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Frogs In Georgia

There are 31 different types of Frogs in Georgia, all species are endemic to the state except the Greenhouse frog which is invasive. With over 5,000 species of frog in the world, Georgia’s species is just a small fraction of the population.

They are found all over the state, and some can even be found in your backyard.

This list has all frog species in Georgia and interesting things you should know about each one.

Frogs can often look alike, but their habitats, behavior, mating call, and physical characteristics can help with identifying a species. Using this list can help you find and learn about all the frogs in Georgia.

Frogs are beneficial in keeping a healthy environment. Protecting and learning about the species near you can help ensure a strong habit and population. Here are all the frog species that inhabit Georgia. 

Frogs In Georgia

1. Oak Toad

Oak Toad (Anaxyrus quercicus) close-up on a hand found in Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia, USA
An Oak Toad (Anaxyrus quercicus) close-up on a hand found in Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Bufonidae 
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus quercicus
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.75 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: $10 

Oak toads inhabit the coastal plains of Georgia and the southern United States. They live in moist, grassy areas and prefer habitats with sandy soil.

Forests, savannas, and grasslands are common places to find them. They will breed in freshwater habitats like ponds, lakes, streams, and temporary waters. They can even be found in wetlands.

Oak toads are the smallest species of Toads in Georgia and North America. They are commonly confused for other toad species and thought to be their young.

Fine reddish bumps run down their back, and they are black or brown in color. Their belly is white and covered in small bumps. On their back is a cream-colored dorsal stripe.

Oak toads breed seasonally from April to September. They are most active in the day, but can sometimes be seen at night.

They are mainly insectivores, and being so small they are preyed on by snakes and other toads. Most predators will try to avoid them since they secrete an unpalatable toxin.

2. American Toad

American Toad (Anaxyrus americanus) on concrete road on Kubol Drive, Lawrenceville, Georgia, USA
An American Toad (Anaxyrus americanus) on concrete road on Kubol Drive, Lawrenceville, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus americanus
  • Other Names: Eastern American Toad
  • Adult Size: 2 to 3.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30

American toads can be found in Northwestern Georgia, and are active during the cooler seasons of the year. In summer and hot periods, they will remain inactive and spend their time hiding in burrows or under debris.

During fall and spring, they can be found in forests and other areas with high foliage litter. They are nocturnal and spend their days hiding.

American toads are medium-sized with gray or brown coloring. Some may even be red, olive-colored, or brown. Yellow patches and a faint mid-dorsal stripe sit on their back.

Their skin is dry and covered in warts. Black dots are on their back with two or three warts in them. Their parotid glands are located on their neck, which secretes a toxin.

The toxin secreted by this toad is deadly and poisonous to small animals if eaten. Snakes, large frogs, and birds who have adapted to their toxin are what preys on this species.

To defend themselves they will remain still and rely on their camouflage. 

3. Fowler’s Toad

Fowler's Toad (Anaxyrus fowleri) on cloth somewhere close to Sandy Beach Water Park, Bibb County, Georgia, USA
A Fowler’s Toad (Anaxyrus fowleri) on cloth somewhere close to Sandy Beach Water Park, Bibb County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus fowleri
  • Other Names: Bufo fowleri
  • Adult Size: 2 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 5 years
  • Average Price Range: $20

Fowler’s Toads are found in most of Georgia except the southeastern coastal plains region. They inhabit forested areas near permanent sources of water like lakes, or rivers.

They are nocturnal and are most active in the humid summer season. This toad will breed in spring until summer in shallow waters. Their call is similar to a sheep’s sound, which lasts for 1 to 4 seconds.

Like most toads, they have dry warty skin. Brownish to gray is their color with green mixed in.

A light stripe runs down their back. Black dots appear on their back and the 3 warts within them can help distinguish this species from other toads.

Fowler’s toads spend most of their time on the ground and have a diet of insects.

Camouflage and changing its shade is how it avoids predators like snakes, birds, and carnivorous mammals.

They are common in Georgia but have been victims of habitat loss.

