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Frogs in Kansas 

There are 22 different types of frogs in Kansas, living in the state’s diverse habitats. Kansas is great for herping, as there are over 100 different reptiles and amphibians to find in the state.

Kansas is home to many forests and freshwater habitats that make a perfect home for frogs.

Each species has its own preference in where they prefer to live. Some species enjoy dry habitats, while others are more aquatic.

Learning about the different types of frogs you can come across is helpful in identifying and locating them in the wild.

Frogs, toads, and tree frogs can all be found in Kansas. Frogs are one of the most common amphibians, and there are 22 different species that can be found in Kansas.

In this article, you will learn about the different species of frogs in Kansas, and interesting information that you should know about each one.

Frogs are important amphibians that help keep a balanced ecosystem and are a sign of a healthy environment. Let’s learn about the 22 species of frogs that you may come across in Kansas.

Table of Contents

  1. Frogs in Kansas 
    1. American Toad 
    2. Great Plains Toad
    3. North American Green Toad 
    4. Fowler’s Toad
    5. Red-spotted Toad
    6. Woodhouse’s Toad
    7. Plains Spadefoot Toad
    8. Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad
    9. Western Narrow-mouthed Toad
    10. American Bullfrog
    11. Southern Leopard Frog
    12. Plains Leopard Frog
    13. Pickerel Frog
    14. Green Frog
    15. Crawfish Frog
    16. Gray Treefrog
    17. Cope’s Gray Treefrog
    18. Blanchard’s Cricket Frog
    19. Spotted Chorus Frog
    20. Spring Peeper
    21. Boreal Chorus Frog
    22. Strecker’s Chorus Frog
  2. Wrapping up

Frogs in Kansas 

1. American Toad 

American Toad (Anaxyrus americanus) in mud and greens in Lawrence, Kansas, USA
An American Toad (Anaxyrus americanus) in mud and greens in Lawrence, Kansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus americanus
  • Other Names: Eastern American toad 
  • Adult Size: 2 to 3.5 inches 
  • Lifespan: 2 to 10 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30

American toads are one of the most common toad species in America, found in the eastern United States and Canada. In Kansas, this species lives in the eastern third of the states.

Pine forests, grasslands, and fields are some of the habitats they live in. They can also be seen in gardens and various other habitats.

Sandy soil, moisture, and leaf litter are present where this toad lives. They will burrow underground, and why they use sandy soil.

Breeding for the American Toad occurs at the beginning of the year and lasts until early summer. They use fish waters to breed, and males can be heard calling during this period.

As many as 20,000 eggs are laid by this toad, attached to vegetation in the water, which hatches in around a week.

American toads are brown, reddish, gray, or olive. They have a light-colored stripe running down their back and are covered in warts.

American toads have dry skins, and black dots on their body, with at least one of two warts in these spots. Common in toads, two paratoid glands are located behind their eyes, which secrete toxins.

Predators of this species include snakes and mammals, but most will avoid eating this poisonous toad. Insects make up a majority of their diet, doing most of their hunting at night.

2. Great Plains Toad

Great Plains Toad (Anaxyrus cognatus) on dry, rocky dirt in Attica, Kansas, USA
A Great Plains Toad (Anaxyrus cognatus) on dry, rocky dirt in Attica, Kansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus cognatus
  • Other Names: Rana pipiens
  • Adult Size: 3.5 to 4.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $15

Great Plains toads are found all over Kansas, and have a range within the central United States, going into Mexico. This toad lives in many habitats like deserts, chaparral, grasslands, and prairies.

Freshwater habitats like rivers or floodplains are preferred by this species. They are active during the night and will spend the day buried underground.

In mid-spring to early summer, this toad will breed in freshwater. Breeding is triggered by the heavy rainfalls of the season.

Males will make croaking and chirping sound to attract females or try to defend their territory. Thousands of eggs are laid by females, which hatches in around a week.

It only takes around a month for the tadpoles to fully go through the metamorphosis process.

Like other species of toads, the great plains toad is covered in warts and also has parotoid glands sitting behind its eyes. They are one of the largest species of toads in Kansas, capable of growing up to 4 inches, but they have small heads.

