Skip to Content

Spiders in Massachusetts 

Massachusetts is filled with spiders, and they make their home in many different habitats across the state. Orb weavers, widows, jumping spiders, and grass spiders are some of the types that are abundant in Massachusetts.

Spiders play an important role in keeping the number of pest insects low. You can find many species out in nature, but there are just as many that live near urban areas.

The most common time to find a spider is in spring, as that is when many start breeding.

Usually, most species only live around a year, so many eggs are laid to hatch in the spring for the next year. Spiders can have a variety of differences between them, and there is a wide range of types to appreciate.

In this list, you will find 45 different spiders in Massachusetts, but there are many more that live in the state. Here are some of the spiders you can find in Massachusetts, and useful facts about each one.

Table of Contents

  1. Spiders in Massachusetts
    1. American Grass Spider
    2. Nursery Web Spider
    3. Six-Spotted Fishing Spider
    4. Dark Fishing Spider
    5. Tiger Wolf Spider
    6. Rabid Wolf Spider
    7. Carolina Wolf Spider
    8. Rustic Wolf Spider
    9. Bold Jumping Spider
    10. Tan Jumping Spider
    11. Emerald Jumping Spider
    12. Bronze Jumping Spider
    13. White-jawed Jumping Spider
    14. Peppered Jumping Spider
    15. White-cheeked Jumping Spider
    16. Cardinal Jumping Spider
    17. Thin-spined Jumping Spider
    18. Canopy Jumping Spider
    19. Northern Black Widow
    20. Southern Black Widow
    21. False Black Widow
    22. Long-bodied Cellar Spider
    23. American House Spider
    24. Triangulate Cobweb Spider
    25. Two-Spotted Cobweb Spider
    26. Golden Silk Orbweaver
    27. Banded Garden Spider
    28. Black and Yellow Garden Spider
    29. Bridge Orbweaver
    30. Spined Micrathena
    31. Spotted Orbweaver
    32. Furrow Orbweaver
    33. Cross Orbweaver
    34. Marbled Orbweaver
    35. Black Laceweaver
    36. Goldenrod Crab Spider
    37. White-banded Crab Spider
    38. Garden Ghost Spider
    39. Red-spotted Ant-mimic Sac Spider
    40. Spitting Spider
    41. Northern Yellow Sac Spider
    42. Woodlouse Spider
    43. Eastern Parson Spider
    44. Broad-faced Sac Spider
    45. Black-footed Yellow Sac Spider
  2. FAQ
  3. Conclusion

Spiders in Massachusetts

1. American Grass Spider

American Grass Spider (Agelenopsis) eating its prey in its web in Canton, Massachusetts, USA
An American Grass Spider (Agelenopsis) eating its prey in its web in Canton, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginners
  • Family: Agelenidae
  • Scientific Name: Agelenopsis
  • Other Names: funnel weavers
  • Adult Size: 9 to 20 mm (0.35 to 0.78 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The American grass spider is a common funnel weaver species. This spider lives in Massachusetts but is also found throughout the United States.

As their name suggests they live in grassy habitats with other vegetation. American grass spiders do not build webs in trees, but instead on the ground near the grass.

A funnel-like web is what they create, and they sit and wait for any prey to pass. 

The American grass spider is a medium-sized species, and capable of growing larger than most spiders. They have a tan coloring, with an elongated abdomen.

On the back of their abdomen are dark markings, and they have two bold dark stripes on their head. Small hairs cover their body, and their legs have a tan/orangish coloring. 

Grass spiders are most active at night since that is when most insects come out. They prefer to live outside but may find their way into homes looking for a more suitable habitat.

This species only lives for around a year and is active from Spring to Fall. 

2. Nursery Web Spider 

American Nursery Web Spider (Pisaurina Mira) hanging onto a leaf in Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA
An American Nursery Web Spider (Pisaurina Mira) hanging onto a leaf in Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Pisauridae 
  • Scientific Name: Pisaurina Mira 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 15 mm (0.59 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: $10 

In Massachusetts and all across the U.S, the nursery web spider is a species you may find. This spider breeds in summer and is known for carrying its egg sac around in its jaws.

Males woo the female spider by offering her a gift and then try to breed with her. Females lay hundreds of eggs, and protect their clutch until they are ready to hatch. 

The Nursery web spider can be easily confused with other species if they do not have an egg sac with them.

This spider has a slender tan body. Their legs are thin, and their abdomen has a pointed look. This spider ranges from dark to light tan and may have dark markings present on them. 

Nursery web spiders do not build webs like an orb weaver or funnel spider. They wander for food and are similar to wolf spiders.

Active day and night they are seen more often in areas with high vegetation. Their venom is not dangerous, and a bite from this species is only harmful to the small insects it eats. 

3. Six-Spotted Fishing Spider 

Six-Spotted Fishing Spider (Dolomedes triton) on a leaf in Haverhill, Massachusetts, USA
A Six-Spotted Fishing Spider (Dolomedes triton) on a leaf in Haverhill, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Pisauridae 
  • Scientific Name: Dolomedes triton 
  • Other Names: Dock Spiders 
  • Adult Size: 15 to 60 mm (0.59 to 2.3 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20 

Six-spotted fishing spiders are a species that live all across North America. They live near bodies of water and can glide over the surface of the water.

Near a freshwater habitat like a lake, or pond is where this species is usually seen. This spider can glide on water because of the low tension their legs put on the water’s surface, as well as their waterproof appendages.

The six-spotted fishing spider has gray to brown coloring and two cream stripes that run down its sides. Spots are present on this species’ back, and they are named after the six spots that are on the bottom of their abdomen.

When born this spider is extremely small but looks similar to its adult form. Females are larger than males and also live longer. 

Fishing spiders feed on the prey they find in the water like small fish, tadpoles, and water bugs. They can successfully kill prey around 5 times their body weight.

This species is active from the middle of spring, until fall. 

4. Dark Fishing Spider 

Dark Fishing Spider (Dolomedes tenebrosus) on a chunk of bark in Athol, Massachusetts, USA
A Dark Fishing Spider (Dolomedes tenebrosus) on a chunk of bark in Athol, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Pisauridae 
  • Scientific Name: Dolomedes tenebrosus 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 6.8 to 25.4 mm (0.27 to 1 inch)
  • Lifespan: 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Dark fishing spiders are aquatic spider species that live in Massachusetts, and other areas within North America.

