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Frogs in Florida

There are around thirty species of frogs in Florida. The Sunshine State, with its humid climate and numerous freshwater bodies, provides the perfect environment for these amphibians to grow, live, and thrive in.

Frogs and toads are an important part of the ecosystem, they are crucial for pest control, and some of them even make good pets!

Without further ado, let’s find out more about the species of frogs and toads in Florida!

Frogs in Florida

1. Southern Cricket Frog

Southern Cricket Frog (Acris gryllus) on someone's hand near Lake Lamonia, Tallahassee, Florida, USA
The tiny Southern Cricket Frog (Acris gryllus) on someone’s hand near Lake Lamonia, Tallahassee, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: N/A
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Acris gryllus
  • Other Names: Southeastern Cricket Frog
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: N/A 

The Southern Cricket Frog is a small species that is native to southeastern states, including Florida. It prefers coastal plains, swamps, ponds, and other bodies of water that get a lot of sunshine.

The Southern Cricket has a pointed snout and a distinct black stripe on its thighs. It feeds on various types of insects and is active whenever it is warm out, regardless of the time of the year.

Breeding takes place in late spring and early summer, and females lay up to 150 eggs.

There are two subspecies of these Cricket Frogs living in Florida. The first is the nominated subspecies – Southern Cricket Frog (Acris gryllus gryllus), and the second one is the Florida Cricket Frog (Acris gryllus dorsalis).

2. Northern Cricket Frog

Northern Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans) sticking its head out of water on a leaf by Turtle Point, Edenton, Maryland, USA
The tiny Northern Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans) sticking its head out of water on a leaf by Turtle Point, Edenton, Maryland, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Acris crepitans
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 years in captivity; 4 months in the wild
  • Average Price Range: $9

The Northern Cricket frog is yet another small hylid species in Florida. In fact, these two species (Southern and Northern cricket frogs) are so similar, it is often difficult to tell them apart. The northern species, however, has a blunt snout and shorter legs.

The northern cricket frog comes in a wide variety of dorsal colors and often has irregular patterns of spots and blotches.

This is a diurnal species that feeds on small insects. Despite the name, the staple of the Northern cricket frog’s diet mainly consists of mosquitos. 

The species is a great jumper – it can leap 3 feet – and an even better swimmer. Both of these abilities come in handy when escaping predators – birds, fish, and even other frogs.

The subspecies of the northern cricket frog that inhabits Florida is known as the eastern cricket frog (Acris crepitans crepitans). 

3. Little Grass Frog

Little Grass Frog (Pseudacris ocularis) on a piece of grass near Saarinen Preserve, Florida, USA
The very tiny Little Grass Frog (Pseudacris ocularis) on a piece of grass near Saarinen Preserve, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: N/A
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris ocularis
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.4 to 0.6 inches
  • Lifespan: 4 to 9 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

If you thought that Cricket frogs are small, wait till you meet the Little Grass frog – this species is so tiny that it is often photographed holding on to a single strand of grass. In fact, this is the smallest frog on the North American continent.

The Little Grass frog is usually of a light brown color, although you may occasionally run into a green or reddish one.

It mostly resides in and near swamps and marshes, and it breeds in shallow water, usually in spring. A female will lay around 100, but sometimes more than 200 eggs in a clutch. 

Despite their size, Little Grass frogs are pretty good climbers. They have been observed climbing trees, bushes, and vines at heights exceeding 4 feet.

The species mostly feeds on arthropods. 

4. Spring Peeper

Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) on a fuzzy green leaf at Wekiva River Buffer Conservation Area, Orange County, Florida, USA
A little Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) on a fuzzy green leaf at Wekiva River Buffer Conservation Area, Orange County, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: N/A
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris crucifer
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1 to 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $13 

The Spring Peeper is easily recognizable by a dark X shape on their backs. This is how they got their scientific name – crucifer (Latin for cross-bearer).

Their background color is typically a shade of tan or brown. The common name comes from the high-pitched peep the frog produces that marks the beginning of spring.