Yellow, brown, or green are the colors this toad appears. Dark clothes also cover this species’ back, which is usually black, green, or brown.

Warts on this toad appear in the dark blotches, and they have a white belly.

The toxin from this species is secreted from its parotoid glands and is helpful in warding off predators. This species is kept as a pet, but its secretions are capable of irritating human skin.

In the wild, the great plains toad feeds on flies, moths, and other insects.

3. North American Green Toad 

Green Toad (Anaxyrus Debilis) being held by someone in Wallace County, Kansas, USA
A Green Toad (Anaxyrus Debilis) being held by someone in Wallace County, Kansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Bufonidae 
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus Debilis 
  • Other Names: Green Toad
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 2.1 inches
  • Lifespan: 7 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

North American Green toads are rare in Kansas and are only found in a few select countries on the western border of the state. In Kansas, they are most abundant in Wallace and Logan counties, but their regional range stretches until Mexico.

This species lives in dry semi-arid regions and uses aquatic sites to breed. In Kansas, they are considered endangered and are not a common toad to come across.

Green toads will breed from March until summer, during the rainy season. They will breed in temporary ponds.

Their eggs will quickly hatch, sometimes within a day of being laid. Males of this species will form shallow water, and females can lay up to thousands of eggs.

Green toads have bright green or pale coloring. They have black spotting on their body, as well as warts covering their skin. Green toads have white stomachs and black markings on their legs.

Insects like crickets, flies, worms, and what this species eats.

In Kansas, this species is rare and endangered. Habitat loss and disease are some reasons frogs become endangered.

North American toads are rare not only because they are endangered, but they are burrowing frogs, only coming out at night to hunt, or to breed.

4. Fowler’s Toad 

Fowler's Toad (Anaxyrus fowleri) on a rock near grass at Poplar Ridge, Illinois, USA
A Fowler’s Toad (Anaxyrus fowleri) on a rock near grass at Poplar Ridge, Illinois, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus fowleri
  • Other Names: Bufo fowleri 
  • Adult Size: 2 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $20

In Kansas, the fowler’s toad has a range on the eastern border of the state. This species also lives in most of the western United States.

Forests, wetlands, valleys, ponds, and near other freshwaters. They will burrow underground for part of the year, then come out to mate in spring.

Fowler’s toads breed until the middle of summer and will use water sources like lakes, and ponds to breed.

They prefer shallow water to breed, and a female can lay as much as 10,000 eggs. These eggs take around a week to hatch, and complete metamorphosis in a few months.

Fowler toads look similar to American toads but can be distinguished by the number of warts they have in their dark spots. Fowler’s toads have three warts in each black mark on its back and rough skin.

These toad’s base color is brown, gray, or olive green. They have pale stomachs, and males have a dark spot under their throats.

Common for toads, this species has two parotoid glands on their back that secrete bufotoxin.

The toxins in this toad’s skin can make animals sick, and make predators less likely to eat them. It can irritate human skin, but some animals like raccoons and snakes will still feed on this toad.

Fowler’s toads are nocturnal and feed on insects and small invertebrates. They are burrowed underground for the majority of the year and can be a hard species to spot.

5. Red-spotted Toad 

Red-spotted Toad (Anaxyrus punctatus) on a rock in Barber County, Kansas, USA
A Red-spotted Toad (Anaxyrus punctatus) on a rock in Barber County, Kansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus punctatus
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $20 

Barber County is the area in Kansas that holds most of the range for the red-spotted toad in the state. Thesis species are found in Texas, Nevada, and parts of California and Mexico.

A permanent water source is present where they live and enjoy living in rocky habitats. Deserts, coastal plains, and rivers are common places red-spotted toads inhabit.

Most of the time this species will hide in vegetation, or bury themselves in the ground.

Breeding season is when the red-spotted toad is most active. Males during this season will gain dark coloring around their throats.

If they live near each other the western toad is able to breed with this species. Red-spotted toads do not lay eggs in clutches, but individual ones.

They hatch in around 1.5 months. They will breed until summer and then hibernate in winter.

Red or orangish spots cover this species’ back, as well as dark blotches.

They have gray or tan skin, and warts covering them. They also have a parotoid gland behind their eyes and a white underside.

