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Spiders in New Jersey 

There are around 500 different types of spiders that live in New Jersey, and around 5,000 species that are in the United States. Spiders are beneficial to have around since they control the population of many insects considered pests.

Spiders like the black widow or brown recluse live in New Jersey and have some of the most dangerous bites. A bite from a spider is not usually deadly, but depending on the species the pain will vary. 

This article contains some of the most common spiders in New Jersey, and interesting things to know about each one. Around 500 different species live in New Jersey, and here you will find some of the most abundant species.

Spiders are found everywhere and can be in gardens, homes, backyards, and more. Here are 38 spider species that you are likely to see in New Jersey.

Table of Contents

  1. Spiders in New Jersey
    1. Grass Spider
    2. Triangulate House Spider
    3. American House Spider
    4. Long-Bodied Cellar Spider
    5. Northern Black Widow
    6. Southern Black Widow
    7. Brown Recluse
    8. False Widow
    9. Western Lynx Spider
    10. Striped Lynx Spider
    11. Banded Garden Spider
    12. Black-footed Yellow Sac Spider
    13. Six-spotted Fishing Spider
    14. American Nursery Web Spider
    15. Goldenrod Crab Spider
    16. Black and Yellow Garden Spider
    17. Woodlouse Spider
    18. Arrow Shaped Micrathena Spider
    19. Eastern Parson Spider
    20. Garden Ghost Spider
    21. Rabid Wolf Spider
    22. Tiger Wolf Spider
    23. Zebra Jumping Spider
    24. Golden Jumping Spider
    25. Dimorphic Jumping Spider
    26. Canopy Jumping Spider
    27. Sylvan Jumping Spider
    28. Bold Jumping Spider
    29. Tan Jumping Spider
    30. Arabesque Orbweaver
    31. Hentz Orbweaver
    32. Red-spotted Orbweaver
    33. Cross Orbweaver
    34. Marbled Orbweaver
    35. Orchard Orbweaver
    36. Six Spotted Orb Weaver
    37. Shamrock Orb Weaver
    38. Cave Orb Weaver
  2. FAQ
  3. Conclusion

Spiders in New Jersey 

1. Grass Spider

Grass Spider (Agelenopsis) making a web underneath a leaf in Stafford Township, New Jersey, USA
A Grass Spider (Agelenopsis) making a web underneath a leaf in Stafford Township, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginners
  • Family: Agelenidae 
  • Scientific Name: Agelenopsis 
  • Other Names: funnel weavers 
  • Adult Size: 9 to 20 mm (0.35 to 0.78 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Grass spiders are a common species in New Jersey. They are also called funnel-web spiders since the web they make looks like a funnel.

They live in holes and use vibrations to know when prey is near their home. Around bushes, grass, and other low-lying vegetation are where this spider will make its home.

Grass spiders are tan with dark brown stripes and bands on their body and legs. They have long legs and big abdomens.

Wolf’s spiders and hobo spiders look similar to this species, and the grass spider is in the middle when compared by its size. Grass spiders have two spinnerets on the bottom of their abdomen.

These tails help identify them from other spider species, but also let the grass spider spin a funnel web. Grass spiders are harmless to humans, and their fangs are usually not strong enough to puncture human skin.

While they are venomous, the toxins produced only work on small prey. Insects like moths, aphids, and grasshoppers are what this species preys on the most. 

2. Triangulate House Spider

Triangulate House Spider (Steatoda triangulosa ) on some wood in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, USA
A Triangulate House Spider (Steatoda triangulosa ) on some wood in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Steatoda triangulosa 
  • Other Names: Triangulate bud spider, Triangulate Cobweb Spider
  • Adult Size: 3 to 6 mm (0.1 to 0.23 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Triangulate house spiders are small spiders common to find indoors. Triangulate house spiders live inside man-made structures, and can be found across the world.

This species is believed to be native to Eurasia and has followed humans wherever they inhabit. On walls, roofs, and in corners is where they can possibly spin their web.

They cannot see well and rely on vibrations to navigate the world. Small in size, this spider has a round body and thin legs.

They have a similar body shape to a black widow and have a brownish-orange color. Males are the smaller of the sexes, and both have white markings on their backs.

Triangulate house spiders are small and harmless. A bite from this spider is harmless and only has notable effects if allergic.

Small insects they catch in their web are what they eat, and they will also eat other spiders. 

3. American House Spider 

Common House Spider (Parasteatoda tepidariorum) in its corner web in Millville, New Jersey, USA
A Common House Spider (Parasteatoda tepidariorum) in its corner web in Millville, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Parasteatoda tepidariorum 
  • Other Names: Common House Spider
  • Adult Size: 3 to 5 mm (0.11 to 0.19 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

American house spiders live throughout the United States. They are found near structures, and man-made buildings, and will often make their web up high.

The web of the American house spider is the classic web design you may see in Halloween decorations, and they are seen on homes, barns, and other buildings. American house spiders always build one area of their web thicker than the rest, and they may add small foliage to be used as hiding places.

American house spiders are small and brown, with some spiders showcasing white spotting. They have long legs with orange tinting, and females are larger.

Dark rings and bands can be seen going down the legs of this spider. Like other spiders, the common house spider survives off insects.

Small insects found in homes and man-made buildings are what they feed on. Flies and mosquitoes are the most common foods since they are flying insects.

This spider may bite if provoked, but its venom is harmless to humans unless allergic. 

