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Frogs in Louisiana

There are about 32 different species of toads and frogs in Louisiana currently known: twenty-four species of frogs and eight species of toads. Although both frogs and toads are amphibians of the order Anura, significant differences exist between them; here’s an explanation.

Firstly, the skin of a frog is usually slimy and somewhat smooth, while that of a toad is dry and full of warts.

In addition, frogs hop while toads prefer to crawl around. This is because frogs have very long legs that are made for hopping, and toads’ legs are much shorter.

If you would like to know the different types of frogs in Louisiana, keep reading! This article provides some basic information on the species of frogs — and toads — that can be found in Louisiana.

It tells their scientific names, average lifespan, what type of habitat you could expect to see them in, and how you can distinguish them based on appearance, color and size, their prey, and their predators.

Remember that some of these species are already endangered, or soon will be, and should not be endangered further. Activities involving the destruction of their natural habitats should be curbed to ensure they are allowed to reproduce and grow in number.

Also, most of these anurans that are not poisonous make good first pets in homes and for kids.

Table of Contents

  1. Frogs in Louisiana
  2. Toads in Louisiana
  3. FAQ
  4. Conclusion

Species of Frogs in Louisiana

1. Blanchard’s Cricket Frog

Blanchard's Cricket Frog (Acris blanchardi) on a pebbly surface in St Gabriel, Louisiana, USA
A Blanchard’s Cricket Frog (Acris blanchardi) on a pebbly surface in St Gabriel, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Acris blanchardi
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.6 to 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 0 to 1.4 years in the wild; up to 4.9 years in captivity

Blanchard’s cricket frogs could be found in central, midwestern, and southeastern United States, in parts of such states as Michigan, Wisconsin, Colorado, Texas, Louisiana, and Virginia. They have also been found in parts of Canada and Mexico.

They are typically found in moist habitats, but they live mostly along permanent and semi-permanent water bodies like lakes, ponds, and streams that move slowly.

This species of frog is small in size with large warts on its skin. They are usually tan, brown, reddish-brown, or olive green in color.

Sometimes, they have red, green, or black blotches on their skins and a broad stripe running down their backs. They usually have a dark visible triangular mark on top of their heads, located between their eyes.

They are nocturnal, and so if you ever want to look for one in your area, it’s best to search in the nighttime when the air is humid. They are active during light rain and in humid conditions, but not on days when it is extremely cold and windy.

Blanchard’s cricket frogs do not face the danger of population decline currently. They are one of the most aquatic frogs because they tend to remain around water even after breeding.

They specifically feed on insects like mosquitoes, beetles, ants, and spiders as adults.

2. Northern Cricket Frog

Northern Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans) on dry leaves in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA
A Northern Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans) on dry leaves in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Acris crepitans
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.5 to 1.5 inches (1.3 to 3.6 centimeters)
  • Lifespan: 0 to 4 months in the wild; up to 4.9 years in captivity

This species of frog is one of the least endangered. Northern cricket frogs can be found in the eastern and middle states of the USA and parts of Canada and Mexico.

They are found along the edges of ponds, streams, lakes, and rivers with subaquatic or budding vegetation.

Northern cricket frogs have small waists, webbed toes, and a triangle mark in between their eyes. They do not have toe pads.

Their skin is usually colored gray or light brown. They also have bumpy skin with dark bands on their legs, and white lines from their eyes to their forelegs.

Although a member of the treefrog family, the northern cricket frog does not climb trees. It typically eats insects and is hunted by herons, fish, and snakes.

It has a jump of over three feet, likened to a six-foot human jumping 200 feet — amazing! It uses its jump power to evade predators by jumping in a zigzag pattern.

This species of frogs are diurnal, meaning that they are more active during the day than at night.

3. Southern Cricket Frog

Southern Cricket Frog (Acris gryllus) sitting on a leaf in Palomino Drive Park, Louisiana, USA
A Southern Cricket Frog (Acris gryllus) sitting on a leaf in Palomino Drive Park, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Acris gryllus
  • Other Names: Southeastern cricket frog
  • Adult Size: 1.2 to 3.3 cm (0.5 to 1.3 in)
  • Lifespan: typically four months

Southern cricket frogs are small and native to the southeastern part of the United States. They can be found in such states as Virginia, Florida, and Louisiana.

They love to live in temperate regions, usually on land or in freshwater areas illuminated by the sun. Forests, lakes, streams, marshes, swamps, and shallow ponds with vegetation are ideal for them.

This species of treefrogs are quite similar in appearance and behavior to the northern cricket frogs, although smaller and more slender. The southern cricket frogs however do not like to share habitation with the northern cricket frogs — how odd is that!

You can find these frogs in a wide range of colors, including black, brown, reddish-brown, tan, olive green, and gray.

From the top of its snout and running along its back, you can see a stripe on the skin of a northern cricket frog. This line is conspicuous because it is usually in a color contrasting the frog’s skin.

You can tell the southern apart from the northern cricket frogs. Their bodies are more slender, snouts more pointed, feet less webbed and warts less prominent.

They as well possess a longer jump range of eight feet! You can also tell the males and females apart — the males have darker throats while the females have white throats.

They mainly eat insects and are prey to fish, snakes, turtles, birds, and large salamanders.

To avoid their prey, they employ their jump and are able to camouflage both in the vegetation and in water. This is called cryptic adaptation to the environment.

4. Bird-Voiced Treefrog

Bird-voiced Treefrog (Hyla avivoca) on some wood in St. Tammany, Louisiana, USA
A Bird-voiced Treefrog (Hyla avivoca) on some wood in St. Tammany, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla avivoca
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2.8 to 5.2 cm (1.1 to 2.05 in); average 3.2cm (1.26 in)
  • Lifespan: 0 to 4 years in captivity; typically 2.5 years

The bird-voiced treefrog is found in the Gulf Coast area and the Mississippi River, in states like North Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Florida. It could be found in large-river swamps, rivers, and streams.