Since this is a widely distributed species, the specimens that live in the northern parts of its range have had to adapt to harsher weather conditions. Namely, due to an occasional drop in temperature to below freezing, this frog has developed a tolerance to some of its body fluids freezing. 

There are two subspecies of the spring peeper, and both of them inhabit Florida – the southern spring peeper (Pseudacris crucifer bartramiana) and the northern spring peeper (Pseudacris crucifer crucifer). The main difference is that the southern subspecies have a distinct marking on their belly.

5. Southern Chorus Frog

Southern Chorus Frog (Pseudacris nigrita) on a leaf on the forest ground in Apalachicola National Forest, Liberty County, Florida, USA
A Southern Chorus Frog (Pseudacris nigrita) on a leaf on the forest ground in Apalachicola National Forest, Liberty County, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: N/A 
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris nigrita 
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: N/A
  • Average Price Range: N/A 

The Southern Chorus frog is a species endemic to the southeastern US states, including Florida.

It lives in a wide range of habitats, from temperate forests and grasslands to ditches, agricultural fields, and even excavation sites. Despite such a wide variety of habitats, it thrives in, the Southern Chorus frog is being threatened by habitat loss, mainly due to human activity.

Chorus frogs can closely resemble Cricket frogs. It is believed that that’s exactly where their scientific name Pseudacris comes from – pseudo is Latin for false, and Acris is the scientific name used for cricket frogs. In other words, chorus frogs are false cricket frogs.

There are two subspecies of the Southern Chorus frog, the eponymous Southern Chorus frog (Pseudacris nigrita nigrita) and the Florida chorus frog (Pseudacris nigrita verrucosa). Both of these species are commonly found in Florida.

6. Ornate Chorus Frog

Ornate Chorus Frog (Pseudacris ornata) as big as a the fingernail it sits on near Lost Lake Recreational Area, Florida, USA
The tiny Ornate Chorus Frog (Pseudacris ornata), as big as a the fingernail it sits on near Lost Lake Recreational Area, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: N/A
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris ornata 
  • Other Names: N/A 
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 3.5 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The Ornate Chorus frog comes in an array of colors ranging from green to brownish-red. On both sides, it has a well-defined, broken dark stripe. The belly is white with some yellow spotting around the legs. 

Ornate Chorus frogs are mainly nocturnal and live in coastal plains or pinewoods.

Although they’re believed to be common – or even abundant – in areas where they live, they are a relatively rare sight. There are signs, however, pointing out that the species might be headed to the endangered list, and that its numbers are declining.

Most predators of chorus frogs are other reptiles – namely salamanders and snakes.

Thankfully, most of them aren’t nearly as good at jumping as the ornate chorus frog. Even if they were, the frog has another defense mechanism up its sleeve – lying flat on the ground. We won’t speak on its effectiveness.

7. Upland Chorus Frog

Upland Chorus Frog (Pseudacris feriarum) on some dry leaves and sand near Robert Brent Wma, LakeTalquin State Forest, Florida, USA
An Upland Chorus Frog (Pseudacris feriarum) on some dry leaves and sand near Robert Brent Wma, LakeTalquin State Forest, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: N/A 
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris feriarum
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 to 5 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A 

Formerly thought to be a subspecies of the Western chorus frog (Pseudacris triseriata), the Upland Chorus frog only recently got its status as a species.

This is usually a brown frog with darker blotches. It inhabits the region from New Jersey to Florida and spans westward to eastern Texas.

This is a nocturnal and secretive species, so you’re not too likely to stumble upon it unless you’re looking. However, their activity increases significantly after rain, regardless of the time of year.

Breeding takes place in colder months, usually between November and March near a body of water. Otherwise, the species is almost entirely terrestrial.

The population of the Upland Chorus frog seems to be declining in all its habitats. In the state of New Jersey, it has been added to the list of protected species due to habitat loss and destruction. 