Red-spotted toads are mostly active at night and will hunt. They feed on insects and small invertebrates.

If not hunting or breeding they will hide in the crevices of rocks. Toxin secreted from this toad’s parotoid gland can help it not be eaten. They are good pets but can secrete this toxin when handled.

6. Woodhouse’s Toad 

Woodhouse's Toad (Anaxyrus woodhousii) sitting in sand in Morton County, Kansas, USA
A Woodhouse’s Toad (Anaxyrus woodhousii) sitting in sand in Morton County, Kansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus woodhousii 
  • Other Names: Western Woodhouse’s toad 
  • Adult Size: 2.5 to 5 inches
  • Lifespan: 12 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The wood house toad is a common species in Kansas and is found all over the state. They have a large range covering the midwest of the U.S. Wooded areas, prairies, grasslands, lakes, and dry habitats are where this species is found.

They are nocturnal but are brought out by heavy rain. Most of the time this species will hide under logs, debris, or burrows.

In spring and summer, the breeding seasons occur for this species. Males can be heard calling in the water trying to attract females.

Eggs of the woodhouse toad are laid in rows and are sometimes attached to vegetation. When breeding is when this frog is seen the most, as they will burrow underground for other periods of the year.

In winter they are inactive and stay in their burrows underground. 

Brown, gray, olive, and yellow are the possible colors they come in. They have dry skin and are covered in warts.

A light-colored stripe also runs down the center of this species’ back. They have round bodies and parotoid glands behind their eyes.

Their parotoid glands make them less likely to be eaten, as they can secret toxins that are harmful if ingested.

Hunting is when this species is also seen. They feed at night on insects and small invertebrates.

7. Plains Spadefoot Toad 

Plains Spadefoot (Spea bombifrons) on sand, rocks, and greens in Cimarron National Grassland, Morton County, Kansas, USA
A Plains Spadefoot (Spea bombifrons) on sand, rocks, and greens in Cimarron National Grassland, Morton County, Kansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Scaphiopodidae
  • Scientific Name: Spea bombifrons
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 2.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 

In Kansas, the plains spadefoot toad lives all over the state, but are absent from the southeastern corner of the state. They have a large range in the central United States and live in a variety of habitats.

Grasslands, shrublands, and sandy soils habitats are where they live. They need sandy soils since they are a burrowing species, and spend most of their life underground.

The breeding season is when the Plains spadefoot toad is most active and comes out from their burrows.

These frogs will breed in spring and summer, during heavy rainfall. They breed sporadically and use ponds and other shallow waters to lay their eggs.

The plain spadefoot toad is gray, olive green, and brown. They have spots covering their body that are red, yellow, and sometimes black.

They have smooth skin and yellow cat-like eyes. This species is named since its back foot has a black spade, used to help it dig.

When hungry this species will come out of its burrow to feed on insects and small invertebrates. They can survive for months on one feeding, and can sometimes go long periods without breeding.

They are a common species with a large range, but you may not come across them because of their secretive nature.

8. Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad (Gastrophryne carolinensis) in dirt and rocks in Cherokee County, Kansas, USA
An Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad (Gastrophryne carolinensis) in dirt and rocks in Cherokee County, Kansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Microhylidae 
  • Scientific Name: Gastrophryne carolinensis 
  • Other Names: N/A 
  • Adult Size: 2.1 inches 
  • Lifespan: 6 years 
  • Average Price Range: $10

The eastern narrow-mouthed toad is endangered in Kansas and only found in the far southeast corner of the state. They are found all over the southeastern United States and live in high elevation habitats.

Moisture and fishless waters are usually present in most of their habitats. This species is nocturnal, and during the day will hide under natural debris like rocks.

Summer is when the eastern narrow-mouthed toad’s breeds. They will meet in fishless waters like puddles and ditches.

Rainy nights in warm temperatures are the best conditions for their breeding. Males will call with a loud nasally call, and when the eggs are hatched they take up to 2 months to mature.

The eastern narrow-mouth toad is a small and flat species. They can be gray, tan, dark brown, and pink, and have a mottled pattern on their back.

Their belly is also pale with a heavy mottled pattern on it. The head of this species is what gives them their name since it is pointed and gives them a small mouth.