Bodies of water are usually present in the habitats they live in, but they also live in forests and woodland habitats. Dark fishing spiders are able to walk across the water. While not always in the water, they often use freshwater as an area to hunt. 

Dark fishing spiders are a very similar species to the Six-spotted fishing spider but lack the spots on the bottom of their abdomen.

They have gray to dark tan coloring, and dark markings over their body. On their abdomen are three W-shaped marks, and small hairs also are all over them. 

Dark fishing spiders are active hunters, and will stalk the prey they are chasing like a cat. Insects, small fish, tadpoles, and other spiders are just some of the things they eat. 

5. Tiger Wolf Spider 

Tiger Wolf Spider (Tigrosa helluo) in someone's leather shoe in Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts, USA
A Tiger Wolf Spider (Tigrosa helluo) in someone’s leather shoe in Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Lycosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Tigrosa helluo 
  • Other Names: Woodland Giant Wolf Spider 
  • Adult Size: 13 to 21 mm (0.511 to 0.82 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 4 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $40 dollars 

Tiger wolf spiders are some of the largest spiders in Massachusetts, as they are a member of the Lycosidae family. This species lives in forests and grassland habitats.

They live across the United States and prefer areas with high vegetation. Tiger wolf spiders are wanderers and do not build webs to sit in.

Like other wolf spiders, they are nocturnal and make a burrow to live in. Tiger wolf spiders are large and are covered in small hairs.

This species is brown and is named after the light-colored orange bands on its body. Their heads are larger than their abdomen, and they have a mottled pattern. 

Tiger wolf spiders hunt at night and prey on any small insect they can eat. Flies, worms,  grasshoppers, and other spiders are some of the things they consume.

A bite from this spider may be painful, but its venom is not strong enough to cause any severe effects on humans. 

6. Rabid Wolf Spider 

Rabid Wolf Spider (Rabidosa rabida) walking through some leaves in Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA
A Rabid Wolf Spider (Rabidosa rabida) walking through some leaves in Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate  
  • Family: Lycosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Rabidosa rabida 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 13 to 21 mm (0.511 to 0.82 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 4 years 
  • Average Price Range: $40.00 

Rabid wolf spiders live in North America and are a species you may find in Massachusetts.

They are active from spring to fall and wander around at night. During the day this species hides in debris or vegetation.

It is also common for them to make their home in a small hole, or burrow. When a mother rabid wolf spider lays its eggs it will carry its babies on its back until they are ready to hatch. 

The rabid wolf spider is very similar to other wolf spiders in appe and has a tan coloring. They have dark bold stripes that appear on the abdomen and head.

These bold stripes are a bit darker than other wolf spiders. This species has long legs, and on some spiders, their two front legs are all black. 

The rabid wolf spider hunts in the night and preys on anything that is small enough to take down. Small insects like ants, grasshoppers, and other spiders are what this species eats.

Birds, snakes, and larger spiders are the predators that eat the rabid wolf spider. 

7. Carolina Wolf Spider 

Carolina Wolf Spider (Hogna carolinensis) in dried leaves at Camp Edwards, Bourne, Massachusetts, USA
A Carolina Wolf Spider (Hogna carolinensis) in dried leaves at Camp Edwards, Bourne, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Lycosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Hogna carolinensis 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 19 to 25 mm (0.7 to 0.98 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 4 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The Carolina wolf spider is the largest wolf spider species and is also one of the largest spiders in Massachusetts.

This spider lives in burrows and is active at night. Habitats like deserts, forests, coastlines, and wetlands are where this species can be found, as they are very adaptable.

Carolina wolf spiders are the largest of their family. They have a dark mottled pattern on them and tan coloring.

Males are smaller than females, and also have orange coloring on the side of their abdomen. 

Small insects and invertebrates are what this spider feeds on. Frogs and birds are this species’ most common predators, but they are susceptible to any animal that is willing to attack them.

Their eyesight is designed to see movement in the dark. The venom of the Carolina wolf spider is not harmful to people but paralyzes small prey. 

8. Rustic Wolf Spider 

Rustic Wolf Spider (Trochosa ruricola) on large rocks in Westford, Massachusetts, USA
A Rustic Wolf Spider (Trochosa ruricola) on large rocks in Westford, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Lycosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Trochosa ruricola 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 10 to 25 mm (0.4 to 0.98 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 4 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Rustic wolf spiders are a species of Lycosidae that live in Massachusetts, and across the United States. This species is seen from spring to fall.

Active at night, in the day wolf spiders seek a secluded area, or burrow to hide in. Grasslands, woodlands, forests, urban areas, and highly vegetated habitats areas where this spider can be found. 

Rustic wolf spiders look similar to other members of their family and have tan coloring. This species has a dark and light band that runs down its back.

Small hairs cover their body, and they have eight tiny eyes on their face. 

Insects like beetles, roaches, crickets, and any other small animal are what this spider eats. They are active hunters and take down their prey like a wolf.

Wolf spiders are one of the best hunters among spiders and have venom that is strong enough to kill tiny prey. 

9. Bold Jumping Spider 

Bold Jumping Spider (Phidippus audax) on a leaf in Melrose, Massachusetts, USA
A Bold Jumping Spider (Phidippus audax) on a leaf in Melrose, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus audax 
  • Other Names: Daring jumping spider 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 19 mm (0.23 to 0.74 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

Bold jumping spiders are a common species in North America and Massachusetts.

This spider lives in habitats like grasslands, forests, fields, and residential areas. They navigate by jumping and are active during the day. 

Bold jumping spiders and other jumping spiders in the Phidippus genus have some of the largest bodies among jumping spiders. They are all black and have dark green chelicerae.

White tufts of hair are found all on their body and legs. Jumping spiders have two large eyes on their face that give them some of the best eyesight in spiders.

When active during the day this species spends its time hunting for small prey. To ensure a successful hunt they may stalk, and circle their prey.

When it seems safe they will quickly pounce, and begin to feed. Small insects are what this species eats. They do not build webs to catch prey, but jumping spiders use webs similar to the safety rope of a mountain climber.

They place their web down when jumping to ensure a safe landing if they fall.  

10. Tan Jumping Spider 

Tan Jumping Spider (Platycryptus undatus) on wooden floorboards in Rockport, Massachusetts, USA
A Tan Jumping Spider (Platycryptus undatus) on wooden floorboards in Rockport, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Platycryptus undatus 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 8.5 to 13 mm (0.33 to 0.51 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

Tan jumping spiders are one of the most common species of Salticidae and are spiders seen often across the United States.

