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Spiders in Arizona

Arizona is home to a variety of spider species, each with its own unique lifestyle and appearance.

Some of the species in the state may look very similar, or have great differences between them, but all of them are an important part of the natural ecosystem of the state. This article will cover the most common spiders in Arizona, and the various things that can be learned about each one.

On this list, you will find 54 spiders that live in Arizona, and interesting facts about each one. The desert, woodlands, chaparral, mountainous regions, and other habitats in Arizona make a perfect home for the different spiders living in the state. A large portion of species also prefers to live in urban areas or man-made structures.

Spiders are considered one of the most feared animals on the planet, but most of them are actually harmless. Varying in size, appearance, and behavior, many of the species you come across have something unique to appreciate about them.

Let’s take a look at the most common spiders in Arizona.

Table of Contents

Spiders in Arizona
FAQ
Conclusion

Spiders in Arizona

1. Colonus Hesperus

Colonus Hesperus (Colonus Hesperus) on some long leaves in Pima County, Arizona, USA
Colonus Hesperus (Colonus Hesperus) on some long leaves in Pima County, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Colonus Hesperus
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 8 mm (0.31 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Colonus hesperus is a species of jumping spider inhabiting woodland areas in Arizona. This spider has a range in the Southwestern United States, up into the coastal regions.

Colonus hesperus is active year-round, but is more commonly found in the early spring months. This spider is primarily arboreal, and spends its time moving around on vertical surfaces.

Colonus hesperus is a small species, with tan coloring. They have dark spots on their abdomen, as well as a mottled pattern of tan and cream coloring on them.

Like other jumping spiders they have two large eyes on the front of their face, with six smaller eyes wrapping around their head. The top of their head has four dark markings, and their body is covered in small thin hairs.

Colonus hesperus feeds on small insects that it comes across. The insects they eat are smaller or equal in size to them, and if their prey is too big they will avoid hunting it.

Flies, butterflies, grasshoppers, and aphids are a few of the animals they feed on.

2. Pantropical Jumping Spider

Pantropical Jumping Spider (Plexippus paykulli) on a stem in Sao Paulo, Brazil
Pantropical Jumping Spider (Plexippus paykulli) on a stem in Sao Paulo, Brazil. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Plexippus paykulli
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 9 to 12 mm (0.35 to 0.47 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Native to southeast Asia, the pantropical jumping spider has managed to spread its population to other parts of the globe.

It is a spider found in Arizona, and also in other parts of the southern United States. Pantropical jumping spiders are active for most of the year, but it is seen most often in the spring.

Males and females of this species are similar in size but have slight differences. Females are brown, with white markings on their heads and back.

Males have a black abdomen and head, and a white stripe running down their body. Brown markings appear on the front and top of this spider’s head. Small hairs cover their body, and females are slightly hairier.

Pantropical jumping spiders feed on pest insects like roaches, beetles, mosquitoes, and flies. Like other jumping spiders they are extremely agile, and are able to leap great distances.

This species also has venom that it injects into its prey to neutralize them, but this venom is harmless to humans. The coloring of this species helps it camouflage into wooded habitats, and sneak up on prey it feeds on.

3. Regal Jumping Spider

Regal Jumping Spider (Phidippus regius) on a leaf with prey in its mouth at Tiger Bay State Forest, Florida, USA
Regal Jumping Spider (Phidippus regius) on a leaf with prey in its mouth at Tiger Bay State Forest, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus regius
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 6 to 18 mm ( 0.23 to 0.70 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: $30

Found in the southeastern and southern United States, the regal jumping spider is one of the most common Salticidae species in its range. Woodland and open forests habitats are where this species is found most often.

Regal jumping spiders are also one of the most common jumping spider species kept as a pet. This spider is active during the day, and at night they create a silk sac to live in.

Regal jumping spiders are sexually dimorphic. Females have orange coloring, and tan hairs covering them. Light orange spots boarded in black appear on their abdomen.

Males are black, with white tufts of hair on their legs. They have three white triangle marks on their abdomen, with vibrant green chelicerae. The regal jumping spider male looks very similar to the Bold jumping spider species, but is slightly larger.

Insects like moths, grasshoppers, and flies are what this species feeds on. They may also feed on other spiders, but they try to avoid animals that can potentially harm them.

Living for around a year, this species is often kept as a pet in a small terrarium, living in moist environments.

4. Agave Jumping Spider

Agave Jumping Spider (Paraphidippus basalis) on an agave leaf in Conchise County, Arizona, USA
Agave Jumping Spider (Paraphidippus basalis) on an agave leaf in Conchise County, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Paraphidippus basalis
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 7 to 15 mm (0.27 to 0.59 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Found in Arizona, the agave jumping spider is a small species living in arid and semi-arid habitats. This species is named after the agave plant, as it is primarily found in it.

Other rosette-forming plants are where this species is found, such as sotols and yuccas. Most jumping spiders wander around, but this spider is usually only found on specific plants, which is a rare trait amongst its species.

Agave jumping spiders are small, with black coloring. They have an orange marking near the top of their abdomen, as well as white spots on it. This species has two large eyes, with six smaller ones.

They have angular legs, helping them jump large distances. On the tips of their legs are orange bands, and small hairs cover their entire body.

Using plants like the agave as its home, this spider will feed on any small insects that get near its area. They have excellent eyesight, with nearly 360 degrees of vision.

Jumping spiders are visual hunters, and will track their prey using wit their keen vision.

5. Apache Jumping Spider

Apache Jumpin Spider (Phidippus apacheanus) on a leaf in Tumacacori, Arizona, USA
Apache Jumpin Spider (Phidippus apacheanus) on a leaf in Tumacacori, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus apacheanus
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 3.3 to 11 mm (0.13 to 0.43 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Apache jumping spiders live in the southwestern regions of the United States and are a spider you may come across in Arizona. This spider lives in deserts, grasslands, and other dry habitats.

They are commonly found on vegetation like cactus, desert shrubs, and perennial vegetation. Active during the day, and at night they will use nearby vegetation as shelter, and make a silk nest to rest in.

While deserts are the main habitat they are present in, this spider is also regularly found in urban areas around homes.

Apache jumping spiders are a small species, with vibrant coloring. Their chelicerae are bright green, and they have bold red and black coloring. The top of the head and abdomen are completely red.

Females have a black blotch near the tip of their abdomens. The legs of this species are dark black, with a few orange coloring on them. 

Apache jumping spiders are active for most of the year except winter. They molt three times before fully maturing, and are mostly seen in the spring and summer months.

Mating occurs in the fall, and females will guard their nest until their spiderlings are ready to go out on their own. 

6. Zebra Jumping Spider

Zebra Jumping Spider (Salticus scenicus) on a glass wall in England, United Kingdom
Zebra Jumping Spider (Salticus scenicus) on a glass wall in England, United Kingdom. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Salticus scenicus
  • Other Names: Zebra Spider
  • Adult Size: 5 to 9 mm (0.19 to 0.35 inches)
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30

Zebra jumping spiders are named after their black and white coloring. A small species, they live in North America, Europe, and parts of North Asia.

This spider is found in open areas and enjoys climbing on vertical surfaces. Near urban areas and climbing on houses are places where this spider is regularly found.

Male and female zebra jumping spiders have similar appearances, but males have darker colors. The black and white coloring of this species appears on their abdomen and head.

They have small white hairs that cover their grayish legs, and their chelicerae are black. The front of their face has two large eyes, giving them great binocular vision.

Zebra jumping spiders use their great eyesight to feed on smaller insects and other spiders. They stalk their prey and slowly move towards them until they are close enough to pounce on them.

Zebra jumping spiders are preyed on by larger spiders, lizards, and frogs.

7. Golden Jumping Spider

Golden Jumping Spider (Paraphidippus aurantius) on a yellow flower petal in Cochise, Arizona, USA
Golden Jumping Spider (Paraphidippus aurantius) on a yellow flower petal in Cochise, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Paraphidippus aurantius
  • Other Names: Emerald Jumping Spider
  • Adult Size: 3.04 mm (0.12 inches)
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30

Golden jumping spiders live across the United States and are found in Arizona. This spider lives in woodlands, and forest habitats. They are also common in residential areas near homes.

