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Spiders in Arkansas

In Arkansas, there are many spiders that inhabit the state. Living all about here are some of the most common species you can find in Arkansas, and interesting facts about each one.

In the U.S. alone there are more than 3,000 different species of spider. Arkansas’ diverse terrains of swamps, forests, and other vegetated habitats make it a perfect home for a variety of wildlife to thrive.

In this article, you will find 48 spiders that inhabit the state of Arkansas. The information here can help identify a spider you find or see the amazing ones that roam about.

The sizes of spiders on this list are based on the length of their body. Some species have extremely long legs that can stretch almost double their body length.

 Spiders are one of the greatest insect killers. Some people may fear these arachnids because of their bite, but most species are harmless.

A variety of spiders live near humans, and many are great at keeping unwanted pests away. Here is everything you need to know about the types of spiders you can find in Arkansas.

Table of Contents

  1. Spiders in Arkansas
    1. Tan Jumping Spider
    2. Bold Jumping Spider
    3. Gray Wall Jumper
    4. Zebra Jumping Spider
    5. Banded Garden Spider
    6. Black and Yellow Garden Spider
    7. Spotted Orbweaver
    8. Furrow Orbweaver
    9. Leaf Curling Sac Spider
    10. Spinybacked Orbweaver
    11. Orchard Orbweaver
    12. Starbellied Orbweaver
    13. Triangle Orbweaver
    14. White Micrathena
    15. Spined Micrathena
    16. Lined Orbweaver
    17. Bridge Orbweaver
    18. Shamrock Spider
    19. Golden Silk Orbweaver
    20. Cat-faced Orbweaver
    21. Marbled Orbweaver
    22. Cross Orbweaver
    23. American Grass Spider
    24. Nursery Web Spider
    25. Six-spotted Fishing Spider
    26. Carolina Wolf Spider
    27. Black-footed Sac Spider
    28. Garden Ghost Spider
    29. Woodlouse Spider
    30. Spitting Spider
    31. Green Lynx Spider
    32. Bennett’s Laceweaver
    33. Eastern Parsons Spider
    34. Ground Crab Spider
    35. Goldenrod Crab Spider
    36. White-banded Crab Spider
    37. Variegated Spider
    38. Brown Recluse
    39. Southern House Spider
    40. American House Spider
    41. Southern Black Widow
    42. Two-spotted Cobweb Spider
    43. Triangulate Cobweb Spider
    44. Rabbit Hutch Spider
    45. Brown Widow
    46. False Widow
    47. Bowl and Doily Spider
    48. Texas Brown Tarantula
  2. FAQ
  3. Conclusion

Spiders in Arkansas

1. Tan Jumping Spider 

Tan Jumping Spider (Platycryptus undatus) on some wooden planks at Greenbrier, Arkansas, USA
A Tan Jumping Spider (Platycryptus undatus) on some wooden planks at Greenbrier, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Platycryptus undatus 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 8.5 to 13 mm (0.33 to 0.51 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

The tan jumping spider lives throughout the eastern United States and is one of many Salticidae species living in Arkansas.

This species is active during the day. When night comes they rest, curling up and dangling from a web. Tan jumping spiders are seen most often outdoors and use their tan coloring to blend into wooden objects. 

Gray, tan, and brown are some of the colors this species is found in. Many hairs cover their body and legs.

The eyesight of jumping spiders is better than most arachnids because of their position and shape. Two large eyes are located in front of their face, which gives them great depth perception.

The rest of their eyes wrap around their head like a crown increasing their peripheral vision. 

Tan jumping spiders hunt on vertical surfaces during the day, looking for small insects to feed on. This spider is harmless to humans but pounces on any prey that is small enough to take down. 

2. Bold Jumping Spider 

Bold Jumping Spider (Phidippus audax) being held up on a wooden stick in Magnolia, Arkansas, USA
A Bold Jumping Spider (Phidippus audax) being held up on a wooden stick in Magnolia, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus audax 
  • Other Names: Daring jumping spider 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 19 mm (0.23 to 0.74 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

Bold jumping spiders live in grasslands, prairies, woodlands, and urban areas. They are known for their dark black coloring, and vibrant green chilicarea.

This spider is very furry like other jumping spiders. Bold jumping spiders are mostly black, and have orange spots on them when young.

As they age these spots turn white. White tufts of hair are also present on their body. 

In gardens, and around homes are common areas to find the bold jumping spider. They are known to feed on small insects that feed on plant life like weevils, beetles, stink bugs, mosquitoes, and leaf worms. 

Spring is the season bold jumping spiders begin to roam. They are active until winter and use this time to mate and hunt.

Jumping spiders only live around a year in the wild. In the winter young spiders become inactive and overwinter until spring to adventure once again. 

3. Gray Wall Jumper 

Gray Wall Jumping Spider (Menemerus bivittatus) on a white and gray surface in Kowloon City, Hong Kong
A Gray Wall Jumping Spider (Menemerus bivittatus) on a white and gray surface in Kowloon City, Hong Kong. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Menemerus bivittatus 
  • Other Names: Gray jumping spider 
  • Adult Size: 8 to 10 mm (0.31 to 0.39 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Originally from Africa, the gray wall jumper now has a range within the United States. It has been spotted in Arkansas but also inhabits Texas, Florida, and California.

This species is very adaptable and prefers to live in warm, tropical areas. Spring is when they are seen most, and spend their time hunting on vertical surfaces.

Gray wall jumpers have a grayish, or brown color, and are covered in small hairs. Females are slightly larger and have a bold stripe running down their abdomen.

Males have a lighter color, and their dark stripe pattern runs along their sides instead of straight down their center.

During the day this species hunts similar to a cat. It stalks and circles its prey, waiting for the right time to pounce.

Insects almost twice the size are eaten by this species. When not hunting these spiders mate. Males are able to create a sound similar to cricket to attract a female.

4. Zebra Jumping Spider 

Zebra Jumping Spider (Salticus scenicus) ona stem in Quebec, Canada
A Zebra Jumping Spider (Salticus scenicus) on a stem in Quebec, Canada. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Salticus scenicus 
  • Other Names: Zebra Spider 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 9 mm (0.19 to 0.35 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

Named after its black and white coloring, the zebra jumping spider is a common species found across North America.

It also inhabits parts of Europe, Asia, and other regions within the Holarctic. Vertical surfaces like walls, fences, and windows are where this species is often seen. 

Zebra jumping spiders are very similar to other species of jumping spiders in appearance and are colored in black and white. Males are smaller than females and have slightly more white coloring on them. 

Other spiders make up a majority of this species’ diet, but they also feed on insects like mosquitoes. This species does not use silk to build webs, but as an anchor when roaming about.

If a male sees a female in the wild, they attempt to mate, and court the female with an arm wave dance. When a female lays an egg sac they will guard it until it is ready to hatch. 

5. Banded Garden Spider 

Banded Garden Spider (Argiope trifasciata) on a web in a field of flowers at Woolsey Wet Prairie, Arkansas, USA
A Banded Garden Spider (Argiope trifasciata) on a web in a field of flowers at Woolsey Wet Prairie, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Argiope trifasciata 
  • Other Names: Banded orb-weaving spider 
  • Adult Size: 15 to 25 mm (0.59 to 0.98 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Banded garden spiders live across North and South America.