Males can also be found in trees above the surface of the water before breeding season. The adult female frogs of this species are typically almost twice as big as the male ones.

The adult frogs are generally colored green, gray, or black. They have dark blotches on their backs, dark marks between their eyes, and a pale spot on each side of their heads.

They also have smooth skin, dark stripes on their limbs, and dark spots on their white bellies. As their name suggests, they live in trees and so have webbed feet with padding to aid climbing.

Bird-voiced treefrogs are primarily solitary, interacting and communicating during the mating season for reproduction. They are nocturnal and mainly feed on insects and terrestrial non-insect arthropods.

Their brown and green skins help them blend into their environments and avoid predators like water snakes and birds.

5. Cope’s Gray Treefrog

Cope's Gray Treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) on Breaux Bridge, Louisiana, USA
A Cope’s Gray Treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) on Breaux Bridge, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla chrysoscelis
  • Other Names: Southern gray tree frog
  • Adult Size: 3.2 to 6 cm (1.26 to 3.26 in)
  • Lifespan: 2.5 to 7 years in captivity

This species of treefrogs is very similar to the gray treefrog. It is native to North America, inhabiting Ontario, Canada, and USA states like Texas and Florida.

Cope’s gray treefrogs can be found in elevated wooded areas around both temporary and permanent waters. They live around swamps, ponds, lakes, and mixed or deciduous forests.

Both sexes of this species of frogs look alike. They have toe pads that are biologically adapted for climbing and white marks beneath their eyes.

They are colored differently, commonly gray with black blotches on their backs. There are also frogs of this species in green and brown.

Adhesive toe pads help these frogs adapt to climbing. They are nocturnal, solitary, and sedentary, possessing high tolerance for freezing temperatures because of the glycerol in their blood.

Adult frogs eat insects and their larvae, mites, spiders, and snails. They are prey to snakes, birds, small mammals, and even other frogs. They avoid their predators by nocturnal activity and cryptic adaptation.

6. American Green Treefrog

Green Treefrog (Hyla cinerea) on a black bar of a gate in Northwestern State University of Louisiana, Louisiana, USA
A Green Treefrog (Hyla cinerea) on a black bar of a gate in Northwestern State University of Louisiana, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla cinerea
  • Other Names: Green treefrog
  • Adult Size: 3.2 to 6.4 cm (2.6 to 5.2 in)
  • Lifespan: 0 to 6 years

These are common frogs popular as pets. American green treefrogs are found in southeastern states of the US.

They live in weedy marshes, wet prairies, swamps, and along the edges of ponds, lakes, and streams. They prefer areas of the forest with an open canopy in order to easily find prey.

Green treefrogs are moderately large with a pointed snout and flat head. They are mostly yellow-green in color, but there are some which are reddish-brown or green.

Their hind legs web extensively and most of them have a white or yellow line from their jaw to their thigh on each side of the body. White or yellow dorsal spots are visible as well.

The pads on their toes are big, their legs long, and their skin smooth.

For most of the year, these species of frogs live solitarily and are most active in high humidity. While they are prey to large fish, birds, snakes, and some other frog species, they prey on small insects.

By cryptic coloration, they are able to hide from predators. They only have to tuck their legs in and close their eyes, and they blend with the vegetation; how cool!

7. Pine Woods Treefrog

Pine Woods Treefrog (Hyla femoralis) on someone's finger at St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana, USA
A Pine Woods Treefrog (Hyla femoralis) on someone’s finger at St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla femoralis
  • Other Names: Morse-code frog
  • Adult Size: 4 cm (1.57 in)
  • Lifespan: 7.8 years (speculation)

Southeastern states of the USA are home to this type of frog. It is found on the Atlantic plains and the Gulf Coast.

Pine woods treefrogs are likely to be found in temporary wetlands, so if you are in Louisiana, you could check roadside ditches and find some!

This species of treefrogs look like squirrel treefrogs. Pine woods treefrogs, however, have small brightly colored spots on their thighs which could be white, yellow, or orange and they are not visible.

The toes of these frogs are only slightly webbed. Adult females are slightly larger than adult males, usually gray, dull green, light brown, or dark brown.

They prefer to lead solitary lives, only grouping together to breed. Breeding takes place around bodies of water and when not breeding, these frogs live on trees.

They are considered the most arboreal treefrogs in the southeastern part of the US, adapted to climbing and specialized for jumping and hopping. They are also crepuscular (more active at dusk and dawn).

Pinewood treefrogs make food for insects and other terrestrial invertebrates like ants, moths, beetles, and grasshoppers.

Common predators include different species of water snakes and raccoons. Using adaptive coloration, they are able to avoid their predators.

And you know how we shout when we are in danger and need help? These frogs do that as well, though not exactly.

When captured, they let out long alarm calls which are even louder than their mating calls to surprise and destabilize their hunters.

8. Barking Treefrog

Barking Treefrog (Hyla gratiosa) on dark pavement in Washington Parish, Louisiana, USA
A Barking Treefrog (Hyla gratiosa) on dark pavement in Washington Parish, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  •  Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla gratiosa
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 5.1 to 7 cm (2.01 to 2.76 in)
  • Lifespan: 0 to 7 years, up to 12.5 years in captivity

Barking treefrogs are native and restricted to southeastern states of the US, known especially for their loud barking calls.