Golden jumping spiders spend most of their time on vertical surfaces like trees, fences, and the sides of houses. Vertical surfaces are where this spider is often found since they can use their eyesight to spot prey and predators. 

This species is often called the emerald jumping spider, because of the emerald coloring that occasionally appears on its back. This spider has black or tan coloring, with orange and white markings that appear on its back. The emerald coloring of this spider is its most identifiable trait, and has a metallic glistening look. 

Emerald jumping spiders feed on small insects, and use their jumps to pounce on prey. Harmless to humans, when approached it is more common for this spider to flee instead of bite.

They produce mile venom, but it is only harmful to the small animals it feeds on. 

8. Habronattus Clypeatus

Habronattus clypeatus (Habronattus clypeatus) on a dry leaf in Pima County, Arizona, USA
Habronattus clypeatus (Habronattus clypeatus) on a dry leaf in Pima County, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Habronattus clypeatus
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 5 to 8 mm (0.19 to 0.31 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Found in the United States and parts of Mexico, Habronattus clypeatus is a species of jumping spider inhabiting Arizona.

This spider is found in a variety of habitats and is common in the Sonoran desert regions. Not much is known about this spider because of its secretive nature, and it is a relatively new species discovered.

Habronattus clypeatus is a small spider, and ranges from dark to light brown. They have dark markings on their abdomen, and the sides of their head, and have a mottled pattern covering their leg. The tan coloring of this species makes it easy for camouflage to blend into the sandy dirt habitats they live in.

Like other jumping spiders this species feeds on small insects, using its leaps to jump on prey. They are preyed on by lizards, and toads, as well as larger spiders.

This species is a part of the Habronattus genus, which is known for its small size and bold coloring.

9. Ribbon Jumping Spider

Ribbon Jumping Spider (Metacyrba taeniola) on rocks in Cochise County, Arizona, USA
Ribbon Jumping Spider (Metacyrba taeniola) on rocks in Cochise County, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Metacyrba taeniola
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 4.4 to 7.2 mm (0.17 to 0.28 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Inhabiting grassy fields, wooded areas, and other edged-type habitats, the ribbon jumping spider is a species you can find in Arizona. This spider is active during the day, and at night they create a silk nest to rest in.

When not roaming about, this spider is commonly seen under rocks, logs, and other natural debris. They are active for most of the year, and in winter they will overwinter until warmer temperatures come.

Ribbon jumping spiders have a charcoal black or gray coloring. They have a yellowish mottled pattern on their abdomen, with yellow or white stripes running down the sides of their body. A small species, their legs are reddish brown, and small hairs cover their body.

Ribbon jumping spiders’ range stretches across the southern United States and spends most of its time hunting. They feed on small insects, and track them using their amazing eyesight. When threatened this species will flee, and only bites if provoked.

10. Habronattus Pyrrithrix

Habronattus Pyrrithrix (Habronattus Pyrrithrix) on grass in Arizona, USA
Habronattus Pyrrithrix (Habronattus Pyrrithrix) on grass in Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Habronattus Pyrrithrix
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 5 to 8 mm (0.19 to 0.31 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Habronattus pyrrithrix is a species of jumping spider that inhabits the southwest United States. This species is common in mountaintops, riparians, and desert habitats.

Residential areas and agricultural fields are also where this spider is commonly found. They are diurnal and are active from spring to fall.

Small in size, this species is covered in many tiny hairs. They have a tan, or brownish coloring, with a red mask marking on their eyes. Males of this species are covered in dark bold stripes, but females have a uniform pattern.

While this spider is a keen hunter, other larger spiders are one of the main predators this species faces. Like other jumping spiders they feed on small insects, and hunt them with their long jumps.

Birds, lizards, and small mammals are also common predators this spider is threatened by in the wild. The bite of this species is mildly venomous but only harmful to the small insects it preys on.

11. Bold Jumping Spider

Bold Jumping Spider (Phidippus audax) on a concrete wall in Prescott, Arizona, USA
Bold Jumping Spider (Phidippus audax) on a concrete wall in Prescott, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus audax
  • Other Names: Daring jumping spider
  • Adult Size: 6 to 19 mm (0.23 to 0.74 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30

Bold jumping spiders are one of the most common spiders in North America. They live in prairies, woodlands, open fields, and near urban areas.

Active during the day, this species spends its time on vertical surfaces like tall plants, trees, houses, and fences. Active during the day, spring to fall is when this spider is seen most often.

At night, and during cold periods Bold jumping spiders take shelter in a silk nest that they create. Their silk nest is made in secluded areas like under loose dirt, on the grooves of trees, and on plant life. 

Bold jumping spiders have black coloring and are covered in white tufts of hair. White triangular spots appear on their abdomen, which is orange when they are juveniles. This species is named after its bold coloring and iridescent green chelicerae.

Small insects like aphids, bollworms, mosquitoes, and other pest species are what this spider feeds on. If living in a garden they do a great job at protecting plants from insects that will eat them.

Their jumps are used to navigate their terrain to hunt, and when moving about they use a silk tether to prevent them from falling to their death.

12. European Garden Spider

Cross Orbweaver (Araneus diadematus) on its web in Sonoma County, California, USA
Cross Orbweaver (Araneus diadematus) on its web in Sonoma County, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Araneus diadematus
  • Other Names: Cross spider, Pumpkin spider
  • Adult Size: 5.5 to 20 mm (0.2 to 0.7 inches)
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

European garden spiders are native to Europe but have populations spread around the globe, including areas within Arizona. This spider is also called the cross spider, because of the white cross pattern painted on its abdomen.

They lie in woodlands, meadows, gardens, and other vegetated habitats. This spider is mostly seen in the summer and fall months. They live in large circular webs, sometimes made on the sides of buildings near lighting.

Female European orbweavers are the creator of the large circular webs this spider is found in. They have large round abdomens, while males are much smaller.

This species ranges in color from tan to dark brown. They have a white crown marking on their back, as well as other white blotches.

Mainly nocturnal, European orbweavers create new webs every night. As an orbweaver, this species is known to eat its web to recycle its silk.

Flying insects like moths, mosquitoes, and flies are what this orb weaver eats. They make their webs near light since that is what attracts a large variety of insects.

13. Furrow Spider

Furrow Orbweaver (Larinioides cornutus) in the dark in Santa Cruz, Arizona, USA
Furrow Orbweaver (Larinioides cornutus) in the dark in Santa Cruz, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Larinioides cornutus
  • Other Names: Furrow orb weaver
  • Adult Size: 10 to 12 mm (0.39 to 0.47 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Furrow orbweavers are a common orb-weaving species found across the United States and are very common in Arizona. This species’ range also stretches to Mexico, Canada, Europe, Africa, and parts of Asia.

Furrow orbweavers are known to live in moist vegetated habitats. Areas with freshwater nearby and plenty of moisture are required since they drink the water droplets that fall into their web.

This species is named after the furrow pattern that is found running across its back. Furrow orbweavers come in colors like black, white, red, brown, and light tan.

Females have large abdomens, while males are much smaller in size. Dark bands run down this spider’s legs, and they are covered in small hairs. The hairs on the spider help them navigate through their sticky web, and sense when prey falls into their trap.

Furrow orbweavers are mostly active at night and feed on flying insects that get caught in their web. Moths, mosquitoes, gnats, and flies are some of the insects they eat.

This spider has mild venom, but bites from them are rare and harmless. At night the furrow orbweaver can be seen sitting in the center of its web, but during the day they hide in a secluded area.

When feeding on the prey they will wrap them up in silk, and use their venom to paralyze them.

14. Spinybacked Orbweaver

Spinybacked Orbweaver (Gasteracantha cancriformis) on its web in Abbeville County, South Carolina, USA
Spinybacked Orbweaver (Gasteracantha cancriformis) on its web in Abbeville County, South Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Gasteracantha cancriformis
  • Other Names: crab-like orbweaver
  • Adult Size: 2 to 9 mm (0.07 to 0.35 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Named for their spikey appearance, the spiny-backed orbweaver lives in the southern United States, the Caribbean, and Central America.

