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Spiders in California 

In California, there are hundreds of spiders to be found and around 3,000 different species that live in the United States. In this article, you will learn about some of the different types of spiders that live in California.

California is the most populated state, and also has the most diverse landscape in America. Its diversity makes it home to a variety of life you may not see in other areas of the US.

The different landscapes in the state make a perfect home for the many species of spider. Valleys, redwood forests, deserts, grasslands, marshes, and coastal regions are just a small portion of habitats that is in California.

Spiders are one of the world’s most fascinating creatures. Some spin webs, while others roam around. Each species varies in how they look and how they live. Here are some of the most common and interesting spiders in California.

Table of Contents

  1. Spiders in California
  2. FAQ
  3. Conclusion

Spiders in California 

1. Desert Grass Spider 

Desert Grass Spider (Agelenopsis aperta) walking through its funnel web at Silver Fish Truck Trail, California, USA
A Desert Grass Spider (Agelenopsis aperta) walking through its funnel web at Silver Fish Truck Trail, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Agelenidae 
  • Scientific Name: Agelenopsis aperta 
  • Other Names: Funnel-web spider 
  • Adult Size: 13 to 18 mm (0.511 to 0.70 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The desert grass spider is a small funnel-weaving species that inhabit California. Dry and arid regions are where this species prefers to live.

It is a very hardy spider able to withstand the heat and the coldness of the desert night. In the southwestern regions of the US California and Texas are common areas this species is found.

Grasslands, valleys, and near homes in urban areas are habitats in the desert grass spider lives in.

Gray, brown, and black are the colors this spider showcases. Their legs are long to allow them to traverse across grassy areas.

Their body is light in color, with dark stripes on them similar to other funnel spiders. When born this spider lives in a communal web, but as they age they scatter. The abdomen is thin and has long spinnerets to allow them to build the funnel webs they create. 

Secluded areas are where this species builds its tubular web. The silk used for their web is not sticky but lets the spider know when something is in their trap.

Desert grass spiders are aggressive, and combative with other spiders near them.  Grasshoppers, aphids, and other grass insects are what this spider eats.

2. Colonus hesperus 

Colonus hesperus (Colonus hesperus) on a white surface in Mariposa County, California, USA
A Colonus hesperus (Colonus hesperus) on a white surface in Mariposa County, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Colonus hesperus 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 7 mm (0.19 to 0.27 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Colonus hesperus is a species of jumping spider that inhabits the southwestern United States and the coast of California. Forests are a common place to find this species since they mainly live in trees but they also live in urban areas.

This spider becomes active in spring and remains active until fall. There is no common name for this species as of yet. 

The Colonus genus of spider has 14 species currently in 2022, including Colonus hesperus.

These spiders can be identified by the pairs of bulbous spines that are located on the inside of the spider’s leg, in their tibia segment. This species has tan coloring, with small hairs covering its body. 

Like other jumping spiders they have a unique arrangement of eyes giving them excellent vision.

Its two front eyes are large and brown, the rest of its 6 eyes vary in size, and wrap around its head like a crown. The tips of this species’ legs are black, and this spider is covered in a pattern of tan and brown. 

Colonus hesperus is an active hunter. They use their jumping ability to stalk prey. Insects are smaller, or slightly larger than it is what this spider feeds on.

If the prey is too large they may get timid. Jumping spiders use their excellent eyesight, and speed to pounce on prey when it is least expecting it.

Their fangs produce a weak venom to help subdue their prey. 

3. Cross Orbweaver 

Cross Orbweaver (Araneus diadematus) on its web in the dark in Alameda, California, USA
A Cross Orbweaver (Araneus diadematus) on its web in the dark in Alameda, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Tetragnathidae
  • Scientific Name: Araneus diadematus 
  • Other Names: European garden spider 
  • Adult Size: 5.5 to 20 mm (0.2 to 0.7 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The cross orbweaver is originally from Europe but is now found in the United States. Similar climate and habitat have made it possible for this species to successfully make a home in Southeast California, and other areas within the Northwestern United States.

This spider is not considered a pest, since it does no considerable damage to the new habitats it inhabits. Woodlands, gardens, grasslands, open fields, and man-made buildings are some of the places this species lives.

Summer and fall are the seasons this species is active most. Females create large webs to sit in and are typically active at night. Each day a new web is created.

They are sometimes seen sitting head down in the center of their web or will go to the webbing’s edge. In late fall breeding occurs.

Cross orb weavers will leave their web to find a secure area to lay their eggs. Around 300 to 900 eggs are laid, usually hidden in tree bark or another small crevice. 

The cross orbweaver is named after the white cross pattern that appears on its abdomen. Its coloring ranges between yellowish, tan, or dark orange.

Along with the white cross on its abdomen; the cross orbweaver has a mottled pattern on its body and dark bands that run down its spindly legs. 

Like other orbweavers, this spider feeds on the flying insects that get caught in its web. Cross orbweavers usually stay in their web in case any food comes by.

If in danger this spider may fall out of its web to escape harassment, to then crawl back in it  later. 

4. Cat-faced Spider 

Cat-faced Orbweaver (Araneus gemmoides) in its web above leaves at Frog Pond Wetland Preserve, California, USA
A Cat-faced Orbweaver (Araneus gemmoides) in its web above leaves at Frog Pond Wetland Preserve, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Araneus gemmoides 
  • Other Names: Jewel Spider 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 7 mm (0.19 to 0.27 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The cat-faced spider lives across the United States and Canada. They live in webs created near low-vegetation, or well-lighted areas that attract insects. Its web is occasionally moved, torn down, and eaten to create a new one.

A trait shown by many spiders in the Araneidae family, the cat-faced spider may sit head down at the center of its web. They may also retreat to a corner of their web but keep in contact with a strand of silk to know if anything is caught in their web, similar to a fishing line.

This spider gets its common name from its abdomen shape, which some say looks like a cat. They have two horn-like growths that protrude from their abdomen, as well as dimple holes.

Cat-faced spiders range in color from light to dark brown. Males and females look similar, but males have smaller and shaper abdomen. 

Spring to fall is when the cat-faced spider is active. Mating occurs in summer and fall.

Females tend to die after laying their egg sac, but they may stay alive long enough to lay another one. When born, spiderlings of this species feed on each other. Adult cat-faced spiders feed on the variety of small insects that get caught in their web.

This spider bites prey in its web to inject venom, but its bite is usually not strong enough to penetrate human skin. 

5. Shoreline Wolf Spider

Shoreline Wolf Spider (Arctosa littoralis) on some pebbles at Castiac Lake, California, USA
A Shoreline Wolf Spider (Arctosa littoralis) on some pebbles at Castiac Lake, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Lycosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Arctosa littoralis 
  • Other Names: Sand wolf spider, Beach Wolf Spider 
  • Adult Size: 10.9 to 14 mm (0.43 to 0.59 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 4 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The United States and southern Canada is the range inhabited by the beach wolf spider. Beaches and other sandy habitats are the primary living area of this spider, which makes California the perfect state for them.

Sandy water banks, sea shores, and dunes are areas they can be found. Being nocturnal, the beach wolf spider hides out under sand, rocks, driftwood, or in other hidden areas during the day. 

Beach wolf spiders have a cream tan coloring, with a mottled pattern on them. Their shade and texture make it easy for them to camouflage in the sandy habitats.

Like other wolf spiders, this species has a robust body. Their legs are long and stretch out their sides. 