4. Southern Toad

Southern Toad (Anaxyrus Terrestris) on concrete near Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia, USA
A Southern Toad (Anaxyrus Terrestris) on concrete near Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus Terrestris
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2.5 to 3.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $20

The Southern Toad inhabits the southern half of Georgia.

They live in coastal scrub, farmland, woodlands, and other areas with sandy soil. This toad is a burrowing species and will use a wide variety of water habitats to breed.

February to October is when they mate, triggered by warm rainy weather. 

Southern Toads are medium-sized, and males are smaller than females.

They are brown, gray, black, and brick red. Dark spots, blotches, and warts cover their back. A faint mid-dorsal stripe runs down their back and their belly is pale white.

They have long parotoid glands, and knobs near their snout.

Southern Toads will eat beetles, earwigs, ants, and other bugs. It will spend its time buried underground when not foraging or breeding. A small toxin is produced from the glands on their neck, but they will also hide under natural floor litter to escape predators.

5. Eastern Spadefoot Toad

Eastern Spadefoot (Scaphiopus holbrookii) in sand and grass on Cumberland Island, Georgia, USA
An Eastern Spadefoot (Scaphiopus holbrookii) in sand and grass on Cumberland Island, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Pelobatidae
  • Scientific Name: Scaphiopus holbrookii
  • Other Names: The Spadefoot Toad
  • Adult Size: 1.75 to 2.25 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $20

Eastern spadefoot toads are found all over Georgia but are more prominent in the Coastal Plain regions. Found all over the state, they prefer to live in sandy habitats for burrowing.

Breeding occurs in fishless waters and their call sounds like a low-pitched “wah” sound.

Eastern spadefoots are covered with warts but have smoother skin compared to other toads.

Tan, yellow, and brown are some of their colorings. Two stripes run down their back until it reaches their eyes. Bright cat-like eyes that are yellow in color can help identify this species from others.

These toads are extremely common but are not seen often due to their burrowing nature. They can even be found in residential areas.

Spadefoots can sometimes smell like peanut butter. 

Beetles, ants, spiders, and termites are some of the insects they eat. These toads have no parotoid gland but can still secrete a noxious substance from their skin.

6. Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad (Gastrophryne carolinensis) on a rock near Cowan Lake, Georgia, USA
An Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad (Gastrophryne carolinensis) on a rock near Cowan Lake, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced
  • Family: Microhylidae
  • Scientific Name: Gastrophryne carolinensis
  • Other Names: Narrowmouth Toad
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 6 years
  • Average Price Range: $10

Eastern narrow-mouthed toads are found in most of the state and have a unique look compared to other toads.

They live in high elevations and will live in most habitats that have enough moisture. They are often found under logs and in other dark moist places. 

Narrow-mouthed toads look flat and have a pointed head.

They can be gray to brown in color but will change shade depending on their environment. Their skin is smooth and moist, while their belly has a mottled pattern.

Narrow-mouthed toads have a small mouth to eat insects. Small insects like beetles, ants, and termites are what they eat. They can help control the populations of unwanted insects but are preyed on by large fish and mammals. 

7. Northern Cricket Frog

Northern Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans) on someone's hand near Chattahoochee River, Cliftondale, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
A Northern Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans) on someone’s hand near Chattahoochee River, Cliftondale, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Acris crepitans
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.5 inch
  • Lifespan: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $20

Northern Cricket frogs are found in most of Georgia but are lacking in the far southern areas of the state.

They are most common in edges of water sources like lakes, ponds, and other slow-moving water. Highly vegetated waters with shallow water make great habitats. They spend most of their time on the ground and are not good at climbing.

Northern cricket frogs are small with warts covering their body and can be found in shades of brown, green, and olive coloring with a dark bar pattern covering their body. A triangular mark sits on the top of their head.

Northern cricket frogs are mostly active during the day and most of the year. Their diet consists of small insects like flies, mosquitos, and spiders.

Birds and other large frogs will often prey on this species, and they use their legs to jump and escape. 