4. Long-Bodied Cellar Spider 

Long-bodied Cellar Spider (Pholcus phalangioides) hanging in the air against a white wall in Millburn, New Jersey, USA
A Long-bodied Cellar Spider (Pholcus phalangioides) hanging in the air against a white wall in Millburn, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Pholcidae 
  • Scientific Name: Pholcus phalangioides
  • Other Names: Skull spider, Daddy long-leg spider 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 10 mm (0.23 to 3.9 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 0.5 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Long-bodied cellar spiders are a common species of arachnids found in North America. They live in dark moist places like cellars, basements, and the side of houses.

Cellar spiders are sometimes seen in the wild on forest floors and other similar habitats. Daddy long legs is a name some use for this species since their legs are long and thin.

Their bodies are long and oval-shaped, with tan or white coloring. Dark markings are present on their bodies, and thin legs. 

Cellar spiders are often seen in their web hanging from the ceiling. They will bounce on their web quickly to confuse any nearby predator.

They do not bite often and have weak, harmless venom. 

5. Northern Black Widow 

Northern Black Widow (Latrodectus variolus ) on a white cloth in Marlton, New Jersey, USA
A Northern Black Widow (Latrodectus variolus ) on a white cloth in Marlton, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Latrodectus variolus 
  • Scientific Name: Latrodectus variolus 
  • Other Names: Northern Widow 
  • Adult Size: 12.7 to 15.24 mm (0.5 to 0.6 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20

Northern black widows live in the United States and can be found in New Jersey. This species of spider is known for its painful and deadly bite.

Females will sometimes eat the male after mating if they are hungry since they are much larger. Logs, fences, and secluded areas are where they live.

During the day you may not see the northern black widow since it will hide in a secluded area away from everything. At night they come out and sit on their web. 

Black widows are more likely to emerge in the warmer periods and are sometimes seen sitting in their webs. They have shiny black coloring, and females have the iconic hourglass pattern.

The northern black widow has a broken hourglass, which can help identify it from the southern species. 

Even as younglings northern black widows are cannibalistic, and will eat each other when hungry. Black widows have a short life span, and most will only live a year if they survive their youth.

Insects like flies, mosquitos, small flying bugs, beetles, and other insects are some of the food that they eat. 

6. Southern Black Widow

Southern Black Widow (Latrodectus mactans ) on a web in Township, New Jersey, USA
A Southern Black Widow (Latrodectus mactans ) on a web in Township, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Latrodectus mactans 
  • Other Names: Shoe-button spider 
  • Adult Size: 8 to 13 mm (0.3 to 0.5 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20  

Southern Black widows are one of the most dangerous spiders in New Jersey, and a bite can bring extreme pain. This spider generally lives near humans but will hide out in more secluded areas.

Under rocks, logs, in corners, gutters, basements, roofing, and fences are just some areas the black widow will build its web.

Black widows have a shiny black coloring, and females are known for the bright red hourglass shape on their abdomen. Southern black widows have a complete hourglass unlike the northern widows, which have a broken one.

Male southern black widows are small and have red and white markings. Like all arachnids, they have eight legs, and their coloring helps warn others of their danger. 

Southern black widows eat insects like ants, caterpillars, flies, other spiders, and wasps. They have thick strong webs that they live in and help catch the nearby prey.

Southern black widow’s venom is extremely painful but can be treated. Bites are almost never deadly, but symptoms can last days if not treated with antivenom. 

7. Brown Recluse 

Brown Recluse (Loxosceles reclusa) on a white, textured wall in West Plains, Missouri, USA
A Brown Recluse (Loxosceles reclusa) on a white, textured wall in West Plains, Missouri, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Sicariidae 
  • Scientific Name: Loxosceles reclusa 
  • Other Names: Violin spiders 
  • Adult Size: 7 mm (0.27 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Brown recluse are a spider found across New Jersey and other parts of the Eastern United States. They are sometimes found indoors but live in debris like piles of wood in the wild.

Brown recluses will go into dark places if they are inside like under cardboard, basements, or garages. During the day they will stay hidden, but at night they are active and will be out hunting. 

Brown recluses are named after their brown color, but some of them are gray. They have thin legs that taper towards the bottom, and a round abdomen. On their back is a violin-shaped mark, which is also why they have the name violin spider. 

This species is one of the most dangerous species in New Jersey and North America. Bites are rarely deadly, but pain, nausea, and other symptoms occur if bitten.

Brown Recluses hunt insects at night, and that is when they are seen the most. 

8. False Widow 

False Black Widow (Steatoda grossa) in some wet dirt and pebbles in Puyallup, Washington, USA
A False Black Widow (Steatoda grossa) in some wet dirt and pebbles in Puyallup, Washington, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Steatoda grossa 
  • Other Names: brown house spider, cupboard spider 
  • Adult Size: 10 to 14 mm (0.39 to 0.55 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 to 6 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The False widow, also known as the false black widow is a species found in New Jersey, and also other areas in North America. They also live in other areas of the world like Australia, New Zealand, and parts of Europe.

The cobwebs they make create a good home, and also help to catch bugs. Their webs are messy, and not like other spiders which are in a pattern. 

This spider is called the false widow since it closely resembles the black widow spider. They have dark brown, tan, and black coloring. Males are smaller and thinner, while females have bulbous abdomen.

Tan or white coloring is present on their body, and males will have lighter coloring. Unlike other similar spiders like the black widow or redback spider, false widows do not have any bright red coloring on their back. 

Even though they do not have the bright red coloring their bite is still painful. Swelling, fever, muscle spasms, and nausea are just some symptoms that are possible if bitten.

The false widow’s bite is not deadly, and antivenom exists for it. Their venom also helps to incapacitate insect prey.

False widows eat what they can find, but enjoy isopods like pill bugs, and other crawling insects. 