In Arkansas, this species is seen in spring and remains active until the end of summer. Areas with high vegetation like tall grass and shrubs are common in the habitat they live in.

Females create large webs to sit in, which are usually around 2 feet in diameter. Males roam around looking for a female to mate with, then perch in the same web when they find one. 

Females are much larger in size than males. They have large abdomens and dark bands that cover their entire body.

White and black coloring is also present in this species. It is easy to confuse this spider with the black and yellow garden spider.

This spider is slightly smaller and has an abdomen with more of a point. When sitting on its web they create an X shape.

Flying insects are the main food this species eats. They wait for anything to get caught in their web, then wrap them up in a silk coffin.

To neutralize their prey they inject them with venom. While large and colorful, a bite from the banded garden spider is harmless to humans. 

6. Black and Yellow Garden Spider 

Black and Yellow Garden Spider (Argiope aurantia) on its web in Conway County, Arkansas, USA
A Black and Yellow Garden Spider (Argiope aurantia) on its web in Conway County, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Argiope aurantia 
  • Other Names: Yellow garden spider  
  • Adult Size: 5 to 28 mm ( 0.2 to 1.1 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: $8

Black and yellow garden spiders are one of the largest Araneidae spiders in Arkansas. This species lives throughout North America, Mexico, and areas in Central America.

Black and Yellow Garden spiders become active in the spring and are most commonly seen in late summer. Females create a large web up to 2 feet in diameter, with a thick zig-zag pattern in its center. 

The black and yellow garden spider is named after its coloring. Its abdomen is pointed and round. The legs of this species have alternating bands of black and white.

When sitting in a web they create an X shape, similar to a skull and bones. Males are much smaller and will sit in the corner of the female’s web that they mate with. 

Animals that get caught in this spider’s web are what they feed on. Black and yellow garden spiders are beneficial to have around gardens and homes, as their large web is the death of many flying pest insects.

Humans are not a threat to this species, so they are not aggressive. They can be watched up close, and only bite if aggressively handled.

7. Spotted Orbweaver

Spotted Orbweaver (Neoscona crucifera) climbing on a flower in Bethel Heights, Arkansas, USA
A Spotted Orbweaver (Neoscona crucifera) climbing on a flower in Bethel Heights, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Neoscona crucifera 
  • Other Names: Hentz Orbweaver
  • Adult Size: 5 to 20 mm (0.19 to 0.78 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Late summer and fall are when the Hentz orb weaver can be spotted sitting in its large web. They live in highly vegetated areas.

They may make their webs near shrubs, trees, and gardens. Finding them on porches, or on the side of the house is not uncommon.

The Hentz orb weaver has a large range within the United States and is found in many southern states like Arkansas. Hentz orb weavers have a coloring that helps them blend wooden textures.

They are medium-sized, colored brown, with reddish legs that are covered in black bands. The abdomen of the Hentz orb weaver is rounded, and on its underside, there are white and black markings. 

At night is when this spider is active and creates its web. During the day their web is taken down, and they hide in a secluded area.

Flying insects like moths and mosquitoes is what this species consumes. They prefer to live in moist areas, and sometimes create their home near lights since light attracts insects. 

8. Furrow Orbweaver 

Furrow Orbweaver (Larinioides cornutus) on its web in Elizabeth, Arkansas, USA
A Furrow Orbweaver (Larinioides cornutus) on its web in Elizabeth, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Larinioides cornutus 
  • Other Names: Foliate spider 
  • Adult Size: 10 to 12 mm (0.39 to 0.47 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a  

Furrow orb weavers are widespread across the globe, inhabiting North America, South America, Europe, Asia, and North Africa. This species can be found in Arkansas, and it is a spider commonly found on man-made structures.

Furrow orb weavers are nocturnal and hide in secluded areas during the day. Similar to other orb weavers they build large webs with an orb shape. 

This spider is tan and has a large rounded abdomen. On their abdomen are dark markings, and blotches. Their legs are covered in hair and have a pattern of black bands. 

Furrow orb weavers eat small insects like ants, flies, mosquitoes, gnats, moths, and other things that get trapped in their web.

Their bite is venomous but only effective on the small prey that they hunt. If bitten its bite is similar to the sting of a bee, but they usually only bite if provoked. 

9. Leaf Curling Sac Spider 

Leaf-curling Sac Spider (Phonognatha graeffei) hanging from its leaf web in Victoria, Australia
A Leaf-curling Sac Spider (Phonognatha graeffei) hanging from its leaf web in Victoria, Australia. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Phonognatha graeffei 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 12 mm (0.19 to 0.47 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

A species found in Arkansas, the leaf curling spider lives across the United States and other parts of the world. They live in woodland, forests, and urban areas.

This spider is known for keeping a leaf in its web to hide in if predators are near. Active in the day, the leaf curling spider is mostly seen in summer and fall. 

Leaf Curling Spiders are tan, with reddish legs. They have a cream-colored pattern on their back and rounded bodies.

The most identifiable trait of this spider is the curled leaf it keeps at the center of its web. The different sexes of this species look very similar, but females are slightly larger. 

Bites from this species are rare, as they are rather timid. This spider spends most of its time in its curled leaf but comes out to feed when it catches an insect.

Flying bugs are what the leaf curling spider feeds on the most. Many times multiple spiders live close together, but each makes its own web. 

10. Spinybacked Orbweaver 

Spinybacked Orbweaver (Gasteracantha cancriformis) on its web in Bryant, Arkansas, USA
A Spinybacked Orbweaver (Gasteracantha cancriformis) on its web in Bryant, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Gasteracantha cancriformis 
  • Other Names: Thorn spider 
  • Adult Size:  6.35 to 12.7 mm (0.25 to 0.5 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Spiny-backed orb weavers can be found from corner to corner in the United States.

They are a species found in Arkansas and live in areas with high vegetation. Forests, gardens, and grasslands are some of the places this species can be found. 

The spiny-backed orb weaver has an oval-shaped abdomen, with large spikes protruding out of it. Its body is covered in black dots that slightly resemble a face.

White, red, orange, and yellow are some of the colors they come in. The spikes that come out of its body are usually red, or black. 

To catch its prey this spider creates a large web in a circular shape. It is believed the spines of this species are useful in keeping predators like birds at bay.

Males of this species do not have any bright colors or spikes. They wait in the female’s web and initiate mating by tapping on the web four times. When mating is complete females lay up to 300 eggs. 

11. Orchard Orbweaver 

Orchard Orbweaver (Leucauge venusta) on a leaf at Ozark St. Francis National Forest, Arkansas, USA
An Orchard Orbweaver (Leucauge venusta) on a leaf at Ozark St. Francis National Forest, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Tetragnathidae
  • Scientific Name: Leucauge venusta 
  • Other Names: Orchard Spider
  • Adult Size: 3.5 to 7.5 mm (0.13 to 0.29 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 

Orchard orb weavers inhibit the U.S. and are only found in the southeastern regions. They can be found in Arkansas, and live all across the state.

