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Frogs in Texas

There are 44 different types of frogs in Texas that inhabit many different kinds of places within the state. Frogs are most active from spring to fall, and most species will go into a resting state during the winter.

Every species has its preferred habitat but most frogs will live near a water source to mate and lay their eggs.

Knowing a species habitat, range, appearance, and other traits will help identify numerous frogs and toads in Texas since there are so many to check out.

On this list, you will find all frogs and toads species in Texas as well as learn some interesting things you might want to know about each of them. There are 44 species and some of them on this list could even be your next pet, as some can be raised in captivity.

The populations of some have been declining and many face a loss of habitat and death from contamination. Let’s take a look at all 44 species that inhabit the state of Texas:

Frogs in Texas

1. American Bullfrog

American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) on a lilypad in Brays Bayou in Braeswood Place, Harris County, Texas, USA
An American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) on a lilypad in Brays Bayou in Braeswood Place, Harris County, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates catesbeianus (Rana catesbeiana)
  • Adult Size: 3.5 to 6 inches
  • Lifespan: 7 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $20

The largest frog in North America is the American bullfrog and it inhabits many freshwater habitats within Texas.

This species is widespread across the U.S living in ponds, marshes, and lakes, preferring warmer waters. Man-made lakes and water sources will attract this species along with dense vegetation.

They are aggressive species and are prey on small predators. Other frogs, crayfish, small birds, insects, and whatever they can find is what they hunt.

Bullfrogs are hefty with large features. Their eyes are brown with almond-shaped pupils, protruding out of their heads. They have long legs which help them jump ten times the body length.

Its legs are cooked and eaten regularly in some areas. They are most active at night and will come out in wet weather. Monster frogs are often found of this species that can weigh as much as 13 lbs.

2. American Toad

American Toad (Anaxyrus americanus) on a plant in a white pot at Flat Bay, Moore Station, Texas, USA
An American Toad (Anaxyrus americanus) on a plant in a white pot at Flat Bay, Moore Station, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus americanus
  • Other Names: Eastern American toad
  • Adult Size: 2 to 3.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30

American toads inhabit the northeast region of Texas and need shallow water with hiding places and plenty of food. Hardwood forests, pinewoods, and residential areas are places to find them.

They burrow so they prefer sandy soiled areas. American toads are nocturnal and will hide under logs, dirt, and other natural debris during the day. In the heat of summer, they will avoid coming out and during winter they remain inactive.

Widespread across the U.S they are important food for many species of larger frogs, birds, and snakes. When in danger they will remain still and try to blend in with their surroundings using their coloring.

They are small in size and can be brown gray red, or olive tan. Their skin is dry and covered in warts. Breeding occurs in shallow water. Tadpoles of this species emit toxins out their skin that are capable of killing predators. As they age they lose that ability.

3. Blanchard’s Cricket Frog

Blanchard's Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans blanchardi) on a rock in Dinosaur Valley State Park, Glen Rose, Texas, USA
A Blanchard’s Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans blanchardi) on a rock in Dinosaur Valley State Park, Glen Rose, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner-Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Acris crepitans blanchardi
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.63 to 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The Blanchard’s cricket frog can be found in Texas but in the far eastern areas.

Its call sounds similar to pebbles clicking together and is a rapid knocking sound. They prefer shallow water that is permanent. It is active in the day and night and can sometimes be seen basking in the sun.

They are common to find around the edges of water and highly vegetated areas. This species can tolerate freezing and will seek areas like crayfish burrows to take shelter in during winter.

This species is small with short legs. They have rough skin with yellow, red, black, and tan coloring.

They have a dark triangular spot between the eyes. In warmer temperatures above 60 feet with rain is when this species is most active. They will breed mid-spring to late summer.

Terrestrial and aquatic insects and small invertebrates are the main part of their diet.

Pollution is a common cause for this frog’s decline in population since water sources can be easily contaminated and this frog relies on them to live. Habitat loss can also affect this species but overall they have a healthy population.

4. Burrowing Toad

Mexican Burrowing Toad (Rhinophrynus dorsalis) in some wet straw near the Mexican-Texas Border by La Loma De Falcon, Texas, USA
A Mexican Burrowing Toad (Rhinophrynus dorsalis) in some wet straw near the Mexican-Texas Border by La Loma De Falcon, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced
  • Family: Rhinophrynidae
  • Scientific Name: Rhinophrynus dorsalis
  • Other Names: Mexican Burrowing Toad, Tipsy Toad
  • Adult Size: 3 to 3.25 inch
  • Lifespan: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The Mexican burrowing toad lives in tropical dry forests and can only be found in the state of Texas within the U.S by the Mexican border. They are listed as endangered and are the only member of the Rhinophrynidae family.

This species spends most of its life underground. In heavy rainfall, they will have a breeding season and come out to mate.

 Burrowing toads are unique in look and have brown to grayish skin. They are covered in red, yellow, and brown dots.

Their heads are extremely tiny compared to its body and conical-shaped. Interesting traits include tiny beady eyes, smooth wet skin, and a round flat body.

At the beginning of their mating season, the first heavy rain hits, and their low “whoooo” call can be heard.

This is the only period they don’t burrow and hunt ants, termites, and other small bugs. Underground, they dig backward using their heels and stay there to remain moist.