Small insects and invertebrates are what this species usually eats. They can secrete a mile of poison from their skin to defend themselves from ant bites when feeding on an anthill.

9. Western Narrow-mouthed Toad 

Western Narrow-mouthed Toad (Gastrophryne olivacea) in someone's hands in Geary County, Kansas, USA
A Western Narrow-mouthed Toad (Gastrophryne olivacea) in someone’s hands in Geary County, Kansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Microhylidae
  • Scientific Name: Gastrophryne olivacea
  • Other Names: Great plains narrow-mouthed toad
  • Adult Size: 1.5 inches 
  • Lifespan: 6 years 
  • Average Price Range: $10

Western narrow-mouthed toads are the most common narrow-mouthed toad species in Kansas and have a range covering the state.

They live in moist habitats like woodlands, wetlands, and swamps. They will hide under leaf litter, logs, and rocks, mainly coming out at night.

In spring and summer, this species will begin to breed. They use fishless shallow waters to mate and lay their eggs.

When mating males secrete a substance from their body that sticks the two frogs together.

Eggs are laid on the surface of the water, and over 66 are laid. It only takes 2 to 3 days for these frog eggs to hatch, and the tadpoles mature in around a month.

The pointed heads of the western narrow-mouthed toad are what give this species its name. They have flat bodies, and gray, tan, or green coloring.

The only pattern seen on their back is a mild mottled pattern. They are very similar to the eastern narrow-mouthed toad but that species does not come in green.

Their small mouths make ants the perfect meal for this species. When feeding in an area with a lot of ants they are able to secrete toxins from their skin to help protect them from ant bites.

10. American Bullfrog 

American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) on dry sand and rock at Quivira National Wildlife Refuge, Stafford County, Kansas, USA
An American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) on dry sand and rock at Quivira National Wildlife Refuge, Stafford County, Kansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced 
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates catesbeianus
  • Other Names: lithobates catesbeianus
  • Adult Size: 3.5 to 8 inches 
  • Lifespan: 7 to 15 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20

American bullfrogs are found all over Kansas and the United States. They are one of the most widespread species and have become invasive in areas they originally did not inhabit.

Ponds, lakes, rivers, and areas with a permanent water source are where this species lives. They are aquatic and enjoy slow-moving water sources.

Bullfrogs will mate in spring and summer. Males make a low call, which is similar to the sound of a bull.

They are aggressive when breeding, and males will fight each other for mates. After winter this species hibernates in the winter, waiting until spring to come again.

Bullfrogs are the largest frogs in North America and are one of the largest frog species in the world. They look similar in appearance to the green frog but are much larger.

This species has green and brown skin with a mottled pattern on them. Moist skin and webbed feet let you know it is an aquatic species. They have an exposed eardrum on the side of their head, and their upper lip is bright green.

American bullfrogs are aggressive and eat anything they can overpower. Other frogs, snakes, birds, bats, small rodents, and fish are just some of the things they eat.

Humans eat American bullfrogs since they are so large, but this species is also preyed on by snakes, birds, and large mammals.

11. Southern Leopard Frog

Southern Leopard Frog (Lithobates sphenocephalus) on rocky ground near Spring River, Cherokee County, Kansas, USA
A Southern Leopard Frog (Lithobates sphenocephalus) on rocky ground near Spring River, Cherokee County, Kansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates sphenocephalus
  • Other Names: Rana sphenocephalus
  • Adult Size: 2 to 3.5  inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $15

Southern leopard frogs have a range in the southeast of Kansas and live in other parts of the southeastern United States.

This species lives near water sources, like lakes, ponds, rivers, and wetlands. They can be found in habitats like woodlands, wetlands, and marshes.

Leopard frogs will breed in spring and summer. In fall they stop and get ready for hibernation.

Breeding occurs in freshwater, and when they are finished they will move onto land. As many as 5,000 eggs are laid by a female.

In winter they will hibernate and bury themselves until the next breeding season.

The dark blotches of this species are why they are called the leopard frog. They have green, or tan skin, with dorsolateral stripes running down their backs.

The leopard frog looks similar to other leopard frog species but has a white speck on its eardrum. They have orange coloring in between their legs to scare a predator.