Orchard orb weavers live in highly vegetated habitats. Gardens, meadows, and orchards make perfect homes for them. Females make large circular webs and wait for their next meal to get caught in their trap. 

Orchard orb weavers are colorful, with an elongated abdomen. This species has slender legs and an emerald coloring. Red, white, silver, and orange markings cover their body. 

Orchard orb-weavers build their web low to the ground. Grasshoppers, flies, and other insects are what they feed on. If harassed, they drop to the ground out of their web for safety.

Spring to fall is when this species is active. In fall most spiders die but lay eggs to hatch next spring before they go. 

12. Starbellied Orbweaver  

Starbellied Orbweaver (Acanthepeira stellata) hanging upside down on a small leaf at Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas, USA
A Starbellied Orbweaver (Acanthepeira stellata) hanging upside down on a small leaf at Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Acanthepeira stellata 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 15 mm ( 0.19 to 0.59 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: $20 

Starbellied orb weavers live across the U.S and can be found in every state. Grasslands, gardens, and meadows are some of the places they are found.

Tall grass is preferred in the habitats they live in. Starbellied orb weavers become active from spring to fall. During this period their time is spent feeding, and mating. 

The abdomen of this spider is covered in spikes that look like the edge of a star. These spikes cover its entire back and are useful in deterring predators.

Star Bellied orb weavers range in colors from dark to light tan. All together they have around 10 star-like points on them. 

Similar to other members of Araneidae, this species creates a circular web. Flies, beetles, and moths are just some of the flying insects this species eats.

Mud daubers are one of the main predators this spider faces in the wild. If it feels threatened the star-bellied orb-weaver drops from its web, and hides in nearby foliage. 

13. Triangle Orbweaver 

Arrowhead Orbweaver (Verrucosa arenata) on a leaf in Fayetteville, Arkansas, USA
An Arrowhead Orbweaver (Verrucosa arenata) on a leaf in Fayetteville, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Verrucosa arenata 
  • Other Names: Arrowhead spider 
  • Adult Size: 9.5 mm (0.37inches)  
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Triangle orb weavers are a species active most in summer and late fall. It can be found in Arkansas and other areas in North America.

They live in highly vegetated areas and make circular webs. In winter most mature triangle orb weavers die, but eggs and younglings overwinter until spring.

This spider is named after the triangle-shaped abdomen. Males are much smaller in size and are a rare sight to see.

Yellow, white, tan, or red is the possible colors of this spider. They are covered in small hairs that help them know when something is trapped in their web. 

Active in the day, the triangle orb-weaver sits in the center of its web and waits for food to get caught in its web. Insects and other small animals are what they eat. Birds and wasps are the main predators that prey on this spider. 

14. White Micrathena 

White Micrathena (Micrathena mitrata) on a small leaf in Polk County, Arkansas, USA
A White Micrathena (Micrathena mitrata) on a small leaf in Polk County, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Micrathena mitrata 
  • Other Names: Spiny orbweavers 
  • Adult Size: 4.2 to 10.8 mm (0.16 to 0.42 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Found in North and Central America, the white micrathena is a spider that inhabits forests, mountains, meadows, and garden habitats.

They live in vegetated areas with flora like tall grass and trees. This spider inhabits Arkansas and other states in the eastern U.S.

White micrathena have white abdomens as their names suggest. Black blotches cover their body, and on the end of their abdomen are small spikes.

Their head and legs are dark browns. The shape of the white Micrathena looks similar to a turban, which is referenced in their scientific name ‘mitrata’. 

The white micrathena eats small insects that get caught in its web. Plant-eating insects make up some of their diet, which is why they can be good for gardens.

Like other similar spiders this species is harmless, and if bitten its venom does not affect humans. 

15. Spined Micrathena  

Spined Micrathena (Micrathena gracilis) on a wooden stick in Craighead Forest Park, Arkansas, USA
A Spined Micrathena (Micrathena gracilis) on a wooden stick in Craighead Forest Park, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Micrathena gracilis 
  • Other Names: Castleback orbweaver 
  • Adult Size: 4 to 10 mm (0.15 to 0.31 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Spined micrathena lives in most states in the eastern United States, including Arkansas. This species inhabits woodland and urban habitats.

Moist habitats near freshwater are usually where they make their home. This spider is most active and spotted in summer.

Spined micrathenas stay active until fall. When winter comes eggs, and young spiderlings overwinter until spring. 

The abdomen of the spined micrathena is where its name comes from, and what makes this spider easily memorable. Females have a large abdomen and are usually black.

Around 10 spikes protrude from this species’ abdomen, which helps them be less likely to be eaten by predators. 

Males are much smaller than females, and also have fewer spines. Female spine micrathena build large circular webs.

These webs are helpful in catching flying insects to feed on. Every day the female fixes the center of her web, but the outer areas are untouched. Males travel often and look for females to mate with. 

16. Lined Orbweaver  

Lined Orbweaver (Mangora gibberosa) in its patterned web in Columbia County, Arkansas, USA
A Lined Orbweaver (Mangora gibberosa) in its patterned web in Columbia County, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate   
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Mangora gibberosa 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 6 mm (0.2 to 0.25 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

In the eastern United States and Arkansas, the lined orb weaver is a common species to come across. Females of this species build large circular webs. In the center of their web, they create a circle with thick silk.

This circle makes the spider’s web more resistant to damage, and more visible to birds flying.  Active in the day, this spider appears from spring to fall. 

Lined orb weavers have a greenish or light tan coloring. Their head and legs are nearly translucent. The abdomen of this species is white and has dark lines that run down it. 

Small insects like flies, gnats, mosquitoes, moths, and other flying bugs are what this spider eats. The lined orb weaver’s bite is venomous, and useful in neutralizing prey, but is not harmful to humans.  

17. Bridge Orbweaver 

Grey Cross Spider (Larinioides sclopetarius) hanging in its web in Quebec, Canada
A Grey Cross Spider (Larinioides sclopetarius) hanging in its web in Quebec, Canada. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Larinioides sclopetarius 
  • Other Names: Gray cross spider 
  • Adult Size: 8 to 14 mm (0.31 to 0.55 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The bridge orb-weaver inhabits moist habitats and is known to make its home near bridges. This spider has a large range in the Eastern United States and is a spider you can find in Arkansas.

This spider builds messy circular webs to live in. Active at night the bridge orb-weaver hides in secluded areas during the day.

Like other spider species, orb weavers showcase sexual dimorphism. Females have a more robust body, but males are the larger of the sexes.

Bridge orb weavers have a rounded abdomen, and a shape similar to other orb weavers species. They have a tannish and yellow coloring and are covered in a dark mottled pattern. 

The bridge orb-weaver makes its web near light since light attracts insects.

Small flies make up a large portion of their diet, but they also feed on other things that fall into their web. If enough food is present young spiders are able to grow and mature faster through molting. 