8. Southern Cricket Frog

Southern Cricket Frog (Acris gryllus) on a long, green leaf in Long County, Georgia, USA
A Southern Cricket Frog (Acris gryllus) on a long, green leaf in Long County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Acris gryllus
  • Other Names: Southeastern Cricket Frog
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.5 inch
  • Lifespan: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $5 to $10

Southern Cricket frogs are found in the southern half of Georgia and can be found along the edges of slow-moving water sources.

Breeding occurs in the spring and summer, and males turn aggressive to find a mate. They are very similar to the Northern Cricket frog, but the two species can be distinguished by their call.

Southern Cricket Frogs are small and very similar to Northern Cricket. The call of each frog can help distinguish one from the next. The Southern Cricket Frog makes a clicking sound as its call but is slower than the northern.

These frogs are gray, brown, or green with a dark triangular shape on their head.

Insects are the main source of food they survive off of. They are not good at climbing and spend most of their time on the ground. 

9. Gray Tree Frog

Gray Treefrog (Hyla versicolor) in some dry leaves near Speyside, Milton, Ontario, Canada
A Gray Treefrog (Hyla versicolor) in some dry leaves near Speyside, Milton, Ontario, Canada. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla versicolor
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1 to 1.25 inch
  • Lifespan: 7 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $20

Gray Tree Frogs are found all over the state of Georgia. They’re one of the most common species of frogs living in piedmont and mountain regions.

They inhabit wooded habitats and other moist forests. They will breed in fishless waters and are most active during the summer. 

Gray Tree Frogs are large and heavy-bodied with colors ranging from gray to light green, changing shades along with their shade depending on their environment. The inside of their thighs is bright yellow or orange with spots.

Gray Tree Frogs are nocturnal and spend their day hiding in secluded areas. At night they hunt for insects and other small invertebrates. When active they spend most of their time high in trees.

10. Pine Woods Tree Frog

Pine Woods Tree Frog (Hyla femoralis) on a fan palm in Stephen C. Foster State Park, Charlton County, Georgia, USA
A Pine Woods Tree Frog (Hyla femoralis) on a fan palm in Stephen C. Foster State Park, Charlton County, Georgia, USA – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner to Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla femoralis
  • Other Names: Morse Code Frog
  • Adult Size: 1 to 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 4 to 4.5 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Pine Woods Tree Frogs are found in the southern half of Georgia.

They live in forests and will breed in temporary waters. The call of this frog sounds like sporadic chattering, which is why some call it the Morse Code Frog.

These frogs are small and yellow, orange, brown, reddish, or tan in color. They have shiny smooth bodies and moist skin. On their thigh is a row of spots. They have large toes with webbing on their feet. 

This frog eats insects and is fairly common in its region.

They are most active from spring through fall when they breed. In colder weather, they will hide in dark hidden places like under logs, or rotten stumps.

11. Bird-voiced Treefrog

Bird-voiced Treefrog (Hyla avivoca) on a leaf somewhere in Gwinnett County, Georgia, USA
A Bird-voiced Treefrog (Hyla avivoca) on a leaf somewhere in Gwinnett County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla avivoca
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 2.5 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A 

Bird voiced tree frogs live in wooded areas near streams, swamps, and rivers.

They are mostly active at night and can be found living amongst the trees. This species is rarely found on the ground except to breed in late spring or early summer.

They breed in highly vegetated water pools that are temporary.

Small in size they range in colors from gray to brown. Temperature and activity will change its color, and it can also be pale green. 

Dark cross patterns form on their back and legs. Their belly is pale grey and they have yellow coloring between their legs. 

Insects are what this species eats, and hunts for at night.

Their call can be heard when they breed near the edges of ponds and other water sources. Sounding like a bird, the call is what inspired their name. 

12. Green Tree Frog

Green Treefrog (Dryophytes cinereus) on tree bark near Grace Fellowship Baptist Church in Cave Springs, Georgia, USA
A Green Treefrog (Dryophytes cinereus) on tree bark near Grace Fellowship Baptist Church in Cave Springs, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Dryophytes cinereus
  • Other Names: American green tree frog
  • Adult Size: 2 to 2.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 6 years
  • Average Price Range: $10

Green tree frogs have a range within the southern half of Georgia. They live in swamps, ponds, and other water sources filled with dense vegetation.