Spring to fall is when this species is active. When winter comes younger and not fully mature spiders hibernate and become active next season. 

Tan jumping spiders are slim and are beige in color. They have a mottled pattern and are covered in small fur.

Oftentimes spiders are seen with black specks, and orange markings on them. Like other jumpers, they have two large eyes, as well as six small ones surrounding their head giving them excellent vision. 

Flies, wasps, grasshoppers, and other insects around their size are what this species eats. Things that are larger than them, or even around the same size may make them wary of attacking.

Jumping spiders are docile, and generally do not bite humans. If bitten their bite is harmless, and only gives extremely mild symptoms. 

11. Emerald Jumping Spider 

Emerald Jumping Spider (Paraphidippus aurantius) on a leaf in Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
An Emerald Jumping Spider (Paraphidippus aurantius) on a leaf in Worcester, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Paraphidippus aurantius 
  • Other Names: Golden Jumping Spider 
  • Adult Size: 3.04 mm (0.12 inches)
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

Emerald jumping spiders are a common species in Massachusetts and live across North America. They live in a variety of habitats, like forests, wetlands, fields, and prairies.

Finding one of these spiders in or around your house is not uncommon. They are active during the day and can jump around 2 feet in length.

The body of this spider is all black, with a white outline around its body.

They have small hairs on them and are relatively slim. This species gets its name from the glistening emerald stripe that runs down its abdomen. 

The emerald jumping spider is a shy species and will flee by jumping away if approached.

They feed on small insects and will pounce on prey when least expecting it. Their bite is harmless to humans, and they are easily handled since biting is rare. 

12. Bronze Jumping Spider 

Bronze Jumping Spider (Eris militaris) on a leaf in Haverhill, Massachusetts, USA
A Bronze Jumping Spider (Eris militaris) on a leaf in Haverhill, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Eris militaris 
  • Other Names: Bronze lake jumper 
  • Adult Size: 4.7 to 8 mm (0.18 to 0.31 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 6 months to 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The bronze jumping spider lives in the United States and is often seen in Massachusetts. Spring to fall is when this spider is most active, and like other jumpers they are diurnal. 

This species has a vibrant brown coloring. Bronze jumpers are small, and also have white and black markings on them.

The abdomen of this spider is short, and its legs are much longer than its body. Females are larger, while males have a more crab-like appearance. 

The bronze jumper has a similar lifestyle to other jumping spiders and spends its time hunting.

It will pounce on its prey when close, and take it down tactfully. At night when this species is inactive, they will hang suspended from a web waiting for the day to come. 

13. White-jawed Jumping Spider 

White-jawed Jumping Spider (Hentzia mitrata) walking on a long blade leaf in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
A White-jawed Jumping Spider (Hentzia mitrata) walking on a long blade leaf in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Hentzia mitrata 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 4 to 6 mm (0.15 to 0.23 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Found in the United States, Canada, and also the Bahama islands, the White-jawed jumping spider is a very widespread species. This spider lives in a variety of habitats like scrublands, forests, and mountains, but prefers tropical and warm regions.

This spider is similar to other jumping spiders. They have excellent vision but are only active during the day. They can be quite curious and sometimes interact with humans by following and viewing them. 

White jawed jumping spiders are snow white and are covered in white fur. Their abdomen and heads have a light tan to orange coloring. This spider’s body is thin, and they have long nimble legs.

Small insects are what this species eats, hunting similar to other jumping spiders. Their venom and agile jumps make them a force for any small insect to cross. 

14. Peppered Jumping Spider 

Peppered Jumping Spider (Pelegrina galathea) in a fuzzy leaf at Pine Hill WMA Lancaster, Massachusetts, USA
A Peppered Jumping Spider (Pelegrina galathea) in a fuzzy leaf at Pine Hill WMA Lancaster, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Pelegrina galathea 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 2.7 to 5.4 mm (0.1 to 0.21 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Peppered jumping spiders are named after their appearance, as they have the coloring of salt and pepper.

They are a small species found across North America and are sometimes spotted in Massachusetts. Forests, tropical, and mountainous habitats are areas they inhabit.  

Jumping spiders are active from spring to fall. This species is active during the day and has two large front eyes that give it great eyesight.

The rest of this species’ eyes wrap around its head giving it a large peripheral vision. 

Insects the size or smaller are what jumping spiders eat. The peppered jumping spider and other types of species make great pets and are easy to care for.

Only a small terrarium is needed to comfortably house a jumping spider. They are great pets for people looking to start owning arachnids. 

15. White-cheeked Jumping Spider 

White-cheeked Jumping Spider (Pelegrina proterva) walking on a furry leaf in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, USA
A White-cheeked Jumping Spider (Pelegrina proterva) walking on a furry leaf in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Pelegrina proterva 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 4 to 9 mm (0.15 to 0.31 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The white-cheeked jumping spider is a common species in Massachusetts, and it lives across the eastern half of the United States.

They are a friendly and small species. This spider is capable of living in many habitats like grasslands, and urban areas, but are most common in woodlands. 

Small in size the white-cheeked jumping spider is only around the size of a house fly. They have white and gray heads, with a tan and white abdomen.

The legs of this spider are short and designed for jumping large distances.

Like other jumping spiders they are most active during the day, from spring to fall. Young spiders overwinter in the cold season and become active when spring comes again. 

16. Cardinal Jumping Spider 

Cardinal Jumping Spider (Phidippus cardinalis) on the edge of a leaf in Groton, Massachusetts, USA
A Cardinal Jumping Spider (Phidippus cardinalis) on the edge of a leaf in Groton, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus cardinalis 
  • Other Names: Cardinal Jumper , Brilliant Jumping Spider
  • Adult Size: 4 to 18 mm (0.15 to 0.70 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The cardinal jumper is a spider found in parts of North America and inhabits the state of Massachusetts. They are a small species, with red velvet coloring.

Their legs are black and small, designed to allow them to jump more than 10 times their length. The color of this species is believed to mimic velvet ants and make them look more dangerous than it is. 

Cardinal jumpers are docile and have a harmless bite. Like other jumping spiders, this species’ venom is only harmful to small insects.

When active during the day the Cardinal jumping spider spends its time hunting and will pounce on its prey when it gets to chance. Males try to mate with a female if they see one, and get the female’s attention with a dance by waving their arm. 