18. Shamrock Spider 

Shamrock Orbweaver (Araneus trifolium) on some leaf litter in Sauk County, Wisconsin, USA
A Shamrock Orbweaver (Araneus trifolium) on some leaf litter in Sauk County, Wisconsin, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Araneus trifolium 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 40 mm (0.2 to 1.57 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 

Shamrock orb weavers live in the United States, and Canada, and are a species inhabiting Arkansas. Mostly seen in the summer and fall, young spiders that have overwintered begin to become active in the spring.

This spider builds large orb webs to live in and is active during the day. They rebuild a new web daily, eating the old web in the morning.

Woodlands, grasslands, gardens, and other areas with dense foliage are where this species lives. Freshwater is common in their habitat since the moisture attracts insects. 

This spider comes in many colors like tan, orange, red, yellow, and white. They have large round abdomens, and females are covered in dense fur.

Their legs are light in color and are covered in dark bands. Several white dots are present on this spider’s back which can help distinguish it from other species. 

Small flying insects are what this species feeds on. While their bite is deadly to insects, it is harmless to humans.

The sticky web is useful in trapping prey, and the small furs on their body let the spider know when something is in their web. To remain safe the shamrock orbweaver may hide in a secluded area, and use a thread of silk attached to the web to know when something is caught.

While active during the day you may see them sitting in the center of their webs. 

19. Golden Silk Orbweaver 

Golden Silk Orbweaver (Trichonephila clavipes) on its web near Arkansas Post National Memorial, Arkansas, USA
A Golden Silk Orbweaver (Trichonephila clavipes) on its web near Arkansas Post National Memorial, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Trichonephila clavipes 
  • Other Names: Banana Spider 
  • Adult Size: 24 to 50 mm (0.94 to 1.96 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 6 months to a year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The golden silk orbweaver is a species that lives in the Southeastern United States. Found in Arkansas, summer, and fall is when the golden silk orbweaver is most active.

Woodlands, swamps, and other forested habitats are where this species makes its web. Females of this species make large circular webs in shaded areas. Their silk glistens in the sun and has a golden appearance. 

Female golden silk orb-weavers are some of the largest spiders in Arkansas and are identifiable due to their banana yellow coloring. This species’ legs are long and have black and brown bands on them.

The head of this spider is white, and they have white specks on its abdomen. Red coloring can also be seen in this species. Males are much smaller in size but have a similar look to females. 

Grasshoppers, flies, beetles, and other insects are what this species eats. This spider’s large web stretches out to around 3 feet in diameter but may be larger.

Large animals like birds prey on this species, but it is also possible for them to get caught in the spider’s web, and eaten. 

20. Cat-faced Orbweaver

Cat-faced Orbweaver (Araneus gemmoides) on its web in Fraser-Fort George, British Columbia, Canada
A Cat-faced Orbweaver (Araneus gemmoides) on its web in Fraser-Fort George, British Columbia, Canada. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Araneus gemmoides 
  • Other Names: Jewel Spider 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 7 mm (0.19 to 0.27 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The cat-faced spider is an orb-weaver species that can be found in Arkansas, and other parts of North America. This spider is active from spring to fall.

In winter most mature spiders die or move into man-made structures. Eggs overwinter and hatch in the spring.

Cat-faced spiders sit in the center of their web during the day. When their web is damaged they rebuild or move to a new spot. This species makes its web in areas with high vegetation. 

This spider has a large bulbous abdomen. They have a tannish or gray color, and small furs cover their body.

The cat-faced spider gets its name from its abdomen. Its body has two bumps and dimples on its back which form the face of a cat. 

Like other orb weavers, this spider eats a variety of insects that get caught in its web. They make their web near light, and moist areas to attract the most insects.

The cat-faced spider is a docile species, but if bitten its fangs are usually too small to puncture the skin. 

21. Marbled Orbweaver 

Marbled Orbweaver (Araneus marmoreus) on dried leaves in Polk County, Arkansas, USA
A Marbled Orbweaver (Araneus marmoreus) on dried leaves in Polk County, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Araneus marmoreus 
  • Other Names: Pumpkin spider 
  • Adult Size: 9 to 22 mm (0.35 to 0.86 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 

Marbled orbweavers live across most of North America. They live in wooded habitats that are near a freshwater source.

This species lives in webs and creates them near highly vegetated areas. In summer and fall is when the marbled orbweaver is most active. 

The marbled orbweaver is named after the marbled pattern that appears on this species’ abdomen. Females of this species are larger than males and are almost double in size.

Yellow or orange is the color of this species. Dark bands cover their legs, as well as tiny hairs. 

Small insects that get trapped in the marbled orb weavers web are what this species eats. When an insect has trapped the female shakes aggressively.

The webs they create are large and in a circular shape. 

22. Cross Orbweaver 

Cross Orbweaver (Araneus diadematus) on its web in Sofia, Bulgaria
A Cross Orbweaver (Araneus diadematus) on its web in Sofia, Bulgaria. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Araneus diadematus 
  • Other Names: European garden spider 
  • Adult Size: 5.5 to 20 mm (0.2 to 0.7 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Grasslands, woodlands, meadows, gardens, and other vegetated habitats are where the cross orb weaver lives. This species inhabits North America and is a common spider to find in Arkansas.

It originally inhabited Europe. This species lives in webs, and are nocturnal. They are most active in the warm months of summer and fall. 

Cross orb weavers have a rounded abdomen and spindly legs. They are tan, with a mottled pattern on them.

This spider gets its name from the cross pattern that appears on its back. Females are much larger than males and build the large circular webs this spider is known for. 

The large webs of the cross orb weavers are useful in catching flying insects like flies, and mosquitoes. The bite from this species is venomous, but harmless to humans. 

23. American Grass Spider 

Grass Spider (Agelenopsis) in dry leaves and its web in Hot Springs, Arkansas, USA
A Grass Spider (Agelenopsis) in dry leaves and its web in Hot Springs, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginners 
  • Family: Agelenidae 
  • Scientific Name: Agelenopsis 
  • Other Names: funnel weavers 
  • Adult Size: 9 to 20 mm (0.35 to 0.78 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

American grass spiders are a common funnel weaver species found across the United States.

This spider is found in most states and lives in grassy habitats. American grass spiders do not make webs like orbweavers but live in funnel webs. 

This species is tan, and medium-sized. They have bold dark stripes that appear on their abdomen, and head.

Small hairs cover this species’ body, and their legs are long. They have a similar appearance to a fishing spider but are much smaller in size. 

American grass spiders sit in their funnel-web and wait for unsuspecting prey to pass. When prey passes their funnel-web they are pounced on and eaten.

Small insects found in grassy areas like aphids, grasshoppers, and ants are what this species eats. 

24. Nursery Web Spider

A Nursery Web Spider (Pisaurina Mira) on a leaf at Halls Creek Natural Area, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Pisauridae 
  • Scientific Name: Pisaurina Mira 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 15 mm (0.59 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: $10 

Nursery web spiders live in Arkansas and other areas within North America. This spider is active from spring to fall and lives in wooded habitats with moisture.

Nursery web spiders mate by having males offer the females a gift. Females are capable of laying hundreds of eggs, and carrying them in their mouths until they are ready to hatch.

