats.

They hunt by perching and waiting until something crosses their path. In Iowa and other places they are found, green frogs are one of the most abundant species.

15. Pickerel Frog 

Pickerel Frog (Lithobates palustris) on a rocky surface near Delabar State Park, Kingston, Iowa, USA
A Pickerel Frog (Lithobates palustris) on a rocky surface near Delabar State Park, Kingston, Iowa, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates palustris
  • Other Names: Rana palustris
  • Adult Size: 1.75 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 8 years
  • Average Price Range:  $10 to $15 

Pickerel frogs are native to the eastern United States, and can also be found in eastern Iowa. They live in streams, woods, forests, swamps, and other moist areas.

Early spring to October is when they are active. In spring they breed in different freshwater sources, and you will most likely come across this species.

Pickerel frogs are nocturnal but are occasionally seen in the day. In winter they hibernate and burrow themselves until the next season comes.

Pickerel frogs look similar to leopard frogs and are often confused for that species. They have dark square blotches running down their back and on their legs. Their eyes are large and protrude from their heads.

Green, olive, and tan are common colors for this species. In between their hind legs is bright coloring that is flashed to confuse predators. A dark mottled pattern appears on their light-colored belly.

Pickerel frogs are able to secrete a toxin from their skin that can kill other frogs and harm predators if they eat them. It can be fatal to smaller animals and even cause a reaction for humans that pick them up. They feed on small insects like ants, spiders, and beetles.

Even though they can be dangerous they are popular pets, but should not be kept with other frogs. 

16. American Bullfrog 

American Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) in mud at Nicholson-Ford OHV Park, Marshalltown, Iowa, USA
An American Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) in mud at Nicholson-Ford OHV Park, Marshalltown, Iowa, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Rana catesbeiana
  • Other Names: Bullfrog
  • Adult Size: 3.5 to 6 inches
  • Lifespan: 7 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $20

American Bullfrogs are one of the most widespread species in the U.S. and are very common in Iowa. They live and breed in permanent water sources like lakes, rivers, and ponds.

Originally they were only found near the Mississippi in Iowa, but due to their nature, they have managed to spread their presence all over the state. This species is active from spring to late summer. When breeding males call from the water and create a sound similar to a bull’s.

American bullfrogs are the largest frogs in North America and Iowa. They are green, olive or tan. Shades of color vary depending on the frog and conditions.

A large exposed eardrum can be seen on the side of their head, which is large in males. Since this species is so large they are often one of the most popular frogs to be eaten by humans. 

In most areas where they live American Bullfrogs are one of the largest species, they are also one of the most dominant in where they live. Other frog species are eaten by bullfrogs, and also lose valuable resources.

Bullfrogs eat birds, snakes, rodents, fish, and anything they can find small enough to swallow.

Their large appetite can sometimes bring imbalances in ecosystems. Humans, snakes, and birds are the large predators that prey on this species and keep their population controlled.

17. Plains Spadefoot Toad

Plains Spadefoot (Spea bombifrons) in red sand somewhere in Kingfisher, Oklahoma, USA
A Plains Spadefoot (Spea bombifrons) in red sand somewhere in Kingfisher, Oklahoma, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Scaphiopodidae
  • Scientific Name: Spea bombifrons
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 2.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 

On the western border of Iowa, you may be able to find the Plains Spadefoot toad. They also have a range covering the majority of the Central areas of the U.S. Plains spadefoot toads live in grasslands, shrublands, and other areas with sandy soil.

They are a burrowing species, and can sometimes inhabit rodent burrows. Most of their life is spent underground, but they come out to breed. In warm weather with rainfall, they come out to breed and may use temporary or fresh water as a source to breed. 

Large yellow eyes with cat-like pupils are what can easily identify this species. Gray, olive, and brown are their skin colors. They are covered in black, red, and sometimes yellow spots. This toad looks similar to a frog and has moist smooth skin. They are named after the black spade on their hind foot that helps them burrow into the ground. 

Small insects are the main food source this species survives on. Most of the time they are found underground and can stay there for weeks. If no rain falls they may even stay underground for years. 

Wrapping up

There are 17 species of frogs in Iowa, each important to the state. Frogs help keep balanced environments and are a sign of a healthy habitat.

Frogs and other amphibians across the U.S are becoming endangered and losing their population faster than ever. Pollution, disease, and habitat loss are the reasons their population has been on the decline. Amphibians in Iowa like the Crawfish frog, Blue-spotted salamander have become endangered because of these conditions.

Frogs are fun to observe, and using this list will help you easier find and identify them in the wild. Each species is different and has its own unique traits.

New species can always find their way into the state and become invasive. Iowa has 17 species in the state, but some of these species can also be found in other parts of the U.S. Frogs and other amphibians are important to the environment, and can even make a great pet at home.

Frogs in other states

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