9. Western Lynx Spider 

Western Lynx Spider (Oxyopes scalaris) on a green leaf in Millburn, New Jersey, USA
A Western Lynx Spider (Oxyopes scalaris) on a green leaf in Millburn, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Oxyopidae 
  • Scientific Name: Oxyopes scalaris 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 4 to 16 mm (0.15 to 0.62 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The western lynx spider is a species that lives in New Jersey, and other parts of North America. Lynx spiders can be found in a variety of habitats like woodlands, meadows, and dry grassland.

They do not live on webs, or even use them to hunt. Lynx spiders are active hunters, which is what gives them their name. When eggs are laid their webbing is used to help protect the eggs until they hatch. 

Lynx spiders are small and covered in tiny hairs. They range from tan to green coloring and have camouflage to help them blend in with the environment. This spider’s legs are long compared to its body, and its abdomen is pointed. 

The western lynx sheet gets its name from the way it hunts, which is like a lynx cat. They do not make webs like other spiders in New Jersey like the orb weaver.

They chase and hunt down small insects, being most active during the day. 

10. Striped Lynx Spider 

Striped Lynx Spider (Oxyopes salticus) on a leaf in Princeton, New Jersey, USA
A Striped Lynx Spider (Oxyopes salticus) on a leaf in Princeton, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Oxyopidae 
  • Scientific Name: Oxyopes salticus 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 4 to 7 mm (0.15 to 0.27 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Striped lynx spiders are another lynx spider species that can be found in New Jersey. Grasslands, fields, and urban areas near plenty of vegetation are where the striped lynx spider lives.

Striped lynx spiders live across North America, but do not live in webs like other species other spiders. They will live near plants and do not use webs that often. 

Striped lynx spiders are small, and have tiny hairs covering their body. This species is tan, or brown, with dark markings on its head and back.

The striped lynx spider can be distinguished from other species by the thin stripes on its head, and legs. They also have large fangs and 8 eyes on their face. 

Like other lynx spiders, the striped lynx is an active hunter similar to a cat. They do not use webs to catch prey, but will stalk, and kill prey.

Small insects they find in the small grass are what they eat. Striped lynx spiders are active during the day, and are food for birds, and larger species of spiders. 

11. Banded Garden Spider 

Banded Garden Spider (Argiope trifasciata) hanging from its web in Monroe Township, New Jersey, USA
A Banded Garden Spider (Argiope trifasciata) hanging from its web in Monroe Township, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Argiope trifasciata 
  • Other Names: Banded orb-weaving spider 
  • Adult Size: 15 to 25 mm (0.59 to 0.98 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

In New Jersey, and other parts of North America banded garden spiders are a common species to find hanging in their web. They live in gardens, near low vegetation, and often tend to stay near their web.

In other parts of the world like Europe, banded garden spiders will live if there is suitable habitat and tough food. 

Banded garden spiders have long thin legs and a robust oval-shaped body. Their legs are longer than their body and have black and yellowish bands running down them.

When sitting on a web they position their legs in an x position, and their body looks similar to a skull and bones. 

Banded garden spiders make their home next to areas with a high insect population, and will feed on the bugs that get caught in their webbing. Lizards, birds, wasps, and other spiders are predators this species faces in the wild. 

12. Blackfooted Yellow Sac Spider 

Blackfooted Yellow Sac Spider (Cheiracanthium inclusum) on a grey wall in New Jersey, USA
A Blackfooted Yellow Sac Spider (Cheiracanthium inclusum) on a grey wall in New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Cheiracanthiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Cheiracanthium inclusum
  • Other Names: Agrarian Sac Spider
  • Adult Size: 6.3 to 9.5 mm (0.2 to 0.37 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

There are various yellow sac spider species that live across the world. The black-footed yellow sac spider is a species that can be found across North America and New Jersey.

They live near vegetation and urban houses. During the day yellow sac spiders sleep in webs they make in corners and secluded areas. 

Black-footed yellow sac spiders are small species with tan or yellowish skin. They have long legs and black tips on their feet. Male yellow sac spiders have longer legs, but their bodies are smaller. 

In fall is when this spider is most active. They will roam outside but are a common spider to find indoors.

This species is a hunter, and are adept at navigating the world. When food becomes scarce sac spiders are more likely to find their way into homes. The bite of this species is painful and similar to the sting from a wasp.

The black-footed yellow sac spiders get their name from the tips of their feet, and how they create a sac to sleep in for the night. 

13. Six-spotted Fishing Spider 

Six-spotted Fishing Spider (Dolomedes triton) in the water on some leaves in Harding Township, New Jersey, USA
A Six-spotted Fishing Spider (Dolomedes triton) in the water on some leaves in Harding Township, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Pisauridae 
  • Scientific Name: Dolomedes triton 
  • Other Names: Dock Spiders 
  • Adult Size: 15 to 60 mm (0.59 to 2.3 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20 

The six-spotted fishing spider is a species that lives in the wetland habitats of New Jersey and North America. They live near freshwater habitats and are able to skim across the surface of the water.

Vegetation is preferred in the areas they live in and do not make webs like other New Jersey spiders. They are wandering spiders, that use webs to travel or attract a mate. 

Six spotted fishing spiders are one of the larger species in New Jersey, They have long legs, with a large body and head. This spider has spots on its back, and also some on its underside. Six spotted fishing spiders are tan, with white markings. 

This species of spider will eat anything it comes across on land, or in the water. Insects, small fish, other spiders, tadpoles, and frogs are just some of the things this species eats.

As hunters, these spiders will wander during the day, and on what they can find. In their home, they are a deadly predator but are used as food by large frogs and birds. 