Nursery web spiders have slender abdomens, and tan, gray or black coloring. They are covered in small hairs, and a dark bold stripe runs from their head to the bottom of their abdomen.

This spider is sometimes confused with the fishing spider but has more slender legs.

Nursery web spiders hunt for their food and chase down small insects to feed on. They have excellent eyesight and use their fangs to neutralize their prey.

Like fishing spiders, they have the ability to walk on water to look for prey. 

25. Six-spotted Fishing Spider 

Six-spotted Fishing Spider (Dolomedes triton) on a small leaves in Paragould, Arkansas, USA
A Six-spotted Fishing Spider (Dolomedes triton) on a small leaves in Paragould, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Pisauridae 
  • Scientific Name: Dolomedes triton 
  • Other Names: Dock Spiders 
  • Adult Size: 15 to 60 mm (0.59 to 2.3 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20 

The six spotted fishing spider is a species native to North America and is a species that lives in the eastern United States. This spider is semi-aquatic and lives near freshwater.

Woodlands and other areas with high vegetation near water are where this species lives. They are able to walk across water, as they put very little pressure on the water’s surface. 

The six-spotted fishing spider looks very similar to a wolf spider. They have tan coloring and long legs that stretch out the sides of their body.

The abdomen of this species has white dots, and its head is edged with a white pattern. While white spots are present on this species’ back, they are named after the six spots on their belly. 

Fishing spiders are active most from spring to fall. They are nocturnal and spend their time hunting at night.

Small fish, insects, and other small animals are what this species feeds on. They use the water to hunt, but also to escape prey. During the day they stay hidden and hide under debris. 

26. Carolina Wolf Spider 

Carolina Wolf Spider (Hogna carolinensis) in a plastic cup in Lowell, Arkansas, USA
A Carolina Wolf Spider (Hogna carolinensis) in a plastic cup in Lowell, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Lycosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Hogna carolinensis 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 19 to 25 mm (0.7 to 0.98 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 4 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Carolina wolf spiders are the largest species of Lycosidae. They can be found in Arkansas, and live in a variety of habitats.

Forests, deserts, urban areas, and wetlands are some of the places this spider lives. They are nocturnal and live in burrows like a tarantula.

This spider has tan coloring and a dark mottled pattern. The Carolina wolf spider can also be gray or black.

Dark bold stripes appear on their abdomen and head. This spider has two large fangs and is covered in small fur.

The venom from the Carolina wolf spider is not dangerous, but their bite can be painful because of their large fangs. This species hunts its prey like a wolf and eats any animal that is small enough for it to overpower. 

27. Black-footed Sac Spider 

Black-footed Sac Spider (Cheiracanthium inclusum) holding onto the end of a leaf in Yaroslavl', Russia
A Black-footed Sac Spider (Cheiracanthium inclusum) holding onto the end of a leaf in Yaroslavl’, Russia. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Cheiracanthiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Cheiracanthium inclusum 
  • Other Names: Agrarian Sac Spider 
  • Adult Size: 6.3 to 9.5 mm (0.2 to 0.37 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Black-footed yellow sac spiders are a species that can be found in North and South America. They are nocturnal and live in forested habitats.

This spider also lives near man-made structures and urban areas. Spring and summer are when this species is most active, and it is common for them to make their way into homes. 

Black-footed sac spiders have a beige or tan coloring. They have long and thin legs with black coloring on the tips of their feet.

Insects and other spiders make up the majority of this spider’s diet. The venom of the sac spider is more potent than most other spiders, but not deadly.

Sac spider bites occur more often since they sneak into homes at night looking for food. 

28. Garden Ghost Spider 

Garden Ghost Spider (Hibana gracilis) hanging in a web it made in a white flower in Conway, Arkansas, USA
A Garden Ghost Spider (Hibana gracilis) hanging in a web it made in a white flower in Conway, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Anyphaenidae 
  • Scientific Name: Hibana gracilis 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 4 to 8 mm (0.15 to 0.31 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Garden ghost spiders are named after their translucent appearance like a ghost. This species is native to North America and can be found in Arkansas.

Garden ghost spiders are nocturnal and do most of their hunting at night. They are active from spring to fall and become inactive in the winter. During the day the garden ghost spider hides in a secluded area, like under logs, leaves, rocks, and other natural debris. 

This species has beige or white coloring and is covered in small hairs. Some species have dark markings on them, and they have a similar body shape to a sac spider.

The garden ghost spider feeds on small insects and is an ambush hunter. Insects and plenty of hiding places are preferred in this species’ living area. 

29. Woodlouse Spider 

Woodlouse Spider (Dysdera crocata) in a nook of rocks and wood at Capital, British Columbia, Canada
A Woodlouse Spider (Dysdera crocata) in a nook of rocks and wood at Capital, British Columbia, Canada. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Dysderidae 
  • Scientific Name: Dysdera crocata 
  • Other Names: Woodlouse hunter, sowbug killer 
  • Adult Size: 9 to 3 mm (0.35 to 0.59 inches)
  • Lifespan: 2 to 5 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The woodlouse spider is found in the eastern United States, and other regions like Eurasia, South America, Australia, South Africa, and New Zealand.

This species lives in dark moist habitats. They feed primarily on woodlouse and live in the same areas as those insects.

The head of the woodlouse spider is reddish, and its abdomen is light tan. They have large fangs that help take down their prey.

While woodlouse is the main food of this species, they also feed on other animals like centipedes, crickets, beetles, earwigs, and millipedes. 

The woodlouse spider is active at night, which is when it wanders about. During the day they hide in a secluded area and cover it in silk. 

Woodlouse spiders do not prefer to eat woodlice but will eat whatever is available. 

30. Spitting Spider 

Spitting Spider (Scytodes thoracica) on a bumpy white wall in Cambridgeshire, England, UK
A Spitting Spider (Scytodes thoracica) on a bumpy white wall in Cambridgeshire, England, UK. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Scytodidae 
  • Scientific Name: Scytodes thoracica 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 18 mm (0.25 to 0.75 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1.5 to 4 years 
  • Average Price Range: $30 

Spitting spiders live across the United States and Arkansas. They are known for being able to spit venom and web at their prey.

Spitting spiders are common in the eastern United States. They prefer to live in shady areas and are active in the warmer periods of the year.

Spitting spiders are tan, and covered in dark markings. They have long legs, and their two front legs help them aim at the insects they are eating at.

Spitting spiders have a rounded abdomen and cephalothorax. Unlike most spiders, they only have six eyes instead of eight. 

Other spiders and insects are what the spitting spider preys on. They are nocturnal and during the night they hunt. The substance that they spit is liquid silk mixed with venom. 

31. Green Lynx Spider 

Green Lynx Spider (Peucetia viridans) walking over a leaf in Shirley, Arkansas, USA
A Green Lynx Spider (Peucetia viridans) walking over a leaf in Shirley, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Oxyopidae 
  • Scientific Name: Peucetia viridans 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 12 to 22 mm (0.47 to 0.86 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: $5

Found in the southern United States, the green lynx spider is a species inhabiting Arkansas. Woodlands, prairies, gardens, meadows, and other vegetated areas are where this spider lives.