17. Thin-spined Jumping Spider

Thin-spined Jumping Spider (Tutelina elegans) on a flower with stems in Dunstable, Massachusetts, USA
A Thin-spined Jumping Spider (Tutelina elegans) on a flower with stems in Dunstable, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Tutelina elegans 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 4.5 to 9 mm (0.17 to 0.35 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Living in the eastern United States, the thin-spined jumping spider is a spider active in summer. This spider inhabits areas in Massachusetts and lives nearby grasslands.

They often hide in vegetation, and under natural debris like rocks or logs.  In winter adults die off, and young spiders overwinter until the spring. 

Thin-spined jumping spiders are a small species and are covered in small iridescent hairs.

They have short legs, and like most other spiders females are larger than males. Their abdomen and head are gray to tan, and they have thin bodies. 

This species will eat anything it comes across if it is small enough, and they can catch it. If no food is present they can last around a month without eating.

Rapid movements and jumps help close in on an enemy, but also escape incoming predators. Birds, lizards, and larger spiders are the most common predators this spider faces. 

18. Canopy Jumping Spider 

Canopy Jumping Spider (Phidippus otiosus) on a white background at an unknown location
A Canopy Jumping Spider (Phidippus otiosus) on a white background at an unknown location. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus otiosus 
  • Other Names: n/a  
  • Adult Size: 8 to 16 mm (0.31 to 0.62 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

The southern-eastern United States in areas like Massachusetts is where the Canopy jumping spider lives.

They have also found their way overseas in countries like Sweden and Germany. This species is capable of living in many habitats but prefers to live in trees. 

Males and female canopy jumping spiders look different, but both are covered in small fur. Females have an orange appearance and are painted with black markings.

Males are mostly black and are covered with white tufts of hair. The pattern of these two sexes looks nearly identical but is painted with different colors.

Males are also slightly smaller and have a red pattern on their but. 

Small insects are what this species eats, but they also sometimes cannibalize each other. When mating if she is hungry the female may try to eat the male.

Males are always ready to mate with any female they cross and will dance and flail their arms to try and initiate mating. 

19. Northern Black Widow 

Northern Black Widow ( Latrodectus variolus) in green leaves in Milton, Massachusetts, USA
A Northern Black Widow ( Latrodectus variolus) in green leaves in Milton, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Latrodectus variolus 
  • Scientific Name: Latrodectus variolus 
  • Other Names: Northern Widow 
  • Adult Size: 12.7 to 15.24 mm (0.5 to 0.6 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20

Northern black widows are believed to be some of the deadliest spiders in the U.S and are a fairly common species in Massachusetts. This spider is found all over the U.S and is most active in the summer months.

They are nocturnal and hide in a secluded area during the day. At night they sit in their webs and wait for prey to come by.

Female black widows are larger than males and are what most people think about when thinking of a black widow. They are all black and have a red hourglass mark on their abdomen.

The northern black widow has a broken hourglass on its abdomen, which can be helpful in identifying it from the Southern Black Widow. Males are around half the size of a female and have white, red, and black coloring. 

Bites from the black widow are not usually deadly but are much worse than other spider species. Symptoms vary from person to person, and treatment is only needed for people who have severe side effects.

Their venom is more useful on the small insects they eat. The web of a black widow is also much stronger. Its web is harder to break than other species and traps most insects that get near it. 

20. Southern Black Widow

Southern Black Widow (Latrodectus mactans) on a green surface in Fairfax, Virginia, USA
A Southern Black Widow (Latrodectus mactans) on a green surface in Fairfax, Virginia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Latrodectus mactans 
  • Other Names: Shoe-button spider 
  • Adult Size: 8 to 13 mm (0.3 to 0.5 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20  

The southern black widow is the second Latrodectus species that can be found in Massachusetts. They are common in the southeastern United States and are often seen in warm summer months.

They are nocturnal and create a messy web similar to a house spider. Their webs are extremely strong and are comparable to steel. 

Black widows get their name from their jet-black coloring, and also the female’s tendency to eat the male after mating.

Females eating the male is a common thing most spiders do, as female spiders are larger than males in most species. The hourglass marking on the southern black widow is complete, unlike its northern sister. 

Black widow bites are rare, and they only do so when provoked. Most of the biting happen to the insects they eat when they administer the digestive enzymes to their prey.

Flies, grasshoppers, other spiders, crane flies, and roaches are just a small portion of the animals they eat. When seeing prey in their web they use the small combs on their feet to quickly wrap their food into a silken prison.

21. False Black Widow 

False Black Widow (Steatoda grossa) on wet dirt in Lagos, Portugal
A False Black Widow (Steatoda grossa) on wet dirt in Lagos, Portugal. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Steatoda grossa 
  • Other Names: brown house spider, cupboard spider 
  • Adult Size: 10 to 14 mm (0.39 to 0.55 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 to 6 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Active from spring to fall, the False widow has a large range all over the United States. This species is widespread and inhabits areas in Europe, Asia, Africa, and South America.

The false widow is often confused for the fearsome black widow and lives near man-made structures. Webs are where they live, messily creating them with their poor eyesight. 

False widows have a large round abdomen and a dark brown to black color. Their abdomens have white or tan markings on them.

It is sometimes mistaken for a black widow because of its body shape, but is slightly smaller and lacks the red hourglass. Male false widows are much smaller than females but have a similar appearance. 

Trees, walls, fences, water spouts, and other mildly secluded areas are where this species creates its web. They cannot see well and rely mostly on vibrations to navigate the world.

The bite from the false widow is much less powerful than the black widows, but can still cause pain and discomfort. Having around this spider can be beneficial since they prey on many unwanted insects. 

22. Long-bodied Cellar Spider 

Long-bodied Cellar Spider (Pholcus phalangioides) hanging on its web in front of a white wall in Boston, Massachusetts, USA
A Long-bodied Cellar Spider (Pholcus phalangioides) hanging on its web in front of a white wall in Boston, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Pholcidae 
  • Scientific Name: Pholcus phalangioides
  • Other Names: Skull spider, Daddy long-leg spider 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 10 mm (0.23 to 3.9 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 0.5 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The long-bodied cellar spider is among the most abundant spiders in the U.S, and around the world. They prefer to live in damp habitats and live near humans. In homes, basements, fences, and other areas they build their web. 

This spider has a small abdomen and head and is shaped like a pill. Their legs are their biggest feature and are long and thin. When in a web the long-bodied cellar spider uses its legs to quickly move around.

Other spiders in the same web may find it hard to detect when a cellar spider is near, since having such long legs make it easy to move about. They are nimble and only put small pressure on the web. 