14. American Nursery Web Spider 

American Nursery Web Spider (Pisaurina Mira) on a long leaf in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, USA
An American Nursery Web Spider (Pisaurina Mira) on a long leaf in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Pisauridae 
  • Scientific Name: Pisaurina Mira 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 15 mm (0.59 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: $10 

The American nursery web spider is a spider that lives in the eastern United States. It is found in states like Alabama, Mississippi, Michigan, Iowa, New Jersey, and more.

Woodlands, grasslands, and other vegetated areas are the habitat of this spider. To attract a mate, males will give gifts.

Nursery web spiders mostly use their webbing to create a nursery webbing for their eggs, which is why they have their name. 

With long legs and tan coloring, the nursery web spider is sometimes confused with a wolf spider or fishing spider. This species is larger than most other spiders in New Jersey, and some have a leg span of up to 3 inches.

Dark brown and black markings are present on some spiders’ backs. 

Nursery web spiders are not dangerous, and a bite will only have mild symptoms. Small insects are what this spider eats, actively hunting for their food.

Like other spiders, they have eight eyes on their face to make it easy to track fast-moving prey. 

15. Goldenrod Crab Spider 

Goldenrod Crab Spider (Misumena vatia) on a white flower petal in Cape May County, New Jersey, USA
A Goldenrod Crab Spider (Misumena vatia) on a white flower petal in Cape May County, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Thomisidae 
  • Scientific Name: Misumena vatia 
  • Other Names: Flower crab spider 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 10 mm (0.20 to 0.39 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Goldenrod crab spiders live in North America and Europe. In New Jersey, they are a spider most active in fall.

Flowers, leaves, and other vegetation are where this species will live. They hide in flowers and do not hang in webs like other spiders. Males are more active and will travel to different flowers looking for a female.

This species of crab spider is larger than others but is still relatively small. Orange, yellow, and white are common colors for this species.

Goldenrod crab spiders are able to change their color to better fit their habitat, and the flower they are living in. Coloring change for this spider does not happen immediately like a chameleon, but slowly over the course of a month. 

Goldenrod crab spiders are ambush hunters similar to species like the wolf and jumping spiders. The reason they are called crab spiders gets their name from their crab-like legs and the way they move. 

16. Black and Yellow Garden Spider 

Black and Yellow Garden Spider (Argiope aurantia) on its web in Hardwick Township, New Jersey, USA
A Black and Yellow Garden Spider (Argiope aurantia) on its web in Hardwick Township, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Argiope aurantia 
  • Other Names: Yellow garden spider  
  • Adult Size: 5 to 28 mm ( 0.2 to 1.1 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: $8 

Black and yellow garden spiders are widespread across North America. In New Jersey, they live in areas that are suitable for them to live in.

Vegetation like shrubs, trees, bushes, and flowers are present in the places they live. Yellow garden spiders are adaptable and will build a web in sunny areas.

Swamps, wetlands, and gardens are where this species is sometimes seen, but they are rare to find in rocky mountain regions. 

This garden spider can have different looks, but black, yellow, and white are the colors they are painted in. Most of the time this spider will be hanging from its web.

Their legs can be all black, or have yellow bands running down them. The body of this spider is round, with bright yellow spots. 

Black and yellow garden spiders sit in their web and wait for an insect to get caught. This species is not dangerous, and a bite is just a mild pain.

Black and yellow garden spiders are beneficial in controlling insect populations, and they create their web in areas with plenty of bugs. 

17. Woodlouse Spider 

Woodlouse Spider (Dysdera crocata) on something green in Jersey City, New Jersey, USA
A Woodlouse Spider (Dysdera crocata) on something green in Jersey City, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Dysderidae 
  • Scientific Name: Dysdera crocata 
  • Other Names: Woodlouse hunter, sowbug killer 
  • Adult Size: 9 to 3 mm (0.35 to 0.59 inches)
  • Lifespan: 2 to 5 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

In New Jersey and other eastern states lives the woodlouse spider. During the day this species hides under debris like logs, rocks, and other hidden places on the floor.

Warm dark places are where you may find them if they are not roaming at night. Instead of sitting in webs, they use their silk to make a burrow. This spider also uses silk to create a sac for its eggs. 

Woodlouse spiders are tan with a reddish head. Their bodies and heads are both large, and oval-shaped.

Large oversized fangs that look similar to ants’ mandibles sit on their face. Females are the larger of the sexes, and some can be twice as large as males. 

This species looks for food by scavenging the ground for prey. Woodlouse spiders’ main prey is woodlice in the woods.

Areas with a healthy woodlice population are where you will find this spider often. Other small insects are also a part of the woodlouse spiders’ diet.

The bite from this spider is extremely harmless, and the pain only lasts around an hour. 

18. Arrow Shaped Micrathena Spider 

Arrow-shaped Micrathena Spider (Micrathena sagittata) in its web around leaves in Glassboro, New Jersey, USA
An Arrow-shaped Micrathena Spider (Micrathena sagittata) in its web around leaves in Glassboro, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Arneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Micrathena sagittata 
  • Other Names: Arrow-shaped Orbweaver
  • Adult Size: 5 to 9 mm (0.20 to 0.35 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a  

The arrow-shaped micrathena is a spider found in the eastern United States. It is usually found outdoors and will live in areas with high vegetation.

An Arrow-shaped micrathena spider sits in its web, and females will also lay their eggs in a web. This spider is named after its look, which is unique among spiders and makes it easily identifiable. 

The body of this spider is shaped like an arrow, and covered in spikes. Yellow, back, and red are the colors that they come in.

On the back of their abdomen are large spikes that protrude from their body. These spikes look dangerous and help them hide better in their webbing.