They do not build webs but sit on a variety of plant life. Green lynx spiders are only active during the day and spend the majority of their time hunting. 

This lynx spider is named after its green coloring. Black spots cover this species’ body, and legs. Their legs are white and long.

Small hairs cover the green lynx spider. They look nearly translucent and camouflage well into the green plant life.

Green lynx spiders are ambush hunters and are able to jump on their prey like a jumping spider. It feeds on small insects that feed on plants and flying bugs like bees.

They are also able to spit venom up to 8 inches. While deadly to insects, their bite and venom are harmless to humans. 

32. Bennett’s Laceweaver 

Bennett's Laceweaver (Callobius bennetti) on a rocky surface at Quetico Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada
A Bennett’s Laceweaver (Callobius bennetti) on a rocky surface at Quetico Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Amaurobiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Callobius bennetti 
  • Other Names: Hacklemesh weaver, Hackled Mesh Weaver
  • Adult Size: 5 to 14 mm (0.19 to 0.55 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The hackled mesh weaver is a spider that can be found in North America, and Eurasia. This spider prefers to live in dark areas like under debris.

They are active from spring to fall, and in winter they may make their way into homes and basements. The web it makes is messy and spread over surfaces. 

This spider has reddish tan coloring. Dark bands cover their legs, and their abdomen has a dark pattern on it.

Hackled mesh weavers have a rounded body and cephalothorax. Their legs are long and are almost double the size of their body. 

Hacklemesh weavers feed on small insects that get trapped in their messy webs. Their bite is not dangerous, but they are often mistaken for the brown recluse.

The body of the hacklemesh does not have a violin-shaped mark but may have dark chevron patterns on them. 

33. Eastern Parson Spider 

Eastern Parson Spider (Herpyllus ecclesiasticus) on grey stone in Brooklyn, New York, USA
An Eastern Parson Spider (Herpyllus ecclesiasticus) on grey stone in Brooklyn, New York, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Gnaphosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Herpyllus ecclesiasticus 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 12.7 mm (0.2 to 0.5 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The eastern parson spider is found in North America and is a species you may find in Arkansas.

This spider does not build webs but roams about. This spider is active at night and hides in secluded areas during the day.

Woodlands and grasslands are some of the areas this species lives. Many have found this species inside their homes, as they are small enough to wander in through the smallest of crevices. 

The tips of this species are reddish-brown, and the rest of their body has a dark black coloring. On their abdomen is white markings. Small hairs cover this spider’s body.

Bites from the Eastern parson spider are not dangerous to humans. Bites from this species occur more often than other spiders since they sneak into humans’ homes.

Small insects are what they eat, hunting at night. 

34. Ground Crab Spider 

Ground Crab Spider (Xysticus sphericus) on a rock in the sun in Fayetteville, Arkansas, USA
A Ground Crab Spider (Xysticus sphericus) on a rock in the sun in Fayetteville, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Thomisidae 
  • Scientific Name: Xysticus sphericus 
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 3 to 9 mm ( 0.11 to 0.35 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The ground crab spider is a ground-dwelling species you can find in Arkansas. They live in woodlands, gardens, meadows, grasslands, marshlands, and other highly vegetated habitats.

This species is active during the day and roams about. At the night they hide in secluded areas like under rocks or other natural debris. 

Ground crab spiders are named after their crab life appearance. Gray and tan are the most common colors they come in.

Their coloring helps them blend into the dirt. This species has a mottled pattern, and some species may have a stripe that runs down its head.

Some may confuse this species for a tick due to their size and body shape. 

The legs of this species are covered in small spines and are extremely strong to help it feed on a variety of insects. Most of the time they stay still and wait for unsuspecting prey to pass by. 

35. Goldenrod Crab Spider 

Goldenrod Crab Spider (Misumena vatia) in some purple flowers at Ozark-St. Francis National Forests, Springdale, Arkansas, USA
A Goldenrod Crab Spider (Misumena vatia) in some purple flowers at Ozark-St. Francis National Forests, Springdale, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Thomisidae 
  • Scientific Name: Misumena vatia 
  • Other Names: Flower crab spider 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 10 mm (0.20 to 0.39 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The goldenrod crab spider is a species that lives throughout North America and Europe. This spider is often found in milkweed and goldenrod flowers but may live on other plant life.

Females sit on plants, and males stay in the area of the nearest female they find to mate with. Goldenrod crab spiders lay their egg sac hidden in vegetation. Females will guard the sac, after which they die. 

This spider is known for its ability to change colors to better blend into the flower they sit on. While not instant like a chameleon, the change is subtle and over a period of weeks.

Vibrant white or yellow are the possible colors of this species. Reddish markings appear on the sides of this species’ abdomen. Females are larger than males and have a crab-like appearance. 

The goldenrod crab spiders sit in flowers and wait for prey to come by. Using their color they blend into their surroundings.

Goldenrod crab spiders are extremely strong and grab anything that gets near with their front legs. Pollinators like bees are what they eat most since they move from flower to flower. 

36. Whitebanded Crab Spider 

White-banded Crab Spider (Misumenoides formosipes) on a yellow flower at Ozark St. Francis National Forest, Arkansas, USA
A White-banded Crab Spider (Misumenoides formosipes) on a yellow flower at Ozark St. Francis National Forest, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Thomisidae 
  • Scientific Name: Misumenoides formosipes 
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 3 to 11 mm (0.11 to 0.43 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Similar in appearance to other crab spiders, the white-banded crab spider lives across the United States and in parts of Canada. This species gets its name from the white line that runs through its eyes.

Male white-banded crab spiders are small and have a golden coloring. Females are much larger and have a crab-like appearance. They appear in white, tan, or yellow coloring. 

A rare trait in spiders, this species is able to change its color to better blend into its habitat.

Active in the day, white-banded crab spiders live in gardens, grasslands, woodlands, and fields. Flowers are where they make their home, waiting for prey to come by.

Living on flowers, crab spiders feed on the pollinators that come close when trying to feed on the flower. Bees, fruit flies, and wasps are some of the things they eat.

While equipped with venom like other spiders, it is only effective on the small insects they feed on. The pollinators they feed on have evolved to develop fast reflexes to avoid this ninja-like species. 

37. Variegated Spider 

Variegated Ground Spider (Sergiolus capulatus) on the tops of some leaves in Cleburne County, Arkansas, USA
A Variegated Ground Spider (Sergiolus capulatus) on the tops of some leaves in Cleburne County, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Gnaphosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Sergiolus capulatus 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5.5 to 10 mm ( 0.21 to 0.39 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a  

The Variegated spider lives in the eastern United States. This spider is a species of ground spider and has been recorded to be active during the day and night.

This spider is known mostly by its scientific name Sergiolus capulatus since its common name is also the name of a popular house plant. Forests, grasslands, gardens, and meadows are some of the places this species lives. They enjoy areas with plenty of floor vegetation like lawns. 

Sergiolus capulatus is small in size and has a similar appearance to the velvet ant. This ground spider’s cephalothorax is a reddish color, and its chelicerae and black.