Woodland and vegetated areas are where this spider lives. Trees and shrubs are where they create their large circular webs. 

Spinybacked orbweavers are a colorful species and are found in white, yellow, red, yellow, and orange. They have large spikes that protrude from their body and have dark dimples on their abdomen.

Males are much smaller in size and lack the spines on their bodies. The spikes on their body are said to help ward off predators like birds, and other large spiders.

Spinybacked orbweavers feed on small insects that get caught in their web. They use their venom to paralyze their prey, feeding on animals such as bees, flies, gnats, and mosquitoes.

Areas with plenty of vegetation are where you will find this species since it is abundant with insects for them to feed on.

15. Golden Silk Orbweaver

Golden Silk Orbweaver (Trichonephila clavipes) on its web in Puntarenas, Costa Rica
Golden Silk Orbweaver (Trichonephila clavipes) on its web in Puntarenas, Costa Rica. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Trichonephila clavipes
  • Other Names: Banana Spider
  • Adult Size: 24 to 50 mm (0.94 to 1.96 inches)
  • Lifespan: 6 months to a year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Golden silk orbweavers are named after the silk they use to make their large webs, which shine golden in the sun. This spider is found in Arizona, and lives across the United States in tropical habitats.

Woodlands, swamps, and very humid habitats with plenty of vegetation are where this spider lives. Active from spring to fall, they are found most often in the summer months.

Females of this species create large circular webs held up by vegetation around it. They are capable of making webs up to 3 feet in diameter, using silk that has a yellowish hue.

Females have long abdomens, with long legs. They have a bright yellow coloring, with white spots and blotches on their back.

Their long spindly legs are yellow with black and red bands. Males are much smaller in size, with red, yellow, and black coloring.

Golden Silk orbweavers are one of the largest orb weaver species in Arizona and mainly feed on flying insects that get caught in their web. Insects like grasshoppers, flies, flies, butterflies, and other flying insects.

They are active the day and night, usually seen sitting in the center of their web.

16. Silver Garden Spider

Silver Garden Spider (Argiope argentata) on its web in front of a cactus in Jourdanton, Texas, USA
Silver Garden Spider (Argiope argentata) on its web in front of a cactus in Jourdanton, Texas, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Argiope argentata
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 3 to 17 mm ( 0.11 to 0.66 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: $25

Silver garden spiders live in the southern regions of the United States, with their range stretching into South America. This species prefers to live in hot and humid habitats.

Females of this species create large webs for them to sit in. The Webs of this species have a zig-zag stabilimenta in their center. This species is active during the day and is seen sitting in the center of their web creating an X shape with their body.

Males are rarely seen, but are sometimes seen in females waiting to mate. This spider is active during the warm months of Summer and Fall. In winter this species dies off, but the spiderlings and eggs will overwinter in the cold season, waiting to be active in the spring.

A large species, this spider is named after the silver coloring on its head and abdomen. The end of their abdomen has yellow, white, and brown coloring, with 5 bumps protruding from them.

They have yellow, black, and silver coloring on their legs. Small hairs also cover this species’ body to help them navigate their web.

Silver garden spiders create large webs to catch flying insects. Insects are their main source of food, and when one gets caught in their web they take them out with their venom.

While this spider is large and has flashy colors, they are harmless to humans. Bites rarely occur, unless they are harassed.

17. Arrowhead Spider

Arrowhead Orbweaver (Verrucosa arenata) on its web in Decatur, Georgia, USA
Arrowhead Orbweaver (Verrucosa arenata) on its web in Decatur, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Verrucosa arenata
  • Other Names: Arrowhead spider
  • Adult Size: 9.5 mm (0.37inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Named for their triangular body shape, arrowhead spiders are a spider you may cross paths with in Arizona. This species lives across the United States and is most common in the summer and fall.

Arrowhead spiders build circular webs to live in. Unlike other orbweavers, this species sits in its web facing the sky. They are active during the day, creating new webs daily since their web gets damaged regularly.

Arrowhead spiders are known for their triangular-shaped abdomen, but only females have these traits. Males are smaller and are usually only seen waiting in a female’s web trying to mate.

This species comes in black, dark brown, red, and cream coloring. Their triangular-shaped abdomen is colored yellow, white, or cream. They have dark bands running down their legs, and small hairs covering their body.

Small insects make up the majority of this species’ diet. Common predators of this spider include wasps, birds, and frogs.

This species is not dangerous. It is usually found in habitats like marshes, wetlands, gardens, and other moist vegetated areas.

18. Banded Garden Spider

Banded Garden Spider (Argiope trifasciata) on its web in a field at Coronado National Forest, Arizona, USA
Banded Garden Spider (Argiope trifasciata) on its web in a field at Coronado National Forest, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Argiope trifasciata
  • Other Names: Banded orb-weaving spider
  • Adult Size: 15 to 25 mm (0.59 to 0.98 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Banded garden spiders are found all across the United States. Active during the day, this spider sits in large webs that it creates.

Highly vegetated areas like grasslands, gardens, prairies, and other areas with tall grass. Banded garden spiders are mostly seen in the summer and fall. Only females create these large webs, and there is usually a large zig-zag pattern running down the center of their web.

A very large species, females have rounded abdomens, with long spindly legs. They are much larger than males, having a sleek and tiny appearance.

This species is named after the bands that run down their body and legs. Yellow and black are their usual colors, but younger spiders may have white and black coloring. When sitting in their web they sit with their head facing down towards the sun and resemble a skull and bones.

Flying insects that get caught in this spider’s web are their main food source. They wrap up their prey in a silk cocoon and inject them with venom to neutralize them.

Flies, mosquitoes, butterflies, bees, and some of the animals they regularly feed on.

19. Western Spotted Orbweaver

Western Spotted Orbweaver (Neoscona oaxacensis) hanging on a thread of its web in Maricopa County, Arizona, USA
Western Spotted Orbweaver (Neoscona oaxacensis) hanging on a thread of its web in Maricopa County, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Neoscona oaxacensis
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 9 to 17 mm (0.35 to 0.66)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Western spotted orbweavers are a common species found in the United States, as well as South America. This spider is found during the months of Summer and fall.

Females create large circular webs to live in, while males spend their time wandering for a mate. Western spotted orb weavers live in vegetated habitats and create circular webs to live in. Open areas like fields and gardens are where they are found.

This species is a large orbweaver, with a mottled pattern on its back. Small hairs cover their body, and dark bands run down their legs.

Western spotted orbweavers can have brown, gray, red, or yellow coloring. Females have a rounded bulbous abdomen, and males are slightly smaller.

Like other orbweaver, this species has a zig-zag pattern running down the center of its web, which is why some call them the zig-zag spider. Small insects that get caught in their web are what they feed on.

They will wrap up their prey, then bite them to inject them with venom.

20. Cat-faced Orbweaver

Cat-faced Orbweaver (Araneus gemmoides) on a brick wall in its web in Pima County, Arizona, USA
Cat-faced Orbweaver (Araneus gemmoides) on a brick wall in its web in Pima County, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Araneus gemmoides
  • Other Names: Jewel Spider
  • Adult Size: 5 to 7 mm (0.19 to 0.27 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Cat-faced orb weavers are named after their body shape, with some saying they look similar to a cat’s face. This spider has a tan, yellow or orangish coloring, and dark bands running down its legs.

Their abdomen has two bumps on it that look similar to a cat’s ears, as well as small dimples that look like eyes. Male and females have similar appearances, but males are small in size.

This spider lives in large webs it creates, and it can be seen during the day repairing their home. This species eats its own web to recycle and repair the damage that occurs during the day, a trait common amongst orb-weaving spiders.

Cat-faced is active from spring to fall, and when the cold hits this spider will die off or overwinter. This species is found in mountainous regions and other areas with lots of vegetation. It is common for them to build their webs near areas that are well-lit at night, like porches.

Cat-faced spiders feed on small insects that get caught in their web. Mud daubers are this spider’s main predators, and they are often found in the mud-daubers home paralyzed.

This spider is harmless to humans and only uses its venom to feed on small animals. Their bite is usually not strong enough to pierce human skin, and bites only occur if provoked.