5. Cajun Chorus Frog

Cajun Chorus Frog (Pseudacris fouquettei) on some concrete and wood near Guy, Texas, USA
A Cajun Chorus Frog (Pseudacris fouquettei) on some concrete and wood near Guy, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris fouquettei
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1 to 1.25 inch
  • Lifespan: 2 to 5 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The Cajun chorus frog is a small species found in grasslands and prairies within Texas. They will hang around the edges of water habits and do a high call that sounds like a comb being plucked.

Males will call and the breeding season usually commences late winter to early spring. Near water at night eggs are laid in temporary pools with lots of vegetation for hiding.

Cajun chorus frogs are small with brown to brownish-gray skin. Dark stripes along their back are common but some individuals will have spots. Near their eyes are a dark stripe going through it and a light stripe going under.

Their throat gets puffed out when calling, usually at a rate of 20 calls a minute.

In 2008, this frog was made its own species after previously being considered an Upland chorus frog.

They eat insects and invertebrates to survive.

6. Cane Toad

Cane Toad (Rhinella marina) in some dirt with sticks found in Starr County, Texas, USA
A Cane Toad (Rhinella marina) in some dirt with sticks found in Starr County, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Rhinella marina
  • Other Names: Giant Neotropical Toad, Marine Toad
  • Adult Size: 4 to 6 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $50 to $100

The cane toad can be found in south Texas and is one of the largest frogs in the states. They live in grassland and woodland habitats near water. They prefer highly vegetated areas.

Cane toads are most active at night and require constant moisture to survive. This toad secretes a toxin serum on their skin that can be dangerous for some animals to eat.

Cane toads are one of the world’s worst invasive frog species. They survive off insects and other small animals they can overpower.

Their deadly poison makes them less likely to get eaten by snakes and birds.

7. Canyon Tree Frog

Canyon Tree Frog (Hyla arenicolor) camoflauged against a dirt mound in Mount Livermore, Fort Davis, Texas, USA
A Canyon Tree Frog (Hyla arenicolor) camouflaged against a dirt mound in Mount Livermore, Fort Davis, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla arenicolor
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2 to 2.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5  to 8 years
  • Average Price Range: $50 to $100

Canyon tree frogs can be found in rocky arid habitats next to a permanent water source. They are medium-sized with brown, gray, or green coloring.

They have yellow coloring around their neck and groin. These frogs will have a camouflage to match the local rock coloring. Canyon tree frogs are nocturnal and survive off insects.

In spring showers they will mate and when the rainy season ends they will spend more time hiding in crevices.

These frogs are more active in cooler weather and when faced with a predator will freeze. This frog’s call can be heard by the water loudest near sunset.

8. Cliff Chirping Frog

Cliff Chirping Frog (Eleutherodactylus marnockii) climbing some rocks at Jacob's Well Natural Area, Dripping Springs, Texas, USA
A Cliff Chirping Frog (Eleutherodactylus marnockii) climbing some rocks at Jacob’s Well Natural Area, Dripping Springs, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Eleutherodactylidae
  • Scientific Name: Eleutherodactylus marnockii
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.5 inch
  • Lifespan: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Cliff chirping frogs are common in rocky areas with limestone. They can be found in central and southern Texas, mostly active at night.

These frogs can hop, but also crawl and run. Their pattern helps them blend into limestones and other rocks.

They have a greenish color with brown molting. Their bodies are thin to fit in cracks of rocks.

Cliff chirping frogs are shy and will flee if approached. They are a small species and can be hard to find. Breeding for the Cliff Chirping Frogs occurs in winter, and eggs will be laid in a moist substrate of leaf litter.

9. Cope’s Gray Tree Frog

Cope's Gray Treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) on a black metal gate somewhere near Church Hill, Henderson, Texas, USA
A Cope’s Gray Treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) on a black metal gate somewhere near Church Hill, Henderson, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla chrysoscelis
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1 to 1.25 inch
  • Lifespan: 7 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $20

Cope’s Gray Tree Frogs inhabit woodlands and forest habitats within Texas.

Swamps are a common living area but they will live in a variety of habitats near water. Grasslands and fields are areas you can possibly find these species as they get ready to mate and find a breeding pool.

This species is gray but can turn bright green. Bright yellow patches appear on the inside of their hind legs, which is unique compared to other tree frogs. Males have a darker black throat compared to females.

Their skin is bumpy and they have thin black markings on their back. When threatened, they might react by fleeing or hiding under debris. Cope’s gray treefrog is very similar to the regular gray treefrog but has a slightly different croak.

10. Couch’s Spadefoot

Couch's Spadefoot (Scaphiopus couchii) on a rocky road near Big Bend National Park, Texas, USA
A Couch’s Spadefoot (Scaphiopus couchii) on a rocky road near Big Bend National Park, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Scaphiopodidae
  • Scientific Name: Scaphiopus couchii
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2.5 to 3 
  • Lifespan: 10 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $30

Couch Spadefoot lives in North America and is named after Darius Nash Couch. Couch’s spadefoot lives in desert habitats with sandy soil and desert vegetation.

In summer when it rains they will gather to breed.

This species spends a lot of time underground and will dig with its spade-like foot. They are greenish, yellow, or olive with dark blotches on them.

The couch’s Spadefoot is a popular pet and can do well in the right terrarium. They will eat bugs from the pet store and can come out at night.

In breeding season they will mate when heavy rain comes. Males’ vocal sacs inflate a deep call for the singer to find a mate.