Where you find these frogs are largely dependent on the weather. They are found high up in trees in humid weather and inside the ground when the weather is dry. They are the biggest species of frogs currently known in this area.

Their bodies are plump and chubby, usually marked with dark round spots and coming in different shades of gray, brown, or green. They also characteristically have a yellow stripe on each of their sides, large toe pads, and rough skin.

These frogs are nocturnal and carnivorous, preying mostly on insects and invertebrates, like earthworms, but also eating smaller frogs. They are in turn hunted by snakes, birds, and raccoons.

Barking treefrogs are cryptically adapted to their environment, with a wide range of vision and the ability to quickly sense motion.

9. Squirrel Treefrog

Squirrel Tree Frog (Hyla squirella) on a leaf in St Gabriel, Louisiana, USA
A Squirrel Tree Frog (Hyla squirella) on a leaf in St Gabriel, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla squirella
  • Other Names: Rain frog, chameleon frog
  • Adult Size: 2.2 to 4.1 cm (1 to 1.5 in)
  • Lifespan: 0 to 8.5 years (in captivity)

The species of frogs known as squirrel treefrogs are again native to the southeastern region of the United States of America. They have also been introduced to the Bahamas.

They are typically found in marshes, swamps, and the surroundings of lakes and streams. They prefer areas with moisture that can provide both their shelter and food, including gardens, bushes, vines, trees, and shrubs.

These frogs are small in size even in adulthood. They come in various colors and can even change color.

They are usually gray, green, brown, or yellowish with either solid or patterned skins. Some have light broken stripes down their sides, and some have partial bars between their eyes.

Squirrel treefrogs are mostly active during the night but can be spotted hunting for insects during the day if it is humid. They are preyed upon by smaller mammals, other frogs, birds, snakes, and prey upon insects.

These frogs also employ cryptic coloration to make them less visible to predators.

10. Gray Treefrog

Gray Treefrog (Hyla versicolor) on someone's hands in Kisatchie National Forest, Louisiana, USA
A Gray Treefrog (Hyla versicolor) on someone’s hands in Kisatchie National Forest, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla versicolor
  • Other Names: Dryophytes versicolor, eastern gray treefrog
  • Adult Size: 3 to 5 cm (1.18 to 1.9 in); longest 6 cm (2.25 in)
  • Lifespan: 0 to 7 years, up to 9 years

This species of treefrog is only found in the eastern part of the USA and southeastern region of Canada.

Their population is quite stable so if you’re out looking for a gray treefrog, should easily find one. You could look in small areas full of trees, large forests, trees along prairie streams, and along rivers and swamps.

Gray treefrogs show no physical differences between their males and their females. Their skins are rough and warty, tougher than the average frog but smoother than the average toad.

Their toe pads are large, advanced, and adhesive, adapting them to climbing.

Due to environmental factors like humidity and season, these frogs may change in dorsal color. However, they are mostly found in various shades of gray with black blotches on their backs.

Brown, green, and ivory-colored frogs of this species are also found. They usually have a white mark beneath each eye and white bellies with black speckles around the groin.

Frogs of this species are largely solitary, nocturnal, crepuscular, saltatorial—adapted for jumping, hopping, and leaping—and arboreal. They eat smaller gray frogs, insects, insect larvae, spiders, snails, and mites, and are eaten by small mammals, other frogs, snakes, and birds.

To avoid predation, they live high in trees, change color to blend in with their surroundings, and are most active at dusk, dawn, or night.

11. Cuban Treefrog

Cuban Tree Frog (Osteopilus septentrionalis) on wood and leaves at Audubon Riverview Park, Louisiana, USA
A Cuban Tree Frog (Osteopilus septentrionalis) on wood and leaves at Audubon Riverview Park, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Osteopilus septentrionalis
  • Other Names: Giant treefrog, marbled tree-toad
  • Adult Size: 2.54 to 10.16 cm (1 to 4 in); longest up to 15.24 cm (6 in)
  • Lifespan: 0 to 5 years in the wild; up to 10 years in the wild and up to 12 years in captivity

Although found in several other parts of the Americas, this species of frog come from Cuba, the Cayman Islands, and the Bahamas. They live both in natural habitats like pine forests and swamps, and in man-modified areas like homes, buildings, and gardens.

They are the largest species of treefrogs found in the United States, with females typically larger than males. Individual frogs of this species vary largely in color, ranging from gray, tan, brown, and ivory to olive-green and blue-green.

They have large and noticeable toe pads, lacking warts and lateral stripes on their backs. Adult Cuban treefrogs have the skin on their backs glued to their skulls and this is one characteristic that distinguishes them from frogs native to the US.

While these frogs eat mainly insects, small invertebrates, and other frogs, they are prey to mostly skunks, snakes, owls, and raccoons. They like the hunt and can even eat prey up to twice their size!

They protect themselves by nocturnality, cryptic coloration, and defensive secretions from their inflated bodies.

12. Spring Peeper

Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) in leaves at Atchafalaya National Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana, USA
A Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) in leaves at Atchafalaya National Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris crucifer
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.9 to 3.5 cm (0.75 to 1.3 in)
  • Lifespan: 0 to 3 years; up to 4 years in captivity

Spring peepers are small frogs known for their whistling calls that mark the beginning of spring. They can be found in a lot of eastern states of the United States and parts of Canada.

They live in moist areas around trees, fields, wetlands, grassy lowlands, and ponds. If you’re looking for a spring peeper outside its breeding season, you may find it hard to see.

This type of treefrog is usually colored gray, tan, olive-brown, or brown. The back is X-shaped and has an irregular brown mark on it.

It has a white belly, dark bands on its legs, and moderately webbed feet for climbing. It lives in trees mostly but likes to be found on the ground among leaves.