Cellar spiders are active all year, and use man-made structures to take shelter when conditions harshen. Insects are the main source of food they eat.

Using their long legs they wrap anything that gets in their web into a cocoon so they can eat them without the threat of being harmed.

23. American House Spider 

American House Spider (Parasteatoda tepidariorum) hanging by its web in Brookline, Massachusetts, USA
An American House Spider (Parasteatoda tepidariorum) hanging by its web in Brookline, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Parasteatoda tepidariorum 
  • Other Names: American House Spider
  • Adult Size: 3 to 5 mm (0.11 to 0.19 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The American house spider is a small species known to live in homes. While they are very common in Massachusetts, they are also found in 25 other states.

Our home makes a great place for us to rest, but it also makes the perfect habitat for this species. In secluded areas like corners, and behind furniture are where this spider makes its web.

American house spiders range in color from tan to black. They have large abdomens and thin legs.

The pattern and colors of this species help it blend into its habitat. Males and females are very similar, but males have much smaller abdomens.

Small insects like roaches, grasshoppers, flies, and mosquitoes are what this species eats. They are docile towards humans and are used to our presence since they live near us.

The eyesight of the American house spider is very poor, and they can only see a few inches away from them. Like other spiders, they rely on vibrations to know if anything is in their web. 

24. Triangulate Cobweb Spider 

Triangulate Combfoot (Steatoda triangulosa) on a white wall in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
A Triangulate Combfoot (Steatoda triangulosa) on a white wall in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Steatoda triangulosa 
  • Other Names: Triangulate bud spider 
  • Adult Size: 3 to 6 mm (0.1 to 0.23 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Triangulate cobwebs spiders are found all over the world in regions like North America, Russian, and Europe. This species lives in homes and other man-made structures.

They are active year-round and sit in the messy webs they create. The temperature and seclusion from predators are why they survive well in man-made structures.

This spider is small and has a brown or orangish color. They have cream markings on their abdomen, along with white specks. Their legs have black and yellow bands on them, and they are covered in small hairs. 

Triangulate cobweb spiders are beneficial to have near as they prey on insects, venomous spiders, and a variety of other pests. They do not bite unless provoked, and no envenomation from this species has been reported. 

25. Two-Spotted Cobweb Spider 

Two-Spotted Cobweb Spider (Asagena americana) on someone's arm in Westborough, Massachusetts, USA
A Two-Spotted Cobweb Spider (Asagena americana) on someone’s arm in Westborough, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Asagena americana 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 3 to 5 mm (0.11 to 0.15 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year or less 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

From the spring to fall the two-spotted cobweb spider is a species that can be found in Massachusetts and other parts of the United States.

Found mostly in their web, some spiders may wander for food, or to try and find a mate. Under debris like logs, rocks, and leaf litter are also places you may find this species.

Two-spotted cobweb spiders are named after the two light-colored spots that appear on their abdomen. They have a dark brown coloring, with a robust body. Females are slightly larger than males but have a sleeker build. 

To mate male spiders are able to create a sound with their stridulating organ that is located on the spider’s pedicle. A sound is produced to make female spiders near aware of the male’s presence.

As they are away from their web wasps, birds, and other larger spiders are what actively prey on this small spider. 

26. Golden Silk Orbweaver 

Golden Silk Orbweaver (Trichonephila clavipes) on its web in Sucumbios, Ecuador
A Golden Silk Orbweaver (Trichonephila clavipes) on its web in Sucumbios, Ecuador. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Trichonephila clavipes 
  • Other Names: Banana Spider 
  • Adult Size: 24 to 50 mm (0.94 to 1.96 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 6 months to a year
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

In Massachusetts and other areas in the southeastern, the golden silk orbweaver is a spider sometimes seen in its web. In vegetated areas like woodlands or forest is where this spider usually builds its webs.

They commonly attached them to trees and bushes. From summer to fall is when the Golden Silk Orbweaver is seen most and can be seen sitting on its web.

Females of this species are much larger than males and can be around 3 or 4 times larger. The abdomen is a golden color and has an elongated shape.

Their legs are long and thin, with a black and yellow band pattern on them. Small white dots and markings appear on their abdomens, and they have a white head. 

Like other orbweavers, this spider builds a large web, up to three feet to sit in. They are nocturnal, and during the day sit suspended in their silky pattern.

Its large web is great at catching insects like moths, flies, and mosquitoes for they can feed. 

27. Banded Garden Spider 

Banded Garden Spider (Argiope trifasciata) on a web in greenery in Royalston, Massachusetts, USA
A Banded Garden Spider (Argiope trifasciata) on a web in greenery in Royalston, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Argiope trifasciata 
  • Other Names: Banded orb-weaving spider 
  • Adult Size: 15 to 25 mm (0.59 to 0.98 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Banded-garden spiders are a species found across North America. They live in highly vegetated areas like grasslands, forests, and gardens.

Banded garden spiders are seen most in summer, and become inactive in the winter. Active during the day this species sits in the web it makes that is around 1 foot in diameter. 

This spider is named after the bands that cover its legs and body. The bands are black, and they have a yellow and gray color.

When sitting in its web this species positions its legs in an X shape. Males are much smaller than females and look almost like a juvenile when compared. 

Banded garden spiders are not dangerous, and a bite from this species is harmless. As their name suggests they are often found in gardens, and can significantly help decrease the number of pests near.

Waps, flies, mosquitoes, and other flying insects that get trapped in their web are what this spider feeds on. 

28. Black and Yellow Garden Spider 

Black and Yellow Garden Spider (Argiope aurantia) on a web at Myles Standish State Forest, Massachusetts, USA
A Black and Yellow Garden Spider (Argiope aurantia) on a web at Myles Standish State Forest, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Argiope aurantia 
  • Other Names: Yellow garden spider  
  • Adult Size: 5 to 28 mm ( 0.2 to 1.1 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: $8 

The black and yellow garden spider lives across North America and is a spider you can find in Massachusetts. This species lives in areas with high vegetation, and are most common in sunny fields.

Active during the day this spider is often seen sitting on its web. It creates a web daily that stretches up to 2 feet in diameter. Down the center of its web is a zig-zag pattern made with thick silk. 

Female black and yellow garden spiders are much larger than males. They have a black and yellow coloring, with a large white head. Black and yellow garden spiders have an abdomen shaped like a pinecone, and long spindly legs. 

Insects that get caught in the spider’s webbing are what this species eats.