They have a healthy population within the state and spend a lot of their time high in trees. March to October is when they breed, and males can be heard calling from the waters.

Green tree frogs are medium and bright green. They have long limbs and a white stripe that runs down their side. Males are smaller than females, and some frogs have small yellow speckling on their backs.

These frogs are nocturnal and spend most of their life in thick vegetation. They are less susceptible to predators, due to their camouflage and lifestyle.

These frogs can make good pets, but being so small they do not do well when handled. 

13. Barking Tree Frog

Barking Treefrog (Dryophytes gratiosus) climbing dark green leaves in Oconee County, Georgia, USA
A Barking Treefrog (Dryophytes gratiosus) climbing dark green leaves in Oconee County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Dryophytes gratiosus
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2 to 2.75 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $15 

Barking Tree Frogs can be found in the southern half of Georgia. They live in wooded habitats and next to fishless waters to breed.

Breeding occurs from March to late August. Males will make a “donk” sound and can be seen floating on the surface of the water to call a mate. 

The Barking Tree Frog is one of the largest species of tree frogs within the state. They are heavy-bodied with bright green skin. Small light brown blotches cover their back and they have large webbed toes.

Spiders, beetles, and flies are some of the insects they feed on. Like most tree frogs this species spends most of its time in trees, which helps it avoid predators.

14. Squirrel Tree Frog

Squirrel Tree Frog (Hyla squirella) sitting in someone's hands on Little St. Simons Island, Georgia, USA
A Squirrel Tree Frog (Hyla squirella) sitting in someone’s hands on Little St. Simons Island, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla squirella
  • Other Names: Rain Frogs
  • Adult Size: 1 to 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 9 years
  • Average Price Range: $10

Squirrel tree frogs are a species that lives in the Southern half of Georgia.

They can be found in marshes, swamps, and on the edges of water habitats. Dense vegetation is preferred by this species to hide and climb. 

Squirrel tree frogs can be found in a wide range of colors like green, tan, and grey. They are able to change their shade to help blend in with the environment.

Some frogs will have stripes on their legs and near their eyes. They can be spotted or have no pattern. They look very similar to other tree frogs and are identified by figuring out what species they are not. 

Breeding and mating calls are triggered by heavy rain. They are nocturnal but can sometimes hunt during the day if hungry. Porch lights that attract bugs will also tend to attract these frogs.

15.  Mountain Chorus Frog

Mountain Chorus Frog (Pseudacris brachyphona) on a rocky surface in Daniel Boone National Forest, Frenchburg, Kentucky, USA
A Mountain Chorus Frog (Pseudacris brachyphona) on a rocky surface in Daniel Boone National Forest, Frenchburg, Kentucky, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris brachyphona
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1 to 1.25 inches
  • Lifespan:  1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Mountain chorus frogs live in a small section of the northern mountainous areas of Georgia. They inhabit woodlands, forests, and densely vegetated habitats. Streams, ponds, and other shallow bodies of water are what they breed in.

Small in size they are green to olive-colored. The yellow coloring between their legs can help identify them.

A pattern appears on their back resembling a reverse parenthesis. Mountain chorus frogs also have a dark triangular pattern between their eyes.

Breeding occurs in spring but in summer they can be hard to find. Males mating call can be described as the sound of a finger running through a comb.

Under leaf litter and other natural debris is where they hide during the hotter period.

Spending most of their time in trees, they are insectivores and hunt with a sticky tongue. 

16. Spring Peeper

Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer)  on some dark leaves at night near North Mount Loretto State Forest, Staten Island, New York, USA
A Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) on some dark leaves at night near North Mount Loretto State Forest, Staten Island, New York, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris crucifer 
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.25 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $20

Spring Peepers are found all over the state of Georgia.

They are a chorus frog species and are one of the first frogs to emerge after winter. Their mating call is usually a sign of the beginning of spring.

They live in a variety of forests and woodlands near semi-permanent water. They spend most of their time on land and only go to the water to breed.