Spring peepers are nocturnal and mostly live alone, feeding on insects and other non-insect arthropods. Some predators include large spiders, snakes, salamanders, owls, and birds.

To avoid being attacked, they employ cryptic coloration, jump away, and estivate (they bury themselves in mud or deep water).

13. Cajun Chorus Frog

Cajun Chorus Frog (Pseudacris fouquettei) in grass at Atchafalaya National Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana, USA
A Cajun Chorus Frog (Pseudacris fouquettei) in grass at Atchafalaya National Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris fouquettei
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 3.2 cm (1.25 in)
  • Lifespan: 0 to 5 years

This type of chorus frog is largely found in southeastern US states like Arkansas and Louisiana.

They are found in different habitats including forests, open fields, and roadside ditches. They are believed to burrow underground in the non-breeding season as they are hardly seen above ground when not breeding.

Cajun chorus frogs are characterized by their small size, pointed snouts, robust and moderately long arms, webless forelimb digits, long and slender padded toes, light stripes from each eye to each tympanum, and white or cream belly with light spotting.

They are usually brown or light gray in color with gold flecking. There could be three brown stripes or three sets of dark spots down their backs.

They are mostly diurnal, using small invertebrates like ants and flies for food.

Garter snakes, birds, ribbon snakes, turtles, water snakes, and other mammals are common predators. These frogs have not been observed using any escape or defense mechanisms.

14. Ornate Chorus Frog

Ornate Chorus Frog (Pseudacris ornata) in some grass in Leon County, Florida, USA
An Ornate Chorus Frog (Pseudacris ornata) in some grass in Leon County, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris ornata
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2.5 to 3.2 cm (1 to 1.5 in)
  • Lifespan: 0 to 3.5 years

This frog type is only found in the southeastern parts of the USA, in wetlands, woodlands, and grassy areas like prairies.

They like to breed in temporary or semi-permanent water bodies such as ponds, ditches, and flooded meadows. They are however most common in habitats with little to no moisture, like sandhills.

Frogs of this species are very colorful, coming in gray, green, and reddish-brown color phases. Across each of their eyes is a black stripe like a mask.

They have dark markings on their sides and groins, with occasional yellow spots on their groins and small yellow spots on the inside of their legs.

They are nocturnal and like humid weather. They are hunted by snakes, birds, small mammals, hawks, owls, raccoons, and skunks.

They are insectivorous, feeding on insects and other small non-insect arthropods. Escape mechanisms of ornate chorus frogs include taking immense leaps away from predators, lying flat when surprised, and estivation.

15. Strecker’s Chorus Frog

Strecker's Chorus Frog (Pseudacris streckeri) on dark concrete in Harper County, Kansas, USA
A Strecker’s Chorus Frog (Pseudacris streckeri) on dark concrete in Harper County, Kansas, USA. – Source
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris streckeri
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.9 to 3.8 cm (0.75 to 1.5 in); average 2.5 cm (0.98 in)
  • Lifespan: 0 to 3 years in the wild, an average of 2 years

Strecker’s chorus frogs are native to the south-central United States. They are one of the most terrestrial species of the treefrog family, resident in woods, sand prairies, cultivated fields, steam edges, and cypress swamps.

They are the largest of the chorus frogs with stout bodies and forearms — they look like toads. They have a dark stripe on each side from snout to shoulder across each eye.

Dark spots along the sides, dark blotches on the back, and yellow or orange-yellow colored groins are characteristics of Strecker’s chorus frogs. They may be green, gray, or olive in color.

These frogs are nocturnal and burrow into the soil to avoid predators like snakes, raccoons, turtles, birds, fish, and other mammals. They mostly eat insects, arthropods, and other invertebrates.

 16. Rio Grande Chirping Frog

Rio Grande Chirping Frog (Eleutherodactylus campi) on a cracked surface in Austin, Texas, USA
A Rio Grande Chirping Frog (Eleutherodactylus campi) on a cracked surface in Austin, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Family: Eleutherodactylidae
  • Scientific Name: Eleutherodactylus cystignathoides campi
  • Other Names: Mexican chirping frog, lowland chirping frog
  • Adult Size: 1.59 to 2.54 cm (0.625 to 1 in)
  • Lifespan: Not known

These are small-sized frogs native to parts of the United States like Texas, and parts of Mexico like Tamaulipas and Veracruz. They thrive around humans, as they are found in piles of debris and in watered lawns and gardens.

These chirping frogs are also found in more natural habitats like dense vegetation and along semi-permanent water bodies. Female Rio Grande chirping frogs tend to be bigger in size than the males. 

Generally, with frogs of this species, their snouts are pointed, their bodies are small but elongated and flattened, their toes are long and slender, and their dorsal skin is usually grayish-brown with olive or yellow undertones. They have a dark line on each side of their heads, from their eye to their nostril.

Their feeding and defensive habits are not known much, but they have been observed to prey on small spiders, flies, and other insects. They are a common species and are not endangered. They are completely terrestrial frogs.

17. Greenhouse Frog

A Greenhouse Frog (Eleutherodactylus planirostris) on wood in Lafayette, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Eleutherodactylidae
  • Scientific Name: Eleutherodactylus planirostris
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.2 to 3cm (0.47 to 1.18 in)
  • Lifespan: no information

The greenhouse frog species is native to the Caribbean Islands. They have however been introduced to other areas of the Americas and Asia like Hawaii, Florida, Shenzhen, Hong Kong, and Louisiana.

They are largely terrestrial, found in both residential areas and natural habitats.

They also live in open grasslands and along stream banks. They have granular skin in various colors ranging from brown and reddish-brown to tan and bronze.