8. Crawfish Frog

Crawfish Frog (Lithobates areolatus) on green leaves near Clear Creek Public Use Area, Arkansas, USA
A Crawfish Frog (Lithobates areolatus) on green leaves near Clear Creek Public Use Area, Arkansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: N/A
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Rana areolata (Lithobates areolatus)
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2.2 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A 

The Crawfish frog got its name after its tendency to use vacant crayfish burrows. While they do use other animals’ burrows too, crayfish ones seem to be their favorites.

The species is usually tan to brown in color with darker brown spots on its back and a white belly.

The breeding of the species usually starts in late winter or early spring, although it might begin earlier in warmer regions. It takes place near a body of water, even if it is a temporary one.

The female lays 2000 to 7000 eggs in shallow water, and the tadpoles will hatch one to two weeks later.

The subspecies that inhabit Florida are known as the southern crawfish frog or the Florida gopher frog (Rana areolata aesopus).

9. Green Frog

Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans) in the grass at Orange Beach, Florida, USA
A Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans) in the grass at Orange Beach, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Rana clamitans (Lithobates clamitans) 
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2 to 4 inches
  • Lifespan: 6 years
  • Average Price Range: $5

If someone asked you to imagine a frog, the image that forms in your mind is probably closest to the green frog.

Most specimens are, as the name suggests, green, although some are more olive and brown. Rarely, blue individuals are found, as well. The head is usually more vibrantly colored than the rest of the body.

This is a typically diurnal species, which is why it is more commonly encountered by passers-by. It mostly feeds on invertebrates such as flies and moths, but it will also eat a slug or crayfish.

Very large specimens occasionally eat snakes and even other frogs. 

The Green frog is very water-oriented. It is a great swimmer, it tends to jump in the water and swim away when approached, and it breeds in water, too.

The subspecies of the green frog that lives in Florida is known as the bronze frog (Lithobates clamitans clamitans).

10. Bullfrog

American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeiana) on painted concrete near Lutz Memorial Park, Lutz, Florida, USA
An American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeiana) on painted concrete near Lutz Memorial Park, Lutz, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Expert
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Rana catesbeiana (Lithobates catesbeiana)
  • Other Names: American bullfrog
  • Adult Size: 3.6 to 6 inches
  • Lifespan: 7 to 9 years
  • Average Price Range: $20

Bullfrogs are the largest frog species in North America and native to the eastern part of the continent. It is mostly green, either monochrome or with some light mottling and banding. 

The bullfrog is not only large, but it can be a little aggressive, too. It is an opportunistic predator, which means that it will eat basically anything it can fit in its mouth, including other bullfrogs.

Due to its importance in the ecosystem, the species has been artificially introduced to many regions of the world. Being invasive, however, it is now jeopardizing other amphibian species native to the region.

To threaten other male challengers or ward off predators, the bullfrog assumes an inflated posture. Fights for dominance between males are common and resemble a wrestling match on water.

11. Pig Frog

Pig Frog (Lithobates grylio) submerged in grassy water by Otter Cave Hammock Trail, Everglades National Park, Homestead, Florida, USA
A Pig Frog (Lithobates grylio) submerged in grassy water by Otter Cave Hammock Trail, Everglades National Park, Homestead, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: N/A 
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Rana grylio (Lithobates grylio)
  • Other Names: Lagoon frog, Southern bullfrog
  • Adult Size: 3.5 to 6 inches
  • Lifespan: N/A
  • Average Price Range: N/A 

The pig frog is usually of a greenish shade with darker blotches. It has fully webbed feet and a pointed snout. Pig frogs got their name after the sound they make – a loud, deep snort similar to the sound pigs produce. 

This is a secretive, shy species that prefer to be unseen, so it’s no wonder that we don’t know all that much about it. It is fully aquatic and during the day, it can be found hiding among vegetation. At night, it feeds on insects and crustaceans.

Along with their close cousins, bullfrogs, pig frogs are considered a delicacy in many cuisines, especially their legs. However, there is speculation that the population numbers have been declining, despite this still being a very common frog species within its habitat range.