Even with their large size, the beach wolf spider is able to traverse quickly across the ground. Like a wolf, they hunt down their prey and do not use webs to catch their food.

Other spiders, roaches, small lizards, and grasshoppers are just some of the things they eat. Wolf spiders prey on anything small enough they can successfully take down. 

After mating the beach wolf spider carries around its egg sac to protect its babies. When born the spiderlings sit on the back of their mother’s abdomen until they are ready to fend for themselves.

Mating occurs in the spring, and up to 100 eggs are laid by the female. 

6. Silver Garden Spider 

Silver Garden Orbweaver (Argiope argentata) on its web at Catalina Island, Los Angeles, California, USA
A Silver Garden Orbweaver (Argiope argentata) on its web at Catalina Island, Los Angeles, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Argiope argentata 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 3 to 17 mm ( 0.11 to 0.66 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: $25 

Silver garden spiders live in southern California and other areas with warm climates. Texas, Florida, and Arizona are the other states this spider lives in, but they also inhabit South and Central America.

This spider creates a large web in a chaotic zigzag pattern. These spiders are active during the day and night. Fall is the season when this species is seen most on its web.

Female silver garden spiders are larger than males, and the creators of the large webs they are seen sitting in. This spider has extremely long legs, and when sitting in its web it creates an X shape.

Its abdomen, and legs are covered in silver color and hair. Their spindly legs also have black, sometimes red bands on them.

A pattern of yellow, black, and reddish markings also appear on their abdomen. Males are much smaller than females, with a similar appearance. They are often seen sitting in the corner of a web.

Silver garden spiders are considered beneficial to the areas they live in since they feed on a variety of pest insect life. They tend to create their webs near plants like cacti and feed mostly on flying bugs. 

7. Banded Garden Spider 

Banded Garden Spider (Argiope trifasciata) on its web in green leaves in San Diego County, California, USA
A Banded Garden Spider (Argiope trifasciata) on its web in green leaves in San Diego County, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Argiope trifasciata
  • Other Names: Banded orb-weaving spider 
  • Adult Size: 15 to 25 mm (0.59 to 0.98 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Areas with tall grass and other types of vegetation make the perfect home for the banded garden spider. This species lives in California, and across the United States where the habitat is suitable.

Summer and fall are when these spiders are seen most often, as in spring most spiders are still juveniles. Similar to other garden spiders the banded garden spider builds a large web around highly vegetated areas.

Studies have shown they are naturally inclined to build their webs on an east-west axis, and face with their heads pointed south when in their web.

Dark bands cover this spider’s legs and abdomen. They have a cream base, with yellow coloring on their abdomen.

Their legs are shaped in an X position when sitting on their web. Younger spiders do not have bands but get them as they age. Males are much smaller than females and are often seen sitting in the corner of webs.

Banded garden spiders feed on flying insects that get caught in their web. Spiders in the genus Argiope build a stabilimentum in the center of their web, which is a thick zig-zag silk pattern.

This helps stabilize the web and ensures it doesn’t break if large prey gets trapped in their silk. Birds are the main predator of this spider, and feed on them whenever they get the chance. 

8. Gray House Spider 

Grey House Spider (Badumna longinqua) on a flower petal in Caspar, California, USA
A Grey House Spider (Badumna longinqua) on a flower petal in Caspar, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Desidae 
  • Scientific Name: Badumna longinqua 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 15 mm ( 0.19 to 0.59 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The gray house spider lives across the globe, found in regions like Europe, South America, Japan, and the United States. This spider is originally from Australia.

It mainly lives in homes, which is how it has been able to successfully populate other parts of the world. Other habitats they live in include forests and wetlands. They create their webs in secluded areas, and in the corners of homes. 

Gray house spiders have a light gray coloring. Their abdomen is large and rounded.

Their legs are long and covered in dark bands. The gray house spider is extremely furry, with small hairs covering its legs and body. 

This spider is commonly found in homes, but it is not dangerous to humans. Its bite is venomous but only harmful to small insects.

Some do not consider this spider a pest since they actively feed on other insects that come into the home. Their bite neutralizes the prey that falls into the web and allows them to suck out their prey’s insides. 

9. California Trapdoor Spider 

California Trapdoor Spider (Bothriocyrtum californicum) in the mud near Los Angeles, California, USA
A California Trapdoor Spider (Bothriocyrtum californicum) in the mud near Los Angeles, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced 
  • Family: Halonoproctidae 
  • Scientific Name: Bothriocyrtum californicum 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 50 mm (2 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 5 to 20 years 
  • Average Price Range: $30

California trapdoor spiders are native to California. This spider lives in a burrow it creates out of silk, vegetation, and dirt.

The burrow it creates is circular like a pipe, and it has silk-covered walls. A cork-like top covers the spider’s burrow.

This tip is used to camouflage itself from the world and hide from the prey that it hunts. California trapdoor spiders create its burrow in sturdy soil, with plenty of prey to feed on. 

The California trapdoor spider is medium-sized, with females being the larger of the sexes. They have a dark black coloring and a brown abdomen.

This spider has a shiny, and hairless body. They have large fangs, with large spines to help them dig. 

This species is called the trapdoor spider because of the way that it hunts. The cover for this spider’s burrow is like a trap door that opens wherever prey walks by.

California trapdoor spiders pull their prey into their burrow when it walks by and is least expecting it. It is extremely aggressive, but bites from this species only cause mild symptoms. It uses vibrations to know when something is near and quickly leaps out at its prey. 

This spider spends most of its life in its burrow, but males are sometimes seen wandering to find a mate. Females lay their eggs in a burrow and care for their young until they are able to care for themselves. 

10. Long-legged Sac Spider 

Northern Yellow Sac Spider (Cheiracanthium mildei) on a leaf in Culver City, California, USA
A Northern Yellow Sac Spider (Cheiracanthium mildei) on a leaf in Culver City, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Clubionidae 
  • Scientific Name: Cheiracanthium mildei 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 4 to 10 mm (0.15 to 0.39 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Long-legged sac spiders are a medium-sized species commonly found in and around homes. This species is active at night, and during the day hides in a secluded area.

A silk-like sac is made by this species for them to hide in, which is why they are called sac spiders.  Long-legged sac spiders live across North America, as well as other parts of the globe like Central America, Africa, Asia, South America, and the oceanic regions.

Long-legged sac spiders have a cream beige or yellowish coloring. They have large fangs tipped in black. Small hairs cover their body that is yellow and black.

This species’ abdomen is large and has a pointed end. The legs of this species are long and extend out of its body. 

This spider is nocturnal and actively hunts for its prey at night. They feed on insects like roaches, moths, flies, and anything small enough they can take down.

This species is known to wander into homes looking for food and is one of the species that bite humans the most. Their bite is painful because of their large fangs, but the venom they produce is only mild. 

11. Woodlouse Hunter 

Woodlouse Spider (Dysdera crocata) on a light green wall in San Diego, California, USA
A Woodlouse Spider (Dysdera crocata) on a light green wall in San Diego, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Dysderidae 
  • Scientific Name: Dysdera crocata 
  • Other Names: Woodlouse hunter, sowbug killer 
  • Adult Size: 9 to 3 mm (0.35 to 0.59 inches)
  • Lifespan: 2 to 5 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The woodlouse hunter is found across the globe in regions like North and South America, Australia, New Zealand, Africa, and Eurasia.