 11. Crawfish Frog

Crawfish Frog (Lithobates areolatus) in wet brown straw found near Bernardo, Texas, USA
A Crawfish Frog (Lithobates areolatus) in wet brown straw found near Bernardo, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates areolatus
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2.5 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 7 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Crawfish frogs live in prairies and grasslands and will live in the burrows of crayfish holes. On the day they will be active above ground but will not stray far from their hole.

These frogs mate in water with no fish. Insects like spiders or small crawfish are eaten by this species.

Crawfish frogs can be large and reach 3 inches with a short snout. Their colors may range from brown to gray with dark spots around their bodies. They have a plain light belly.

They will eat anything they can swallow. After the breeding season, they will go to their burrows.

12. Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad (Gastrophryne carolinensis) on a brick-red floor near Santa Fe, Galveston County, Texas, USA
An Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad (Gastrophryne carolinensis) on a brick-red floor near Santa Fe, Galveston County, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced
  • Family: Microhylidae
  • Scientific Name: Gastrophryne carolinensis
  • Other Names: Narrowmouth toad
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 6 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 

Eastern narrow-mouthed toads are gray chairs brown, red or black with splotches and stripes covering them. They are small in size with smooth skin and narrow heads.

They live in areas with leaf litter and soil. Deserts, sandy hills, forests are where they live breeding in highly vegetated water habitats.

Their diet consists of ants, beetles, and small insects.

Males will begin to call in may and breeding will happen during the summer. Eggs are laid on the water surface up to 850 of them.

13. Fowler’s Toad

Fowler's Toad (Anaxyrus fowleri) against similar-colored dirt and leaves near Friendship Baptist Church in Anderson County, Texas, USA
A Fowler’s Toad (Anaxyrus fowleri) against similar-colored dirt and leaves near Friendship Baptist Church in Anderson County, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus fowleri
  • Other Names: Bufo fowleri 
  • Adult Size: 2 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $20

Fowler’s toads can be found in the U.S and parts of Texas. They inhabit open fields, valleys, and areas near water.

They prefer sandy soil and can even be found in agricultural areas. This species has a healthy population and was previously considered a subspecies of wood house toad.

Brown, tan, gray, and light green are colors they can be. Dark spots cover its entire body.

Yellow markings can occur on its body, and it has a light-colored stripe running down its back. This toad has a light underside with dark markings and a grainy feeling body covered in warts.

Insects like ants, flies, and fleas are some of the things this toad will eat. Predators will try to eat this species and they will flee into the water, play dead or jump when threatened.

In early summer they breed and their sheep-like call can be heard near waterfronts.

14. Gray Tree Frog

Gray Treefrog (Hyla versicolor) on a rusty metal rod found in Polk County, Texas, USA
A Gray Treefrog (Hyla versicolor) on a rusty metal rod found in Polk County, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Dryophytes versicolor
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.25 inches
  • Lifespan: 7 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $20

The gray tree frog lives in habitats with lots of trees and shrubs. They are nocturnal and spend most of their time climbing in vegetation.

They will travel to ponds, marshes, and man-made water sources to mate. They will not likely lay eggs in permanent water due to fish and other predators.

This frog changes its shade and color to blend into its environments.

They can be brown to gray and have dark blotches. White spots sit underneath each eye and they have a dark line on their legs. Their snout is blunt and their skin is covered in warts.

Gray tree frogs will eat different kinds of insects like snails, plant lice, and slugs.

Smaller frogs are sometimes a part of their diet. Predators can include snakes, birds, and larger frogs. When inactive they will hide in tree holes, under logs, and other natural debris.

15. Great Plains Toad

Great Plains Toad (Anaxyrus cognatus) on rocks and sand at the Silver Falls Rest Area, Crosby County, Texas, USA
A Great Plains Toad (Anaxyrus cognatus) on rocks and sand at the Silver Falls Rest Area, Crosby County, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus cognatus
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 2 to 4.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $20 

Great Plains toad is a large toad species native to North America and found in Texas.

They are grey, brown, or green covered in dark blotches, and can grow almost 5 inches. Grassland habitats with sandy soil are where it can be found next to permanent water.

Great Plains toads are strictly active at night and will breed in spring through summer. In dry areas, they may emerge more but this toad will spend a lot of its life underground.

Insects like mealworms are what it survives on. Its call is loud and is repeated multiple times, heard near the water.

16. Green Frog

Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans melanota) on some peat soil near the Houston Arboretum and Nature Center, Buffalo Bayou, Houston, Texas, USA
A Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans melanota) on some peat soil near the Houston Arboretum and Nature Center, Buffalo Bayou, Houston, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates clamitans melanota
  • Other Names: NorthernGreen Frog
  • Adult Size: 2.25 to 3.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 15 to 20 years
  • Average Price Range: $10

The Northern Green Frog is an aquatic species found in Texas. This frog stays close to shallow water and can be found in streams, swamps, rivers, and other water sources.

It is a very active species, venturing most at night. They can also be out in the day to explore. In winter they may hibernate but they will come out when the weather warms up.

Green frogs can be green but also brownish to tan. They are covered in dark spots of varying sizes. They are a medium-sized species and with a large head and spotted lips.

Males will have yellow throats and females dark-spotted throats. Its belly is white and has stripes running along with it. The Bullfrog closely resembles this frog.

The green frog preys on vertebrates and small invertebrates. Dragonflies, flies, crayfish, and fish are some of the things they consume.

Green frogs are kept as pets since they are so common and are an easy beginner species.