Some show dark and light coloration, a dorsal band in the shape of a V, and a band between the eyes. Others have light stripes running laterally along the back from the eye to the posterior end.

These frogs usually have light gray bellies, small fingers, toes that are not webbed, and small toe pads.

Greenhouse frogs are nocturnal, and active mostly in humid and rainy weather. In dry weather, they usually seek shelter under different natural and man-made objects.

They are typically insectivores, hunted by other frogs, birds, mammals, snakes, and lizards, and cryptically colored to evade predators.

 18. Southern Crawfish Frog

Southern Crawfish Frog (Lithobates areolatus areolatus) on pebbles and sand in Austin County, Texas, USA
A Southern Crawfish Frog (Lithobates areolatus areolatus) on pebbles and sand in Austin County, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates areolatus areolatus
  • Other Names: Rana areolatus areolatus
  • Adult Size: 6.35 to 11.43 cm (2.5 to 4.5 in)
  • Lifespan: not known

Southern Crawfish frogs are native to central to the southern United States. Natural habitats include grasslands, prairies, and woodlands.

You wouldn’t easily find these frogs, however, because they spend most of the year underground, in abandoned burrows of other animals. During the mating season, you can spot them around ponds, lakes, and streams.

The frogs in this species are big and have large heads up to a third of their whole size! You could tell it apart by its short and stocky body, grayish or brownish color, dark spots outlined in tan, white belly, and yellowish ventral side.

Its hind legs are strong and long, with three digits webbed together and a separate longer fourth digit. They get their name from living in burrows of crayfish for most of the year.

They are solitary and quiet frogs, coming together and calling loudly only in the breeding period. These frogs make food for insects and non-insect arthropods, other amphibians, and some reptiles.

Because of their underground shelters, they are hardly preyed upon but they hop away quickly from predators or swim to the bottom of the water body.

19. American Bullfrog

American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) on an island of mud in water in Franklinton, Louisiana, USA
An American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) on an island of mud in water in Franklinton, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates catesbeianus
  • Other Names: Bullfrog, North American bullfrog
  • Adult Size: 9 to 15.2 cm (3.5 to 6 in)
  • Lifespan: 0 to 7 years in the wild, up to 9 years; up to 16 years in captivity

The American bullfrog is native to eastern North America but has been introduced to other places in Europe, Asia, and South America. They are largely aquatic and so you can find them around bodies of still, shallow water.

Swamps, ponds, marshes, ditches, rivers, and streams with abundant vegetation are common habitats, but they can also be found along the banks of streams.

Bullfrogs are the largest species of true frogs known in North America. Dorsally, they could be colored in different shades from brown to green, with darker colored blotches on their backs.

You can tell the male and female frogs of this species apart easily; in males, the external ear is much larger than the eye, while the eye and external ear are relatively the same sizes, or the ear smaller.

These frogs are active both during the day and at night, they just prefer warm and humid weather. They are predators to insects, insect larvae, and terrestrial vertebrates — they don’t even hesitate to eat frogs of the same species!

Known predators of American bullfrogs include turtles, raccoons, great blue herons, great egrets, and water snakes. They are even hunted by humans for meat but face no threat of extinction.

20. Green Frog

Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans) on a trunk at Barataria Preserve, Louisiana, USA
A Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans) on a trunk at Barataria Preserve, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates clamitans
  • Other Names: Rana clamitans
  • Adult Size: 7.5 to 12.5 cm (2.95 to 4.92 in)
  • Lifespan: up to 10 years in captivity

Native to the eastern part of North America, green frogs can be found in ponds, marshes, lakes, bogs, sloughs, and along slow-moving streams and rivers. They are typically found around water but may move into meadows and wooded areas when the rains come.

They are mostly green, yellow-green, brown, brownish-green, and olive in color, with some rare blue ones. They have irregular dark spots on their backs, transverse bands on their legs, and well-webbed toes.

The external ear (tympanum) of this species is quite large, being much larger than the eye in males and the same size as the eye in females.

Green frogs mainly enjoy living alone and are both nocturnal and diurnal. They eat various invertebrates and other chordates like small frogs.

Adults are eaten by snakes, herons, birds, raccoons, larger frogs, turtles, and humans. They have excellent vision and this helps them detect both predators and prey.

They employ mimicry to avoid predators. How cool is this: mink frogs taste bad because they secrete foul-tasting liquid when eaten, but green frogs don’t. However, green frogs look like mink frogs and they occur together.

In order to not be eaten by their hunters, they take advantage of this resemblance!

 21. Pig Frog

Pig Frog (Lithobates grylio) on some bricks at West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana, USA
A Pig Frog (Lithobates grylio) on some bricks at West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates grylio
  • Other Names: Rana grylio, lagoon frog, southern bullfrog
  • Adult Size: 11.5 to 16.5 cm (3.25 to 6.5 in)
  • Lifespan: not known

Texas, South Carolina, Louisiana, and Florida are some states in the southeastern part of the USA where pig frogs are native to. They bear this name because their calls are similar to a pig’s grunt.

They are found in lakes, marshes, and streams, and particularly in ponds with such vegetation as water lilies, saw grass, pickerel weed, bladderworts, and maiden cane.

A pig frog bears semblance to a bullfrog but has a narrow, pointed head with fully webbed hindlegs. They are usually found in shades from olive to black-brown color and have dark spots scattered on their backs.

Each thigh has either a bright line or a row of bright spots running through it, its eyes are larger than normal and its nostrils are prominent.

You can tell the male and female frogs of this species apart by the same standards as green frogs. These frogs are however shy, and so they are not seen much in the daytime.

They are entirely aquatic, mainly nocturnal, and hunted by humans for food.