Southern leopard frogs eat insects, fish, and small rodents. They are eaten by snakes and predatory mammals.

Kansas does not have many of these frogs since they are in such a small range in the state.

12. Plains Leopard Frog 

Plains Leopard Frog (Lithobates blairi) in a glass case in Shawnee County, Kansas, USA
A Plains Leopard Frog (Lithobates blairi) in a glass case in Shawnee County, Kansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates blairi
  • Other Names: Blair’s leopard frog
  • Adult Size: 2 to 4.25 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $30

Plains leopard frogs are the most abundant leopard frog in Kansas and are found all over the state. Freshwater is seen in their habitat, but they will be both on land and in the water.

In summer rains this species is more common to come across, and they are also nocturnal. This species will use lakes, ponds, and other types of water sources to breed.

The plains leopard frog breeds in spring and summer. Males create a chuckling sound to call a female to mate. Eggs are laid in the water in a ball clump.

They can have several thousands of eggs during the seasons, making these species one of the most common frogs.

Plains leopard frogs have leopard-like blotches on their back like other species. To identify them from other leopard frog species you can look at the dorsolateral stripes that run down their back.

The stripe is broken near its end, which is unlike other leopard frog species. They have green or tan skin. Their belly is pale, and this species is medium-sized. 

Insects, small mammals, and other frogs are what this species eats. They are very abundant and used for food by a variety of life including snakes, birds, and larger frogs.

13. Pickerel Frog 

Pickerel Frog (Lithobates palustris) on a rock at Burgess Falls State Park, Tennessee, USA
A Pickerel Frog (Lithobates palustris) on a rock at Burgess Falls State Park, Tennessee, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates palustris
  • Other Names: Rana palustris
  • Adult Size: 1.75 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 8 years
  • Average Price Range:  $10 to $15 

Pickerel frogs are rare in Kansas and only live in the far southeast corner of the state. Their range is made up of most of the eastern United States.

This frog lives in marshes, woodlands, and meadows. They enjoy living in moist habitats and are active at night.

Pickerel frogs will breed in spring and fall. They are more active in warm weather and will use the thick vegetation in their habitat to lay their eggs.

Breeding occurs in the freshwater source. As many as 3,000 eggs are laid in the various water habitats they breed in.

Pickerel frogs look very similar to the leopard frog but can be told apart by them from slight differences.

Pickerel frogs have more square blotches that align in rows. They have yellowish skin and orange coloring in between their legs.

This species is capable of secreting toxins from its body to stop predators from eating it. Species like bullfrogs will still eat this species.

Pickerel frogs are easily affected by water pollution and will only live in the cleanest waters. An abundance of these frogs means there is a healthy habitat.

14. Green Frog 

Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans melanota) in grass at Cromwell Valley Park, Hampton, Maryland, USA
A Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans melanota) in grass at Cromwell Valley Park, Hampton, Maryland, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates clamitans melanota
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2.25 to 3.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 15 to 20 years
  • Average Price Range: $10

Green frogs are found in the southeastern corner of Kansas. Their range covers the eastern United States, and they are a common semi-aquatic frog.

They live in streams, marshes, and other freshwater habitats. They are usually found on the edges of water habitats and will jump into the water if they feel threatened.

Green frogs breed in aquatic habitats from the start of spring, until summer. They will wait near the shorelines for females.

Eggs are laid in the water attached to vegetation close to shore.

The bullfrog is a species similar to the bullfrog but is larger. Green frogs are green to brown and have a mottled pattern on their back.

They have a white belly and bright yellow under their throat. Like a bullfrog, the green frog has a large exposed eardrum on the side of its head. Green frogs have large limbs, and bumps covering their skin.

Green frogs are opportunistic feeders and will eat anything they can come across. They feed on smaller frogs, insects, small snakes, and other animals.

Being so abundant they are a food source for snakes, birds, bullfrogs, and mammals. This species is not endangered, but since they are an aquatic species they are highly affected by pollution.

Like other frogs, they have experienced a population decline.