17. Green Toad 

Green Toad (Anaxyrus debilis) on concrete and rock at the Silver Falls Rest Area, Crosby County, Texas, USA
A Green Toad (Anaxyrus debilis) on concrete and rock at the Silver Falls Rest Area, Crosby County, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus debilis
  • Other Names: North american green toad
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $15 to $30

Green toads are found within the southwestern United States.

They live in semi-arid habitats and are common throughout the state. They are bright to pale green with dark blotches. They have pale bellies and rough skin.

Breeding occurs from March to August and will happen when heavy rain hits.

They are secretive and males will move from drier habitats to wet for breeding. They secrete toxins from the skin on their back that will put a bad taste in predators’ mouths.

Birds and large snakes are animals that will prey on this species.

18. Green Tree Frog

Green Treefrog (Dryophytes cinereus) on a long leaf strand at Jesse H. Jones Park and Nature Center in Humble, Texas, USA
A Green Treefrog (Dryophytes cinereus) on a long leaf strand at Jesse H. Jones Park and Nature Center in Humble, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Dryophytes cinereus
  • Other Names: American Green Treefrog
  • Adult Size: 2 to 2.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 6 years
  • Average Price Range: $10

Green tree frogs are a common species in Texas and can live near urban areas. They live in areas like marshes, lakes, swamps, streams, and places that are highly vegetated. They will sometimes be in swimming pools at night and will even lay their eggs there.

The frog is medium-sized and can range from green to bright green. They have smooth skin and plain abdomens. Color will vary depending on time and temperature.

They can make good pets but do not do well with handling.

19. Greenhouse Frog

Greenhouse Frog (Eleutherodactylus planirostris) on some wet wood on South Padre Island, Cameron County, Texas, USA
A Greenhouse Frog (Eleutherodactylus planirostris) on some wet wood on South Padre Island, Cameron County, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Eleutherodactylidae
  • Scientific Name: Eleutherodactylus planirostris
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.5 inch
  • Lifespan: N/A
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The greenhouse frog is a small species olive-brown in color with dark stripes. Their underside is pale and they have large eyes. They are nocturnal and live in areas with moist leaf litter.

On warm rainy days, they will come out more. Ants, beetles, mites, ants, and roaches are some of the things eaten by this species.

They will often be found near humans and can use flowerpots as an area to lay their eggs. Unlike other frogs, they will not lay their eggs in water but in damp, dark protected areas fit for their eggs.

20. Gulf Coast Toad

Gulf Coast Toad (Incilius valliceps) on some mossy rocks at Punta Laguna, Solidaridad, Mexico
A Gulf Coast Toad (Incilius valliceps) on some mossy rocks at Punta Laguna, Solidaridad, Mexico. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Incilius valliceps
  • Other Names: Coastal Plains Toad, Central American Gulf Coast Toad
  • Adult Size: 2 to 4 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $10

The Gulfcoast toad can be found in south-central Texas and along the gulf coast. Forests, swamps, beaches, and prairies are some of the places to find them. During the day they hide under vegetation and debris.

They will usually hunt and venture at night. Breeding happens in heavy rainfall from spring to September. These toads are abundant and one clutch of eggs can have as many as 20,000 eggs.

Gulf coast toads range in coloring from brown to black. They are spotted with orange, yellow, and white coloring. Their eyes are large and their bodies are bumpy.

Insects are what they eat most, going under lights to find them.

21. Houston Toad

Houston Toad (Anaxyrus houstonensis) in some wet leaf litter near Bastrop State Park, Texas, USA
A Houston Toad (Anaxyrus houstonensis) in some wet leaf litter near Bastrop State Park, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus houstonensis
  • Other Names: Bufo houstonensis
  • Adult Size: 2 to 3.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Houston Toads are endangered and endemic to Texas and the United States.

They live in pinewoods, oak woods, and savannahs. Sandy soil and lots of vegetation are their preferred habitats. Houston toads will need slow-moving water nearby to breed, preferably permanent.

Houston toads are light brown but can be reddish. They have dark spots on their back and cremated colored bellies. They survive on beetles and ants. To hunt they will either sit and wait for prey or actively search for it.

Pesticides, drought, and lack of breeding areas have contributed to this species decline. It is said there is a population of around 3,000.

22. Hurter’s Spadefoot

Hunter's Spadefoot (Scaphiopus hurterii) in some tiny leaves somewhere near Henry Prairie Baptist Church, Texas, USA
A Hunter’s Spadefoot (Scaphiopus hurterii) in some tiny leaves somewhere near Henry Prairie Baptist Church, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Scaphiopodidae
  • Scientific Name: Scaphiopus hurterii
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.75 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 4 to 8 years
  • Average Price Range: $10

Hurter’s spadefoot can be found in South Central United States and is a species found in Texas, after once being thought of as another species.

This species will live in wooded and open areas with sandy soils. Deserts are habitats they live in most since they are great for burrowing. They are nocturnal and will come out at night and in heavy rains.

The Spadefoot toad spends most of its life underground and will only come out to breed or eat. They can catch enough food to store in their underground lairs for months and only need about 7 servings. In winter they will likely stay underground.