In the United States, this spider is more common in the eastern half of the country. In California, the woodlouse hunter has a small range on the coast of the state. 

Areas with debris like leaf litter, rocks, logs, and other hiding places are where this spider is found.

As their name suggests they primarily feed on woodlouse, but only because they are found in the same habitats. This species is nocturnal, and during the day hides in a silken sac it creates. 

The woodlouse spider is a medium-sized species, with vibrant orange, or reddish coloring on its body and legs. Its abdomen is rounded, and brown in color. Their body shape is similar to ground, or sac spiders. 

Woodlouse spiders do not have any preference for the type of insect they eat, as long as they can successfully hunt it. They are nocturnal, and an aggressive species.

Even when mating this spider is ferocious. Females often injure or kill the males they breed with. Woodlouse spiders lay up to 70 eggs after they copulate.

In its preferred habitat, this species is common to find and is active for most of the year. 

12. Tropical Orbweaver 

Tropical Orbweaver (Eriophora ravilla) in its web in Santander, Colombia
A Tropical Orbweaver (Eriophora ravilla) in its web in Santander, Colombia. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Eriophora ravilla 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 20 mm ( 0.23 to 0.78 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: $20 

In the United States, the tropical orb weaver is a species that is only found in warm climates and regions. This spider can be found in California, as well as Texas, Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Florida.

Summer and fall are the seasons this spider is most active. They are nocturnal and hide in secluded areas during the day. When night approaches this spider creates a large web to sit in, and wait for insects to get caught in its trap.

Tropical orb weavers have many colors and patterns that they can showcase. They have bodies similar to other orbweavers and are covered in small thick hairs.

Tropical orb weavers are dark brown, tan, gray, or black in color. They have a stripe, blotches, or large green mark on the back of their abdomen.

Some tropical orb weavers can have an all-green abdomen. This species is very similar to the tropical orb-weaver but looks at the coloring and markings on its legs and abdomen. 

Tropical orb weavers feed on the insects that get caught in their webs at night. Flying insects like moths and mosquitoes are what this spider eats most often.

At night they are often seen sitting in the center of their web, but during the day this spider hides in a secluded area like under a leaf. Man-made structures, light fixtures, and bridges are some of the places this spider makes its webs. 

13. Western Parsons Spider 

Western Parson Spider (Herpyllus propinquus) on red concrete in Escondido, California, USA
A Western Parson Spider (Herpyllus propinquus) on red concrete in Escondido, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Gnaphosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Herpyllus propinquus 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 8 to 13 mm (0.31 to 0.51 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The western parson’s spider is a ground spider that lives in North America. This spider is very similar to the eastern parson’s spider, but inhabits states west of the Rock Mountains, like California.

This spider is nocturnal, and during the day creates a silken nest to hide in. They live in wooded areas, but also find their way indoors on occasion. 

The western parsons (Herpyllus ecclesiastes) are nearly identical to the eastern parson’s spider (Herpyllus ecclesiastics).

Both spiders have a similar appearance and are generally told apart by the locations they live in. These two spiders cannot be told apart at a glance, and an in-depth glance at their reproductive organs is needed to tell them apart.

 The western parson spider has a dark black abdomen and head.

There is a bold white stripe that runs down the center of its head and abdomen and a white marking on the end of the butt. Their legs are long, with reddish-brown and black coloring. 

Small insects are what this spider eats. They roam around at night and are an active hunter like the wolf spider.

It pounces on its prey, and bites it, injecting venom. The venom is harmless to humans, and bites usually occur when they make their way into homes. 

14. Pantropical Huntsman Spider 

Pantropical Huntsman Spider (Heteropoda venatoria) on a concrete wall in San Diego, California, USA
A Pantropical Huntsman Spider (Heteropoda venatoria) on a concrete wall in San Diego, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Sparassidae 
  • Scientific Name: Heteropoda venatoria 
  • Other Names: Huntsman spider, Crane Spider 
  • Adult Size: 22 to 28 mm (0.86 to 1.1 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2.5 years 
  • Average Price Range: $40 

The pantropical huntsman spider is just one of the thousands of huntsman spiders that exist. This species can be found in California, Texas, Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina.

This species is active at night and lives in tropical habitats. They are active for most of the year, except for the colder periods.

Woody habitats are where this species prefers to live. In winter they may find their way indoors to survive the cold. 

Huntsman spiders have long legs and flat bodies. Their flat body shape allows them to crawl through the smallest of crevices.

Males have longer legs than females but have a more slender body. This species has a similar body shape to the brown recluse but is large. They have a tan or gray coloring.

Huntsman spiders get their name from their quick speed and hunting ability. Insects, small lizards, and other spiders are some of the things they eat.

This spider relies on its camouflage and quick speed. They are harmless to humans, as they do not see us as threats. Huntsman spiders can often be held, and are quite docile.

15. Marbled Cellar Spider 

Marbled Cellar Spider (Holocnemus pluchei) in its web in Carmichael, California, USA
A Marbled Cellar Spider (Holocnemus pluchei) in its web in Carmichael, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Pholcidae 
  • Scientific Name: Holocnemus pluchei 
  • Other Names: Daddy long legs
  • Adult Size: 5 to 8 mm (0.19 to 0.31 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Marbled cellar spiders are a common spider in California. In or around man-made structures are where we live most often.

In warehouses, basements, backyards, and in and around houses are some of the areas they live. They prefer to live in dark and secluded areas.

This species builds a web to live in. Its web is loosely spun and messily made. Cellar spiders sit on the bottom of their web, and they may live together in large groups next to each other. 

The marbled cellar spider has extremely long legs when compared to its tiny pill-shaped body. Males and females are around the same size, but females have larger pedipalps when fully grown.

Their long legs are tan and have dark bands on them. Their small abdomens have a gray and brown marbled pattern on them giving them their name. 

Marbled orbweavers eat whatever falls into their web. They are extremely fast at wrapping up their prey, and their long legs allow them to keep a safe distance.

Marbled orbweavers may look fragile, but they are able to kill more dangerous spiders like the black widow. Some prefer to keep them around as a natural form of pest control.

When its prey is wrapped up they inject mild venom into them, but their jaws are too small to bite humans. 

16. Crusty Spider 

Crusty Spider (Homalonychus theologus) on wood in San Diego County, California, USA
A Crusty Spider (Homalonychus theologus) on wood in San Diego County, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Homalonychidae 
  • Scientific Name: Homalonychus theologus 
  • Other Names: American Sand Assassin 
  • Adult Size: 6.5 to 10 mm 
  • Lifespan: 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Homalonychus theologus is a desert spider, and very little is known about this species. This spider belongs to the genus Homalonychus, which has three other members.

Homalonychus lives predominantly found in Mexico but also lives in the southwestern areas of the United States. In California, this spider inhabits the extreme south of the state near Mexico. 

This species is more well known by its scientific name Homalonychus theologus, but people who have lived near this species call them the crusted spider, because of their dirt, or rock-like coloring. Crusty spiders are tan and have a sandy, rock-like coloring.

They hide under rocks or bury themselves in the sand. Their legs are extremely long, and thin, compared to their thick body. Dark markings and a mottled pattern cover them, giving them the ability to blend in with rocks.

Crusty spiders are not known by many, and their long crab-like legs make them seem alien. Even though they look fearsome when spotted these spiders are docile. Oftentimes when found they are hiding under natural debris.

Their appearance and camouflage make it likely they are active hunters like the wolf spider. Insects found in the dry, and arid regions they live in are what this species feeds on. 