21. Black and Yellow Garden Spider

Yellow Garden Spider (Argiope aurantia) in its web in Patagonia, Arizona, USA
Yellow Garden Spider (Argiope aurantia) in its web in Patagonia, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Argiope aurantia
  • Other Names: Yellow garden spider
  • Adult Size: 5 to 28 mm ( 0.2 to 1.1 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: $8

The black and yellow garden spider is a species of orb-weaving, known to live in gardens and other vegetated habitats. While it is found in Arizona, its range stretches across the US, reaching Mexico, Canada, and parts of Central America. It is most active in summer and fall.

Black and yellow build large circular webs, with a zig-zag stabilimentum in its center made of thick silk. It is believed the stabilimentum is used so birds are more likely to see the web, and not fly into it.

Black and yellow garden spiders are named after their coloring. This spider has black, and yellow bands running downs its long legs, as well as black and yellow markings on its abdomen.

Their abdomen has some silver coloring, but their head is completely silver. Females are larger than males and are more than double their size. This species has a rounded abdomen and sits in its web in the shape of an X.

The black and yellow garden spider has flashy colors but is not dangerous. Its bite is similar to that of a bee sting, unless allergic.

This species feeds on small insects that get caught in its web. Grasshoppers, flies, and wasps are some of the animals they eat.

22. Starbellied Orbweaver

Starbellied Orbweaver (Acanthepeira stellata) clinging onto a stem in Biglerville, Pennsylvania, USA
Starbellied Orbweaver (Acanthepeira stellata) clinging onto a stem in Biglerville, Pennsylvania, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Acanthepeira stellata
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 5 to 15 mm ( 0.19 to 0.59 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20

Named after their spikey body, the star-bellied orb weaver is a unique species you can find in Arizona. This spider is found all over the United States, living in meadow and grassland habitats.

This spider lives in large circular webs, capable of being up to a foot in diameter. Their web is made in areas with plenty of vegetation, and during the day it is sometimes seen sitting in the center of its web.

This spider comes in a variety of colors like reddish brown, tan, and black. Its abdomen is covered in shape spikes that protrude from its body, used to help ward off predators. Males have a much smaller abdomen, but still keep the spiky look, as well as having much longer legs.

Starbelleid orbweaver will drop from its web if it feels threatened, and curl into a ball-like shape. Birds, wasps, and frogs are the most common predators this species faces.

Starbelleid orbweavers have mild venom, which is used to feed on the small insects that get caught in its web.

23. Arabesque Orbweaver

Arabesque Orbweaver (Neoscona arabesca) on a leaf in Sierra Vista, Arizona, USA
Arabesque Orbweaver (Neoscona arabesca) on a leaf in Sierra Vista, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Neoscona arabesca
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 5 to 7 mm (0.19 to 0.27 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Arabesque orbweaver inhabit North America and are a species that you may find in Arizona.

This spider is named after the swirling arabesque pattern painted across their backs. Arabesque orbweaver can have brown, orange, red, gray, and even black coloring.

Females have the classic orb weaver appearance of a bulbous abdomen, and shorter spindly legs. Males have longer legs and an abdomen around the same size as their heads.

Females create large circular webs to live in, while males spend their time wandering looking for a mate. This spider web varies from around 5 to 17 inches in diameter. Habits such as grasslands, gardens, woodlands, and around human structures are where this spider can be found.

Arabesque orbweavers are active at night and use this period to feed on small flying insects that get caught in their web. They will sit in the center of their web, and use vibrations to know when something is caught in the trap.

Insects like gnats, flies, mosquitoes and moths are ambushed, wrapped in silk, then injected with paralyzing venom.

24. Shamrock Spider

Shamrock Orbweaver (Araneus trifolium) on a leaf in British Columbia, Canada
Shamrock Orbweaver (Araneus trifolium) on a leaf in British Columbia, Canada. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Araneus trifolium
  • Other Names: Shamrock orbweaver
  • Adult Size: 19 mm (0.74 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Shamrock spiders live across the United States and Canada. Humid areas with a variety of vegetation are where this spider is found.

Grasslands, gardens, woodlands, and around human structures are where this spider can be found. The warm months of summer and fall are when this spider is active.

This spider lives in circular webs and builds its home in the morning. When not in its web this spider will hide out in a secluded area, using a silk line to know if anything has fallen into its trap.

Shamrock orbweavers have a variety of colors that they appear in. White, black, red, orange, and gray are some they showcase.

Their abdomen is round and bulbous, with a mottled pattern covering it. Small hairs cover this species entirely, and they have dark bands that run down their legs.

Pest insects like flies and gnats are what this spider feeds on, helping control its population of them. Their web is used to catch the prey they eat, and they will eat their own silk to recycle it for later use.

25. Spotted Orbweaver

Spotted Orbweaver (Neoscona crucifera) nestled in a corner in Prescott Valley, Arizona, USA
Spotted Orbweaver (Neoscona crucifera) nestled in a corner in Prescott Valley, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Neoscona crucifera
  • Other Names: Hentz Orbweaver
  • Adult Size: 5 to 20 mm (0.19 to 0.78 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Spotted orbweavers live in woodlands, gardens, and residential areas. Found in Arizona, this species is active from spring to fall. They live in large webs, made in areas with high insect traffic.

This species makes its web around houses and on porches. They make their webs near lighting since insects are attracted by the light. They mate in the warm months and are able to lay up to 1,000 eggs.

Spotted orbweavers have a tan, or orangish coloring, and are covered in small thick hairs. Their legs are covered in dark bands and have red on their underside.

Females and males look similar, but males have long legs and small abdomens. The underside of this species’ abdomen has a black square marking.

Spotted orbweavers are active at night, and feed on insects that get caught in the web. This species wraps its prey up and injects them with paralyzing venom.

Their main predators are the mud dauber, and they use these spiders to feed their young.

26. Long-bodied Cellar Spider

Long-bodied Cellar Spider (Pholcus phalangioides) on a white wall in Buckeye, Arizona, USA
Long-bodied Cellar Spider (Pholcus phalangioides) on a white wall in Buckeye, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Pholcidae
  • Scientific Name: Pholcus phalangioides
  • Other Names: Skull spider, Daddy long-leg spider
  • Adult Size: 6 to 10 mm (0.23 to 3.9 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Long-bodied cellar spiders are one of the most common spiders in Arizona and live all across the United States.

This spider lives in caves, basements, on the sides of houses, and other dark damp places. They live in loosely woven webs, and multiple spiders are sometimes seen in a communal web.

This species is also nick-named the daddy long leg since their legs are the longest feature of this spider. They have tan or cream coloring, and long pill-shaped bodies. When born this species is extremely small, and it can take a full year for them to reach their adult size, and they will molt around 6 times.

Long-bodied cellar spiders rarely bite humans, and if they do, their fangs are too small to penetrate human skin. This spider is beloved by many that it lives near since they feed on pest insects that get caught in their web.

They are also able to feed on other spiders, using their long legs to quickly and safely wrap up prey. Their long legs help them quickly navigate their web, and when in another spider’s web it is not detected since their legs put very little pressure on webs.

27. Marbled Cellar Spider

Marbled Cellar Spider (Holocnemus pluchei) in its web in grass in Avondale, Arizona, USA
Marbled Cellar Spider (Holocnemus pluchei) in its web in grass in Avondale, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Pholcidae
  • Scientific Name: Holocnemus pluchei
  • Other Names: Daddy long legs
  • Adult Size: 5 to 7.5 mm (0.19 to 0.29 inches)
  • Lifespan:  1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Marbled cellar spiders inhabit North America, Africa, Europe, and the Mediterranean. This species lives in loosely woven webs.

They may choose to live in a communal web with one another, or decide to make their own home. Warm dark areas are where this spider chooses to inhabit. They are common in caves, around rocks, basements, cellars, attics, and on the sides of homes.

Marbled cellar spiders are named around the marble-like pattern that appears on their back. They have gray, black, or cream coloring.

Their legs are extremely long, with a few dark bands on them. This species undergoes around 6 molts, before becoming fully grown.

Insects like flies, roaches, and even other spiders. They are able to quickly wrap up their prey in silk, and inject them with paralyzing venom.