12. River Frog

River Frog (Lithobates heckscheri) on some sand somewhere around Lanark Village, Franklin County, Florida, USA
A River Frog (Lithobates heckscheri) on some sand somewhere around Lanark Village, Franklin County, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: N/A 
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Rana heckscheri (Lithobates heckscheri)
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 3 to 5 inches
  • Lifespan: N/A
  • Average Price Range: N/A 

Yet another frog species that is being increasingly threatened by habitat loss is the river frog, which usually lives in rivers, swamps, marshes, and lakes. It spends most of its time sitting in shallow water and isn’t quick to flee if approached. This makes it a relatively easy target for predators.

Speaking of predators, water snakes (namely bass), fish, and birds of prey all hunt river frogs. It is believed, however, that a river frog’s skin contains secretions that cause nausea and eventually make the predator regurgitate its prey. 

The river frog is usually green to black in color with some light spotting around the lips. The ventral side (the belly) is of a darker shade, too, sometimes even completely black. 

13. Florida Bog Frog

Florida Bog Frog (Lithobates okaloosae) on a moist, grassy rock near Blackwater River State Forest, Florida, USA
A Florida Bog Frog (Lithobates okaloosae) on a moist, grassy rock near Blackwater River State Forest, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: N/A 
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Rana okaloosae (Lithobates okaloosae)
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.3 to 1.9 inches
  • Lifespan: N/A
  • Average Price Range: N/A 

The Florida bog frog is a very rare species of frog. It is native to the western parts of Florida (Okaloosa, Santa Rosa, and Walton counties).

This is also its only known habitat. It is believed that the species is closely tied to a network of small tributary streams of the rivers in the area.

The Florida bog frog is usually dark green with a black belly and a yellowish throat. The webbing on the feet is reduced, which is the main distinguishing feature between the Florida bog and other frogs. 

Due to the very limited population of the species, not much is known about Florida bog frogs. For example, we don’t know how long they live nor if they have any behavioral quirks specific to the species. 

14. Southern Leopard Frog

Southern Leopard Frog (Lithobates sphenocephalus) in sand at the Middle Aucilla Conservation Area, Taylor County, Florida, USA
A sandy Southern Leopard Frog (Lithobates sphenocephalus) at the Middle Aucilla Conservation Area, Taylor County, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Rana sphenocephala (Lithobates sphenocephalus)
  • Other Names: Florida leopard frog
  • Adult Size: 5 inches
  • Lifespan: 3 years
  • Average Price Range: $7

The Southern leopard frog got its name after the colorful pattern on its back that resembles a leopard’s spots. It is usually brown-gray with darker blotches on the back and sides. Males are usually smaller than females, but they also have larger thumbs and forearms.

The species is native to the eastern parts of North America. It prefers shallow freshwater, but it doesn’t mind exploring the surrounding area. Specimens have been found as far as 3 miles away from their aquatic homes.

The Southern leopard frog feeds on insects, crayfish, and other small invertebrates. Larvae (that is, tadpoles) feed on algae and other organic matter. On the other hand, the species is often preyed upon by snakes, otters, fish, birds, and even humans.

15. Carpenter Frog

Carpenter Frog (Lithobates virgatipes) in brown water at Everett Bay, North Carolina, USA
A Carpenter Frog (Lithobates virgatipes) in brown water at Everett Bay, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: N/A 
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Rana virgatipes (Lithobates virgatipes)
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 2.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 6 years in captivity
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The habitat of the Carpenter frog stretches along the Atlantic coast of North America, although it is not as commonly found in Florida as it is in the more northern states.

The species got its name after its distinct call that resembles the sound of a carpenter’s hammer.

Carpenter frogs tend to be uniformly brown with two lighter-colored stripes on each side. It spends most of its time in water and can even live in slightly more acidic aquatic environments. They hide and lay eggs in shallow waters rich with vegetation. 

Carpenter frogs are nocturnal foragers. They feed on insects and non-insect arthropods.