Like most spiders, this species feeds on insects and has a paralyzing venom to help them feed. Their bite is harmless to humans, even if they look deadly.

The arrow-shaped micrathena is an interesting spider to spot in New Jersey and is active during the day. 

19. Eastern Parson Spider 

Eastern Parson Spider (Herpyllus ecclesiasticus) on a white corner in Chester, New Jersey, USA
An Eastern Parson Spider (Herpyllus ecclesiasticus) on a white corner in Chester, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Gnaphosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Herpyllus ecclesiasticus 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 12.7 mm (0.2 to 0.5 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Eastern parson spiders are a species living in New Jersey and other parts of America. They do not make webs but travel on the grounds and walls.

Woodlands, urban areas, and fields are some of the habitats this spider lives. At night is when this spider is active, hiding in secluded areas during the day. 

Black is the color of the eastern parson’s spiders, and some specimens have dark brown legs. Some spiders are all black, while others may have white markings present on them. Medium in size, their bodies are covered in small hairs. 

Webs are not used by this spider to catch prey, but they actively hunt. If not hunting they will hide under rocks and other natural debris.

Bites are not dying from the eastern parson’s spiders, but some may have allergic reactions. 

20. Garden Ghost Spider 

Garden Ghost Spider (Hibana gracilis) on a white wall in North Haledon, New Jersey, USA
A Garden Ghost Spider (Hibana gracilis) on a white wall in North Haledon, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Anyphaenidae 
  • Scientific Name: Hibana gracilis 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 4 to 8 mm (0.15 to 0.31 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Garden ghost spiders live across North America and are a species you may find in New Jersey. Summer and spring are when this spider is most active, and they primarily explore at night.

On the day they will use their web to create a hiding spot under leaves, logs, rocks, and other natural debris. 

Yellow, tan, and green-yellow are colors you may find on this spider. They have long legs, with dark markings on them. Small hairs cover their body, and they have a large, circular head. 

When the garden ghost spider is active at night they are looking for small insects to feed on. Gardens and other areas with a high insect population will attract this species. 

21. Rabid Wolf Spider 

Rabid Wolf Spider (Rabidosa rabida) on a leaf in Deptford, New Jersey, USA
A Rabid Wolf Spider (Rabidosa rabida) on a leaf in Deptford, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner  
  • Family: Lycosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Rabidosa rabida 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 13 to 21 mm (0.511 to 0.82 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 4 years 
  • Average Price Range: $40.00 

Rabid wolf spiders are a species located in New Jersey and other parts of North America. This spider is native to North America and lives in a variety of habitats. Woodlands, grasslands, and urban areas are some of the places they live. 

Rabid wolf spiders are one of the smallest species of wolf spiders but are still bigger than most spiders. They are tan and covered in small hairs. On their abdomen and head are dark brown, and tan stripes. 

Wolf spiders are active hunters and do not use their webs to catch insects. They roam around like a wolf and feed on small insects that they find.

Wolf spiders will pounce on their prey, and wrap their prey up in webbing. Birds, larger spiders, and rodents are some of the animals that feed on the rabid wolf spider. 

22. Tiger Wolf Spider 

Tiger Wolf Spider (Tigrosa helluo) in some grass in Wayne, New Jersey, USA
A Tiger Wolf Spider (Tigrosa helluo) in some grass in Wayne, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Lycosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Tigrosa helluo 
  • Other Names: Wetland Giant Wolf Spider 
  • Adult Size: 6.3 to 50 mm (0.24 to 1.9 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 4 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $40 dollars 

Tiger wolf spiders are a species of Lycosidae that inhabits New Jersey, and other parts of the U.S. This spider lives in a variety of habitats like woodlands, urban areas, rainforests, and deserts.

This spider prefers to wander rather than live in its web. The silk they produce is used to protect their eggs.

Tiger wolf spiders are one of the largest spiders in New Jersey, and females are the larger sex. This spider is tan and has long legs. Some tiger wolf spiders are black, but a tiger-like stripe pattern runs down their legs. 

Wolf spiders get their name from their hunting ability since it takes down prey like a wolf. Small insects, lizards, and other small animals are what this species feeds on. The bite from this large spider can be painful, but their venom is only useful for tiny prey. 

23. Zebra Jumping Spider 

Zebra Jumping Spider (Salticus scenicus) on a rocky surface in Union Township, New Jersey, USA
A Zebra Jumping Spider (Salticus scenicus) on a rocky surface in Union Township, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Salticus scenicus 
  • Other Names: Zebra Spider 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 9 mm (0.19 to 0.35 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

The zebra jumping spider gets its name from its black and white look. This small species is another tiny jumping spider you may find in New Jersey. They live everywhere from urban areas to grasslands. 

Zebra jumping spiders are covered in tiny fur and have thin legs. Their eyes are on the front of their face, which gives them some of the best vision for land animals.

Females of this species are slightly smaller, but males have bigger chelicerae. 

Being a jumping spider the zebra spider is an active hunter. Small insects are what they feed on, and other small spiders make up a large portion of their diet. 

24. Golden Jumping Spider 

Golden Jumping Spider (Paraphidippus aurantius) on a leaf in Piscataway, New Jersey, USA
A Golden Jumping Spider (Paraphidippus aurantius) on a leaf in Piscataway, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Paraphidippus aurantius 
  • Other Names: Emerald Jumping Spider 
  • Adult Size: 3.04 mm (0.12 inches)
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

The golden jumping spider is a species that lives in the United States, sometimes seen in New Jersey. In urban areas, this species is seen and can make its way indoors.

Being jumping spiders, they are active during the day and are constantly roaming. Webs are not used as homes, but to travel and catch prey. 