 22. Pickerel Frog

Pickerel Frog (Lithobates palustris) in sticks and leaves near Bayou D'Arbonne, Louisiana, USA
A Pickerel Frog (Lithobates palustris) in sticks and leaves near Bayou D’Arbonne, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates palustris
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 4.5 to 7.5 cm (2 to 4 in)
  • Lifespan: not known

Pickerel frogs are medium-sized and native to North America.

If you are looking to find one, be sure to check cool streams with trees in the area, swamps, and springs around you. You can also find them in grassy fields, prairies, and weed-covered locations during summer.

Pickerel frogs have two folds running down their backs and two lines of chocolate-brown spots in between these folds. Their ventral side is usually a yellow or yellowish-orange pallor.

Males are typically smaller than females and these males have short forearms and swollen thumbs.

You might not want to have a pickerel frog for a pet as it produces toxic secretions that irritate humans and can cause the death of small animals. These frogs are nocturnal and carnivorous, feeding mostly on insects and other invertebrates.

Snakes and other predators avoid eating them because of their poisonous secretions.

23. Dusky Gopher Frog

Dusky Gopher Frog (Lithobates sevosus) in straw with a single green strand of grass
A Dusky Gopher Frog (Lithobates sevosus) in straw with a single green strand of grass. – Source
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates sevosus
  • Other Names: Mississippi gopher frog, dark gopher frog, St. Tammany gopher frog
  • Adult Size: 7.6 to 10 cm (3 to 4 in)
  • Lifespan: 0 to 8 years

This frog species originated from and only live in the southern part of the United States.

They live in sandy highlands, shrub wetlands, temporary pools, and other wetlands. They have been found across the Coastal Plain in Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi.

If you come across a frog of this species, don’t harm it — it is critically endangered!

You can tell if it’s a dusky gopher frog if it has bumpy skin with black, brown, or gray dorsal coloration and dark spots and ridges on its back. They prefer to be found underground, in burrows and stump holes.

They are currently one of the top 100 most endangered species in the world. They feed on insects and insect larvae, invertebrates, and other frogs.

24. Southern Leopard Frog

Southern Leopard Frog (Lithobates sphenocephalus) in moldy mud and grass at St. Landry Parish, Louisiana, USA
A Southern Leopard Frog (Lithobates sphenocephalus) in moldy mud and grass at St. Landry Parish, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates sphenocephalus
  • Other Names: Florida leopard frog
  • Adult Size: 2 to 13 cm (0.79 to 5.12 in); average 8 cm (3.15 in)
  • Lifespan: <1 year in the wild, up to 2 or 3 years

An introduced species in some areas, southern leopard frogs are native to the eastern part of North America. They are commonly found around bodies of freshwater, dispersing from the water to moist vegetation in the summer.

They are fundamentally aquatic but perform a lot of activity on land as well. They have been noticed around forests, lakes, ponds, temporary water pools, swamps, and marshes.

Frogs of this species are slender and long-legged, with sharply pointed heads. From behind each eye to the hip, there is a conspicuous dorsal fold in a lighter color.

They do not possess toe pads, and females are usually bigger than males. The dorsal coloration on the back and sides is usually green or brown, with distinct dark spots.

Common predators of the southern leopard frog are aquatic predators including snakes, river otters, great blue herons, and humans. They primarily feed on insects and non-insect arthropods.

Larger frogs eat small mammals. They are nocturnal, hiding during the day in vegetation close to water, and they evade predators by entering the water and swimming away.

Species of Toads in Louisiana

25. American Toad

American Toad (Anaxyrus americanus) on a dirt mound in Tunica Hills WMA, Louisiana, USA
An American Toad (Anaxyrus americanus) on a dirt mound in Tunica Hills WMA, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus americanus
  • Other Names: hop toad
  • Adult Size: 5 to 10 cm (1.97 to 4 in); average 7.5 cm (2.95 in)
  • Lifespan: 0 to 10 years in the wild, average 1 year; 0 to 36 years in captivity

American toads are found in places across Canada, Mexico, the eastern part of the United States, and southern Quebec.

They are characteristically stout, thick-skinned, and short-legged. They have noticeable warts on their bodies, usually yellow or red.

A poisonous milky fluid is produced by some glands in their skin to cause harm by ingestion and entrance into the eyes, protecting the toad from predators. American toads are found in many different colors, including olive green, gray, reddish-brown, and tan, and these colors could be solid or include patterns.

You can find the American toad almost anywhere within this region, from rainforests to streams to ponds and even to backyards. As long as there is a body of semi-permanent water for them to breed in and thickset vegetation to act as cover during hunting, this species of frogs lives in the area comfortably.

Adult toads eat insects and other invertebrates for food. They typically hide under rocks, stones, twigs, and other such things in the daytime.

So if you are looking to catch one, wait until it’s nighttime and when the weather is warm and humid.

To differentiate American toads from other toad species, it will be helpful to note that their wart patterns are different. Their backs are littered with several dark spots with few — only one or two — warts.

They also have oval and black pupils with gold circles around them.

26. Fowler’s Toad

Fowler's Toad (Anaxyrus fowleri) on pebbly concrete in Natchez, Louisiana, USA
A Fowler’s Toad (Anaxyrus fowleri) on pebbly concrete in Natchez, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus fowleri
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 5.1 to 9.5 cm (2 to 3.75 in)
  • Lifespan: 0 to 5 years

This species of toad is found in the eastern region of the United States, along the Atlantic Coastal Plain.

They typically live in savannas which have widely spaced trees and open canopy, or grasslands that are conducive to the growth of grasses but not taller trees. They also like to live on beaches — they primarily prefer to live in open spaces and burrow into the ground in case of extreme heat or cold.