17. Southern House Spider 

Southern House Spider (Kukulcania hibernalis) on a red wall in Armona, California, USA
A Southern House Spider (Kukulcania hibernalis) on a red wall in Armona, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Filistatidae 
  • Scientific Name: Kukulcania hibernalis 
  • Other Names: Southern crevice spider 
  • Adult Size: 9 to 19 mm (0.35 to 0.74 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 8 years 
  • Average Price Range: $30 

Southern house spiders are a species whose population is spread across the southern United States. In California, they are found in the southern areas of the state.

This spider lives near humans and is a species commonly found in homes, and other buildings. Lights around houses attract insects, which causes this spider to also be attracted to well-lit areas. 

Tan is the color of male southern house spiders, which is why they are often mistaken for the brown recluse. They have long legs, and dark tan stripes on their head.

This stripe is sometimes mistaken for the violin mark found on the brown recluse but is much thinner.

The brown recluse is not found in California, so you should not worry if you see a spider-like it. Females have a similar appearance to males and are much larger in size.

The web this spider creates is messy and spread across the surface it lives on. It creates special silk that has similar properties to velcro and sticks easily to insects.

In cracks, corners, and crevices of buildings is where their webs are made. Fall is when the southern house spider is most active, and when they mate.

Infestations of this species are possible if they have a reliable food source, and plenty of secluded areas to live. 

18. Brown Widow 

Brown Widow (Latrodectus geometricus) hanging on its web in Los Angeles, Califronia, USA
A Brown Widow (Latrodectus geometricus) hanging on its web in Los Angeles, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Latrodectus geometricus 
  • Other Names: Brown button spider 
  • Adult Size: 8 to 14 mm ( 0.3 to 0.5 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20 

It is believed that brown widows are native to southern Africa, but have managed to find their way around the globe. In California, this species can be found in a select area during the right season.

Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Riverside, Sacramento, Shasta, Santa Barbara, and Orange country are where this species can be found in California. 

Brown widows enjoy warmer climates and are most active in the summer and fall. Webs created by this spider have a messy and tangled design.

Their eyesight is not great, so they rely on the vibrations of their web to sense things. Brown widows are nocturnal, and during the day they are not seen.

Their web is made in open space, but near a secluded area so they are able to hide. In buckets, under furniture, near fences, and around mailboxes are just some places they may choose. 

Brown widows have rounded bodies, and spindly legs similar to other Latrodectus spiders. Male are much smaller than females and are not even the length of one of the female’s legs.

Females have brown coloring and a red hourglass mark on their backs. Some showcase a marbled pattern on their abdomen and have dark banded legs. 

Brown widows only bite when harassed, and their venom is stronger than many other spiders. Death from a bite is extremely rare but swelling, and pain occurs hours after being bitten.

The bite is mostly used to kill insects that fall into their sticky webs. 

19. Western Black Widow 

Western Black Widow (Latrodectus hesperus) on its web in Yucca Valley, California, USA
A Western Black Widow (Latrodectus hesperus) on its web in Yucca Valley, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Latrodectus hesperus 
  • Other Names: Western Widow 
  • Adult Size: 7 to 15 mm (0.27 to 0.59 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: $20 

The western black widow is one of two species of Latrodectus that inhabits California.

This species mainly inhabits the western regions of North America. They are mostly seen in summer and fall. 

Western black widows live in the messy webs they create. The silk they produce is extremely strong and is one of the most durable among spiders.

You can often tell the difference between the black widow’s web and other spiders by touching the web and feeling its tension. 

Western black widows are nocturnal and create their webs in semi-secluded areas. During the day they hide and rest, but at night they can be seen sitting on their web.

Females of this species are known for eating their male mate, as they are significantly larger than them. While this is not always the case if the male stays near when mating they may feed on them. Female spiders are usually larger than males, and other species also exhibit this trait. 

Male western black widows are extremely small and have a tan or gray coloring. They have white markings on their abdomen and have large pedipalps.

Females are the spiders seen most often and are jet black. On the bottom of their abdomen is a red hourglass marking. 

The western black widow is the most dangerous spider in California, as it has potent venom and lives near humans. Deaths from this spider are rare, but their venom is designed to affect the nervous system.

Death is rare, but people with weakened immune symptoms are more sustainable. Western black widows rarely bite unless provoked, and their bite is mainly used to feed on insects. 

20. Bolas Spider

Bolas Spider (Mastophora cornigera) in its web in a wall corner in San Diego, California, USA
A Bolas Spider (Mastophora cornigera) in its web in a wall corner in San Diego, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Mastophora cornigera 
  • Other Names: Southern Bolas Spider
  • Adult Size: 2 to 15 mm (0.07 to 0.59 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Mastophora cornigera is a species of bola spider that lives in California. This spider is a species or orb-weaver but is drastically different in appearance and lifestyle.

Gardens, woodlands, meadows, and other highly vegetated areas are where this species lives. These spiders are mostly active at night and are sometimes seen resting out in the open during the day. 

The male bola is rarely seen, as it is very small. They have a crab-like appearance and orangish coloring.

Females also have an orangish, reddish, white, or tan coloring. They have a plum-like abdomen, with large dimple mounds that protrude from their back.

The shape and abdomen of this species are how they are easily identified. 

Bola spiders do not build large webs like other orbweavers but do have a unique way of hunting.

Using a silk thread, they attach a sticky substance to the end of it, to catch small bugs. This method is like fishing, and they bring in the prey that gets attached to their web.

Moths are what this spider primarily eats, as they are able to produce a pheromone extremely similar to the ones moths produce for mating. Male moths get attracted by the pheromones this spider produces thinking it’s a female, only to be pulled in and eaten. 

21. Gray Wall Jumper 

Gray wall Jumping Spider (Menemerus bivittatus) on white wood in Los Angeles, California, USA
A Gray wall Jumping Spider (Menemerus bivittatus) on white wood in Los Angeles, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Menemerus bivittatus 
  • Other Names: Gray jumping spider 
  • Adult Size: 8 to 10 mm (0.31 to 0.39 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Gray wall jumpers are just one of many species of jumping spiders that live in California. Jumping spiders of the Salticidae family are the most populated family of spiders in the world, with more than 5,000 different types to be found.

Urban areas, forests, and highly vegetated habitats are where this species lives. They are diurnal spiders, and at night find a secluded place to rest. Gray jumping spiders create a silk pocket to hide in, similar to that of a sac spider. 

Gray wall jumpers are sexually dimorphic, but both sexes are gray. Males are dark and have a bold stripe that runs down their abdomen and on the sides of their heads.

Females are pale gray or tan. On the edge of their abdomen and carapace is a dark stripe that runs along their body. 

Gray jumping spiders are originally native to Africa but are very versatile, and now live across the world’s tropical habitats. They are often found on vertical surfaces hunting for small insects.

Jumping spiders have amazing eyesight, and use it to track down prey. They are fast and quick, able to jump nearly 6 inches.

Their large eyes and long jumps make them able to quickly pounce on prey when they are least expecting it. 

22. Half-edged Wall Jumping Spider 

Gray wall Jumping Spider (Menemerus bivittatus) on white wood in Los Angeles, California, USA
A Gray wall Jumping Spider (Menemerus bivittatus) on white wood in Los Angeles, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Menemerus semilimbatus 
  • Other Names: Fairly big jumping spider
  • Adult Size: 4 to 10 mm (0.15 to 0.39 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Menemerus semilimbatus is a member of the Salticidae that lives in California. It has a large range across the globe, also found in Asia, Africa, Europe, and other regions within the Americas.