Spring peepers can be brown, tan, or olive-colored. Sometimes they are grey and most have a white-colored belly. An X mark sits on their back and a dark bar pattern covers their body.

Males are light-colored and have dark throats. They will make a chirping call at the start of spring. 

The spring peeper is nocturnal and survives off a diet of insects. Ants, flies, and beetles are some of the foods they eat.

Snakes, salamanders, raptors, and other birds are the animals that prey on this species. 

17. Upland Chorus Frog

Upland Chorus Frog (Pseudacris feriarum) on someone's hands found off Old Mill Road, Richburg, South Carolina, USA
A tiny Upland Chorus Frog (Pseudacris feriarum) on someone’s hands found off Old Mill Road, Richburg, South Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris feriarum
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.75 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 to 5 years 
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The upland chorus frog can be found in bogs, marshes, wetlands, and grassy areas. Active from spring to fall, they breed in slow-moving water sources.

Their mating call is similar to other chorus frogs but is longer and sounds shakier.

The upland chorus frog is a small species ranging in shades of brown and gray. They have a light line across their lip and stripes running down their back.

Males will have a large vocal sack that is dark in color.

Insects are the main food of this species. They are a common frog species but are only found in the northern half of the state.

18. Southern Chorus Frog

Southern Chorus Frog (Pseudacris nigrita) on a log in Wesley, Georgia, USA
A Southern Chorus Frog (Pseudacris nigrita) on a log in Wesley, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris nigrita
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.25 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Southern Chorus Frogs can be found in meadows, wetlands, ditches, and forests.

They lay their eggs attached to debris in the water and will mate during the spring. This frog species spends most of its active time in the water near highly vegetated areas.

They will also burrow themselves underground and live in areas with sandy soil.

The Southern Chorus Frog looks similar to the Upland Chorus Frog but has a different range.

They’re brown, grey, or greenish with pale bellies. Their snouts are pointed and they have a white mark above their lip.

Ants, flies, and other small insects are what they eat. Predators include water snakes, birds, and large frogs.

This species is secretive and hard to study.

19. Little Grass Frog

Little Grass Frog (Pseudacris ocularis) hanging onto a stem near Alligator Creek WMA, Wheeler County, Georgia, USA
The tiny Little Grass Frog (Pseudacris ocularis) hanging onto a stem near Alligator Creek WMA, Wheeler County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate-Advanced
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris ocularis
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.75 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The little grass frog is found in the coastal plains in wetland habitats. They are active from late winter to September and will call year-round. They are found mostly in highly vegetated areas.

They are the smallest frog in North America and Georgia.

Slender bodies and pointed heads, the little grass frog can be green, brown, red, or sometimes pink. Dark stripes run down the side of their body and can be seen with various other patterns.

Their small size makes them easily identifiable, as they are small enough to sit on the tip of your finger comfortably.

Strong legs give them the ability to jump 2 feet long and escape predators. They survive off small insects found in the soil. They are susceptible to most large animals and are eaten by them.

20. Ornate Chorus Frog

Ornate Chorus Frogs (Pseudacris ornata) on a black piece of wood in Fall Line Sandhills Natural Area, Taylor, Georgia, USA
Ornate Chorus Frogs (Pseudacris ornata) on a black piece of wood in Fall Line Sandhills Natural Area, Taylor, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris ornata
  • Other Names:  N/A
  • Adult Size: 1 to 1.5 inches 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Ornate Chorus Frogs can be found in the southern half of Georgia, also found through the far eastern states of the U.S. Woodlands, wetlands, and grassy areas in the coastal plains are where they can be found.

Small temporary water sources are used for breeding, and their secretive nature makes them hard to find outside of their breeding season.

Ornate Chorus Frogs are a small colorful species.

They can be gray, green, or reddish-brown and has a blotch-like mask covering their eyes. Their skin is smooth and moist and in between their legs are small yellow spots. 

These frogs are nocturnal, and while common, are rarely seen.

Their breeding season occurs in winter during heavy rain. Some decline in their population has occurred due to habitat loss, predators, and disease.