Flying bugs like dragonflies, flies, and bees are common things they eat. When it sees potential food in its web the spider encases them in silk and injects venom to make the prey easier to eat. 

29. Bridge Orbweaver 

Bridge Orbweaver (larinioides sclopetarius) on its web in the dark in Maynard, Massachusetts, USA
A Bridge Orbweaver (larinioides sclopetarius) on its web in the dark in Maynard, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: larinioides sclopetarius 
  • Other Names: Gray cross spider 
  • Adult Size: 8 to 14 mm (0.31 to 0.55 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Bridge orb weavers have a range scattered across the globe, and live in places like Europe, North America, and parts of Asia.

Bridge orb weavers inhabit Massachusetts, and in the U.S are more common in southeastern states. This spider is found near water sources and bridges, but also makes its home near man-made structures. 

Small in size, this species has a tan-grayish coloring. They have a mottled pattern and are covered in small hairs. Their body shape is similar to other orb weavers, and they have a large rounded abdomen. 

Bridge orb weavers are nocturnal, and hide in a secluded area during the day. At night they hang from their web and wait for an insect to fall into its trap.

Light sources attract this spider, as it also attracts many other insects. In urban areas, with many lights, this species tends to thrive. 

30. Spined Micrathena 

Spined Micrathena (Micrathena gracilis) on a stick in Mashpee, Massachusetts, USA
A Spined Micrathena (Micrathena gracilis) on a stick in Mashpee, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Micrathena gracilis 
  • Other Names: Castleback orbweaver 
  • Adult Size: 4 to 10 mm (0.15 to 0.31 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Spined micrathena is a native spider to North America and is a species you can find in Massachusetts. They live in forest habitats with plenty of moisture.

Freshwater sources nearby are usually present in the areas they live. Spined micrathena are active during the day and spend their time sitting on webs.

It is most common from early summer to late fall. In the winter months, this species becomes inactive. 

Spined micrathena are easily identifiable because of their spiky look. This species has a large abdomen that is covered in spikes.

Males are smaller and have fewer spikes. White is the most common abdomen color, but some spiders are yellowish. The body and legs of this spider are black and much smaller than its abdomen. 

Large intricate webs are what this spider makes to catch its prey. Females are the creators of these webs, as male micrathena use silk for mostly mating.

This species is not known to bite, so viewing their elegant style up close is not dangerous. Predators like lizards, birds, and larger spiders are what this species feeds on.

The large spikes on their back are said to make predators wary of eating them. 

31. Spotted Orbweaver

Spotted Orbweaver (Neoscona crucifera) making its web in leaves and stems in Harvard, Massachusetts, USA
A Spotted Orbweaver (Neoscona crucifera) making its web in leaves and stems in Harvard, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Tetragnathidae
  • Scientific Name: Neoscona crucifera 
  • Other Names: Hentz Orb Weaver  
  • Adult Size: 5 to 20 mm (0.19 to 0.78 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

A small orb weaver spider you may come across in Massachusetts is the Hentz orbweaver.

This spider is nocturnal and sits in its web waiting for insects at the night. Like other orb weavers, this spider creates a circular web with an intricate pattern. Every other night they rebuild their web to ensure that it is ready to capture its next meal.

Hentz orb weavers are small hairy spiders. They have tan coloring, with orange, and black markings on them. They have crab-like legs and a round abdomen.

Bands cover their legs, and many specimens of this species have different looks to them. Wooden objects are where their web is sometimes built, and their coloring makes them blend in greatly in that environment. 

Hentz orb weavers leave their web up in the night and wait for small flying insects to get caught in their trap. Being active at night gives them a higher chance of survival, as they avoid many predators active in the day. 

32. Furrow Orbweaver 

Furrow Orbweaver (Larinioides cornutus) in its web at Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts, USA
A Furrow Orbweaver (Larinioides cornutus) in its web at Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Larinioides cornutus
  • Other Names: Furrow orb weaver 
  • Adult Size: 10 to 12 mm (0.39 to 0.47 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a  

Furrow orb weavers are one of the most common species of orb weaver in Massachusetts.

They live in moist environments and tend to make their home near bodies of water. Man-made structures like bridges, houses, garages, and sheds are areas they often make their web. 

Tan, gray, and reddish are some of the colors this species comes in. They have a zig-zag pattern across their abdomen and dark bands on their legs. The pattern on their back looks like a narrow trench left by a plow, also called a furrow. 

Flying insects are what this spider mainly feeds on. Gnats, mosquitoes, moths, and other flying insects that get trapped in their web are what they eat.

Birds, lizards, and wasps are some of the predators that feed on these spiders. 

33. Cross Orbweaver 

Cross Orbweaver (Araneus diadematus) in its web in Arlington, Massachusetts, USA
A Cross Orbweaver (Araneus diadematus) in its web in Arlington, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Tetragnathidae
  • Scientific Name: Araneus diadematus 
  • Other Names: European garden spider 
  • Adult Size: 5.5 to 20 mm (0.2 to 0.7 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The cross orb weaver is a spider that lives in Europe and North America.

They are not native to the U.S, but have been introduced to North America, and can now be found in states like Massachusetts. Gardens, woodlands, meadows, and urban areas are where this species makes its web. 

Cross orb weavers are tan, with thick hair covering their bodies. Females are much larger than males and are the only ones to build large circular webs. Females have large abdomens, while males have a sleek appearance. 

The web orb weavers create is great at catching flying insects for the spider to eat. To consume their prey they wrap them up in a silk coffin and inject them with venom to properly neutralize them. 

34. Marbled Orbweaver 

Marbled Orbweaver (Araneus marmoreus) on its web near grass in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, USA
A Marbled Orbweaver (Araneus marmoreus) on its web near grass in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Tetragnathidae
  • Scientific Name: Araneus marmoreus 
  • Other Names: Pumpkin spider 
  • Adult Size: 9 to 22 mm (0.35 to 0.86 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 

The marbled orb weaver is a secretive species that live from Canada to Texas. They are found all over the United States and are beloved for the marbled pattern that appears on their abdomen.

This species is active from spring to fall. Most of their time is spent on their web, waiting for food to come by. 

Tan, white, orange, and purple are the colors the marbled orb weaver showcases on its abdomen. Pumpkin spider is another name for this species because of the large abdomens than females have.

This spider comes in many color patterns. Their legs have an orangish hue and dark bands running down them. 

Flies, mosquitoes, beetles, and other insects are what this species eats. They are not aggressive, rarely biting humans.