Golden spiders are also called emerald spiders and get their name from their shining appearance. Brown, orangish and black is common colors for this spider, with males being darker and smaller. Their iridescent scales give them a glowing look and will change depending on how they are looked at. 

Golden jumping spiders are common, but little is known about their lifestyle. Their lifespan and tiny size make them difficult to study.

Small insects are what they eat, and they will pounce on prey they find during the day. 

25. Dimorphic Jumping Spider 

Dimorphic Jumping Spider (Maevia inclemens) on a piece of wood in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, USA
A Dimorphic Jumping Spider (Maevia inclemens) on a piece of wood in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Maevia inclemens 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 4.75 to 8 mm (0.187 to 0.31 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

The dimorphic jumping spider is a species that lives in the eastern half of the United States, in places like New Jersey. This species is a roamer and may be found in backyards, gardens, urban areas, fields, and other habitats.

During the daytime is when this spider is active and will move around the area hunting. 

Dimorphic jumping spiders will vary greatly on how they look. Females have a dull orange coloring, with stripes running down their back.

This species is called dimorphic because of the two different looks they can have. Dimorphic Jumping spiders can be black and tufted, or all gray. 

The two morphs of this spider look like two different species, but they are the same. To attract a mate males do a dance, and the two morphs will do two different dances.

Insects are the main food for spiders, and this species actively hunts during the day. 

26. Canopy Jumping Spider 

Canopy Jumping Spider (Phidippus otiosus) on someone's hand in Newfield, New Jersey, USA
A Canopy Jumping Spider (Phidippus otiosus) on someone’s hand in Newfield, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus otiosus 
  • Other Names: n/a  
  • Adult Size: 8 to 16 mm (0.31 to 0.62 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

In New Jersey and other parts of eastern North America, the canopy jumping spider is a species that you may come across. This small spider prefers to live in trees and does not spend much time on a web.

They are active during the day and leap great distances to travel. 

Canopy jumping spiders are small and extremely furry. Females are much larger than males, which helps them produce more eggs, which they lay under the bark of trees.

White, brown, and black are some possible colors for this species. Their chelicerae are also iridescent and change from green to black. Black, white, and reddish patterns also appear on their back. 

Small insects are what this spider eats, and like other jumping spiders, they are active hunters. Trees are abundant where this species lives, and they spend most of their time in them. 

27. Sylvan Jumping Spider 

Sylvan Jumping Spider (Colonus sylvanus) on a furry leaf in Pennsville, New Jersey, USA
A Sylvan Jumping Spider (Colonus sylvanus) on a furry leaf in Pennsville, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Colonus sylvanus 
  • Other Names: Woodland jumping spider 
  • Adult Size: 7.55 mm (0.29 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

The Sylvana jumping spider is a small species you can find in New Jersey. Colonus sylvanus is their current name, as they were once called Thiodina sylvanus.

In backyards, on the side of homes, woodlands, parks, grassland, and other habitats this spider can be found. Instead of sitting on a web, they will leap around looking for food. 

Sylvana jumping spiders are tan or darkly colored. They have white, black, and reddish markings covering their body.

This species is covered in small hairs and has a thinner body when compared with other jumping spiders. Each specimen will vary in look and can have a variety of colors on them. 

Small insects are what this spider hunts during the day. Their jump lets them pounce, and ambush bugs, but also escape predators.

Small mammals, wasps, frogs, and birds are some of the animals that eat this species. Bites from this species are harmless, and they are only dangerous to small insects. 

28. Bold Jumping Spider 

Bold Jumping Spider (Phidippus audax) on a white background in Borough of Highland Park, New Jersey, USA
A Bold Jumping Spider (Phidippus audax) on a white background in Borough of Highland Park, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus audax 
  • Other Names: Daring jumping spider 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 19 mm (0.23 to 0.74 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

Bold jumping spiders live in most areas in the United States and are a species you may come across in New Jersey. Bold jumping spiders are able to jump far distances similar to other jumping spiders.

During the day they are active and can be seen hunting. Large jumps help this species ambush small insects and navigate. 

The bold jumping spider is dark black and has white markings covering its body. They are curious spiders, and their eyes are in front of their face.

The number and position of their eyes are what give them great vision, and the ability to track speedy prey. The chelicerae of the bold jumping spider have an iridescent look, and will slightly change color.

Bold jumping spiders are one of the most common spiders in America and are easily spotted because of their colors. If bitten by one there is no danger, and their bites are similar to other weak small insect bites. The fur look of this spider is why many choose to keep them as pets. 

29. Tan Jumping Spider 

Tan Jumping Spider (Platycryptus undatus) on a white surface with brown lines in Monmouth County, New Jersey, USA
A Tan Jumping Spider (Platycryptus undatus) on a white surface with brown lines in Monmouth County, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Platycryptus undatus 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 8.5 to 13 mm (0.33 to 0.51 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

The tan jumping spider is a small species that is common in New Jersey and other parts of America. They are active during the day and are an extremely active species.

Like other jumping spiders they are able to leap large distances and are excellent climbers. Being small spiders they tend to be shyer and will flee if they feel threatened. 

As their name suggests this spider is brown and is covered in small fur. Their bodies are brown and other shades of tan.

Their legs are angular, and designed to help them jump around their habitat. Their brown shade helps blend into surfaces like the bark on trees, dirt, and fallen leaves. 

Jumping helps this species escape from predators, but also catch prey that is nearby. Flies, aphids, and other small insects are what the jumping spider eats.

Tan jumping spiders do not sit in webs but are active hunters. They are always moving and will use their webbing to sling at nearby predators. 