They are usually medium-sized and tan, gray, brown, or greenish-gray in color. They have dark or black spots on their backs, and each black spot could have three to six warts.

They have a white or light mid-dorsal stripe and light bellies with a single gray spot. Typically, the male toads are darker in color than the females.

Fowler’s toads are considered to be at risk and conflicting information exists about their behavior. Some sources claim this species of toads are completely nocturnal while others say that they are active only during the day, except in extreme heat or cold.

However, they eat mainly insects and other invertebrates like worms.

Know how exhilarating it is to ride on the beach in a Jeep? Well, the activities of such off-road vehicles like ATBs and mountain bikes on beaches and dunes contribute to the at-risk status of Fowler’s toads.

Chemicals used in farming and agriculture, in general, contribute too. In addition, the toads are hunted down by snakes, birds, and small mammals, their predators.

Thankfully, this species of toad employs various methods to avoid or ward off predators. Because of their natural earth tones, they blend into their environments.

They also pretend to be dead by lying still if roughly handled by predators. Another defensive mechanism of theirs is the poisonous liquid from warts on their skins.

27. Oak Toad

Oak Toad (Anaxyrus quercicus) on white sand in St Tammany Parish, Louisiana, USA
An Oak Toad (Anaxyrus quercicus) on white sand in St Tammany Parish, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus quercicus
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.9 to 3.3 cm (0.75 to 1.3 in)
  • Lifespan: 0 to 1.9 years

Oak toads can be found in the southeastern Coastal Plains of the USA.

They usually prefer living near savannas, in moist and grassy areas with sandy soil. They breed in shallow pools and ditches and live in temperate forests, ponds, streams, rivers, and marshes.

They are the smallest toad species in North America, possessing short heads and short, flat bodies. In the same way some humans may blush with anger, excitement, or embarrassment, the bodies of oak toads can change color!

However, the color changes are a result of temperature changes. Their backs are usually brown or black.

Oak toads have a single dorsal stripe which is prominent and can be in various colors such as orange, yellow, cream, or white.

They usually have dark blotches (4 to 5 pairs) on their backs, with fine bumps called tubercles in red or orange color giving their backs a rough texture. Their bellies do not have blotches but they do have tubercles on their white surface.

They possess poisonous fluids in their skin to ward off predators, stored in their elongated parotid glands. They primarily feed on insects and other small arthropods and are prey to snakes and gopher frogs.

They are primarily diurnal but can be found at night taking breeding choruses. They live solitarily and are not threatened yet but are expected to be in the near future.

28. Southern Toad

Southern Toad (Anaxyrus terrestris) on pebbles in sand at Washington Parish, Louisiana, USA
A Southern Toad (Anaxyrus terrestris) on pebbles in sand at Washington Parish, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus terrestris
  • Other Names: Bufo terrestris
  • Adult Size: 4.1 to 9 cm (1.6 to 3.5 in); up to 11.3 cm (4.4 in)
  • Lifespan: 0 to 10 years in the wild, average 1 year; 0-36 years in captivity

The southern toad is native to the southeastern region of the USA.

While it can be found in natural habitats, this toad is also comfortable living in human environments, like parks and yards, as long as they have a water source. This frog likes to burrow in sandy soil, is largely terrestrial, and moves to lowland water bodies to breed.

Southern toads are usually colored brown dorsally but can be found in other colors like red, gray, and black. Sexes can be told apart by size, as males are smaller than females, and throat color during breeding — males have darker throats in this period.

They are nocturnal toads, burrowing in the sand during the day and active during the night. They make food for insects and other invertebrates.

29. Gulf Coast Toad

Gulf Coast Toad (Incilius nebulifer) on some leaves at South Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA
A Gulf Coast Toad (Incilius nebulifer) on some leaves at South Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Incilius nebulifer
  • Other Names: Bufo nebulifer, Coastal plains toad, Mexican toad, nebulous toad
  • Adult Size: 5.3 to 9.8 cm (2.2 to 4.1 in)
  • Lifespan: 0 to 8 years in the wild

Toads of this species are found on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico, from Veracruz, Mexico down to Mississippi, USA.

They inhabit coastal prairies, pools, ditches, marshes, and swamps. They are commonly also seen in suburban and urban areas like towns and barrier beaches.

They are typically large toads, with broad heads and low cranial crests. They possess large external ears, uniformly rough dorsal skin, and sharply pointed tubercles.

The ventral surface possesses unpointed tubercles and is usually a solid cream color. The backs of Gulf Coast toads are usually dark brown in color with a broad white or yellow stripe running down the middle.

Their forelegs have short and robust digits that are not webbed while hind legs are long with slender and half-webbed toes.

These toads are nocturnal and insectivorous.

They also eat scorpions, small lizards, and other frogs. Predators include various types of snakes and tiger salamanders.

30. Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad (Gastrophryne carolinensis) in wet dirt at Park Forest, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA
An Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad (Gastrophryne carolinensis) in wet dirt at Park Forest, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  •  Family: Microhylidae
  • Scientific Name: Gastrophryne carolinensis
  • Other Names: Eastern narrow-mouthed toad
  • Adult Size: 2.5 to 4 cm (1 to 1.5 in)
  • Lifespan: 0 to 6 years in captivity

This is a species of small toads found in the entire southeastern portion of North America and introduced in the Bahamas.

They live anywhere provided there is shelter and moisture. They can be found by upturning logs, boards, vegetable debris, and sawdust piles.

Toads of this species have a distinct fold of skin running across their heads behind their eyes. This fold can move to protect the toad’s eyes from insects.