 23. Mexican Spadefoot

Mexican Spadefoot (Spea multiplicata) on some dirt by some yellow flowers in Marathon, Alpine, Texas, USA
A Mexican Spadefoot (Spea multiplicata) on some dirt by some yellow flowers in Marathon, Alpine, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Scaphiopodidae
  • Scientific Name: Spea multiplicata
  • Other Names: New Mexican Spadefoot
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 2.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $5 to $10 

Mexican Spadefoot toads live in the southwestern United States and Mexico. They can be found in dry grasslands, woodlands but mostly in desert habitats in Texas.

Burrowing and spending most of its life underground, this Spadefoot is nocturnal.

The Mexican Spadefoot or New Mexican Spadefoot can be gray, tan, or green. They have round bellies and some can have yellow or red spots on their back. Their stomachs are white.

Insects like spiders, termites, and beetles are what it survives on. In winter they hibernate and in spring they come out to mate. They prefer to be out of their holes in warm and moist environments.

24. Mexican Tree Frog

Mexican Treefrog (Mexican Smilisca) on a large branch near Rio Honda, Texas, USA
A Mexican Treefrog (Mexican Smilisca) on a large branch near Rio Honda, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Smilisca baudinii
  • Other Names: Baudins Tree Frog, Mexican Smilisca
  • Adult Size: 3.5 to 4 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 years
  • Average Price Range: $100

The Mexican tree frog lives in Mexico and parts of Texas near the Rio Grande valley. They are nocturnal and live in forests near permanent bodies of water.

In Texas, this species is listed and threatened and is rare to see. They are nocturnal and have a spread-out population.

The Mexican tree frog is small and brown to gray colored. They have long legs and large hands compared to the rest of their body.

Highly adaptable they can be found in a variety of mountain and lowland habitats, hiding under rocks to maintain moisture. In heavy rain, they may emerge in more numbers.

25. Mexican White-lipped Frog

Mexican White-lipped Frog (Leptodactylus fragilis) on wet dirt by leaves and white flowers in Moraida, Texas, USA
A Mexican White-lipped Frog (Leptodactylus fragilis) on wet dirt by leaves and white flowers in Moraida, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: leptodactylidae
  • Scientific Name: Leptodactylus fragilis
  • Other Names: American White-lipped Frog
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 2 inches
  • Lifespan: N/A
  • Average Price Range: $20

The Mexican white-lipped frog can be found in the most southern tip of Texas near Mexico. It is rare to find this frog in Texas due to its small range.

They live in grassy areas and will burrow underground. They will come out mostly at night and will bury themselves in hot temperatures.

This frog has a distinctive white line across its mouth. They are small and grey to brown in color. In the night when they come out, they will hunt insects.

Snakes and birds will prey on this species. If not out hunting or breeding they will be in loose soil.

26. Northern Cricket Frog

Northern Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans) on a wet red leaf at William B. Umstead State Park, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA
A Northern Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans) on a wet red leaf at William B. Umstead State Park, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Acris crepitans
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.5 inch
  • Lifespan: 10 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $20

Northern cricket frogs live in the northeastern United States and Mexico.

They are active in the day and live near slow-moving and permanent water. They will hang around the edges of water in the mud. Breeding occurs from May until July. Their mating call sounds like pebbles being clicked together.

The northern cricket frog is one of the three smallest vertebrates within North America. They can be green, gray, and crown with blotching covering their body. The northern cricket frog has shorter legs than the southern species.

They survive off small insects and are eaten by larger frogs, snakes, and other large animals.

27. Northern Leopard Frog

Northern Leopard Frog (Lithobates pipiens) on wet sand somewhere in between Woodrow and Lafleche, California, USA
A Northern Leopard Frog (Lithobates pipiens) on wet sand somewhere in between Woodrow and Lafleche, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates pipiens
  • Other Names: Rana pipiens
  • Adult Size: 3.5 to 4.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $15 

The Northern Leopard frog is one of the most common amphibians in the U.S and can be found within Texas.

Slowing moving waters like swamps, marshes, and bogs are areas it lives in being most active in Spring to mate. In warmer months it can be found in meadows, fields, and farmland areas. This species can even inhabit man-made waters.

These frogs are medium and have and can be dark greenish to brown, covered in dark brown spots. The spots are scattered across their body and are surrounded by a small white outline, similar in appearance to a leopard.

The inside of its legs and belly is white, and on the frog’s back are two light-colored dorsolateral stripes.

Leopard frogs are carnivores and will eat other frogs, birds, and fish. Habitat loss and pesticides contribute to this species decline.

28. Pickerel Frog

Pickerel Frog (Lithobates palustris) on wet mud and leaf litter near South Toledo Bend, Texas, USA
A Pickerel Frog (Lithobates palustris) on wet mud and leaf litter near South Toledo Bend, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates palustris
  • Other Names: Rana palustris
  • Adult Size: 1.75 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 8 years
  • Average Price Range:  $10 to $15

The Pickerel frog can be found throughout the U.S and eastern Texas.

Forests, fields, meadows, are some of the habitats it lives in, especially areas with dense vegetation.

They are usually active from April to October and hang around the edges of the water. In winter they hibernate under natural objects.

Pickerel frogs are medium-sized and have a similar appearance to the leopard frog. Pickerel frogs secrete toxins and leopard frogs don’t. They are gray with rows of brown blotches running down its back.

Bright orange coloring appears around the inside of its leg to help confuse predators if attacked. The call of this frog is similar to the leopard frog, but it is shorter and faster.

This species can secrete a toxin from its skin that is harmful to smaller animals to eat and can irritate human skin. They hunt insects like ants and water bugs on land or in water.