They are territorial, with males often getting into altercations over dominance. The largest male is usually the most dominant one.

16. Greenhouse Frog

Greenhouse Frog (Eleutherodactylus planirostris) on a white surface by Lomon Bay, Englewood, Florida, USA
A Greenhouse Frog (Eleutherodactylus planirostris) on a white surface by Lomon Bay, Englewood, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: N/A
  • Family: Eleutherodactylidae
  • Scientific Name: Eleutherodactylus planirostris 
  • Other Names: Cuban Flat-headed frog
  • Adult Size: 0.6 to 1.2 inches
  • Lifespan: N/A
  • Average Price Range: $4

The Greenhouse frog is native to Cuba, the Bahamas, and the Cayman Islands, which is where the species’ other common name comes from – the Cuban flat-headed frog.

It is usually brown to olive and is either striped (more common) or mottled (less common). The belly is of a lighter shade than the back, and the eyes are red. 

The Greenhouse frog likes damp environments, especially moist fallen leaves. It doesn’t shy away from populated areas, but since it is nocturnal, it is not a common sight.

It will, however, emerge in the daytime on rainy days. It feeds on ants, beetles, roaches, spiders, and similar.

Unlike most other frogs, the Greenhouse frog doesn’t lay its eggs in or near water. Rather, it lays them on the ground, hidden under leaf debris or other vegetation, and sometimes even in flowerpots. The eggs hatch in 2-3 weeks.

17. Pine Barrens Treefrog

Pine Barrens Treefrog (Hyla andersonii) clinging onto a branch in Blackwater River State Forest, Florida, USA
A Pine Barrens Treefrog (Hyla andersonii) clinging onto a branch in Blackwater River State Forest, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla andersonii 
  • Other Names: Pine Barrens treefrog
  • Adult Size: 1 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 5 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The Pine Barrens treefrog is a small treefrog species that can most commonly be found in bushy areas, usually near bodies of water. Despite their love for the water, this is a mostly terrestrial species.

There are only three known areas in the United States where the Pine Barrens treefrog resides – the Pine Barrens in New Jersey, the Sandhills in the Carolinas, and the Florida-Alabama border. 

This treefrog is usually green and has wide dark stripes with white borders on its sides, running from the eye to the middle of the belly. The legs are of a bright orange color around the hips and shoulders. The belly is usually white. 

This species is listed as threatened in New Jersey, and the population trends in other areas aren’t promising, either. The most serious threat this frog is facing is the destruction and loss of habitat, mainly due to human activity.

18. Bird-Voiced Treefrog

Bird-voiced Treefrog (Hyla avivoca) on a branch in Tate's Hell State Forest, Florida, USA
Night flash photography of a Bird-voiced Treefrog (Hyla avivoca) calling on a branch in Tate’s Hell State Forest, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: N/A
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla avivoca 
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The Bird-voiced treefrog got its name after the characteristic call that resembles a bird’s chirp.

This call is most commonly heard in spring and summer, during and around the mating season. Mating is also one of the very few occasions when the bird-voiced tree frog descends to the ground.

As the name suggests, treefrogs spend most of their lives in trees near bodies of fresh water. Wooded swamps seem to be the species’ preference.

At night, the bird-voiced tree frog forages for insects and other invertebrates it can eat.

The subspecies of the Bird-voiced treefrog that inhabits Florida is the Western Bird-voiced Treefrog (Hyla avivoca avivoca). 

19. Cope’s Gray Treefrog

Cope's Gray Treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) calling on a large leaf in Osceola National Forest, Florida, USA
A Cope’s Gray Treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) calling on a large leaf in Osceola National Forest, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: N/A
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla chrysoscelis 
  • Other Names: Southern Gray Treefrog
  • Adult Size: 1.25 to 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 2.5 years in captivity
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Cope’s Gray treefrog was named after American herpetologist Edward Drinker Cope, who first described the species in 1880. The specific scientific name, chrysoscelis, comes from Greek – chrysos means gold, and scelis means leg.