This spider makes a large circular web to catch insects flying by. It is rare to see this species inside, but they are common in gardens. 

35. Black Laceweaver

Black Laceweaver (Amaurobius ferox) on a wooden surface in Natick, Massachusetts, USA
A Black Laceweaver (Amaurobius ferox) on a wooden surface in Natick, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Amaurobiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Amaurobius ferox 
  • Other Names: Black Lace Orbweaver 
  • Adult Size: 8 to 16 mm (0.31 to 0.62 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The black lace orb weaver is originally from Europe but has traveled to places all over the world including Europe.

This spider lives in the webs it creates. Its silk is thin and has a similar texture to lace. Active from spring to fall, the black lace orb weaver is active at night.

Small hairs cover the black lace orb weaver’s body, and they have a dark black coloring. Their legs are brown, and two large fangs sit on their face. This spider may bite if provoked, but only mild symptoms occur after a bite. 

The web created by this spider is not like other orb weavers but is messily spun. When freshly spun their web looks almost blue. Insects that get stuck on the lace web are quickly eaten. 

36. Goldenrod Crab Spider 

Goldenrod Crab Spider ( Misumena vatia ) on a yellow flower in Belchertown, Massachusetts, USA
A Goldenrod Crab Spider ( Misumena vatia ) on a yellow flower in Belchertown, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Thomisidae 
  • Scientific Name: Misumena vatia 
  • Other Names: Flower crab spider 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 10 mm (0.20 to 0.39 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The goldenrod crab spider is a flower-living species found in Massachusetts and other areas in North America. Spiders in the family of Thomisidae have a crab-like appearance and also walk like crustaceans.

They come in a variety of colors like white and yellow. Unique in spiders, this species can change its shade to better match the flower it sits on. 

Female spiders spend most of their life on a flower, as it provides the food and shelter they need. Pollinating insects that travel from flower to flower get eaten by this spider.

Males in this species’ main goal is to mate, and they travel long distances to find a female. The wind is how they travel, and their small size makes them able to fly like a bag in the wind.

On windy days crab spiders travel by ballooning. 

Ballooning is done by spiders spitting out their web out their abdomen, using it to catch a wind stream. Spiders who are ballooning are able to travel miles, and it is useful for finding mates and food. 

37. White-banded Crab Spider 

White-banded Crab Spider (Misumenoides formosipes) on a flower at Cranberry Bog Conservation Land, Massachusetts, USA
A White-banded Crab Spider (Misumenoides formosipes) on a flower at Cranberry Bog Conservation Land, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Thomisidae 
  • Scientific Name: Misumenoides formosipes 
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 3 to 11 mm (0.11 to 0.43 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Found across the United States, the white-banded crab spider is a species you may see in Massachusetts.

Instead of sitting in webs, this spider prefers to make its home in flowers. To feed white-banded crab spiders wait for pollinators to come close to the flower they sit on, then grab them with their strong legs.

Crab-like in appearance, the ability to change colors lets this spider blend into whatever flower it chooses. They can vary from white, red, and even black.

The white line that goes through this species’ eyes is how it can be identified from other similar species. Male white-banded crab spiders only come in gold color and are much smaller in size than a female.

Active during the day, insects like bees, ladybugs, and other spiders are what they eat. 

38. Garden Ghost Spider 

Garden Ghost Spider (Hibana gracilis) on a leaf in Boston, Massachusetts, USA
A Garden Ghost Spider (Hibana gracilis) on a leaf in Boston, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Anyphaenidae 
  • Scientific Name: Hibana gracilis 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 4 to 8 mm (0.15 to 0.31 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Garden ghost spiders are a species native to North America and can be found in Massachusetts. They are nocturnal and retreat into a hidden area during the day.

Under rocks, logs, leaves, and other secluded areas are where they can be found during the day. At night they hunt, and when the cold seasons come they become inactive.

In some states like Florida, this species is active year-round because of the warm weather.

Garden ghost spiders are beige and are covered in thick back hair. A pale coloring gives them the name ghost.

They feed on small insects, and some species of ghost spiders are actually known to feed on plants and nectar. Garden ghost spiders enjoy areas with high vegetation like gardens as they have plenty of food and places to hide. 

39. Red-spotted Ant-mimic Sac Spider 

Red-Spotted Ant-mimic Sac Spider (Castianeira descripta) on dry leaves and sticks at Chimney Lakes near Jennings State Forest, Florida, USA
A Red-Spotted Ant-mimic Sac Spider (Castianeira descripta) on dry leaves and sticks at Chimney Lakes near Jennings State Forest, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Corinnidae 
  • Scientific Name: Castianeira descripta 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 13 mm (0.51 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Red-spotted ant mimics are a species living across North America. This species mimics an ant and walks on six legs with its two front legs to mimic antennae.

This behavior makes other species think this spider is an ant and allows the spider to get close to feeding on unsuspecting prey.

On the abdomen of this spider is a red coloring that looks similar to the color of a velvet ant. They are all black, and no other distinguishing patterns on them.

Woodlands, deserts, urban areas, and grasslands are some of the places this species is found. Ant hills and natural debris are often near where this species lives. 

40. Spitting Spider 

Spitting Spider (Scytodes thoracica) on a white wall in Worcester County, Massachusetts, USA
A Spitting Spider (Scytodes thoracica) on a white wall in Worcester County, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Scytodidae 
  • Scientific Name: Scytodes thoracica 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 18 mm (0.25 to 0.75 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1.5 to 4 years 
  • Average Price Range: $30 

Spitting spiders are a unique species found in the southern United States, and in other countries like Europe.

During the day this species hides out in shady well-hidden areas. At night is when they hunt and travel about.

Spitting spiders are tan, and have a round head and abdomen. They are covered in dark markings, and their legs are covered in black bands.

The two front legs of a spitting spider are extremely long, and they use them to aim at the prey they spit on. 

Venom and silk are mixed together, and spit out by the spider to shoot at its enemies. This substance of liquid silk and venom entraps this spider spits out and entraps its prey. 

41. Northern Yellow Sac Spider

Northern Yellow Sac Spider (Cheiracanthium mildei) on a leaf at Lexington High School, Massachusetts, USA
A Northern Yellow Sac Spider (Cheiracanthium mildei) on a leaf at Lexington High School, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Clubionidae 
  • Scientific Name: Cheiracanthium mildei
  • Other Names: Long-legged Sac Spider 
  • Adult Size:  5 to 10 mm (0.19 to 0.39 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The long-legged sac spider is a common species that live across the United States.