The abdomen of this species is black and white. The colors of this spider are vibrant and make it stand out.

Variegated spiders are agile hunters that prey on animals in the foliage they live in. Woodlouse, ants, and other small crawling insects are what they feed on. 

38. Brown Recluse 

Brown Recluse (Loxosceles reclusa) on a white wall in Russellville, Arkansas, USA
A Brown Recluse (Loxosceles reclusa) on a white wall in Russellville, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Sicariidae 
  • Scientific Name: Loxosceles reclusa 
  • Other Names: Violin spiders 
  • Adult Size: 7 mm (0.27 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

For some, the brown recluse is the most dangerous spider in Arkansas. This species lives across the south, west, and midwest areas of the United States, and is known for its dangerous bite.

The venom from this spider is extremely potent and capable of destroying blood vessels, tissues, and nerves. The bite from this spider is fairly mild, but its venom is one of the most dangerous in North America. 

Death from a brown recluse bite is extremely rare, but this spider is still feared by many. It is easy to confuse this species with many of the other brown spiders in Arkansas.

A violin-shaped mark on this species’ back makes it easy to identify from other similar-looking spiders. The head and abdomen of the brown recluse are rounded, and their legs stretch out to their sides. 

Spring to mid-fall is when the brown recluse is active. During the day they retreat to a secluded area and being nocturnal they roam about at night.

Instead of using webs, this spider is an active hunter. Insects like moths, flies, roaches, and other soft-bodied insects are what this species eats. 

39. Southern House Spider 

Southern House Spider (Kukulcania hibernalis) on a wooden table in Bee Cave, Texas
A Southern House Spider (Kukulcania hibernalis) on a wooden table in Bee Cave, Texas. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Filistatidae 
  • Scientific Name: Kukulcania hibernalis 
  • Other Names: Southern crevice spider 
  • Adult Size: 9 to 19 mm (0.35 to 0.74 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 8 years 
  • Average Price Range: $30 

The southern house spider is a common species in the southern United States. This spider is larger than most house spiders and has a tannish coloring.

Females have more of a grayish color and are large than males. This spider lives in homes, and when measured with legs span they are capable of growing up to 2 inches. 

Southern house spiders are a type of crevice weaver and build a tangle of webs in hidden areas. Males are less likely to build webs and wander about for their food.

The webbing of the southern house spider is similar to velcro and catches on the legs of unsuspecting insects. 

Southern house spiders do not have a deadly bite, but their venom can cause mild swelling. Bites from this species happen often since they live inside and around homes.

Some may confuse this species for a brown recluse, but they lack the violin pattern on their back. 

40. American House Spider 

House Spider (Parasteatoda tepidariorum) in its web at its orb at Pinnacle Mountain State Park, Arkansas, USA
A House Spider (Parasteatoda tepidariorum) in its web at its orb at Pinnacle Mountain State Park, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Parasteatoda tepidariorum 
  • Other Names: Common House Spider
  • Adult Size: 3 to 5 mm (0.11 to 0.19 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The American house spider lives in most of the United States and is a species you may find in Arkansas. This species often makes its home near humans, and they occupy a variety of man-made shelters.

This species creates webs in secluded areas to live in them. Males and females often share the same web in mating periods. This species has poor vision and relies on the tiny hairs that cover its body to sense vibrations. 

Also called the common house spider, this species comes in many colors. This spider’s color ranges from tan to black.

They have a large abdomen, and spindly legs similar to a black widow. Black and tan bands cover this species’ legs. Their abdomen is covered in a pale mottled pattern. 

Small insects found in homes are what the American house spider eats. The webs they spin help catch many insects.

The American house spider cleans its web of old bugs. The venom of this species is great at neutralizing prey like insects and small lizards but is generally harmless to humans. 

41. Southern Black Widow 

Southern Black Widow (Latrodectus mactans) in dry shrub in Ouachita National Forest, Arkansas, USA
A Southern Black Widow (Latrodectus mactans) in dry shrub in Ouachita National Forest, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Latrodectus mactans 
  • Other Names: Shoe-button spider 
  • Adult Size: 8 to 13 mm (0.3 to 0.5 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20  

The southern black widow is one of the most dangerous spiders in Arkansas. This species can be found in the Southern United States.

They are most active in summer, until fall. These nocturnal spiders create messy webs to live in and hide in secluded areas during the day. 

Southern black widows have a glossy black coloring. This species is easily identifiable by the red hourglass on the bottom of its abdomen. Male southern black widows are much smaller than females and have white coloring on them. 

Black widows have some of the strongest webs among spiders, and it is said to be as strong as steel. Using their long legs they capture any prey that falls into their web and spins them into a silken cocoon.

Black widows have some of the strongest bites in Arkansas. Their venom affects the nervous symptoms and causes symptoms like nausea, spasms, cramps, and swelling.

Each person reacts differently to their bite, and it is extremely rare for it to be fatal. 

42. Two-spotted Cobweb Spider 

Two-spotted Cobweb Spider (Asagena americana) on dry leaf litter in Kanawha County, West Virginia, USA
A Two-spotted Cobweb Spider (Asagena americana) on dry leaf litter in Kanawha County, West Virginia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Asagena americana 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 3 to 5 mm (0.11 to 0.15 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year or less 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Two Spotted cobweb spiders live across the United States and can be found in Arkansas.

They create a web to live in, but they may occasionally wander for food or a mate. Two-spotted cobweb spiders live in areas with plenty of natural debris.

Under rocks, logs, stones, bridges, and other secluded areas are where they are found. Woodlands, deserts, and grasslands are the most common habitats they live in. 

Reddish-brown is the color of the two-spotted cobweb spider. They have a rounded abdomen and thick legs. On the back of their abdomen is a pattern of white spots.

These spots are paired in twos and are where they get their name. Other white markings also sometimes appear near their spots. 

This spider makes its web in a secluded area, but also near sources of food. Ants, flies, and other insects that get trapped in their web are the prey of this species.

What makes the males of this species unique is the ability to create a sound like cricket to attract a female. Fall is mating season, and for this species, they lay translucent eggs. 

43. Triangulate Cobweb Spider 

A Triangulate Combfoot (Steatoda triangulosa) on pebbled ground in Conway, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Steatoda triangulosa 
  • Other Names: Triangulate bud spider 
  • Adult Size: 3 to 6 mm (0.1 to 0.23 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Triangulate cobweb spiders are small species found across the world. Their range stretches across North America, Russia, New Zealand, and Europe.

Triangulate cobwebs spiders primarily live in man-made structures. Homes are a common place to find them, as the outside is too harsh for them to survive.

Areas like windows or door frames are where this species lives. 

Small in size this species has reddish-brown coloring. They have rounded abdomen and spindly legs.

Cream markings run down the center of their abdomen and form a zig-zag pattern. Their legs are covered in black and yellow bands. 

Triangulate cobweb spiders may be small, but they are capable of eating a variety of insects. They eat what insects get caught in their web.

Some may keep them in their homes since they are capable of feeding on dangerous spiders like the brown recluse or hobo spider. The bite from a triangular cobweb spider is harmless, and no envenomations have been recorded. 