Highly vegetated areas, and near urban areas is where this spider lives. They crawl on vertical surfaces like houses, fences, trees, and plant life.

Originally, menemerus semilimbatus lived in the Mediterranean region and is native to that area.

This species looks very similar to other jumping spiders and has many of the common traits they share. Two large eyes are located on the front of their face, giving them some of the best vision of spiders.

Hair covers their entire body and chilicaera. They have a tan coloring, with a mottled pattern.

The fangs of this species are covered in thick hair and look similar to a bushy white mustache. Males and females have slight differences; Males have a more slender body and vibrant colors. 

Webs are not used by jumping spiders to hunt, as they are active hunters. Small insects like flies are what they feed on, using their keen vision as speed to take down their prey.

Jumping spiders are very visually inclined, and stalk their prey like a cat. Webbing is only used like a bungee when jumping, to shelter its eggs, or itself when resting at night. 

23. Hacklemesh Weaver 

Hacklemesh Weaver (Callobius bennetti) on wood on Mount Washington, New Hampshire, USA
A Hacklemesh Weaver (Callobius bennetti) on wood on Mount Washington, New Hampshire, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Amaurobiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Callobius bennetti m
  • Other Names: Tangled nest spider, Bennett’s Laceweaver
  • Adult Size: 5 to 14 mm (0.19 to 0.55 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

North America is the home of the hacklemesh weaver, and it is found in the United States in Texas, South Carolina, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, and California. This spider is active from spring to fall and to survive the winter they occasionally make their way into homes and other buildings.

The web of the hacklemesh weaver is extremely messy but forms a funnel for it to live in. Under logs, rocks, woodpiles, basements, doorways, and windows are common areas they build their web. 

The hacklemesh weaver is a medium-sized to small species with reddish-brown coloring. Their legs are long, and they have a large rounded abdomen.

They are sometimes confused for the brown recluse but lack the violin marking on their body. This species is relatively plain, but they may have a chevron pattern on their abdomen.

Small hairs cover this spider’s body and legs. The bite from this species is not dangerous, but having large fangs means it can be painful. 

Insects like termites, moths, and flies are some of the insects they feed on. The silk they use to make their web is not the stickiest, but it is easy for insects to get trapped in its messy designs.

Using vibrations they know when prey is caught in their trap, then they rush to grab it, and inject it with venom. 

24. Goldenrod Crab Spider 

Goldenrod Crab Spider (Misumena vatia) on some white flowers at Eldorado National Forest, California, USA
A Goldenrod Crab Spider (Misumena vatia) on some white flowers at Eldorado National Forest, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Thomisidae 
  • Scientific Name: Misumena vatia 
  • Other Names: Flower crab spider 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 10 mm (0.20 to 0.39 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The goldenrod crab spider lives across North America and other regions within the holarctic region. This spider is very common in the range it lives in and makes its home on a variety of white, and yellow flowers.

Goldenrod flowers are some of the most common flowers they live on, but they can make their home on any flowering vegetation. This species has the ability to change colors. Unlike a chameleon, it does not happen instantly, but over a period of a month. 

Spiders in the family of Thomisidae are known for their crab-like appearance, and this species is no exception. Males of this species are much smaller in size and have a small white abdomen.

Their four front legs are much longer than the rest and have a dark brown coloring. Females have large abdomens and have bright white, or yellow coloring to blend into flowers. 

Pollinators are the main prey this spider hunts. Even being small they are extremely strong and able to take down prey much larger than themselves.

Goldenrod crab spiders use their front legs to grab anything that passes. They are active in the daytime to be able to hunt for insects like bees, butterflies, and dragonflies. 

Goldenrod crab spiders are most active in the fall, and males spend most of their time looking for a mate. When males find a mate they usually guard her with their lives, as other males may try to steal her.

When mating is complete it is common for the female to feed on the male. Female goldenrod crab spiders become aggressive after mating and guard their eggs until they begin to hatch.

Death usually occurs once the eggs are hatched, or the winter becomes too harsh. 

25. White-banded Crab Spider 

A White-banded Crab Spider (Misumenoides formosipes) on an orange flower in Luiseno Park, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Thomisidae 
  • Scientific Name: Misumenoides formosipes 
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 3 to 11 mm (0.11 to 0.43 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

White-banded crab spiders are native to California and can be found in other parts of North America. Summer and fall are when this species is most active.

They do not build webs but make their home on a flower that they are able to camouflage in. Females are able to change color from white to yellow.

Changing from yellow to white takes longer than white to yellow.  Being active during the day, this spider is very tolerant to hot temperatures that occur in summer. 

Male white-banded crab spiders are much smaller than females and have a golden coloring. Their small size and large legs help them traverse areas quickly, which is helpful in finding a mate.

Females are much larger in size and have white, or yellow coloring. Some have a blotchy pattern on their back that can be gray, black, pink, or tan. This species is named after the bold white band that is found on its head. 

Blending in with flowers is how this spider feeds. It sneaks up on pollinators camouflaging into flowers, and grabbing them with its strong front legs.

Bees, butterflies, mites, and other insects that go to visit flowers are what this spider mainly eats. They are great for gardens, and farms, and will feed on any pest insect that is near. 

26. Arabesque Orbweaver 

Arabesque Orbweaver (Neoscona arabesca) on a leaf in Oakland, California, USA
An Arabesque Orbweaver (Neoscona arabesca) on a leaf in Oakland, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Tetragnathidae
  • Scientific Name: Neoscona arabesca 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 7 mm (0.19 to 0.27 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Arabesque orbweavers are one of the most common species of orb weaver in the US. They inhabit California and every other state.

This species of orbweaver is nocturnal and hides in a secluded area during the day. Females create a large web to sit in at night. When the day approaches they eat their own web, to recycle for the next day. 

Males usually do not inhabit these webs, unless they are trying to mate. They will forage on the ground, and near vegetation for food. In late summer, and fall this species is most active.

Arabesque orbweavers are sexually dimorphic and showcase differences in behavior and appearance. Males have slender abdomen and are much smaller than females.

Females have a large rounded abdomen, with hairy legs. This species varies in color, with a possibility of being brown, orange, gray, or black. Its name comes from the arabesque pattern on its back.

Insects are the main source of food for spiders, and this species hunts by using its web. It creates a web near well-lit and moist areas that get the most insect traffic.

Females may also cannibalize the male after mating. The venom this species possesses is able to neutralize small prey. 

27. Hentz Orbweaver 

Spotted Orbweaver (Neoscona crucifera) in its web in San Diego, California, USA
A Hentz Orbweaver (Neoscona crucifera) in its web in San Diego, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Tetragnathidae
  • Scientific Name: Neoscona crucifera 
  • Other Names: Spotted orb weaver 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 20 mm (0.19 to 0.78 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The Hentz orbweaver is a nocturnal species that live in highly vegetated areas. In California, it is common to find this species in gardens, woodlands, and near buildings.

Females of this species build large webs and will take them down every morning when young. When they mature they leave these webs up, and hide in a nearby secluded area.

Males spend most of their life looking for a mate and wander about until one is found. They do not build webs, as they do not possess the correct silk to do so when mature. 

Male Hentz orbweavers are much smaller than females and are often cannibalized after mating is complete. Females have large abdomens, with tannish coloring.