Jumping spiders are one of the main predators this species faces. They will shake when threatened, to get their enemy caught in their silk, or out of their web.

28. Giant Daddy Long Legs Spider

Giant Daddy Long Legs Spider (Artema atlanta) on a gray wall in Queensland, Australia
Giant Daddy Long Legs Spider (Artema atlanta) on a gray wall in Queensland, Australia. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Pholcidae
  • Scientific Name: Artema atlanta
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 8 to 11 mm (0.31 to 0.43 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Giant daddy-long legs inhabit Arizona and other tropical regions around the globe. This species builds dome-shaped webs that are loosely built.

Their webs are made in dark secluded areas like caves, rocky regions, around homes, and inside buildings. This spider is active for most of the year and will make its way indoors during the colder periods.

Artema atlanta, or the giant daddy long leg, is the largest species of Pholcidae. They have tan or gray coloring, with long thin legs.

Their legs have dark bands on them, and their body is covered in tiny hairs. This species has a larger abdomen, and a more robust body when compared with other species of daddy long legs.

The giant daddy-long legs feed flies, mosquitoes, and other insects seen as pests. To take out its prey this spider will fling silk at them, and inject them with venom to neutralize them.

With an abundance of food, this species is able to mature at a quicker rate and lay more eggs.

29. Southern House Spider

Southern House Spider (Kukulcania hibernalis) on a green sponge in Mesa, Arizona, USA
Southern House Spider (Kukulcania hibernalis) on a green sponge in Mesa, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Filistatidae
  • Scientific Name: Kukulcania hibernalis
  • Other Names: Southern crevice spider
  • Adult Size: 9 to 19 mm (0.35 to 0.74 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 8 years
  • Average Price Range: $30

Southern house spiders are a common species in Arizona and other regions within the southern United States. As its name suggests this spider lives in buildings, like homes, warehouses, and barns.

They create flat messy webs in crevices with wooly silk. Most of the time this species is found in man-made structures, but they are occasionally found on trees. Active during the night, and during the day this species hides in a silk crevice.

The southern house spider is a very large species. This spider is sexually dimorphic, and females have a much more robust body.

Males have a sleek appearance, with long thin legs. Southern house spiders have light to dark brown coloring. They are commonly confused with the brown recluse, but are much larger, and lack the dark violin shape on their cephalothorax.

Insects are the main food source for this species, and they feed on the ones that get caught in their frayed web. They are rarely seen since they spend most of their time in the crevices of their web, only coming out to feed.

30. Carolina Wolf Spider

Carolina Wolf Spider (Hogna carolinensis) walking through grass at Tumacacori National Historical Park, Arizona, USA
Carolina Wolf Spider (Hogna carolinensis) walking through grass at Tumacacori National Historical Park, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Lycosidae
  • Scientific Name: Hogna carolinensis
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 19 to 25 mm (0.7 to 0.98 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Carolina wolf spiders live in Arizona and inhabit other parts of the Southwestern United States. This species lives in flat open areas.

Like tarantulas this spider inhabits burrows, Carolina wolf spiders dig their own burrows and use their silk to fortify them. They may also overtake the abdomen of animal burrows, and use it as their own. The burrows this spider lives in provide shelter, and let them withstand the warm months.

Carolina wolf spiders are one of the largest spiders in Arizona and are the largest species of Lycosidae. They range in color from dark to light brown and are covered in hair. Females breed in the summer, and in the fall it is common to see this spider carrying her spiderlings on her back, or her eggs encased in silk.

Being nocturnal, this species is only seen at night. Their eight eyes are located on the front of their face, and shine will glisten when flashed with light.

This spider is named after its wolf-like hunting skills. They feed on small insects like grasshoppers, roaches, crickets, and frogs. Lizards, wasps, birds, and larger frogs are what feed on this large spider. 

31. Koch’s Wolf Spider

Koch's Wolf Spider (Alopecosa kochi) walking on bark in Coconino County, Arizona, USA
Koch’s Wolf Spider (Alopecosa kochi) walking on bark in Coconino County, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Lycosidae
  • Scientific Name: Alopecosa kochi
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 19.8 mm (0.78 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Koch’s wolf spider is a species of Lycosidae most common in Arizona. This spider is active at night and spends its time hunting for insects to feed on.

Wolf spiders live in a variety of habitats like meadows, woodlands, gardens, and around residential areas. Active at night, during the day they hide under natural debris like a rock or log, or live in a burrow.

Koch’s wolf spiders have tan, gray, or dark brown coloring. Females of this species have short legs, with rounded abdomens.

Males have much longer legs, and both have a mottled pattern covering them. The head of the Kochs world spider has a light-colored stripe on its cephalothorax, with dark coloring on the sides of their stripe.

Similar to other wolf spiders this species is active at night. Their eyes are large and see well in the dark. The eyes of the wolf spider shine when flashed in the dark due to the reflective tissue tapetum lucidum, making the light shine through their retina.

Wolf spiders use their excellent night vision to small insects. They are extremely agile and move with grace. It is not uncommon for this spider to be found in your home looking for food.

32. Beach Wolf Spider

Beach Wolf Spider (Arctosa littoralis) on grainy sand at Catalina Foothills, Arizona, USA
Beach Wolf Spider (Arctosa littoralis) on grainy sand at Catalina Foothills, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Lycosidae
  • Scientific Name: Arctosa littoralis
  • Other Names: Sand wolf spider, Shoreline Wolf Spider
  • Adult Size: 10.9 to 14 mm (0.43 to 0.59 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Beach wolf spiders are a widespread species in the United States and are a spider you may find in Arizona. This species is known for inhabiting sandy habitats like beaches, and deserts.

They are also found in forests, meadows, wetlands, and around residential areas. Active at night, during the day the beach wolf spider finds a secluded area to hide, like under driftwood.

Beach wolf spiders are able to blend into sand, easily camouflaging themselves with their color and pattern. This species has a light tan coloring, with light gray bands on its legs, and a mottled pattern on its body.

Beach wolf spiders spend their time at night hunting small insects like roaches, grasshoppers, and other invertebrates. This species uses its camouflage to sneak up on its prey and ambush them.

Birds, wasps, and reptiles are the main predators this species faces. The large fangs of this species produce a painful bite, and common symptoms are short-term mild swelling and itching.

33. American Grass Spider

Grass Spider (Agelenopsis) in its web funnel at Coronado National Forest, Arizona, USA
Grass Spider (Agelenopsis) in its web funnel at Coronado National Forest, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginners
  • Family: Agelenidae
  • Scientific Name: Agelenopsis
  • Other Names: funnel weavers
  • Adult Size: 9 to 20 mm (0.35 to 0.78 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

American grass spiders are among the most widespread and common spiders in the US. This species lives in grassy habitats and creates funnel-like webs to live in.

They are active from spring to fall and are not seen often since this species spends its life in its web. The web from this species is also made in doorways, windows, bushes, lawns, and meadows.

Grass spiders have a brown coloring, with two dark stripes on their cephalothorax. Their abdomen has a mottled pattern on it, with long spinnerets similar to tails, that help them build their funnel-shaped webs. This spider has long legs covered in thin hairs, which make it easy for them to travel over their silk. 

American grass spiders feed on small insects that are found in grassy areas like aphids, grasshoppers, crickets, flies, and other invertebrates. Prey that falls into their web have a hard time escaping and are quickly grabbed by the grass spider.

This spider has mild venom, only used for the small prey it neutralizes.

34. Six-spotted Fishing Spider

Six-spotted Fishing Spider (Dolomedes triton) walking on vegetated water in Carmen, Arizona, USA
Six-spotted Fishing Spider (Dolomedes triton) walking on vegetated water in Carmen, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Pisauridae
  • Scientific Name: Dolomedes triton
  • Other Names: Dock Spiders
  • Adult Size: 15 to 60 mm (0.59 to 2.3 inches)
  • Lifespan: 2 years
  • Average Price Range: $20

Six-spotted fishing spiders are a species known for being able to glide over the water. They are found across the United States, living near freshwater and vegetated habitats.