21. Brimley’s Chorus Frog

Brimley's Chorus Frog (Pseudacris brimleyi) in moist grass somewhere near the Virginia-North Carolina Border, USA
A Brimley’s Chorus Frog (Pseudacris brimleyi) in moist grass somewhere near the Virginia-North Carolina Border, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae 
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris brimleyi
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1 to 1.33 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Brimley’s Chorus Frogs have a small range in Georgia by the coastal plains region. They can be found in forests, scrubs, and wetland habitats.

Breeding occurs in spring, and they will lay their eggs in wetland waters with high vegetation. 

This small chorus frog species ranges in many colors from green to dark brown. They have a dark stripe that runs down the side of their eyes until it reaches their groin. Their belly is yellow with brown markings.

It is rare to find this species in Georgia as they are secretive and have a small range.

Small insects are what they survive off of.

They will bury themselves underground and hibernate in the winters. 

22. Green Frog and Bronze Frogs

Green-Frog-Lithobates-clamitans-on-the-road-near-Savannah-Technical-College-Effingham-Campus-Effingham-County-Georgia
A Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans) on the road at night near Savannah Technical College-Effingham Campus, Effingham County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates clamitans 
  • Other Names: Northern Green Frog
  • Adult Size: 2.25 to 5 inches
  • Lifespan: 15 to 20 years
  • Average Price Range: $10

Green Frogs and Bronze Frogs inhabit many waters within the state of Georgia.

Bronze Frogs are the same species as Green Frogs but have a bronze tint to them. Ponds, marshes, and other slow-moving waters are where you can find this species.

Heavy rains will cause some of these frogs to move towards woodlands and meadows. In winter they hibernate and bury themselves in the mud.

Green Frogs range in colors of dark green, brown-yellow, or even black. They have irregular black spots covering them and a white belly. Males have a large tympanum and a yellow throat.

This species can grow large, sometimes to 5 inches. The Bronze Frog variant will usually be smaller in size. 

Green Frogs eat crayfish, spiders, and other insects. They are opportunistic feeders, eating what can fit in their mouths.

23. Pig Frog

Pig Frog (Lithobates grylio) in some sand at Altamaha Wildlife Management Area, Darien, Georgia, USA
Night flash photography of a Pig Frog (Lithobates grylio) in some sand at Altamaha Wildlife Management Area, Darien, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates grylio
  • Other Names: Lagoon frog
  • Adult Size: 3.25 to 5.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $40 

Pig Frogs are a large species that is highly aquatic. Inhabiting the southern half of Georgia, they can be found in lakes, marshes, and other vegetated waters.

Mostly active at night, their call sounds similar to a pig’s snort.

Pig Frogs can resemble Bullfrogs but are smaller and more narrow.

Olive-green to brown in color, they have dark spots painted on their body. Everything about this frog’s features are large, from its legs to its eyes.

Crayfish, insects, and other frogs make up most of their diet.

They will spend most of their time in the water but may travel inland in heavy rain. 

24. American Bullfrog

American Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) in some leaves, grass, dirt, and sticks at night near Norton Creek, Rabun County, Georgia, USA
Night flash photography of an American Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) in some leaves, grass, dirt, and sticks at night near Norton Creek, Rabun County, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced 
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Rana catesbeiana
  • Other Names: lithobates catesbeianus
  • Adult Size: 3.5 to 6 inches 
  • Lifespan: 7 to 15 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20

American Bullfrogs are the largest frog species in North America and Georgia.

They are found all over the state of Georgia, and the eastern half of the U.S. Inhabiting mostly permanent bodies of water, they can be found in swamps, lakes, ponds, and other water sources. 

Bullfrogs are larger than any other species and can range in colors of green to dark brown. Their call is low and sounds similar to a bellowing bull.

They have smooth skin sometimes with a mottled pattern on them. Their belly is white to yellow. Smooth and moist, their skin tends to have no distinct pattern.

Bullfrogs have been introduced to other areas of the world since their legs are eaten and thought of as a delicacy.

They will feed on anything they can find, like smaller frogs, snakes, birds, and turtles. 