29. Pig Frog

Pig Frog (Lithobates grylio) on some wood near Wilder Bay, Florida, USA
A Pig Frog (Lithobates grylio) on some wood near Wilder Bay, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates grylio
  • Other Names: Lagoon frog
  • Adult Size: 3.25 to 5.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 15 years
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $40 

Pig frogs are highly aquatic and inhabit some Texas areas. They live in edged habitats, lakes, marshes, and highly vegetated waters. They are active mostly at night.

Their pig grunting call is why they have their name which can be heard in summer. Crayfish, insects, and other frogs make up its diet. Being aquatic they will be on land most in rainy weather and at night.

Pig frogs can look similar to bullfrogs but are more narrow. Olive to brown is their color with dark spots along with their bodies. Their eyes are enlarged and elevated atop their head. They are a large species with strong long legs.

30. Plains Leopard Frog

Plains Leopard Frog (Lithobates blairi) in mud near Lake Theo at Caprock Canyons State Park, Briscoe County, Texas, USA
A Plains Leopard Frog (Lithobates blairi) in mud near Lake Theo at Caprock Canyons State Park, Briscoe County, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates blairi
  • Other Names: Blair’s Leopard Frog
  • Adult Size: 2 to 4.25 inch
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $30

Plains leopard frogs live in grasslands, prairies, and vegetated areas near a water source. Some frogs during the summer will venture away from the water.

When winter arrives they hide in pond bottoms and in mud. This species can be beneficial to humans as it has a diet solely of insects. Bugs like spiders and fly populations are controlled by this predator.

They are medium-sized with brown, olive, or green coloring. They have a leopard pattern of their back of dark spots and dark protruding eyes.

When frighten this species will dive into the water and hide there for a period of time. They can be seen jumping on land or in the water catching food.

31. Plains Spadefoot

Plains Spadefoot ( Spea bombifrons) in a twig mound and some leaves near Thornberry, Texas, USA
A Plains Spadefoot ( Spea bombifrons) in a twig mound and some leaves near Thornberry, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Scaphiopodidae
  • Scientific Name: Spea bombifrons
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 2.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 

Plains spadefoot is a frog that can be found in the western half of Texas.

Grasslands, pastures, shrublands near water are where this species lives. They need sandy soil in their habitat since they are a burrowing species. In its burrow is where it will be most of the year until it is time to breed.

On rainy days and in the depth of night they occasionally come out to feed on insects.

The spadefoot has vertical pupils and smooth skin. Their snouts are large, accompanied by two rounded eyes. The foot of this frog is horny and used as a spade for digging.

Disease and pesticides are what threaten this species along with birds and snakes preying on them.

32. Red-Spotted Toad 

Red-spotted Toad (Anaxyrus punctatus) sitting in some rocks on Mount Livermore, Jeff Davis County, Texas, USA
A Red-spotted Toad (Anaxyrus punctatus) sitting in some rocks on Mount Livermore, Jeff Davis County, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus punctatus
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $20 

The red-spotted toads inhabit deserts, pinewoods, and mountain areas. Toads in the mountain will breed from March to May and their calls screech across water edges.

When the breeding season hits males will do wrestling matches over territory and dominance. They can lay as many as 50 or 3,000 eggs are laid in water. They will sometimes breed with the western toad.

The red-spotted toad is a small species only at most reaching 3 inches. Red, orange, light gray, and olive are its back with red/orange skin glands. They have pointed noses and males will have a dusky throat.

33. Rio Grande Chirping Frog

Rio Grande Chirping Frog (Eleutherodactylus cystignathoides campi) in between some ligth gray rocks at Oso Bay Wetlands Preserve, South Side, Texas, USA
A Rio Grande Chirping Frog (Eleutherodactylus cystignathoides campi) in between some ligth gray rocks at Oso Bay Wetlands Preserve, South Side, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Eleutherodactylidae
  • Scientific Name: Eleutherodactylus cystignathoides campi
  • Other Names: Mexican Chirping Frog
  • Adult Size: 0.5 to 1 inch
  • Lifespan: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

The Rio Grande chirping frogs have a scattered population throughout the southeastern half of Texas.

They are semi-tropical and live in densely vegetated areas, edged water habitats, and near semi-permanent water sources. During the day they will hide under rocks and other debris in order to stay warm and moist.

They have smooth brown, gray, or yellow skin. Dark spots and crossbands lay across their legs and dorsal. The heads have a sharply pointed snout.

When in danger they will leap into the thick vegetation.

This species will not lay eggs on water but in moist vegetated hiding areas. It is common for them to live in residential areas as they find their way from potted plants.

34. Rio Grande Leopard Frog

Rio Grande Leopard Frog (Lithobates berlandieri) on some gray rocks on Mount Livermore, Jeff Davis County, Texas, USA
A Rio Grande Leopard Frog (Lithobates berlandieri) on some gray rocks on Mount Livermore, Jeff Davis County, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates berlandieri
  • Other Names: Rana berlandieri
  • Adult Size: 2.25 to 4.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $20 

The Rip Grande leopard frog is an aquatic species that live in the Southern United States, Mexico, and is endemic to Texas. They are nocturnal and inhabit permanent water sources like streams, ponds, and rivers. In Texas, they have a range that is the southwestern half of the state.

The Rio Grande leopard frog is green, grayish, or olive-colored. They have light dorsal spots and light-colored stripes that run across its face. Their bellies are gray with yellow around their legs.