They have a mottled pattern on their back and reddish coloring on their legs and underside. Bands appear on this species’ legs, and they are covered in small hairs.

Summer and fall are when this species is active, and only the eggs survive the winter. This species can lay as many as 1,000 eggs, and they are kept in a silk sac.

The webs this spider makes are large, and usually next to a light source that attracts insects. 

At night they will sit in the center of their web, and rush anything that falls into their trap. Birds and wasps are this species’ most common predators.

Being nocturnal they are able to avoid their predators, but they may also eat their web when the day comes to hide any signs they were there. 

28. Western Spotted Orbweaver 

Western Spotted Orbweaver (Neoscona oaxacensis) on its web in Anaheim, California, USA
A Western Spotted Orbweaver (Neoscona oaxacensis) on its web in Anaheim, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Neoscona oaxacensis 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 9 to 17 mm (0.35 to 0.66) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The western spotted orbweaver is a species that lives in California and is also found in other parts of North America. Mexico and Central America are also a part of the range of this species.

Summer and fall are when the western orbweaver is most active. In winter these spiders are in eggs, and when spring comes they begin to hatch. Spiderlings spend their time maturing to be ready for the mating season in the warmer months. 

Western spotted orb weavers live in highly vegetated areas like gardens, forests, and grasslands. Females create large webs to catch insects and are active during the day and night.

They tend to avoid the summer heat. This species is sometimes seen eating and repairing its web during the day. 

Females of this species have large round abdomens, and spiny legs similar to other orb-weaver species. Males have slightly smaller abdomens, with long legs, and are slightly smaller than females.

Western spotted orb weavers have a tan, or reddish-brown carapace and legs. Their abdomen can give a yellow, brown, white, black, or reddish coloring. Spots cover their abdomen and run down the center of their back. 

 Moths, mosquitoes, flies, and other bugs that get caught in their web are what the western orbweaver preys on. Birds and wasps are the main predators they face.

Being active at night helps this spider avoid many of its enemies. 

29. Giant Crab Spider 

Giant Crab Spider (Olios giganteus) on bark in Descanso, California, USA
A Giant Crab Spider (Olios giganteus) on bark in Descanso, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Sparassidae 
  • Scientific Name: Olios giganteus 
  • Other Names: Huntsman spider 
  • Adult Size: 20 mm (0.78 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Tropical habitats and hot regions are where the giant crab spider can be found. California, Washington, Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Oregon, and Texas is where this species has been documented.

This spider is a type of huntsman spider and is one of the largest spiders in the state. Giant crab spiders do not build webs, as they are active hunters.

Active at night, they occasionally make their way into homes looking for food. 

Huntsman spiders are extremely large, with flare bodies. Their bodies allow them to fit into the smallest of crevices.

Females are much larger than males, but both have a tan-mottled coloring.

The abdomen of the species is small and round, with most of its size coming from its legs. Small hairs cover their body, and they have large fangs to help take down their prey.

During the day the giant crab spider is inactive but can be found by looking under rocks, boards, and other types of debris. This species is one of the most skilled hunters in the spider realm.

The huntsman’s spider speed, large size, and precise movements give them the ability to take down a variety of insect prey, and other small animals. While they look scary, they are docile towards humans, and rarely bite when handled.

Birds, large frogs, lizards, and parasites, can still take down this large spider, and feed on them when given the chance. 

30. Common House Spider 

Common House Spider (Parasteatoda tepidariorum) on a painted wall corner at Moss Beach, California, USA
A Common House Spider (Parasteatoda tepidariorum) on a painted wall corner at Moss Beach, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Parasteatoda tepidariorum 
  • Other Names: 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 8 mm (0.19 to 0.31 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

California is not the only area where the common house spider lives, as this spider’s range spreads across the globe. As their name implies they inhabit the homes that we live in, but they may not be seen often since they build their webs in secluded areas.

In corners, under furniture, and around windows are common places they build their webs. Houses are not the only places they live, but they are also found in warehouses, barns, and other warm structures. 

The color of this species ranges from dark brown to light tan. They have a mottled pattern on their back.

They have large abdomens, and spindly legs, similar to other spiders in their family. Males have smaller abdomen than females but have longer legs. 

Small insects found in homes and buildings are what this spider feeds on. They are able to shoot webs from a distance and attempt to reel in the prey they catch.

Male and females occasionally share the same web to mate, but females occasionally get hyper-aggressive. The venom this spider creates is weak but useful in taking down tiny prey. 

31. Green Lynx Spider 

Green Lynx Spider (Peucetia viridans) in a white flower in San Diego County, California, USA
A Green Lynx Spider (Peucetia viridans) in a white flower in San Diego County, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Oxyopidae 
  • Scientific Name: Peucetia viridans 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 12 to 22 mm (0.47 to 0.86 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: $5

Green lynx spiders live in California, but they are also common in areas within the southern United States. It gets its name from its bright green coloring and translucent appearance.

Grasslands, woodlands, and highly vegetated areas are where this species lives. They spend their time on plants looking for insects. 

The green lynx spider is an ambush hunter and looks for its prey on different plant life. They are active during the day, and their green coloring helps them blend into their habitat, and sneak up on their prey.

Small hairs and black spots cover this species’ body. Long legs help the green lynx spider traverse areas quickly. 

A unique trait found in this spider, and other similar species is the ability to spit, or squirt venom at its enemies. Green lynx spiders are able to spit up to 8 inches and use this trait to defend themselves and hunt.

Fall is the mating season for this spider, and they are capable of laying up to 200 eggs. Females protect their eggs and young until they are able to fend for themselves. 

32. Bold Jumping Spider 

Bold Jumping Spider (Phidippus audax) walking onto a dry leaf in San Leandro, California, USA
A Bold Jumping Spider (Phidippus audax) walking onto a dry leaf in San Leandro, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus audax 
  • Other Names: Daring jumping spider 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 19 mm (0.23 to 0.74 inches) 
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

The bold jumping spider is one of the most common species in North America and can be found in the United States. It is a very large jumping spider, as the members of the Phidippus genus usually have more robust bodies.

This species gets its name from its bold coloring. All black in color, with white tufts of hair and markings covering their body. Their chilicarea and eyes have a green coloring with an iridescent glow.

Spring is the season when jumping spiders are most active. Near homes, woodlands, and vegetated open areas is where the bol jumping spiders live.

Active during the day, they have excellent eyesight, and have long jumps to quickly traverse areas. Jumping spiders use silk differently when compared to other spiders, as they do not build large webs.

When leaping around they attach a tether of silk to avoid falling to their death. Silk is also used to create tents for them to live in or sacs for their babies.

Bold jumping spiders use their excellent eyesight to hunt and stalk their prey. When close enough they will pounce on unsuspecting prey.

Insects like weevils, budworms, smaller spiders and flies are some of their favorite meals. Jumping spiders have many predators to look out for during the day, like lizards, frogs, and dragonflies. 

33. Johnson’s Jumping Spider 

Johnson's Jumping Spider (Phidippus johnsoni) on a large green leaf in Aromas, California, USA
A Johnson’s Jumping Spider (Phidippus johnsoni) on a large green leaf in Aromas, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus johnsoni 
  • Other Names: Red-backed Jumper
  • Adult Size: 9 to 14 mm (0.35 to 0.55 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: $35 

The red-backed jumper is a common species to find in California, but it is also found in other states like New west of the rocky mountains. Red-back jumpers are also sometimes seen in Canada and Mexico.