25. River Frog

River Frog (Lithobates heckcheri) on a lilypad in a river near Springfield, South Carolina, USA
Night flash photography of the River Frog (Lithobates heckcheri) on a lilypad in a river near Springfield, South Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Rana Lithobates heckcheri
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 3 to 5 inches
  • Lifespan: 3 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

River Frogs are a member of the true frog family found in the southeastern coastal plains of the U.S and Georgia.

They live in swamps, creeks, and other water habitats with dense vegetation. This frog is nocturnal and is most active from April to August.

Their tadpoles are larger compared to other frogs, and can sometimes be found in large populations close together. 

River Frogs are mildly large and can be found in dark colors like green, tan, grey, or completely black.

River frogs can sometimes be confused for bullfrogs due to their size.

Their dark colorings and light spots on their lower jaw can help distinguish the two species. River frogs have smooth moist skin, and bright red eyes.

River Frogs’ main predators are large birds, and they will play dead or produce a foul smell to try and protect themselves. They can often be captured by humans, as they will not try to hop away. 

26. Pickerel Frog

Pickerel-Frog-Lithobates-palustris-on-some-wooden-floorboards-at-night-somewhere-in-Woodstock-Georgia
A Pickerel Frog (Lithobates palustris) on some wooden floorboards at night somewhere in Woodstock, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates palustris
  • Other Names: Rana palustris
  • Adult Size: 1.75 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 8 years
  • Average Price Range:  $10 to $15

Pickerel Frogs can be found in a small region within the northern areas of Georgia. This frog inhabits a variety of habitats like woods, wetlands, streams, and meadows.

They have a preference for rocky habitats and in winter they will hibernate under natural debris.

Medium in size, this frog has rectangular blotches spread across its back. Two light-colored dorsolateral ridges go down their back, and their belly is usually a pale color.

Green, olive, and tan are some of their possible colors. They also have a bright yellow coloration between their legs, which can help identify them from the closely looking Leopard Frog.

Pickerel Frogs can secrete a poisonous toxin that can harm predators if they decide to eat them. It can even irritate human skin and prevent many snakes from eating this species.

27. Southern Leopard Frog

Southern Leopard Frog (Lithobates sphenocephalus) on rocky concrete road at Caney Creek Preserve, Big Creek, Georgia, USA
A Southern Leopard Frog (Lithobates sphenocephalus) on rocky concrete road at Caney Creek Preserve, Big Creek, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates sphenocephalus
  • Other Names: Rana sphenocephalus
  • Adult Size: 2 to 3.5  inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $15

Southern Leopard frogs can be found all over the state of Georgia.

They live near freshwater habitats and will breed in fishless waters. Breeding will occur during heavy rainfall. They are terrestrial and can even be found far from the waters.

They are active both day and night, hiding underground during winter. 

Southern Leopard Frogs are known for the leopard-like pattern on their backs.

Their back is greenish, and their legs are a tannish color. They have ridges running down their sides and a light stripe on their upper jaw.

Leopard Frogs eat ants, beetles, worms, and other smaller frogs.

They will feed on anything small enough they can find. Fish, raccoons, skunks, and snakes are their main predators. 

28. Wood Frog

Wood Frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) on leaf litter at Chattahoochee National Forest, Georgia, USA
A Wood Frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) on leaf litter at Chattahoochee National Forest, Georgia, USA – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates sylvaticus
  • Other Names: Rana sylvaticus
  • Adult Size: 1.38 to 2.75  inches
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: $15 to $30

Wood Frogs are found in a small range of Georgia, within the mountainous areas of the far northeastern parts of the state.

They live in moist wooded habitats and can often be found far from water. During the breeding season, they will travel to fishless waters and wetlands.

They are extremely cold resistance species and will hibernate on the ground under leaves, stumps, and logs.

Small to medium-sized, they are usually brown to tan in color. A dark mask pattern can be seen on their eyes, until their snout.

This mask pattern can help identify it from other frogs, and they also have a light stripe below it on their upper jaw. 

Wood Frogs are active in the day and night.