30. Arabesque Orbweaver

Arabesque Orbweaver (Neoscona arabesca) on its web in nature at Bridgewater Township, New Jersey, USA
An Arabesque Orbweaver (Neoscona arabesca) on its web in nature at Bridgewater Township, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Tetragnathidae
  • Scientific Name: Neoscona arabesca 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 7 mm (0.19 to 0.27 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The arabesque orbweaver is a common species in New Jersey and other parts of the United States. They also live in other parts of the world like Europe and are often seen sitting on its web.

These small spiders are not aggressive and will make their homes in low-lying vegetation in a secluded area. Arabesque orbweaver females will sit in their web and maintain it. They will wait for food to come by and like to hide in shelter. 

Arabesque orbweavers are small and have rounded bodies. Females are larger than males, and each spider will vary in its coloring.

Brown, white, tan, and black are the common colors of this species is found in. A variety of markings like lines, dashes, and swirls can be seen on their body.

This spider sits in its web waiting to eat the flying insects like flies, and mosquitoes that get caught in its web. This species of spider is very common in its range and is used as food for birds, wasps, and other spider-eating animals. 

31. Hentz Orbweaver 

Hentz Orbweaver (Neoscona crucifera) in its web on a black background in West Deptford, New Jersey, USA
A Hentz Orbweaver (Neoscona crucifera) in its web on a black background in West Deptford, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Tetragnathidae
  • Scientific Name: Neoscona crucifera 
  • Other Names: Spotted orbweaver 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 20 mm (0.19 to 0.78 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The Hentz orb weaver is a species with a range spread across the United States. It can be found in New Jersey in areas with its preferred habitat.

Backyards, gardens, yards, and buildings are areas where this spider will make its web. They are active at night, but in fall this species becomes more active to mate. 

The Hentz orb weaver is a medium-sized species and is most often seen on its web. They have tan, reddish, or orangish coloring, with small hairs covering their body.

Black bands run down this species’ leg, and they also have black coloring on their underside. White spots appear on the Hentz spider’s underside, which is also why it is called the spotted orb weaver. 

To have a higher chance of catching insects the webs spun by this spider are large. They wrap their prey in silk and eat their food like most other spider species.

Spotted orb weavers are a common spider to see in the wild during spring, and are not dangerous. 

32. Red-spotted Orbweaver 

Red-spotted Orbweaver (Araneus cingulatus) on a strand of grass near Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge in New Jersey, USA
A Red-spotted Orbweaver (Araneus cingulatus) on a strand of grass near Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge in New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Tetragnathidae
  • Scientific Name: Araneus cingulatus 
  • Other Names: Redfemured spotted orbweaver 
  • Adult Size: 5 mm ( 0.19 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

A small orb-weaver species that can be found in the U.S, and New Jersey is the red-spotted orb weaver. This spider lives in vegetation and is usually found perching on a plant. Spring to fall are the seasons when this spider is active the most. 

Red-spotted orb weavers are named after the small red dots that cover their backs. They also have white markings and red bandings going down their legs.

To blend into the vegetation it lives in the red-spotted orb weaver has a yellow or greenish glowing color. Males are typically smaller in size.

The camouflage and size are what protect this orbweaver from common predators. A secretive nature makes this species hard to study, as you will not easily find this spider out in the wild.

Small insects are what this spider eats, and they help control the insect population. 

33. Cross Orbweaver 

Cross Orbweaver (Araneus diadematus) hanging off wood in Ridgewood, New Jersey, USA
A Cross Orbweaver (Araneus diadematus) hanging off wood in Ridgewood, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Tetragnathidae
  • Scientific Name: Araneus diadematus 
  • Other Names: European garden spider 
  • Adult Size: 5.5 to 20 mm (0.2 to 0.7 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Cross orb weavers are North American spiders that can be found in New Jersey.  They live in webs that have a uniform pattern, which is usually near vegetation.

Cross orbweavers will build their webs in nearby plants and areas with plenty of nearby insects. In fall they will lay eggs, and wrap them in silk to hatch in the spring. 

Brown and tan are the color of this species. They have long legs with dark tips and a mottled pattern on their body. Females are larger than males and have more vibrant colors. Males and young spiders will have a darker color. 

Flies, mosquitoes, and other flying insects are what this species eats. They have weak venom that is not dangerous for humans, but it helps neutralize prey.

They are very common in New Jersey and were introduced to the states from Europe. Cross orb weavers are abundant and used as food by birds and other wildlife. 

34. Marbled Orbweaver 

Marbled Orbweaver (Araneus marmoreus) hanging onto its web in the woods at Ringwood State Park, New Jersey, USA
A Marbled Orbweaver (Araneus marmoreus) hanging onto its web in the woods at Ringwood State Park, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Tetragnathidae
  • Scientific Name: Araneus marmoreus 
  • Other Names: Pumpkin spider 
  • Adult Size: 9 to 22 mm (0.35 to 0.86 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 

The marbled orb weaver is a beautiful species known for its large marbled abdomen. This species lives in webs and has a secretive nature.

Females will lay eggs near their web, and hide to protect themselves from danger. Marbled orb weavers are most active in the spring and fall. When it gets cold they overwinter, then become active again in spring. 

The marble orb weaver has a marbled pattern on its abdomen and has white, tan, orange, or purple coloring. Females are the larger of the sex and are almost twice as large as males.

Small hairs cover their legs, and some specimens are covered in dark bands. 

This species is also called the pumpkin spider because of its coloring, and round body. They feed on small insects that get caught in their web. Marbled orb weavers are common in New Jersey, and have a harmless bite. 