They are one of the largest jumping spider species and roam around during the day. When the night comes this species builds a silk nest to rest in. 

Phidippus johnsoni is identifiable by its bright red/ orangish back. Males have an all-red abdomen, and have long legs, but are slightly smaller than females.

Fellas have a similar color abdomen but have a bold black stripe on the center of their abdomen. This species’ legs and carapace have a dark black coloring. 

The red-backed jumper is the first species of spider to go into space after NASA launched the spider in 2012. It was still able to successfully hunt in zero gravity and managed to make its way back to earth.

Small insects are what this species eats, but females are far more active than males. Male spiders’ only purpose is to mate and usually stop eating after fully maturing. 

34. Long-bodied Cellar Spider 

Long-bodied Cellar Spider (Pholcus phalangioides) on a black wood surface in Carmichael, California, USA
A Long-bodied Cellar Spider (Pholcus phalangioides) on a black wood surface in Carmichael, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Pholcidae 
  • Scientific Name: Pholcus phalangioides
  • Other Names: Skull spider, Daddy long-leg spider 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 10 mm (0.23 to 3.9 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 0.5 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Long-bodied cellar spiders are found all across the United States. They are a common species in California and are active year-round.

This spider is common to find in homes, basements, warehouses, and urban areas. They create loose webs and are a common spider to find indoors. Many times these spiders are found close to one another and create a communal web. 

Long-bodied cellar spiders have small bodies, with extremely long legs. Their legs are thin, and their body is longer compared to other similar species.

Long-bodied cellar spiders are tan and have dark bands on the joints of their legs. Males and females have very similar appearances, but females are slightly larger. 

The long-bodied cellar spider is one of the most beneficial spiders to have near your home. This species is harmless to humans.

Their venom is weak, and the bite from this species is not strong enough to puncture human skin. Long-bodied cellar spiders feed on pest insects and other spiders that get caught in their web.

The long legs of this spider allow them to be undetected from other species of spiders when in the same web. They kill their prey by wrapping them up in silk.

Their long legs allow them to stay a safe distance, and they are one of the quickest spiders in wrapping their food.

35. Brush-legged Wolf Spider 

Brush-legged Wolf Spider (Schizocosa maxima) hanging onto a strand of wheat or leed in Merced County, California, USA
A Brush-legged Wolf Spider (Schizocosa maxima) hanging onto a strand of wheat or leed in Merced County, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Lycosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Schizocosa maxima 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 8.5 to 10 mm (0.33 to 0.39 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Brush-legged wolf spider is a species of wolf spider that lives in North America and can be found in California. Forests, grasslands, gardens, fields, and near vegetated urban areas are where this species lives.

They do not make webs but hide under debris to rest. This spider is nocturnal and spends its nights hunting for food. 

The brush-legged wolf spider gets its name from the thick dark fur that is seen on its appendages. Males have more vibrant coloring to help them attract a mate, as well as more tufts of hair.

Like other wolf spiders, the bodies of this spider are robust, and their legs are long. Tan or dark gray are the most common colors of this species. 

Brush-legged wolf spiders spend most of their time hunting. They have excellent night vision and are able to take down prey much larger than its size.

Their venom is not potent to humans, but their large fangs make bites painful. 

36. Wolf Spider 

Wolf Spider (Schizocosa mccooki) on dry rock and sand in Inyo County, California, USA
A Wolf Spider (Schizocosa mccooki) on dry rock and sand in Inyo County, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Lycosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Schizocosa mccooki 
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 10 to 80 mm (0.39 to 3.14 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Schizocosa mccooki is known as the wolf spider, as it has no other common name. This species can be found in California and inhabits the western half of the US.

Like other Lycosidae it does not build a web but wanders about. They are nocturnal, and during the day they may hide in a burrow or under debris.

Fall is when wolf spiders are most active, and in the winter months, they may make their way into the homes for warmth. Males have a much shorter lifespan than females and only live around a year.

Schizocosa mccooki is a medium-sized species, but females can grow to be exceptionally large. This species has tan coloring, with bold dark brown markings running across the back of its body.

Sometimes females are spotted carrying their egg sacs in their mouths or carrying young on their backs. Wolf spider mothers guard their young until they are ready to fend for themselves. 

Wolf spiders get their name from their hunting ability, as are ferocious hunters like wolves. They feed on small animals like lizards, frogs, and insects.

Hunting is done at night, and they use their quick speed and the great night vision to take down their prey. 

37. Six-eyed Spider 

Six-eyed Spider (Segestria pacifica) in greenery in Altadena, California, USA
A Six-eyed Spider (Segestria pacifica) in greenery in Altadena, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Segestriidae
  • Scientific Name: Segestria pacifica
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 10 mm (0.39 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Segestria pacifica is a species of tube web spider that lives throughout the US. Its common name is the six-eyed spider since it only has 6 eyes instead of 8, but this name is also used for several other species.

Six-eyed spiders can be found in California and along the coast of North America. They can be found near urban areas, and are active from spring to fall. 

This species is small in size and has tan coloring. They have a mottled pattern on their back and dark bands on their legs. Males and females are similar, but males have darker colors. 

The web this spider makes is like a burrow. It has an entrance and is tubular in shape.

Their web is made in crevices, and other hidden areas. Their silk is sticky and traps insects that go near its entrance. When something is near this species pulls it into its web, and begins to feed on it. 

38. Stealthy Ground Spider 

Stealthy Ground Spider (Sergiolus montanus) on a yellow leaf in Culver City, California, USA
A Stealthy Ground Spider (Sergiolus montanus) on a yellow leaf in Culver City, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Gnaphosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Sergiolus montanus
  • Other Names: Common Patterned Ant-mimic Ground Spider
  • Adult Size: 13 mm ( 0.51 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Sergiolus montanus is a species of ground spider that inhabits the US. This spider is also known as the stealthy ground spider.

This species can be found in woodlands, grasslands, and near urban areas. Active during the day, at night they create a silken tent to rest in.

This species spends most of its time hunting and wanders into homes looking for food. Stealthy ground spiders are active year-round but are seen most often in the warmer seasons. 

Stealthy ground spiders look similar to other spiders within the genus Sergiolus. To identify these species from one another a microscope is needed, but they can also be told apart by the range they live in.

This species is sexually dimorphic, with females having a much larger abdomen. Gray, tan, and black are the colors the stealthy spider comes in. They can have a blotched or stripe pattern on them. 

The stealthy ground spider is named after its secretive nature, which is used to sneak up on prey. It hunts during the day and feeds on small insects it comes across.

Like other spiders, this species possesses venom but is harmless to humans. If seen they will try to flee and hide in a secluded area. 

39. False Black Widow 

False Black Widow (Steatoda grossa) in its web in Carmichael, California, USA
A False Black Widow (Steatoda grossa) in its web in Carmichael, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Steatoda grossa 
  • Other Names: brown house spider, cupboard spider 
  • Adult Size: 10 to 14 mm (0.39 to 0.55 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 2 to 6 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The false black widow is found in the United States, but in other regions within the world like New Zealand, Europe, and Australia.

This spider is confused by some for the black widow, as they have many similar traits. While black widows are false widows and are both members of the family of Theridiidae, the false widow is of the genus Steatoda, while widow spiders belong to the genus of Latrodectus. 