In times of cold temperatures, they will shelter under rocks and debris. This species is hardy and is active year-round and can tolerate dry conditions. Aquatic and terrestrial prey like water bugs and flies are fed on by this species.

35. Sheep Frog

Sheep Frog (Hypopachus variolosus) on some small rocks and pebbles near Delta Lake, Texas, USA
A Sheep Frog (Hypopachus variolosus) on some small rocks and pebbles near Delta Lake, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate to Advanced
  • Family: Microhylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hypopachus variolosus
  • Other Names: Mexican narrow mouthed toad
  • Adult Size: 1 to 1 ½ inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 5 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Sheep frogs can be found in southern Texas and have a low sheep-like call, which is where they get their name from. Humid areas and tropical forests are where this species lives.

They are nocturnal and will burrow into the ground to avoid predators. Ribbon snakes are one of the only predators that feed off these species. This species is most active in the warmer months and after heavy rainfall.

They are medium-sized with warty tan bodies. Their eyes are small and they have two large glands on their back that swell up and help navigate the water. In Texas, they are listed as threatened.

36. Southern Leopard Frog

Southern Leopard Frog (Lithobates sphenocephalus) on an orange-red leaf at Sam Houston National Forest, Double Lake, Coldspring, Texas, USA
A Southern Leopard Frog (Lithobates sphenocephalus) on an orange-red leaf at Sam Houston National Forest, Double Lake, Coldspring, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Ranidae
  • Scientific Name: Lithobates sphenocephalus
  • Other Names: Rana sphenocephalus
  • Adult Size: 2 to 3.5  inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $15

Southern leopard frogs can be found in shallow freshwater habitats and are extremely active. They can be found at night and occasionally during the day.

In winter and spring, they breed and become more active in rainfall. Leopard frogs will generally be by warm tee but can stay on dry land for a prolonged period of time.

They are green or brown with dark blotches on their back. They have yellow ridges on their side. The blotches on their back are similar to a leopard’s spots, which is where they get their name.

Insects, crayfish, and invertebrates are what this species feeds on.

37. Spotted Chirping Frog

Spotted Chirping Frog (Eleutherodactylus guttilatus) on a tan surface near Parque Naciunal El Cimataio, Corregidora, Mexico
A Spotted Chirping Frog (Eleutherodactylus guttilatus) on a tan surface near Parque Naciunal El Cimataio, Corregidora, Mexico. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Eleutherodactylidae
  • Scientific Name: Eleutherodactylus guttilatus
  • Other Names: Mexican cliff frog
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.25 inch
  • Lifespan: 5 to 10 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A  

The spotted chirping frog is a species found near west Texas and in Mexico. They are uncommon and rare to see in the state.

They are small with dark tan coloring and yellow blotches and white spots on their back. Their skin is glossy with large eyes for their size.

They are nocturnal and will hide under rocks, debris, and plants to escape the sun. Insects like ants, beetles, and flies are what this species survives on.

Chirping frogs are known for the high-pitched chirping noise they do when calling. They will do this when looking for a mate in the rainy season.

38. Spotted Chorus Frog

Spotted Chorus Frog (Pseudacris clarkii) on someone's hands covered in debris found in Crowley, Texas, USA
A Spotted Chorus Frog (Pseudacris clarkii) on someone’s hands covered in debris found in Crowley, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris clarkii
  • Other Names: Clarks tree frog
  • Adult Size: 1.25 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $20

Spotted chorus frogs can be found in grasslands and prairies in the central United States and Texas.

They are nocturnal and are one of the smallest species in Texas. Near permanent and semi-permanent water sources. This species can live near cows and use their poop and drinking water to survive.

Grey or olive green is their color with light green on their backs. Their bellies are white and they are really small. Colors will vary depending on the time of day and color. When they call, their vocal sock inflates.

Fleas, flies, ants, moths, and beetles are what this species eats. Snakes, birds, and large animals will prey on the chorus frog.

39. Spring Peeper 

Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) on some dried leaves near New Caney High School, Texas, USA
A Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) on some dried leaves near New Caney High School, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Pseudacris crucifer 
  • Other Names: Spring peeper
  • Adult Size: 0.75 to 1.25 inch
  • Lifespan: 2 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 to $20

The spring peeper is a tree frog that lives in woodland and residential areas within the U.S and Texas. They are one of the first frogs to start calling when spring starts.

Marshes, ponds, or swamps are needed for this species to breed and lay eggs. Their calls will be high pitch and can be heard from the edges of the water.

Spring peepers are tan or brown with dark blotches going down their back. They have dark eyes and glossy skin. On their feet, there are toe pads that help them climb.

From October to March this frog will breed, going through occasional freezing periods. They can lay over 1,000 eggs sometimes and will lay them in deep vegetation in the water.

The night is when this species will be out more and that is when they hunt for insects. This species has a healthy and widespread population in the U.S.

40. Squirrel Tree Frog

Squirrel Treefrog (Hyla squirella) on a green leaf at Royal Elementary School, Brookshire, Texas, USA
A Squirrel Treefrog (Hyla squirella) on a green leaf at Royal Elementary School, Brookshire, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name: Hyla squirella
  • Other Names: Rain frogs
  • Adult Size: 1 to 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 9 years
  • Average Price Range: $10

Squirrel treefrogs are average-sized frogs that live in coastal plains, marshes, lakes, and edge habitats in Texas. They prefer areas with moisture and abundant food and vegetation.

