Skip to Content

Geckos in Texas

Texas is home to 4 different species of geckos, all of which are interesting and unique reptiles. Only two of Texas’ geckos are native to the state, and two of the species on this list can be bought and kept as pets, depending on the laws and regulations in your area.

If you happen to enjoy learning about geckos or are looking for a gecko species to consider getting as a pet, you are in the right place. Geckos in Texas have a lot in common in regards to their diet, primarily feeding on insects, but as we look more into these geckos, you will find additional information on their habitats, habits, and more.

Geckos in Texas

1. Texas Banded Gecko

Texas Banded Gecko (Coleonyx brevis) walking on dark-colored rocks at the Tuff Canyon Overlook at Big Bend National Park, Texas, USA
A Texas Banded Gecko (Coleonyx brevis) walking on dark-colored rocks at the Tuff Canyon Overlook at Big Bend National Park, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Eublepharidae
  • Scientific Name: Coleonyx brevis
  • Adult Size: 4 to 5 inches long
  • Lifespan: Up to 25 years in captivity
  • Average Price Range: $35+

Texas Banded Geckos are sandy-tan/yellow lizards freckled all over with brown spots.

They are native to Texas as well as New Mexico and Northeastern Mexico, commonly dwelling near streams in rocky areas. When sensing danger, these reptiles will imitate scorpions, raising their tails above their bodies and shaking them from side to side.

By day, these nocturnal geckos are hiding away under any shelter they can find close to the ground. At night they feed on termites, small insects, spiders, and other arthropods they can find.

Female Texas Banded Geckos lay smooth white-shelled eggs in safe, covered areas in early spring.

2. Reticulate Banded Gecko

Reticulated Gecko (Coleonyx reticulatus) on a rock near Big Bend National Park, Texas, USA
A Reticulated Gecko (Coleonyx reticulatus) on a rock near Big Bend National Park, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Family: Eublepharidae
  • Scientific Name: Coleonyx reticulatus
  • Adult Size: 5.5 to 6.75 inches long

Named the Reticulate Banded Gecko, it may come as a surprise that these geckos usually lose their bands as they age. Born pinkish-tan with brown bands, the bands break apart into scattered brown freckles along the lizards’ bodies as they mature. This species of gecko is only found in Texas, with few relative records of it in northern Mexico.

Reticulate Banded Geckos are a nocturnal species of gecko that typically spend their days hiding under logs, rocks, and other debris. They are often spotted on roads at night and seem to be drawn out of hiding by heavy storms, often feeding on insects and other arthropods.

Female Reticulate Banded Geckos have been observed to lay clutches of two eggs. This species of gecko also happens to be able to drop its tail to escape from predators.

3. Mediterranean House Gecko

Mediterranean House Gecko (Hemidactylus turcicus) on a white wall near Soliad State Park and Historic Site, Goliad County, Texas USA
A Mediterranean House Gecko (Hemidactylus turcicus) on a white wall near Soliad State Park and Historic Site, Goliad County, Texas USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Gekkonidae
  • Scientific Name: Hemidactylus turcicus
  • Adult Size: 4 to 5 inches long
  • Lifespan: 9 years
  • Average Price Range: $5 to $20

The Mediterranean House Gecko is native to Southern Europe and Northern Africa. These geckos have also been introduced in Texas, where they are an invasive species.

This gecko is known to disguise or camouflage itself using two color phases, known as a pale and dark phase. The pale phase is a light pink, yellow, or white color with blotches of brown and gray, the dark phase obscures the blotches leaving the gecko appearing all gray or brown.

Mediterranean House Geckos are active at night and dwell in urban areas, feeding on insects attracted to the light fixtures nearby. These reptiles are often found on ceilings, walls, and windows indoors, and outdoors they tend to inhabit crevices in rock piles and trees.

Females of this species lay several clutches of two eggs throughout the summer months under bark, dirt, and in hidden openings.

4. Rough-tailed Gecko

Rough-tailed Gecko (Cyrtopodion scabrum) on a brick wall in Galveston, Texas, USA
A Rough-tailed Gecko (Cyrtopodion scabrum) on a brick wall in Galveston, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Family: Gekkonidae
  • Scientific Name: Cyrtopodion scabrum
  • Other Names: Rough Bent-toed Gecko, Rough-tailed Bowfoot Gecko, Common Tuberculate Ground gecko, Keeled gecko, Keeled Rock Gecko
  • Adult Size: 3 to 4.5 inches long

The Rough Tailed Gecko is a sand-colored gecko with a prickly appearance, with rows of pointed scales covering the tail, sometimes accompanied by patterns of brown patches. This species is native to Egypt, Sudan, and India, and was first reported in Texas, where it is invasive, in 1983.

Rough Tailed Geckos are nocturnal lizards that tend to make their homes in and around buildings, feeding on insects and other arthropods they find. During the day, these lizards hide away under rocks, debris, and in crevices for shelter.

Clutches laid by females of this species consist of one to two eggs and are laid several times a year between April and October.

Wrapping up

Texas may not be home to many species of gecko, but the four geckos that call Texas home are interesting and worth learning about nonetheless. With two species only being found in Texas and close surrounding areas, two species that can be bought as pets, and two invasive species that came from far away, there is so much to enjoy learning about the geckos of Texas.

If you happen to live in Texas or plan on visiting, you should now be able to identify any geckos you may come across more easily. You also already have information on the habitats, diets, and habits of these geckos if you decide to pursue getting one of these species as a pet.

Sources:

Click to rate this post!
[Total: 0 Average: 0]

Sharing is caring!