15. Crawfish Frog 

Crawfish Frog (Lithobates areolatus) on ricks, grass, and sticks near Crab Orchard Lake, Illinois, USA
A Crawfish Frog (Lithobates areolatus) on ricks, grass, and sticks near Crab Orchard Lake, Illinois, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates areolatus 
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2.5 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 7 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Crawfish frogs live near the eastern border in Kansas, with most of its range being in the southeastern United States. Crawfish frogs will live wherever crawfish inhabits, sincerely they will take shelter in their burrow.

Rivers, grasslands, pastures, and fields with a crawfish population are where this species can be found. They are a secretive species, spending most of their lives in their crawfish burrows.

Breeding occurs in freshwater in early spring. Females can lay up to 7,000 eggs, and their tadpoles will complete transition in summer.

Seeing the crawfish frog is rare since they have lost a large amount of their population, and stay in their burrows. This species is listed as in need of conservation.

Tan, gray, and brown are the colors the crawfish frog is found in. They have dark blotches on their body, and large dorsolateral ridges running down their back.

Their blotches have a light-colored border, and their belly is plain.

Habitat loss, disease, and pollution are the reasons they have been on the decline.

Crawfish are used in different ways by this frog, as it is also a regular source of food they consume. They will also eat other small animals and insects.

16. Gray Treefrog 

Gray Treefrog (Dryophytes versicolor) sitting on a wooden fence at Distant Hill Gardens, New Hampshire, USA
A Gray Treefrog (Dryophytes versicolor) sitting on a wooden fence at Distant Hill Gardens, New Hampshire, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner to Intermediate 
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Dryophytes versicolor
  • Other Names: Northern Gray Treefrog
  • Adult Size: 1.25 to 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 7 to 9 years
  • Average Price Range: $20

The range of the gray frog covers eastern Kansas and most of the eastern United States.

They are mostly arboreal, and live in woodlands, forests, farmlands, swamps, and are sometimes even found in urban areas. An abundance of trees and fresh water are needed in the habitats they live in.

Mating for the gray tree frog begins in spring and lasts until the beginning of fall.

Males can be heard calling near water, waiting for a female. They are territorial and will fight other males that come into their presence.

A female lays between 1,000 to 2,000 eggs into the water during the mating season. Tadpoles hatch in about a week and take a month to fully turn into a frog.

Gray tree frogs can change their color depending on their environment. Gray, green, and brown are the colors they naturally come in.

They have a blotchy pattern on their back and a dark stripe near their eyes. In between their legs are bright orange coloring used to surprise predators.

The Gray treefrog and Cope’s gray tree frog are nearly identical, but the gray tree frog may be slightly larger. Gray tree frogs also have a slower call.

Insects, spiders, and other invertebrates are what these species eat. Younger gray tree frogs are more likely to spend time near the forest floor, while older frogs will be less likely to leave the canopy of trees.

A toxic secretion is emitted from this species skin, which is helpful in defending it from predators. Bullfrogs, water snakes, and birds are some of the animals that prey on this frog.

17. Cope’s Gray Treefrog 

Cope's Gray Treefrog (Dryophytes chrysoscelis) clinging onto a leaf with an ant on its head near Baker University Wetlands, Kansas, USA
A Cope’s Gray Treefrog (Dryophytes chrysoscelis) clinging onto a leaf with an ant on its head near Baker University Wetlands, Kansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner to Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Dryophytes chrysoscelis  
  • Other Names: Southern Gray Treefrog 
  • Adult Size: 1.25 to 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $20

The Cope’s gray tree frog is a common tree frog species in the eastern United States and is found in the eastern half of Kansas. They live in woodlands, forests, and other areas near fishless freshwater.

This species spends a majority of its time in the trees and will come down to breed.

Breeding for this species starts in March and lasts until early fall. They will breed in fishless waters to maximize the survivability of their eggs.

Vegetation is also used in the waters they breed to lay the eggs in. When not breeding they will hide in holes in trees, and become active at night. 

Cope’s Gray tree frogs are larger than other species of tree frogs. Gray is their most common color, but it can also come in green or tan.

This frog is able to change its color to help it blend in better with its environment. Cope’s gray tree frogs have a mottled pattern on their back and have granular skin.

In between their legs is yellow, or orange coloring, in which they can flash to confuse predators. 