Like the Pine Barrens treefrog, Cope’s Gray treefrog also has patches of orange-yellow on its legs, namely on areas that are normally hidden from view. It is believed that these patches have a life-saving purpose – the bright colors are supposed to startle the predator when the frog jumps in an attempt to escape.

The rest of Cope’s gray treefrog is usually gray, although some varieties include shades of green and brown. There are usually small dark or black blotches all over the dorsal side, too, but the belly is white.

20. Green Treefrog

Green Treefrog (Hyla cinerea) on a gray surface near Bone Pond, Gilchrist County, Florida, USA
A Green Treefrog (Hyla cinerea) on a gray surface near Bone Pond, Gilchrist County, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla cinerea 
  • Other Names: American Green Treefrog
  • Adult Size: 2.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 6 years in captivity
  • Average Price Range: $6 to $7

The Green treefrog is a very common species, frequently found even in populated areas, and one of the most popular amphibian pets. This is also the official state amphibian of two states – Louisiana and Georgia. 

This is a medium-sized species and, as the name suggests, the Green Treefrog is usually green, although it comes in many different shades. This color provides for good camouflage among leaves.

The belly is usually of a pale shade, sometimes even completely white. Male Green Treefrogs tend to be smaller than females.

Like many other frogs, the green treefrog is an insectivore, mostly feeding on flies, mosquitos, crickets, and such.

However, there is a study that suggests that the Green Treefrog doesn’t pick its prey based on size, but rather based on levels of activity. In other words, the more active the insect is, the more likely it is to be eaten. 

21. Pinewoods Treefrog

Pine Woods Treefrog (Dryophytes femoralis) on some green bark in Orange Lake, Florida, USA
A Pine Woods Treefrog (Dryophytes femoralis) on some green bark in Orange Lake, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: N/A
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla femoralis (Dryophytes femoralis)
  • Other Names: Morse Code frog
  • Adult Size: 1 to 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 2.5 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A 

The Pinewoods treefrog is a small frog species endemic to the southeastern United States.

It comes in a variety of colors, from brownish-gray to shades of green. There are usually slightly darker blotches on the back.

The call of the Pinewoods treefrog can be heard from April to October. It is a series of click-like sounds, giving the species the nickname “Morse Code frog”.

The Pinewoods treefrog spends a lot of time in trees, although it does have a habit of descending to the ground.

As the name suggests, it favors pine woods, but also oak woodlands, cypress swamps, and savannahs. 

22. Barking Treefrog

Barking Treefrog (Hyla gratiosa) on some dirt in Quail Rise, Tallahassee, Florida, USA
A Barking Treefrog (Hyla gratiosa) on some dirt in Quail Rise, Tallahassee, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla gratiosa 
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2 to 2.8 inches
  • Lifespan: 7 years
  • Average Price Range: $15 to $17

The largest native treefrog in the US, the Barking treefrog got its name after the characteristic bark-like call it has.

It comes in a variety of colors – from gray to green – and has dark, round spots on its back. The coloration and the markings change depending on the temperature, lighting, time of day, and surroundings.

This is a solitary and nocturnal species. While it spends days in the trees, it hibernates and aestivates (the summer version of hibernation, basically) in burrows underground.

It will also occasionally burrow to get away from predators.

Barking treefrogs are opportunistic predators, and they mostly feed on insects. In turn, larger predators often prey on them. These include fish, birds, raccoons, snakes, and more.

23. Squirrel Treefrog

Squirrel Treefrog (Hyla squirella) on light concrete near Orange Beach, Florida, USA
A Squirrel Treefrog (Hyla squirella) on light concrete near Orange Beach, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla squirella 
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 8.5 years
  • Average Price Range: $4 to $10

The squirrel treefrog is a very common small treefrog species that comes in several colors, the most common one of them being green. It is pretty similar in appearance to the Green treefrog, although this species is somewhat smaller.

Adult Squirrel treefrogs feed on insects and are very adept at catching them.