They can be found in Massachusetts, and are known to live indoors. In the house they live in they create a silk sac to retreat in. This spider is only active at night and looks for prey during the night. 

Long-legged sac spiders are beige and have a large abdomen. This species has a similar appearance to other sac spiders but has slightly longer legs.

Like other members of its family, this species can be aggressive and bit humans often. Living at home contact with humans happens often.

A bite from them can cause swelling, and nausea, with symptoms lasting for several days. 

42. Woodlouse Spider 

Woodlouse Spider (Dysdera crocata) on a bunch of wood sticks in Weston, Massachusetts, USA
A Woodlouse Spider (Dysdera crocata) on a bunch of wood sticks in Weston, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Dysderidae 
  • Scientific Name: Dysdera crocata 
  • Other Names: Woodlouse hunter, sowbug killer 
  • Adult Size: 9 to 3 mm (0.35 to 0.59 inches)
  • Lifespan: 2 to 5 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Woodlouse spiders are one of the deadliest spiders for a small woodlouse, as they constantly prey on the tiny pill bugs. Woodlouse spiders are common in the eastern half of the U.S, and rarely seen in the western states.

This species is often found near woodlouse and live in similar habitats. Moist areas with decaying plant life will attract this species as it does the woodlouse. 

Woodlouse spiders have a reddish coloring on their head, and legs. They have a tannish abdomen. Woodlouse spiders have reddish heads and legs.

Its large fangs make it a dominant predator in the areas they inhabit. Pillbugs are just some of the prey they eat, as they eat any insect that they can take down.

Bites from this species are rare, but they do get agitated quickly. Even when mating females may attack a male and kill them. 

43. Eastern Parson Spider 

Eastern Parson Spider (Herpyllus ecclesiasticus) on a woody surface in Barstable, Massachusetts, USA
A Eastern Parson Spider (Herpyllus ecclesiasticus) on a woody surface in Barstable, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Gnaphosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Herpyllus ecclesiasticus 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 12.7 mm (0.2 to 0.5 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The eastern parson spider is native to North America and is a species that lives in Massachusetts.

This spider is mostly found in the eastern U.S. and is a nocturnal creature. It is an active yeast round and is often found near urban and forested areas. 

Eastern parson spiders are small and are painted jet black. Their legs have a brown-reddish hue, and on their abdomen is a white arrow-shaped mark. Males are smaller than females like other spiders. 

Insects are the main food they eat, and their bite can be quite painful. While not deadly allergic reactions and swelling can occur.

When not hunting in the night the eastern parson’s spider creates a silken retreat in a well-hidden area. 

44. Broad-faced Sac Spider 

A Broad-faced Sac Spider (Trachelas tranquillus) on a leafy green in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Trachelidae 
  • Scientific Name:  
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 10 mm (0.19 to 0.39 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: 

Broad-faced sac spiders are species inhabiting Massachusetts, and also other areas in the southeastern United States.

This spider enjoys warm and dry habitats. Fall is when this species is seen most, and they have a tendency to find their way into homes. 

This species has reddish-brown legs with a grayish abdomen. The front legs of the broad-faced sac spider are darker than its back.

Their heads are all black, and they have a shiny appearance. This species gets its name from its large and rounded head.

Insects are what the broad-faced sac spider eats, dead or alive. Like other sac spiders, they have a painful bite and are equipped with long jaws.

Their venom can cause symptoms like swelling, and nausea, but is rarely venomous. Human interactions with this species are common since they hunt near homes. 

45. Black-footed Yellow Sac Spider 

Black-footed Yellow Sac Spider (Cheiracanthium inclusum) creating a web on a leaf in Framingham, Massachusetts, USA
A Black-footed Yellow Sac Spider (Cheiracanthium inclusum) creating a web on a leaf in Framingham, Massachusetts, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Cheiracanthiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Cheiracanthium inclusum 
  • Other Names: Agrarian Sac Spider 
  • Adult Size: 6.3 to 9.5 mm (0.2 to 0.37 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Black-footed yellow sac spiders live in North and South America.

This species can be found in Massachusetts, only being active at night. This spider does not make webs to catch prey but is an active hunter.

They live in forest habitats and areas with plenty of natural debris. Yellow sac spiders are also common in gardens, and around man-made buildings. 

Black-footed yellow sac spiders are made up of two body segments and have yellowish-brown color. They have black markings on the tips of their feet, and a light-colored stripe runs down their back. 

The bite from a black-footed sac spider is more painful than most spiders, as they have stronger venom. Bites happen more than other spiders since they live near humans, and can be aggressive. 

FAQ

Are There Any Venomous Spiders In Massachusetts?

The vast majority of spiders are venomous, but not all venom is powerful enough to work on humans.

Some species like the black widow, brown recluse, and wolf spider are located in Massachusetts and have a strong enough venom that if bitten it may require medical treatment. Bites from spiders are rarely deadly, but some may cause severe effects. 

What Spiders Are Invasive In Massachusetts?

The Joro spider is an invasive species in Massachusetts and other parts of the Eastern United States. This species is an example of how invasive animals can make their way into new areas through shipments and trade, and potentially create a stable population in their new home. 

In Massachusetts, What Are The Largest Spiders? 

The Carolina Wolf spider, other wolf spiders, and fishing spiders are some of the largest native spiders in Massachusetts. Spiders come in a variety of sizes, but these spiders are some of the largest reaching close to an inch in length. 

What Are The Most Common Spiders In Massachusetts?

Massachusetts has a variety of species common to find like jumping spiders, orb weavers, and house spiders.

Spring is when spiders are most active, and most roam around until winter. Many of the spiders in Massachusetts also live in other parts of the United States. 

Wrapping up

Sometimes it is the smallest of creatures that can have the most impact on things. While small, spiders are important in keeping a balanced environment.

They are food for animals like birds, frogs, and other larger spiders. Sometimes you may see one of these eight-legged arachnids in your home, but most species are harmless.

House spiders, cellar spiders, and widow spiders are just a few types that can live around or in your home, feeding on the insects that are near. 

The species on this list are just a few that exist, there are around 43,000 different types on the globe. Massachusetts has habitats like grasslands, and forests that make great homes for the arachnids that live in the state.

You can use this list to identify the spiders that you see, and also learn about the ones lurking about. As one of the most common arachnids, spiders are everywhere in Massachusetts and across the globe. 

Click to rate this post!
[Total: 4 Average: 5]

Sharing is caring!