44. Rabbit Hutch Spider 

Rabbit Hutch Spider (Steatoda bipunctata) on its web in front of a light-colored wall in Aholming, Germany
A Rabbit Hutch Spider (Steatoda bipunctata) on its web in front of a light-colored wall in Aholming, Germany. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Steatoda bipunctata
  • Other Names: False widow 
  • Adult Size: 16 mm (0.75 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Rabbit hutch spiders are a species that lives across North America and Europe.

This species is common in Arkansas, and make its home near man-made structures. Rabbit hutches are a common area this species makes its web.

Rabbit hutch spiders create messy webs and prefer to make their home in the corner. They are nocturnal and remain hidden during the day.

Rabbit hutch spiders are often confused for black widows, as they are from the same family. This spider is small with a rounded abdomen. Their bodies are reddish-brown and covered in a cream pattern. 

The bite from this species is harmless and only has very mild effects. A bite from a rabbit hutch spider is rare, as their fangs are extremely small.

Insects like woodlice, gnats, and mosquitoes are what they feed on. 

45. Brown Widow 

Brown Widow (Latrodectus geometricus) in its a web in San Clarita, California, USA
A Brown Widow (Latrodectus geometricus) in its a web in San Clarita, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Latrodectus geometricus 
  • Other Names: Brown button spider 
  • Adult Size: 8 to 14 mm ( 0.3 to 0.5 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20 

Brown widows live all over the United States. This species is thought to be native to Africa.

It has a large range across the world also in Japan, Australia, and some tropical islands. They often live near humans and create messy webs to live in.

These spiders are nocturnal and hide out in secluded areas. Brown widows make their webs in places like flower pots, fences, walls, and other hidden areas.

This species has a similar body shape to the black widow. They are brown or black in color and have an orange to yellowish hourglass marking on their belly. Black bands also run down their legs. Males are much smaller than females.

Brown widows eat a variety of insects that get caught in their web. They have poor eyesight and use vibrations to know when something is on their web.

Brown widows and black widows are very similar as they are a part of the same genus. These two species can be told apart by their lighter coloring.

Brown widows also have spikes that protrude from their egg sacs. 

46. False Widow  

False Black Widow (Steatoda grossa) on some clear wet plastic in Conway, Arkansas, USA
A False Black Widow (Steatoda grossa) on some clear wet plastic in Conway, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Steatoda grossa 
  • Other Names: brown house spider, cupboard spider 
  • Adult Size: 10 to 14 mm (0.39 to 0.55 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 to 6 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The false lives all across the world, and are a species you may find in Arkansas. They often live near humans and create messy webs to sit in.

It is nocturnal and hides in a secluded area during the day. False widows usually make webs on walls, fences, bushes, and near man-made structures. 

This spider is often confused for the black widow, as it has a very similar body shape.

While not black, they have a brown or reddish-brown coloring. They also lack any red markings, but their abdomen is covered in a cream pattern.

False widows have poor eyesight and navigate their web by using vibrations. This spider eats insects like pill bugs and other crawling insects.

When something gets caught in their web, they use their venom to neutralize their prey. Even though they look similar to the black widow, their venom is not as potent and is only mild. 

47. Bowl and Doily Spider 

A Bowl-and-doily Spider (Frontinella pyramitela) on a leaf in Preston, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Linyphiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Frontinella pyramitela 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 4 mm (0.16 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The Bowl and Doily spider is named after its web, which is shaped similarly to a bowl. This spider is found across the U.S. and Arkansas.

They live in temperate woodland habitats and create their web in highly vegetated areas. Spring to fall is when the bowl and doily spider is active.

Male and female spiders coin habitat webs together. Female treats the web as prey until males successfully court the female. 

Bowl and doily spiders are small and have rounded abdomens. They have reddish-brown heads and white abdomens.

Black blotches cover their abdomen. Their legs range from dark to light tan in color. 

The bowl and doily spiders sit on the bottom of their web. It preys on small insects like gnats and pulls them into the bowl part of their web.

Light venom is injected into their prey and neutralizes their food. The bowl and doily top of this spider’s web is unique and allows it to capture a variety of small flying insects. 

48. Texas Brown Tarantula

Texas Brown Tarantula (Aphonopelma hentzi) on rock at Buffalo National River Wilderness Ponca Unit, Arkansas, USA
A Texas Brown Tarantula (Aphonopelma hentzi) on rock at Buffalo National River Wilderness Ponca Unit, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theraphosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma hentzi 
  • Other Names: Arkansas Chocolate Tarantula , Missouri tarantula 
  • Adult Size: 119.3 to 149 mm (4.7 to 5.9 inches)  
  • Lifespan: 10 to 30 year 
  • Average Price Range: $60  

The Arkansas chocolate tarantula is the largest spider in Arkansas. This species lives in western Arkansas, but also inhabits regions in Texas, Colorado, Missouri, Oklahoma, and New Mexico.

Grassland is a common habitat where this species is found. They are burrowing spiders, either digging holes or finding abandoned burrows. 

This large spider comes in various shades of brown. They are covered in reddish hairs and are dark brown.

This spider has two large fangs and thick legs. Females are large of the sexes, and some have been documented to live up to 40 years. 

The Arkansas chocolate spider feeds on a variety of insects. Grasshoppers, crickets, ground beetles, and caterpillars are some of the things they eat.

Their large fangs administer mild venom to the prey they capture. Bites from this species are generally harmless to humans. Having fangs so large the puncture wound is the only danger when getting bit.

FAQ

What Are The Most Dangerous Spiders In Arkansas?

Widow spiders and the brown recluse have the most dangerous bite amongst spiders in Arkansas. While most bites from spiders are not deadly, these species’ bites can cause severe reactions to some.

Sac spider venoms are not as powerful as these two spiders, but they are more likely to bite humans since they often make their way into homes. 

Where Are Spiders Most Common In Arkansas?

On this list, many spiders are common to find in Arkansas, but species like the Cellar spider and false widow are more common than others. These spiders are active year-round.

Other spiders become more prominent in certain seasons. Spiders that live in man-made structures can always be active since they live in climate-controlled areas. 

What Are The Largest Spiders In Arkansas?

Aphonopelma hentzi or the Arkansas chocolate tarantula is the largest spider in Arkansas.

It is also found in other states and is capable of growing larger than 4 inches. Other spiders like wolf spiders, are also larger than most spiders, and also inhabit Arkansas. 

Wrapping up

Spiders are one of the most important little creatures in the wild. They are the dominant force that controls the insects but is also food for the variety of life in the habitats they live in.

With eight legs and eyes, spiders scare many people that come across them, but luckily most of them are harmless. All of the species on this list are spiders you may find in Arkansas, but there are a variety of other species that live in the state. 

In the U.S alone there are around 3,5000 different spiders that you may come across. Many of the species are unique, but some spiders are also very similar.

As one of the most abundant arachnids, spiders are found everywhere. Learning about local species is great for seeing which are near you, but some spiders also make great pets.

Fearing spiders is natural, but as you learn about these eight-legged wonders you may begin to appreciate their presence and beauty. 

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