They often gather around lamp posts, cow dung, or other objects known to attract insects. Tadpoles, on the other hand, are suspension feeders – they feed on the organic matter suspended in the water.

The exact feeding preferences of squirrel treefrogs vary depending on the weather, location, and age of the frog.

24. Cuban Treefrog

Cuban Tree Frog (Osteopilus septentrionalis) sitting on a white pole in Eckerd College, Saint Petersburg, Florida, USA
A Cuban Tree Frog (Osteopilus septentrionalis) sitting on a white pole in Eckerd College, Saint Petersburg, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: N/A
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Osteopilus septentrionalis 
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2 to 5.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $10

The Cuban treefrog is an invasive species that originated from Cuba, the Bahamas, and the Cayman Islands.

It is believed that it was introduced to other countries via cargo ships. Since the Cuban treefrog can thrive in urban environments and isn’t a picky eater, it quickly became invasive and a threat to other species.

Cuban treefrogs can live in a wide variety of habitats, including mountains, coasts, forests, freshwater, tropical habitats, and even urban and suburban settlements. In fact, they are even commonly encountered in people’s homes. In other words, they’re really not picky. 

The Cuban treefrog is usually a shade between white, brown, and green. The underside is usually whitish. It eats anything it can, including other, smaller frog species – Southern Leopard frogs, for example.

25. Cane Toad

Cane Toad (Rhinella marina) by some grass on the sidewalk near Discovery Elementary School, Sunrise, Florida, USA
A Cane Toad (Rhinella marina) by some grass on the sidewalk near Discovery Elementary School, Sunrise, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Rhinella marina 
  • Other Names: Marine toad, Giant Neotropical toad, Bufo toad
  • Adult Size: 4 to 6 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $5 to $200

The Cane toad is a poisonous toad with glands that secrete a toxic chemical called bufotoxin. Even the tadpoles are toxic to most predators if ingested.

Due to the Cane toad’s toxicity and its tendency to become an invasive species, they have become quite an issue in areas where they were introduced.

In Florida, for example, the authorities are urging locals to kill any cane toad they see, since they are not only out of control in terms of populations, but may kill dogs, cats, and other common pets.

Interestingly, in Australia, the bufotoxin produced by cane toads is classified as a Class 1 drug as it can cause mild hallucinations. Aussies have been quite creative when it comes to getting rid of the Cane toad – they use its skin to create leather for purses and other fashion accessories. 

26. Southern Toad

Southern Toad (Anaxyrus terrestris) on a rock near Lake Lafayette, Tallahassee, Florida, USA
A Southern Toad (Anaxyrus terrestris) on a rock near Lake Lafayette, Tallahassee, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus terrestris 
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 3.8 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $15 to $20

The Southern toad is a species native to the southeastern US. It is usually of a brown shade, although specimens ranging from red to black are not entirely uncommon. The back is covered with wart-like growths of various shapes and sizes. 

The Southern toad prefers sandy soils, cultivated agricultural fields, pine barrens, and similar. 

This is a nocturnal species. It usually spends the day hiding in a burrow or under a pile of debris. At night, it hunts for a wide variety of insects, often positioning itself under porch lights or around other objects likely to attract insects.

Although the overall population of the cane toad seems to be stable for now, its numbers have been dropping in Florida. The species is still not considered threatened, but it could become so in the future.

27. Fowler’s Toad

Fowler's Toad (Anaxyrus fowleri) on someone's hand near Orchard Pond Trail, Havana, Florida, USA
Fowler’s Toad (Anaxyrus fowleri) on someone’s hand near Orchard Pond Trail, Havana, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: N/A
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus fowleri 
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2 to 3.7 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $25

The Fowler’s toad got its name as a homage to naturalist Samuel Page Fowler, founder of the Essex Institute.

The toad is usually of a rusty red, brown, or grey shade with darker spots with black edges. The surface of the back is warty, and the belly is white.