They can come in many colors like green, yellow and tan. Some may have spots. They have smooth glossy skin.

These frogs will be attracted to light since that is where most insects tend to congregate. They will hunt and venture at night occasionally during the day or in rain.

Their call is to sound like a squirrel chattering which is why they have their name. They can also be heard chirping in the rain so some people call them rain frogs.

41. Strecker’s Chorus Frog

Strecker's Chorus Frog (Pseudacris streckeri) on a rocky surface somewhere near Lake Weatherford, Texas, USA
A Strecker’s Chorus Frog (Pseudacris streckeri) on a rocky surface somewhere near Lake Weatherford, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Hylidae
  • Scientific Name:  Pseudacris streckeri
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 years
  • Average Price Range: N/A

Strecker’s chorus frog is the largest of the chorus frog and can be found in southern Texas. They are nocturnal and fossorial. Sandy soil is required for here they live for burrowing.

This frog is unique as a burrowing species since it digs with its front legs and not back. Spending time underground to avoid the heat, they will come out in rainfall to breed. Flooded fields, ditches, and small ponds are places they breed.

Light grey, brown, and green are their possible colors, with dark blotches around their back and eyes. Their bellies are white with an orange groin. They are small in size and will feed off insects.

The destruction of habitat and pollution has caused this species to be considered at risk in certain areas.

42. Texas Toad

Texas Toad (Anaxyrus speciosus) on rocky ground near Muleshoe National Wildlife Refuge, Bailey County, Texas, USA
A Texas Toad (Anaxyrus speciosus) on rocky ground near Muleshoe National Wildlife Refuge, Bailey County, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus speciosus
  • Other Names: N/A
  • Adult Size: 3.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: $20

The Texas toad is the state amphibian and can be found in a variety of habitats like grasslands, deserts, woodlands, and areas with sandy soil. They live primarily in Texas but can also be found in surrounding states.

They are highly adaptable and spend time underground when the heat of the sun isn’t too intense. Mostly nocturnal they will come out at night.

Texas toads are medium-sized with brown coloring and patches. Their stout bodies are bumpy and covered with warts. They have large brown eyes and big lips.

Texas toads will eat insects like beetles, ants, and spiders.

In heavy rainfall, breeding will occur and cause this species to congregate. This toad is one of the most common in the southern United States and has a healthy and is listed as being of least concern.

43. Western Narrow-mouthed Toad

Western Narrow-mouthed Toad (Gastrophryne olivacea) on a dark rock at Big Bend National Park, Texas, USA
A Western Narrow-mouthed Toad (Gastrophryne olivacea) on a dark rock at Big Bend National Park, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Microhylidae
  • Scientific Name: Gastrophryne olivacea
  • Other Names: Great plains narrow-mouthed toad
  • Adult Size: 1.5 inches 
  • Lifespan: 6 years 
  • Average Price Range: $10 

Western narrow-mouthed toads can be found in central Texas and the southeastern United States. They live on ground level and can be found buried in soil and loose debris like leaf litter.

They are nocturnal and will live near a permanent water source. Rocky and wooded hills, grasslands, and edged habits are places this species lives in. Private places like burrows, under logs and debris, are common places to find them.

Western narrow-mouthed toads have small heads with plump bodies. Green, olive, and tan are colors they can be. Their belly is white and down their back are small dark spots. When cracking they will make a small buzzing sound, similar to a bee.

Ants are this species main source of food and they can secrete a toxin that will protect them from ant bites while eating. Terrestrial and aquatic predators both rely on this species and its young for food.

They are important in keeping a balanced ecosystem and keep a healthy population within Texas.

44. Woodhouse’s Toad

Woodhouse's Toad (Anaxyrus woodhousii) on grassy cobblestone near Blackie Chesher Park, Lancaster, Texas, USA
A Woodhouse’s Toad (Anaxyrus woodhousii) on grassy cobblestone near Blackie Chesher Park, Lancaster, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Bufonidae
  • Scientific Name: Anaxyrus woodhousii
  • Other Names: Common toad, Rocky Mountain toad 
  • Adult Size: 4 to 5 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 to 20 years
  • Average Price Range: $10 

Woodhouse’s toad lives in most of Texas and they can be found in habitats near lakes, ponds, or rivers.

Woods, meadows, and riparian habitats are common places to find them. Its large range and ability to adapt to multiple habitats make this species of least concern. Near still water, you can hear the males of this species call, which sounds like a sheep.

Medium in size the woodhouse toad can be light brown to yellowish-brown with small dots covering them. They have a light-colored stripe running down their back and a pale stomach. On their head are large eyes and parotoid glands.

At night they come out to hunt for insects. They hunt near light and urban areas that attract bugs. In their skin, they secrete a toxin to help protect them from predators. This is not harmful to humans but can hurt small animals like dogs.

Wrapping up

Texas has 44 different frog species in the state. Most will live near water. Frogs can be near residential areas even laying eggs in swimming pools. Each species is different but most frogs start becoming active in spring.

On warm nights is when they are most active, some being active during the day. Rain and darkness will draw out the different species and their different mating calls can be heard from along water edges.

The frogs in Texas help keep a balanced ecosystem as most frogs prey on insects and help control their populations. Frogs are more beneficial than harmful and some can even make great pets.

Birds, snakes, and other large animals eat frogs and rely on them as a valuable food source. Frogs are important and interesting animals that live in a variety of places in Texas.

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