Hunting for this species is done at night, eating insects and small invertebrates. To defend themselves they also secrete a toxin from their skin that can irritate the skin, and protect it from predators.

The gray tree frog and Cope’s gray tree frog are nearly identical. Genetically they can be told apart, but the Cope’s gray tree frog also has a faster call than the other gray treefrog.

18. Blanchard’s Cricket Frog

Blanchard's Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans blanchardi) on a light-colored rock at Tuttle Creek State Park, Kansas, USA
A Blanchard’s Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans blanchardi) on a light-colored rock at Tuttle Creek State Park, Kansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner to Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Acris crepitans blanchardi
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.625 to 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Blanchard’s cricket frogs are found in the Midwestern United States and live all over the states of Kansas. They live in moist habitats, and on the edges of freshwater. Marshes, lakes, bogs, rivers, and temporary waters are where they can be found.

In some states like Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota this species is endangered. It was originally thought to be a sub-species of the northern cricket frog but is now its own species.

This species is active from March, until the end of October. They are mostly nocturnal and can be heard calling in the night.

Blanchard’s cricket frogs spend most of their time on the ground but are sometimes seen jumping in the water then swimming back to shore. They will breed in summer during heavy rain, and mate until fall comes.

This species does not hibernate as much as other frog species and are sometimes active at the beginning or end of winter.

Blanchard’s cricket frogs are small and are covered in warts like a toad. They are darkly colored in gray or green.

Some of the possible patterns seen on some frogs are dark blotches running down their back, or a triangular mark in between their heads. The belly of this species is pale and has no pattern.

Insects and aquatic vertebrae are what the Blanchards chorus frog eats.

They have a large range in Kansas but are experiencing a population decline. The destruction of their natural habitat is one of the main reasons why in some areas they are endangered.

19. Spotted Chorus Frog 

Spotted Chorus Frog (Pseudacris clarkii) on concrete in Mulvane, Kansas, USA
A Spotted Chorus Frog (Pseudacris clarkii) on concrete in Mulvane, Kansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Hylidae 
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris clarkii 
  • Other Names: Clark’s Tree frog 
  • Adult Size: 1.25 inches 
  • Lifespan: 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: N/A 

In Kansas, the spotted chorus frog has a range within the southern areas of the state. They live all across the central U.S., with only an extremely small range in Canada and Mexico.

The habitat this species lives in includes grasslands, prairies, meadows, woodlands, shrublands, and even occasionally in urban areas.

During the breeding season, this species will breed in freshwater habits like ponds, ditches, marshes, and wetlands. They breed from January, until June, and will congregate in water.

Rain is the main reason these frogs begin to breed, and their choruses can be heard during this season. When winter is almost here they burrow underground.

They will stay buried in soil, and under debris until the next breeding season. 

Spotted chorus frogs are green or gray, and have greenish blotches on their back. These blotches are surrounded by black edging, and they also have a green blotched between their eyes.

Their belly has no pattern and is lightly colored. This species has smooth, moist skin, and males will have a dark spot under their throats during the breeding season.

Like other chorus frog species, the spotted chorus frog survives on insects like plants, moths, ants, and flies. They do not secrete any toxins so rely on their small size and camouflage to avoid predators.

Birds, snakes, and mammals are their most common predators.

20. Spring Peeper 

Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) holding onto a twig, calling, in Cherokee County, Kansas, USA
A Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) holding onto a twig, calling, in Cherokee County, Kansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris crucifer 
  • Other Names: Spring peeper
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.25 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $20  

In the United States and Canada, the spring peeper is a frog that comes across regularly in the eastern United States but has a small range in Kansas. This species is only found in Kansas on the far eastern border.

Inhabiting various habitats like forests, fields, and wetlands, they will usually stay near a freshwater pond.

Spring peeper will breed in fall, until the start of spring. Their mating call is high-pitched, but some males do not call during the breeding season.

Males who do not call wait near males who have the preferred call to sneak in and steal their mate. Breeding occurs in ponds, and females will lay around 900 eggs.

Spring peepers are small chorus frog that comes in a variety of colors including green, brown, tan and gray. Males are more vibrantly colored, but females are slightly larger.