They are insectivores and are a common species in their region.

Their call is short and creates a quacking sound. 

29. Carpenter Frog

Carpenter Frog (Lithobates virgatipes) near water on a moist branch at Franklin Parker Preserve, New Jersey, USA
A Carpenter Frog (Lithobates virgatipes) near water on a moist branch at Franklin Parker Preserve, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates virgatipes
  • Other Names: Sphagnum Frog
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 2.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 3 to 6 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Carpenter Frogs are found on the Eastern coast of the U.S and Georgia. They live within the coastal plains in marshes, bogs, swamps, and other water habitats with lots of vegetation.

These frogs are highly aquatic and will always be near water. In spring and summer, they mate, and males will call from the edges of the water.

Carpenter Frogs are medium seized, with brown coloring. Dark markings appear on their back, and on their legs is a striped pattern to help with camouflage.

Their bellies are white, with a mottled pattern. One of the most identifiable traits of this species is their call, which sounds similar to a carpenter’s hammer. 

In Georgia, they are rare to find due to their limited habitat.

Crayfish, small insects, spiders, and mollusks are some of the foods they eat. Species of water snakes feed on and are the main predator of this frog. 

30. Gopher Frog

Gopher Frog (Lithobates capito) in sand and orange leaves in Elkton, Florida, USA
A sandy Gopher Frog (Lithobates capito) in sand and orange leaves in Elkton, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates capito
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2.5 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 5 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Gopher Frogs have a range within the southeastern areas of the coastal plains in Georgia. They live in wetlands and other moist habitats and will breed in fishless water.

Gopher frogs have seen a decline in population and are Georgia’s rarest endemic species of frog. This species inhabits turtle gopher holes and spends its time underground.

Gopher Frogs are medium-sized and are yellow, tan, or olive-colored. They have a mottled pattern on their back and a light white belly. Large eyes and pupils sit on the top of their heads, and their legs are short and stubby.

Gopher Frogs enjoy wet conditions and survive mostly off insects.

As a rare species, they are rarely seen due to their population and lifestyle. Steps have been taken to improve this species population like breeding in captivity and maintaining their habitats. 

31. Greenhouse Frog

Greenhouse Frog (Eleutherodactylus planirostris) on some leaves in St Marys, Georgia, USA
The very tiny Greenhouse Frog (Eleutherodactylus planirostris) on some leaves in St Marys, Georgia, USA – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Eleutherodactylidae
  • Scientific Name: Eleutherodactylus planirostris
  • Other Names: Euhayas planirostris
  • Adult Size: 0.5 to 1.25 inches
  • Lifespan: N/A
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Greenhouse Frogs can be found in some areas of Georgia, and are an invasive species to the state. They are originally native to Cuba but have been brought to some areas of the U.S  byways of shipments of tropical plants.

They are found in the far southern areas of the state in a small range. They are terrestrial and live in warm climates.

Greenhouse Frogs are small with brown, reddish, or bronze coloring. Some have light markings with a mottled pattern.

Chevron stripes run down their back and near their eyes. Their bellies are white and have some spots on them.

These frogs are nocturnal and insectivores.

As invasive species, they compete with other frogs for food and may bring imbalance to the insect populations. Ringneck snakes, birds, and larger frogs will often prey on this species. 

Wrapping up

Georgia has 31 different frog species that live within the state. Water is used for all frogs to breed, but each species has a preference for the type of source it breeds in.

Ponds, lakes, and streams are places to find frogs, but some will hide underground, and emerge in the rain. Tree frogs will even spend more of their time in trees than in water.

Each frog is unique in its nature and characteristics. Some can even make great pets like the green tree frog, or Leopard frog.

Before keeping a frog as a pet you should understand its needs, and the species to properly care for it. Frogs can make great companions, and some can even live for up to 10 years.

Frogs spread across Georgia and it is common to find many species wandering. Some are active in the day or night.

Frogs control pest populations, and most are a food source for the state’s many predators. A healthy environment will house many frogs and keeping it that way will give us a chance to enjoy all the species of frogs in Georgia.

Frogs in other states

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