Six-spotted fishing spiders live near ponds, lakes, and wetlands-type areas. This species is able to walk on water because the surface tension of the water makes it so the spider doesn’t sink.

Six-spotted fishing spiders are regularly confused for wolf spiders, but they have a sleeker appearance. Their colors range from dark brown to gray, and they have a white coloring that borders the edges of their abdomen and head.

They have white dots on their abdomen in two rows. This species has long legs useful for navigation on land over water. Spots also appear on the underside of this species.

Animals found in the water and on land are what this species eats. Small fish, frogs, tadpoles, and aquatic insects are a few of the animals they eat.

A nocturnal species, fishing spiders are active mostly in the warm months of summer and fall.

35. Western Parsons Spider

Western Parson Spider (Herpyllus propinquus) on a rocky surface in Patagonia, Arizona, USA
Western Parson Spider (Herpyllus propinquus) on a rocky surface in Patagonia, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Gnaphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Herpyllus propinquus
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 8 to 13 mm (0.31 to 0.51 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The western parson spider is a species of ground spider found in Arizona, and other parts of the western United States. This species inhabits woodland areas and spends its time wandering looking for food.

The western parson spider is active at night and is seen most often forming spring to fall. This spider is sometimes seen indoors since, makes its way inside looking for food or shelter.

Western parsons spiders are a small species, with black coloring. They have long legs, with reddish brown legs. This species has a white marking on its abdomen, with a large spinneret on its bottom looking similar to a tail.

This spider looks very similar to the eastern Parsons spider, and can only be told apart when looked at with a microscope. The western and eastern parson spiders have a different range, and the western parson spider is mainly found in the western United States.

The Western parson spider feeds on small insects. They are an ambush predator, rushing insects they find when roaming about.

This species regularly bites people since it may make its way into homes at night undetected. Bites from this species are harmless, with only mild symptoms if not allergic.

36. Mouse Spider

Mouse Spider (Scotophaeus blackwalli) on a concrete floor in Ustecky, Czechia
Mouse Spider (Scotophaeus blackwalli) on a concrete floor in Ustecky, Czechia. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Gnaphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Scotophaeus blackwalli
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 9 to 12 mm (0.35 to 0.47 inches)
  • Lifespan: 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Mouse spiders are found in North America, but also in other regions of the world like Europe. This spider is a small ground-dwelling species and does not spin webs to live in.

They only spin webs to lay their eggs in. Mouse spiders are active at night, and spend their time looking for food. This spider is common in woodland habitats but lives in a variety of areas.

Mouse spiders are small to medium-sized, with females being slightly larger. They have brown coloring on their legs and cephalothorax, with a dark black or gray abdomen. Small hairs cover this spider in its entirety, giving it a shiny velvety appearance.

This species feeds on small insects and is an active hunter. Their bite is not dangerous to humans but helps take down the small insects and invertebrates it feeds on.

They may also use their silk to help neutralize their prey when hunting.

37. Woodlouse Hunter

  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Dysderidae
  • Scientific Name: Dysdera crocata
  • Other Names: Woodlouse hunter, sowbug killer
  • Adult Size: 9 to 3 mm (0.35 to 0.59 inches)
  • Lifespan: 2 to 5 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Woodlouse hunters are a widespread species in the United States. Found in Arizona, this spider inhabits dark and moist areas.

They primarily feed on woodlice, which is where they get their name. This species is active year-round, and spend most of its time hunting at night.

Red is the coloring of this spider’s head and legs, and they have tan or cream-colored abdomens. The fangs of this spider are very large, and used for piercing the shells of woodlice.

Their fangs also produce a painful bite, which is often treated with a tetanus shot since they feed on dead and decaying life. During the day this spider is not seen often, since they hide in a silken retreat they make.

Woodlouse spiders are the woodlice’s most dangerous predators and are generally harmless to humans. They also feed on other small animals like beetles, centipedes, and earwigs. Woodlouse spiders may make their way into homes looking for food.

38. Northern Yellow Sac Spider

Northern Yellow Sac Spider (Cheiracanthium mildei) on a green plant in Tanque Verde, Arizona, USA
Northern Yellow Sac Spider (Cheiracanthium mildei) on a green plant in Tanque Verde, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Clubionidae
  • Scientific Name: Cheiracanthium mildei
  • Other Names:
  • Adult Size:  5 to 10 mm (0.19 to 0.39 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Northern yellow sac spiders are found in Arizona, but also live in other parts of North America, Africa, Europe, Asia, and South America. This species inhabits woodlands, and gardens, and may even be seen in your home.

They are active at night, and during the day they create a silken retreat to rest in. Inside homes, this spider is found under debris and clutter like laundry, woodpiles, and blankets. 

Northern yellow sac spiders have a cream or yellowish coloring with a translucent look. They have long thin legs, with black on the tip of their feet. This spider has a rounded abdomen and is covered in small thin hairs.

The bite from the Northern Yellow sac spider is medically significant to humans, with swelling, redness, and leaves a sore on your skin. A bite from this species may require medical treatment, but death from it is extremely rare.

Yellow sac spiders feed on insects and their eggs, as well as other small spiders.

39. Red-spotted Ant Mimic Spider

Red-spotted Ant-mimic Sac Spider (Castianeira descripta) on a wet leaf in Jacksonville, Florida, USA
Red-spotted Ant-mimic Sac Spider (Castianeira descripta) on a wet leaf in Jacksonville, Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Corinnidae
  • Scientific Name: Castianeira descripta
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 13 mm (0.51 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Red-spotted ant mimics are found all over the US and are a species you may see in Arizona. This spider is known for its tendency to mimic ants.

They walk with their front legs up to mimic an ant’s antenna and move very slowly on six legs. Mimicking ants helps them prey on them, and avoid being targeted by them.

Red-spotted ant mimics have dark black coloring, with a dark marking on their abdomen. Some may confuse this spider for the black widow, but they are harmless. They have a similar body shape to ground spiders and are medium-sized species.

Red-spotted ant mimics feed on ants, but also other small insects they come across. This species spends its time hunting and creates a silk sac for it to rest in.

This spider is active from spring to fall, and in the cold season, they overwinter.

40. Spitting Spider

Spitting Spider (Scytodes thoracica) on a white corner in England, United Kingdom
Spitting Spider (Scytodes thoracica) on a white corner in England, United Kingdom. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Scytodidae
  • Scientific Name: Scytodes thoracica
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 6 to 18 mm (0.25 to 0.75 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1.5 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $30

Spitting spiders are found all over the globe, and are named after their ability to spit at their enemies. This sider spits a fluid of liquid silk mixed with venom.

Using their great aim they are able to take down prey up to .75 inches away. It takes this species around 1/700th of a second to spit its venom.

Spitting spiders have long front legs to help them aim. They are tan, with dark speckles covering their body. The abdomen of this spider is large and rounded.

The cephalothorax of this species is also very large and rounded. Spitting spiders have long thin legs, covered in dark bands. Unlike most species, this spider only has 6 eyes grouped on the front of its face.

Spitting spiders use their spit to feed on insects like flies, mosquitoes, and even other spiders. This spider is only active at night, which is when it spends its time hunting.

41. Green Lynx Spider

Green Lynx Spider (Peucetia viridans) on a dark furry stem in Pima County, Arizona, USA
Green Lynx Spider (Peucetia viridans) on a dark furry stem in Pima County, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Oxyopidae
  • Scientific Name: Peucetia viridans
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 12 to 22 mm (0.47 to 0.86 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: $5

Green lynx spiders are a common species in the southern US, in states like Arizona. This spider is also found in Mexico, parts of Central America, and the West Indies.

Green lynx spiders are found on vegetation like shrubs, and small plants. They are active during the day and spend their time hunting.

Green lynx spiders are the largest species of lynx spiders and are easily identifiable due to their green coloring. The green coloring looks almost as if the spider can glow in the dark, and helps it blend into the plant life that it lives around.

Small thick hairs cover this spider’s long legs, as well as black dots. This spider lays eggs in the fall, which looks like spikey ball.

Green lynx spiders spend their time hunting during the day, feeding on insects like aphids, flies, jumping spiders, and bees. This species is able to spit venom at its prey, similar to the spitting spider.