35. Orchard Orbweaver 

Orchard Orbweaver (Leucauge venusta) standing on a piece of wood in Princeton, New Jersey, USA
An Orchard Orbweaver (Leucauge venusta) standing on a piece of wood in Princeton, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Tetragnathidae
  • Scientific Name: Leucauge venusta 
  • Other Names: Orchard spider 
  • Adult Size: 3.5 to 7.5 mm (0.13 to 0.29 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 

Orchard orb weavers live in New Jersey and other Eastern states in America. Woodlands and mildly vegetated areas are where this species will make its web.

This species is also found near humans and will make their webbing on the structure. Orchard orb weavers mate in spring and that is also when they are most active.

Orchard orb weavers come in a variety of colors, but most specimens are vibrant. Green, orange, white, tan, and red are possible colors, and they can show different markings like spots and stripes. Males have longer legs and females have a large abdomen. 

This spider will make its home near areas with high insect traffic. Spiders pump an enzyme into their prey to predigest their food and then suck it up when it is liquified.

Most of the time this spider will not bite humans, and its venom is weak. 

36. Six Spotted Orb Weaver 

Six-spotted Orbweaver (Araniella displicata) on its web in Montague, New Jersey, USA
A Six-spotted Orbweaver (Araniella displicata) on its web in Montague, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Tetragnathidae
  • Scientific Name: Araniella displicata 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 4 to 8 mm (0.15 to 0.31 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year 
  • Average Price Range: $20 

The six spotted orb weaver is a spider found in New Jersey, and other parts of the U.S. Orbweavers do not build large webs like other species but will make small ones in foliage. Some will try to blend in with flowers, while others will use different plant life as homes. 

The six spotted orb weaver is very small and often confused to be babies of other orb-weaver species. Brown, red, yellow, orange, and tan are some of the colors they come in.

Their colors will fit the environment they live in, whether it be on a flower or in a tree. The name of this species comes from the six dark spots on the bottom of their abdomen. 

Flies, beetles, plant lice, and gnats are some of the bugs that this spider eats. Six spotted orb weavers are most active in the spring and will wait for any small prey to cross their path. 

37. Shamrock Orb Weaver 

Shamrock Orbweaver (Araneus trifolium) in a web at The Presidio, California, USA
A Shamrock Orbweaver (Araneus trifolium) in a web at The Presidio, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Araneus trifolium 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 40 mm (0.2 to 1.57 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 

The shamrock orb weaver is a spider that lives in New Jersey and other areas in the United States and Canada. Shamrock orb weavers live on their web and will make a new one daily.

They are shy and will hide in foliage or behind leaves on their web. The eggs of the Shamrock orb-weaver are laid in the fall but will hatch once the next spring comes. 

This spider is small and covered in small hairs. Tan, brown, black, gray, and reddish are some of their colorations.

They have dark bands covering their legs that can range from brown to black. Their abdomens can have a plain look, or have swirls or other patterns.

Shamrock orb weavers eat insects that fly into their webbing. Making a new web daily makes them likely to catch more, and they help lower the population of pest insects in the area. Like other orb weavers, they create webs in a pattern instead of a mess. 

38. Eastern Cave Long-jawed Spider 

Eastern Cave Long-jawed Spider (Meta ovalis) hanging off its web in a cave in Camillus, New York, USA
An Eastern Cave Long-jawed Spider (Meta ovalis) hanging off its web in a cave in Camillus, New York, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Tetragnathidae 
  • Scientific Name: Meta ovalis 
  • Other Names: Cave Orb Weaver
  • Adult Size: 8 to 10 mm (0.31 to 0.39 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: $20 

Cave orb weavers are a small species that is sometimes seen in New Jersey, and other states like New York, Rhode Island, Maine, Connecticut, and Wisconsin.

They are a species of long-jawed orb weaver, and are sometimes seen indoors or outdoors in North America. Caves, wells, ravines, mines, and other dark habitats are where this spider is often found. 

Cave orb weavers have thin legs and an oval-shaped body. They are dark brown and tan, with a striped pattern running across their legs. Their heads are small, and their venom is not deadly to humans. 

Since this species of spider is often found in caves, flying bugs are what they feed on most. Cave orb weavers are not dangerous and have a secretive nature.

They are not the rarest of orb weavers, but are limited in their range and habitat. 

FAQ

How Many Spiders Are In New Jersey? 

New Jersey has over 500 different types of spiders that live in the state. Its size, colors, and location are some of the differences that you may see amongst species. The various spiders in the state are important for keeping a balanced and healthy ecosystem. 

What Spiders In New Jersey are Dangerous?

Spiders like the Black Widow, Brown Recluse, and wolf Spiders are some of the most dangerous in NJ, because of their painful venom. Spider buts are usually not deadly if medically treated, and deaths most likely occur in people who are allergic. 

Does New Jersey Have Tarantulas?

There are no species of tarantulas in New Jersey that occur in the state naturally. Tarantulas can be found in pet stores, and are legal to keep as a pet in New Jersey. 

What Is The Biggest Spider In New Jersey? 

New Jersey does not have any huge spiders like tarantulas, but the wolf spider is one of the biggest types of spiders in the state. They are capable of growing up to 2 inches and are also extremely fast runners. 

Wrapping up

New Jersey is home to many spiders, but on this list, you will see 38 of the most common species in the state. A large number of spiders are nocturnal, and most will come out of the shadows at night. They like to hide under debris, logs, and in small crevices. Spiders may be seen as pests but they are useful in eating other flying pest bugs that may come near your home. 

Most spiders in New Jersey are harmless and help balance the ecosystem. Spiders are often used as food by larger animals like frogs, birds, and small mammals. The 38 spiders on this list are just some that you will find in New Jersey. 

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