These warts on the toad’s back serve a purpose – they secrete a chemical that makes them poisonous to predators. Speaking of predators, Fowler’s toad is most commonly preyed upon by Eastern hog-nosed snakes, which seem to be immune to the toxin, as well as bullfrogs, raccoons, and some birds.

Adult Fowler’s toads feed on a wide range of invertebrates, although they’re not too fond of earthworms. As tadpoles, however, they mostly feed on algae and other organic matter.

28. Oak Toad

Oak Toad (Anaxyrus quercicus) in someone's fingertips at Jensen Beach, Florida, USA
A tiny Oak Toad (Anaxyrus quercicus) in someone’s fingertips at Jensen Beach, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus quercicus 
  • Other Names: American Oak Toad
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.3 inches
  • Lifespan: 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $13

Oak toads are the smallest toad species in North America.

They are easy to identify thanks to a brightly colored thin stripe on their backs that runs from the tip of the head to the tail. The rest of the back is of a brown or gray shade with spots.

Males have uniform white bellies, while the belly of the female is spotted.

This species mainly feeds on insects and smaller arthropods, but their favorite snacks are ants. This species is mostly diurnal, although they’re no strangers to staying up late, especially during mating season. 

The Oak toad is most commonly preyed upon by snakes, namely Hognose Snakes and Garter Snakes, although Gopher Frogs enjoy eating them, too.

29. Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad (Gastrophryne carolinensis) in grass in Winwood Hills, Tallagassee, Florida, USA
The Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad (Gastrophryne carolinensis) in grass in Winwood Hills, Tallagassee, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: N/A
  • Family: Microhylidae
  • Scientific Name: Gastrophryne carolinensis 
  • Other Names: eastern narrow-mouthed toad
  • Adult Size: 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 6 years
  • Average Price Range: $7

The Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad is a relatively small species with an oval body and small head. The dorsal color ranges from gray to green, and there are often black and white spots.

The skin is relatively smooth but durable. It is believed that the toughness of the skin is a protective mechanism against ants, which also happen to be this toad’s favorite food.

The call of the Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad is said to resemble the bleating of a sheep or even an electric buzzer.

The Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad can settle down in a wide range of habitats, including swamps, pine-oak woodlands, sandy areas, hillsides, maritime forests, around smaller streams, and so on. Despite this, the species is not too tolerant of urbanization and is facing serious habitat loss.

30. Eastern Spadefoot Toad

Eastern Spadefoot (Scaphiopus holbrookii) on someone's hand near Central Park, Fleming Fitch Grant, Holly Hill, Florida, USA
The Eastern Spadefoot (Scaphiopus holbrookii) on someone’s hand near Central Park, Fleming Fitch Grant, Holly Hill, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: N/A
  • Family: Scaphiopodidae
  • Scientific Name: Scaphiopus holbrookii 
  • Other Names: Eastern Spadefoot, American Eastern Spadefoot
  • Adult Size: 1.75 to 2.25 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 9 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $25

The Eastern Spadefoot Toad is native to North America and most commonly found in the southeastern states. The toad is usually brown and has two yellow stripes on the back. Its hind feet have adapted for burrowing.

The Eastern Spadefoot Toad spends most of its time underground. It only comes out to breed and eat, usually during the day (although the species is considered to be nocturnal more than diurnal). Hibernation usually happens during the colder months, although it may be interrupted on an unusually warm day.

Eastern Spadefoot Toads are mainly foragers, and they feed on invertebrates, insects, arachnids, worms, termites, and larvae. When foraging, they rarely stray away too far from the burrow – only a few feet.

In fact, some of them simply sit at the opening of their burrow and wait for unsuspecting prey to get too close.

Summary

Florida’s humid air, plentiful bodies of water, and rich ecosystems provide a fertile environment for dozens of species of frogs and toads, both native and introduced, to thrive there. Most of them play an important part in the life of Florida’s flora and fauna, although some, like the cane toad, are aggressively invasive.

That being said, they are all living beings, just like us, and deserve their spot under the sun. It’s just that for some of them, that spot should be somewhere other than Florida.

Frogs in other states

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