You should be careful around this species as it may spit venom at you, but it is mostly harmless.

42. Goldenrod Crab Spider

Goldenrod Crab Spider (Misumena vatia) on rocks in Tucson, Arizona, USA
Goldenrod Crab Spider (Misumena vatia) on rocks in Tucson, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Thomisidae
  • Scientific Name: Misumena vatia
  • Other Names: Flower crab spider
  • Adult Size: 5 to 10 mm (0.20 to 0.39 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Goldenrod crab spiders are a very common species in North America and Europe. This spider inhabits flowering plants like milkweed, trillium, fleabane, and goldenrod.

Females of this species spend their life perched on a flower, using it for shelter and to catch food. Males are more active and spend their time looking for a mate.

Goldenrod crab spiders when young are able to travel by ballooning, which is where they fly in the air using their silk and the wind.

Females of this species have large round abdomens and crab-like legs. Males are small in size, with long dark legs.

Females come in white, or yellow coloring, and are able to change their shade to better match the flower they are sitting on. Color changes occur very slowly, and they are only able to change to yellow or white. Red or brown markings sometimes appear on this spider’s sides.

Goldenrod crab spiders feed on pollinator insects like wasps, flies, bees, and butterflies. They use their camouflage to remain unseen and quickly grab their prey with their strong crab-like appendages.

43. White-banded Crab Spider

White-banded Crab Spider (Misumenoides formosipes) hanging onto a flowering stem in Cochise, Arizona, USA
White-banded Crab Spider (Misumenoides formosipes) hanging onto a flowering stem in Cochise, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Thomisidae
  • Scientific Name: Misumenoides formosipes
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 3 to 11 mm (0.11 to 0.43 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

White-banded crab spiders are named after the white band that appears on the back of this species’ head. This spider lives in fields, gardens, meadows, and other highly vegetated habitats.

They spend their life sitting on plants like milkweed, fleabanes, thistles, and other flowering vegetation. This species is active from spring to fall, but is mostly seen in the warm months.

White-banded crab spiders like other species of Thomisidae slightly resemble crabs. Females have largely surrounding abdomens, while males are much smaller.

This species has white, or yellow coloring, and is able to change its pigment like a chameleon to better blend into its habitats. Black, tan, or reddish markings may appear on their body.

This species feeds on pollinator insects like butterflies, bees, wasps, flies, and even mites. They are active during the day and are preyed on by animals like birds, lizards, ants, and other larger spiders.

44. Ground Crab Spider

Ground Crab Spider (Xysticus sphericus) on a sandy ground in Cochise County, Arizona, USA
Ground Crab Spider (Xysticus sphericus) on a sandy ground in Cochise County, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Thomisidae
  • Scientific Name: Xysticus sphericus
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 3 to 9 mm ( 0.11 to 0.35 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Ground crab spiders are a species you can find in Arizona. Like other crab spiders, this species is able to walk in all directions and has a crab-like appearance.

They can be found on the ground under debris like logs, leaf litter, or around trees. Ground crab spiders may also inhabit plants and low-lying vegetation.

This species has tan coloring, useful for blending in with dirt and other ground surfaces. They have a mottled pattern covering their body, and at a glance, some may confuse them for a tick.

Ground crab spiders are hunters, using their strong crab-like appendages to take down prey. They sit and wait for something to pass, and bite their prey to kill it.

Birds, reptiles, and small mammals are what prey on this small spider. This species is not often seen, since it easily blends into trees, and ground habitats.

45. Giant Crab Spider

Giant Crab Spider (Olios giganteus) on a large branch in Santa Cruz County, Arizona, USA
Giant Crab Spider (Olios giganteus) on a large branch in Santa Cruz County, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Sparassidae
  • Scientific Name: Olios giganteus
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 20 mm (0.78 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Giant crab spiders are one of the largest species you can find in Arizona. They live in tropical habitats and are excellent climbers.

This species is often found on vertical surfaces like trees, walls, large walls, ceilings, and shrubs. Giant crab spiders get the ability to move sideways and are a very agile species. This spider is not actually a member of the crab spider family Thomisidae, but is a type of huntsman spider.

This spider is extremely large, with very long legs. They have tan coloring, with a rounded abdomen and cephalothorax. The legs of this species are its largest trait and have black coloring on their tips.

Giant crab spiders are nocturnal, and take shelter in secluded areas during the day. This spider is a very keen hunter, using its speed and size to take down its prey.

Insects and small invertebrates make up the majority of these spiders’ diet. They are a very beneficial species that help control the population of pest insects like grasshoppers, roaches, and even other spiders.

46. Bowl and Doily Spider

Bowl and Doily Spider (Frontinella pyramitela) on its web in Pima County, Arizona, USA
Bowl and Doily Spider (Frontinella pyramitela) on its web in Pima County, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Linyphiidae
  • Scientific Name: Frontinella pyramitela
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 4 mm (0.16 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Bowl and doily spiders are named after the unique shape of their web. This spider is found all over the United States in woodlands and humid environments.

They create their web using the support of vegetation like bushes. The web of this spider has two sections.

The bowl part of this spider’s web is where it sits, pulling insects and biting them from the bottom of its web. The doily flat section of this spider’s web is used to push prey further into its trap.

Bowl and doily spiders are small species, with dark brown coloring, with white markings on them. They have large abdomens, and long thin legs useful for navigating through their web.

Flying insects like gnats, flies and other small animals are what this species feeds on. They inject their prey with venom, but their venom is harmless to humans.

It is common for this spider to live in communal webs, with other members of the same species.

47. American House Spider

American House Spider (Parasteatoda tepidariorum) on its web in Saddlebrooke, Arizona, USA
American House Spider (Parasteatoda tepidariorum) on its web in Saddlebrooke, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Theridiidae
  • Scientific Name: Parasteatoda tepidariorum
  • Other Names: Common House Spider
  • Adult Size: 3 to 5 mm (0.11 to 0.19 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

American house spiders are one of the most common species of spiders in the US and are a species you can find in Arizona.

American house spiders build messy cobwebs to live in, usually made in secluded areas within man-made structures. In cabinets, attics, garages, and barns are just a few of the places this spider is found.

This spider is a very small species, with a rounded abdomen and thin legs. They vary in color from tan to black and have a mottled pattern covering their body. Males are slightly smaller than females, with a less bulbous abdomen.

American house spiders feed on small insects that are found in or around man-made structures. Roaches, flies, ants, mosquitoes, and grasshoppers are some of the things they eat.

This spider has very poor eyesight and uses vibrations to know when something is caught in its web.

48. False Widow

False Black Widow (Steatoda grossa) on a white bumpy wall in Springerville, Arizona, USA
False Black Widow (Steatoda grossa) on a white bumpy wall in Springerville, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Theridiidae
  • Scientific Name: Steatoda grossa
  • Other Names: brown house spider, cupboard spider
  • Adult Size: 10 to 14 mm (0.39 to 0.55 inches)
  • Lifespan: 2 to 6 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

False widows are often thought to be a member of the widow family of Latrodectus, but this species is only a part of the same family.

As a tangled web spider, this species lives in the messy cobwebs it creates. This spider is common in Arizona and North America, but also inhabits other regions of the world like Asia, Africa, and Europe.

False widows have bulbous abdomens, and spindly legs similar to the black widow. This spider is dark brown in color, with a cream mottled pattern covering its back. They lack the red house glass markings that are found on the widow spiders that live in Arizona.

False widows feed on insects that get caught in their web. While this species has poor eyesight, they use vibrations to know when prey falls into their trap.

Insects like flies, roaches, beetles, and other spiders are what this species feeds on.

49. Triangulate Cobweb Spider

Triangulate Combfoot (Steatoda triangulosa) on a pebbly surface in Sassari, Italy
Triangulate Combfoot (Steatoda triangulosa) on a pebbly surface in Sassari, Italy. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Theridiidae
  • Scientific Name: Steatoda triangulosa
  • Other Names: Triangulate bud spider
  • Adult Size: 3 to 6 mm (0.1 to 0.23 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Triangulate cobweb spiders are very common in the US and Arizona. This species builds messy cobwebs to live in.