The eastern narrow-mouth toad shows varied dorsal coloration, including light tan, brown, red, reddish-brown, gray, and nearly black.

Its middorsal area is usually with brightly colored strips covered in patches and spots. Its stomach is heavily spotted, its head is narrow, sharp, and pointed, and its mouth is small (hence the name).

They have very smooth skin and no tympana, unlike most true toads.

These toads are fundamentally nocturnal and insectivorous, largely feeding on ants, beetles, and termites. Common predators are snakes and cattle egrets. They avoid their hunters by burrowing into the soil, nocturnality, and mucous secretions that irritate predators.

31. Eastern Spadefoot

East Spadefoot (Scaphiopus holbrooki) in grass at St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana, USA
An East Spadefoot (Scaphiopus holbrooki) in grass at St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Scaphipodidae
  • Scientific Name: Scaphiopus holbrooki
  • Other Names: Eastern spadefoot toad
  • Adult Size: 4.5 to 7.8 cm (1.7 to 3.1 in)
  • Lifespan: 5 to 9 years in the wild; 7 to 10 years in captivity

Endemic to North America, this toad species likes sandy soil, moderate temperature, and rainy regions.

They live in grasslands, ravines, pastures, farmlands, swamps, and temporary pools. They like to burrow into the ground, covering themselves with leaves and twigs for protection.

Eastern spadefoots are dark in color, in different shades ranging from olive to black. Ventral coloration could be gray to white.

They have two conspicuous lines running along their backs and tapering together at the posterior end.

The skin is warty with small parotid glands, large eyes for nocturnal sight, and black spade-like protrusions on the hindlegs to aid burrowing. The color and darkness of skin are affected by the environment and not sex.

They like to live alone and are active both in the day and at night, but more active during the day. They are very active in humid weather. They feed on insects and other invertebrates.

Other toads, different species of snakes, and various birds feed on the eastern spadefoot.

To avoid predators, this toad quickly buries itself in the soil which its skin blends with, and produces a secretion that is foul-tasting and foul-smelling to predators.

32. Hurter’s Spadefoot

Hurter's Spadefoot (Scaphiopus hurterii) in dirt and greenery at Bienville Parish, Louisiana, USA
A Hurter’s Spadefoot (Scaphiopus hurterii) in dirt and greenery at Bienville Parish, Louisiana, USA. – Source
  • Family: Scaphipodidae
  • Scientific Name: Scaphiopus hurterii
  • Other Names: Scaphiopus holbrooki hurterii, Hurter’s spadefoot toad
  • Adult Size: about 6.7 cm (2.6 in)
  • Lifespan: up to 7 years

The species of American spadefoots called Hurter’s spadefoot are found in south-central states of the US. They are found in Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas.

They like to inhabit temporary pools, grasslands, and savannas.

Physically, they have webbed hindleg digits but their foreleg digits are not webbed together. They hop and jump to move about.

They have pectoral glands for structure, with ears and parotid glands distinct. Light bands are present on the back, tapering in an hourglass shape. They also possess tubercles on their toes.

They are nocturnal insectivores, largely feeding on terrestrial invertebrates. They are commonly eaten by snakes, birds, other frogs, and smaller mammals.

FAQ

When do frogs lay eggs in Louisiana?

Frogs typically breed around the beginning of spring, but breeding in different frogs occurs at different times of the year, every month.

The mating season usually lasts between January and September. Frogs lay eggs about two days after amplexus and mating, and these eggs could hatch between 3 and 25 days.

What is the limit of frogs that can be owned in Louisiana?

There are no limits to the possession of frogs in Louisiana. You can own as many frogs as you want, as long as you have a fishing license!

How many different species of frogs are in Louisiana?

There are 24 species of frogs in Louisiana and 8 species of toads.

How to get big bullfrogs in Louisiana

In Louisiana, you can get big bullfrogs without a special permit. You only need a fishing license, an LED light, and fishing equipment, or a net.

Bullfrogs are both nocturnal and diurnal, but it’s better to look for them at night because they are easier to spot at this time. Shine your LED light on the stream or pond’s shoreline, and go closer when you have spotted it to catch it.

Which frogs are poisonous in Louisiana?

Poisonous frogs in Louisiana include Cuban treefrogs and pickerel frogs.

Conclusion

We covered 32 types of toads and frogs in Louisiana. There are 24 types of frogs in Louisiana and 8 toad species known currently.

Most of these toads and frogs are not endangered and can easily be found, like the American green treefrog and American toads.

However, poisonous species like Cuban treefrogs, pickerel frogs, Fowler’s toads, oak toads, eastern narrow-mouth toads, and eastern spadefoots are dangerous to have as pets. American green treefrogs are an abundant species and make great pets.

Sources (Google websites)

·         American Museum of Natural History: https://www.amnh.org/

·         Amphibia Web: https://amphibiaweb.org/

·         Animal Diversity Web: https://animaldiversity.org/

·         Britannica: https://www.britannica.com/

·         CM Schalk: https://cmschalk.weebly.com/

·         Detroit Zoo: https://detroitzoo.org/

·         Lincoln Journal Star: https://journalstar.com/

·         Louisiana Herps: http://www.louisianaherps.com/

·         Michigan Natural Features Inventory: https://mnfi.anr.msu.edu/

·         NatureServe Explorer: https://explorer.natureserve.org/

·         Oklahoma Wildlife Department: https://www.wildlifedepartment.com/

·         Savannah River Ecology Laboratory: https://srel.uga.edu/

·         United States Geological Survey: https://www.usgs.gov/

·         Virginia Herpetological Society: https://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/

·         WikiHow: https://www.wikihow.com/Main-Page

·         Zootaxa: https://www.mapress.com/zt/

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