On the back of this species is an X-shaped pattern, as well as other dark blotches. They have large yellow eyes and smooth skin.

Large toe pads help this species climb but they are usually found on the ground.

This frog is an insectivore, eating things like ants, flies, beetles, and spiders.

They are active both in the night and day, hunting during this period. Snakes, larger frogs, and carnivorous mammals are what prey on these species. Spring peepers are listed as a species of “Least Concern” but have a small range in Kansas.

21. Boreal Chorus Frog 

Boreal Chorus Frog (Pseudacris maculata) on a rock somewhere in Logan County, Kansas, USA
A Boreal Chorus Frog (Pseudacris maculata) on a rock somewhere in Logan County, Kansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris maculata
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Boreal Chorus frogs are found all over the state in Kansas and are one of the most widespread species of frog. They are also found in the states within the central United States, and parts of Canada.

Boreal chorus frogs like open habitats that are near a source of fresh water. Wetlands and other wet fields with trees are areas they thrive in.

This frog is active from spring to fall and will hibernate during the winter. In early spring they breed and lay a massive amount of eggs in water, attached to vegetation.

When hibernating in winter they will partially freeze, and bury themselves underground, or under natural debris. 

Small in size, most Boreal Chorus frogs will never grow larger than 1.5 inches. They come in shades of brown, green, and gray.

Broken stripes run down this species’ backs, which may look similar to spots. A dark stripe also runs through this species’ eye, onto its side. This species has moist skin, pale bellies, and round orange eyes.

Boreal chorus frogs eat a plethora of small insects, similar to other smaller frog species. Since they are such an abundant species, this frog is used for food by a large number of predators.

Adult frogs get eaten by large mammals, birds of prey, snakes, and other frogs, while tadpoles are prey to insects, fish, and reptiles. In Kansas, this species is extremely common and has a healthy population.

22. Strecker’s Chorus Frog 

Strecker's Chorus Frog (Pseudacris streckeri) on a dark road somewhere in Harper County, Kansas, USA
A Strecker’s Chorus Frog (Pseudacris streckeri) on a dark road somewhere in Harper County, Kansas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Hylidae 
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris streckeri 
  • Other Names: N/A 
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 2 inches 
  • Lifespan: 5 years 
  • Average Price Range: N/A 

Strecker’s chorus frogs have a small range in south Kansas and are found in various habitats. Woodlands, fields, prairies, and cultivated fields are where they inhabit.

A freshwater source like a marsh, swamp, river, or lake is usually near the areas they live in. Sandy soil and leaf litter are also present in their habitat, as they burrow and live underground.

This chorus frog uses its front legs to burrow, instead of its hind legs like other species. During the rainy season in spring, they will breed and exit their burrows.

Eggs are laid in the water, and males create a high-pitched noise. Most of the time this species stays in its burrow, but will occasionally exit it at night.

Strecker’s chorus frogs are the largest chorus frog species and have gray, brown, green, or olive coloring. They have a dark stripe on their eyes, and dark spots covering their back.

Their underside is white, and in between their hind legs is yellow or orange coloring. 

Small insects are what this species eats. Their small size makes them vulnerable to a variety of predators like birds and larger frogs.

Strecker’s chorus frogs only have a short lifespan and live an average of 3 years in the wild. They are not kept as pets and may be able to live longer if not eaten by predators.

Wrapping up

Frogs are an important part of the habitats located in Kansas. They feed on pests like insects and are a valuable food source for native mammal, snake, and bird species.

Amphibians, including frogs, have experienced a population decline. Pollution, habitat loss, and disease are some of the main factors of their decline.

Learning about different frogs is fun, but also important in finding ways to sustain their population. 

When trying to identify a frog it may be difficult since some species look similar. Their features, location, and call are all important in identifying a species.

Subspecies are sometimes hard to distinguish from one another as they only have slight differences. As you learn more about each species it will get easier to identify them.

Frogs are also kept as pets, but they are not for everyone. Some of the species on this list like the Green Frog, or American toad can make a good pet for the right amphibian owner.

Hopefully, this list of all 22 frogs in Kansas is helpful in learning about the species near you, and the different types of frogs in America.

Frogs in Other States:

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