Their webs are made in houses, basements, cabinets, and other dark secluded areas. They are active for the year, breeding in the fall.

Triangulate cobwebs spiders are brown, with white markings on their body. This spider has dark bands on its legs, with a large bulbous abdomen. Small hairs cover this spider’s body, and they are usually found sitting in their messy web.

The web of this species is made indoors in dark and secluded areas. They have poor eyesight and rely on vibrations to sense the world around them.

Triangulate cobwebs spiders feed on insects like gnats or flies. They wrap them up in silk and then neutralize them with venom to feed.

While this spider is common in areas inhabited by humans, bites are rare and harmless.

50. Rabbit Hutch Spider 

Rabbit Hutch Spider (Steatoda bipunctata) on a light surface in Jihomoravsky, Czechia
Rabbit Hutch Spider (Steatoda bipunctata) on a light surface in Jihomoravsky, Czechia. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Theridiidae
  • Scientific Name: Steatoda bipunctata
  • Other Names: Cheiracanthium
  • Adult Size: 16 mm (0.75 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Rabbit hutch spiders are found in Arizona, other parts of North America, and Europe. This spider often makes its webs in the cages of rabbits, which is where it gets its name.

Rabbit hutch spiders are active year-round, and breed in summer. This species builds messy webs to live in, created in man-made structures.

Rabbit hutch spiders are a small species, with coloring ranging from brown to black. They have a greasy appearance with a body texture that looks similar to wax.

Females are larger than males and lack any pattern on them. Males may have a white marking on their abdomen.

Flies, mosquitoes, and other insects are what this species feeds on. They feed on insects that get caught in their web and even regularly take out other spiders.

When in the cages of rabbits this spider helps give the rabbits less stress by feeding on annoying pest insects.

51. Western Black Widow

Western Black Widow (Latrodectus hesperus) on its web in Drexel Heights, Arizona, USA
Western Black Widow (Latrodectus hesperus) on its web in Drexel Heights, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Theridiidae
  • Scientific Name: Latrodectus hesperus
  • Other Names: Western Widow
  • Adult Size: 7 to 15 mm (0.27 to 0.59 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: $20

Western black widows are one of the Latrodectus species that inhabit Arizona and are also common in other areas of the western United States. This species is active mostly in the summer and fall months, living in the messy webs it creates.

The web this species creates is extremely thick and stronger than most other species of spider. This spider is active at night, which is when it hangs around in its web. During the day this spider hides in a secluded area.

Western black widows are jet black and are known for the red hourglass that appears on this spider’s back. Only females have this marking and are much larger than males with a rounded abdomen. Males have white markings on their bodies and are usually seen sitting in the female’s web.

The western black widow will create its web under furniture, water spouts, around bushes, in empty flower pots, and in other secluded areas. This species has one of the most dangerous bites in Arizona and has venom that affects the nervous system.

Bites are rarely fatal, but medical treatment is usually needed.

52. Paloma Dwarf Tarantula

Paloma Dwarf Tarantula (Aphonopelma paloma) on grainy dry sand at South Mountain Village, Arizona, USA
Paloma Dwarf Tarantula (Aphonopelma paloma) on grainy dry sand at South Mountain Village, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Theraphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma paloma
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 40 years
  • Average Price Range: $150

Palmo dwarf tarantulas live in Arizona, found in the southern and southwestern areas of the state. These spiders live in lower elevations, creating crescent-shaped mounds to live in.

They are not seen often, since most of their time is spent in their burrows. Paloma dwarf tarantulas breed in the later months of November and December, which is when they are seen most often.

Palamo dwarf tarantulas are one of the smallest tarantula species in Arizona. Females are larger than males and are also lighter colored.

This spider has brown, or reddish brown coloring. Hairs cover this species’ body, with reddish brown hairs on their abdomen.

This species is rarely ever seen, but on some nights it may be seen close to its burrow. Paloma dwarf tarantulas feed on small insects that roam near their home.

They have large fangs, with mild venom used to paralyze prey.

53. Texas Brown Tarantula

Texas Brown Tarantula (Aphonopelma hentzi) walking across dry grass blades and a rock in Patagonia, Arizona, USA
Texas Brown Tarantula (Aphonopelma hentzi) walking across dry grass blades and a rock in Patagonia, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Theraphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma hentzi
  • Other Names: Missouri tarantula, Oklahoma tarantula
  • Adult Size: 2.5 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 40 years
  • Average Price Range: $30 to $100

Texas brown tarantulas inhabit parts of Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Missouri, but are also found in eastern Arizona within Greenlee county.

This tarantula lives in prairies, and shrubland habitats. They spend most of their time in burrows or hiding under rocks or other debris.

Texas brown tarantulas range from dark, to light brown coloring. They are covered in various shades of brown, and are a very hairy species.

The hairs on his spider’s abdomen are able to be kicked off to protect themselves from being harassed. These hairs are irritating to skin, and eyes, making predators leave this species alone.

Members of this species that live in higher elevations tend to grow bigger and more robust than the ones that inhabit lower-level habitats. Texas brown tarantulas are a docile species, only becoming aggressive if they are harassed.

This spider feeds on small insects and invertebrates that pass by its burrow. Tarantula hawks are the main predator this species faces in the wild.

54. Tucson Bronze Tarantula

Tucson Bronze Tarantula (Aphonopelma vorhiesi) on a rocky surface in Pima, Arizona, USA
Tucson Bronze Tarantula (Aphonopelma vorhiesi) on a rocky surface in Pima, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Theraphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma vorhiesi
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 40  years
  • Average Price Range: $50 to $100

Tucson bronze tarantula lives in the southeastern areas of Arizona. They inhabit burrows and create their homes in habitats with loose sandy soil.

Woodlands and deserts are the most common habitat this species lives in. They are not seen often since most of their life is spent underground.

Male Tucson bronze tarantulas are seen most often since they will wander from their burrows in the summer to look for a mate. They are known for their velvety black color, with red and orange coloring. Females are larger than males, have brown coloring, and have thicker legs.

This species is nocturnal, and at night will hunt for insects to feed on. Their burrow is surrounded by silk, so they can feel the vibrations of nearby prey passing by.

When something gets close enough to their home they will strike at them quickly, and feed on them in their home.

FAQ

Does Arizona Have Tarantulas?

Arizona is filled with a variety of tarantula species, and they inhabit the large desert areas within the region.

Arizona has more tarantula species than other states, with only Texas and California getting close to the number of species found in the area. It is not known exactly how many tarantula species live in Arizona since they live in burrows and are rarely seen.

What Are The Largest Spiders In Arizona?

Tarantulas are the largest spider found in Arizona, with some of them capable of growing up to 5 inches. Wolf spiders and the Giant Crab spiders are the other large species that can be found in the state.

Are There Any Dangerous Spiders In Arizona?

In Arizona, the black widow and desert recluse are the most dangerous spiders that live within the state. When compared to a rattlesnake, both these spiders produce much more potent venom measured drop for drop, but deaths from these bites occur less often since only a small amount of venom is administered.

Still, most spiders are harmless, and will only bite if provoked. The bite from most species is similar to that of a bee sting.

Which Spiders In Arizona Are The Most Common?

Cellar spiders, jumping spiders, black widows, and house spiders are some of the most common species in the state. Spiders that are capable of living indoors are seen more often and are even capable of surviving winters since they are sheltered from the cold.

Wrapping up

Arizona is filled with a variety of spiders, and there are also more than 3,500 different spider species that live in the United States.

Spiders are very important to the environments they live in, as they are some of the best at controlling the population of pest insects like mosquitoes, and roaches. Spiders are also used as food by small mammals, birds, lizards, and other arthropods.

Spiders are some of the world’s most fascinating creatures, and many of the species on this list are commonly kept as pets. Most spiders can be kept in a small enclosure, and are easily maintained, and even larger spiders like tarantulas are easy to keep if properly cared for.

Arizona’s spiders are just a few found in the United States, but many of them are found in other parts of the country, and even the world. Altogether there are more than 45,000 species inhabiting the world.

Learning about the different types gives you an idea of how different each species can be.

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