False widows have bulbous abdomen and spindly legs. They have a dark brown or tan coloring. On their abdomen is a mottled pattern, and cream coloring.

Males and females are similar, but males have smaller abdomen and longer legs. The brown widow is also a species that looks similar to this spider.

The red marking on the underside of widow spiders is how these species can be easily told apart. 

This spider lives in messy cobwebs and creates them in secluded areas. They have poor eyesight and rely on vibrations to know when something is in their web.

False widows are not dangerous, but a bite may cause mild symptoms. Insects like moths, pill bugs, and other insects that get caught in their web are what they feed on. 

40. Bowl and Doily Spider 

Bowl-and-doily Spider (Frontinella pyramitela) in its web in grass in Santa Clara County, California, USA
A Bowl-and-doily Spider (Frontinella pyramitela) in its web in grass in Santa Clara County, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Linyphiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Frontinella pyramitela 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 4 mm (0.16 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Bowl and doily spiders are a species found across the United States and are easily identifiable due to the webs they create. The bottom of this spider is shaped like a bowl, while the top is flat.

This design is used to catch many insects, and multiple spiders can inhabit the same web. Fields, grasslands, and other vegetated areas are where this species can be found. 

The bowl and doily spider is a small species, with brown, reddish, and white coloring. Their abdomen is rounded, with white coloring.

Their legs are spindly and reddish-brown in color. Males are slightly smaller than females and have smaller abdomens. 

Small insects like gnats, flies and moths are what this species feeds on. They wait for prey to fall into its web, and neutralize them with venom.

This venom is harmless to humans but helps the spider feed. To eat the spider pulls its prey into the bowl part of its web so it can consume it. 

41. Dark Fishing Spider 

Dark Fishing Spider (Dolomedes tenebrosus) in grass at Tuckahoe-Corbin City Fish and Wildlife Reserve, New Jersey, USA
A Dark Fishing Spider (Dolomedes tenebrosus) in grass at Tuckahoe-Corbin City Fish and Wildlife Reserve, New Jersey, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Pisauridae 
  • Scientific Name: Dolomedes tenebrosus 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 6.8 to 25.4 mm (0.27 to 1 inch)
  • Lifespan: 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Dark fishing spiders are semi-aquatic species that live in California. This spider lives in forested areas next to freshwater sources like ponds and lakes.

They are able to walk on top of their water, as they put very little pressure on the water’s surface. This species is active from spring to fall.

Webs are not used by this spider, but they wander around at night.

Dark fishing spiders have a dark gray color, with a mottled pattern covering them. Their legs are long and covered in dark bands.

This species is one of the largest spiders in California, and they are common near aquatic habitats. 

Dark fishing spiders feed on small insects near, and around water. They also eat aquatic animals like fish, frogs, and tadpoles.

Active at night, during the day this spider hides in a secluded area. This species is a type of nursery web spider, and females guard their eggs and young until they are ready to fend for themselves. 

42. Furrow Spider 

Furrow Orbweaver (Larinioides cornutus) on a white background in Blacksburg, Virginia, USA
A Furrow Orbweaver (Larinioides cornutus) on a white background in Blacksburg, Virginia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Larinioides cornutus 
  • Other Names: Furrow orb weaver 
  • Adult Size: 10 to 12 mm (0.39 to 0.47 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Furrow orbweavers live across the Holarctic region and are a spider you may come across in California. Moist habitats are where this species is found, and near man-made structures is where they often make their webs.

Bridges, barns, porches, and the sides of houses are where their webs are built. Areas hidden from the sun next to bodies of water are where this species prefers to live. 

Furrow orbweavers have large abdomens and long legs. Red, gray, black, tan, and dark brown are some of the colors this species comes in.

They have dark bands on their legs and a pattern on their back that looks like a furrow. Hairs cover this spider’s body to help them sense vibrations. 

Mating for this species occurs in the fall when most spiders are mature. Females who are well-fed are more inclined to breed and lay eggs.

Insects are what this species eats, and they often make their web near lighting. Moisture and lighting help bring out the many flying insects that are bound to get caught in their web.

Like other orbweavers, this species builds a large circular web, and sit in the center of its web at night. 

43. American Grass Spider 

Grass Spider (Agelenopsis actuosa) in its funnel-like web in San Diego, California, USA
A Grass Spider (Agelenopsis actuosa) in its funnel-like web in San Diego, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginners 
  • Family: Agelenidae 
  • Scientific Name: Agelenopsis actuosa
  • Other Names: funnel weavers 
  • Adult Size: 9 to 20 mm (0.35 to 0.78 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The American grass spider is a species of funnel weaver spider that is common to find all across the United States. This spider builds a web to live in, but it is in the shape of a funnel.

The silk they use for their web is not sticky but is used to detect when prey is near. They are extremely quick and use vibrations to know when to strike at their prey.

Grass habitats are where this species makes its web, and they thrive in highly vegetated areas. Lawns, forests, and grasslands are habitats where this species can be found.

American grass spiders look very similar to wolf spiders but are far more slender. They have tan coloring and dark bold stripes that run down their body.

American grass spiders have long legs which help them move quickly.

Small insects found in grassy areas are where this species lives. Spring is when they are most active, and they prefer warm weather.

American grass spiders’ males die after breeding, and females die after laying their eggs. 

44. Triangle Orbweaver 

Triangle Orbweaver (Verrucosa arenata) on its web on a leaf in College Township, Pennsylvania, USA
A Triangle Orbweaver (Verrucosa arenata) on its web on a leaf in College Township, Pennsylvania, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Verrucosa arenata 
  • Other Names: Arrowhead Orbweaver 
  • Adult Size: 9.5 mm (0.37inches)  
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

In California, an orb-weaver species that inhabit the state is the triangle orbweaver. This species is named after the abdomen, which is in the shape of a triangle.

Tan, reddish-brown, yellow, or white are the possible colors of this species appears in. Small hairs cover their body, and dark bands cover their legs. The triangle abdomen of this species is lighter in color when compared with the rest of its dark body.

Triangle orbweaver live in highly vegetated areas. They inhabit grasslands, grasslands, woodlands, gardens, and other similar habitats.

Summer and fall are when this species is seen most often. Most spiders of this species die in winter, but the egg sacs survive until spring. 

Triangle orbweavers are active during the day and can be seen sitting in the center of their web. Insects that get trapped in their web are what they feed on.

Mild venom helps neutralize its prey, but its venom is harmless to humans. 

45. Starbellied Orbweaver  

Starbellied Orbweaver (Acanthepeira stellata) on a furry leaf in Nova Scotia, Canada
A Starbellied Orbweaver (Acanthepeira stellata) on a furry leaf in Nova Scotia, Canada. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Acanthepeira stellata 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 15 mm ( 0.19 to 0.59 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: $20 

Starbellied orb weavers live across the United States and can be found in California. This species is also found in every other state within the US.

Star Bellied orb weavers live in meadows, grasslands, gardens, and meadows. They are active from spring to fall and create their web in highly vegetated areas.

Females create large circular webs to sit in, while males spend most of their time looking for a mate. Fall is when this species is mature enough to mate, and they lay eggs to hatch when the next spring arrives.

Starbellied orbweavers are covered in spikes that look similar to the edge of a star. These spikes help deter predators like wasps, birds, and other spiders.

They have tan, gray, or reddish-brown in color. A mottled pattern appears on their back, and dark bands are also on their legs.

The large web this female creates is how they catch their food. Flying insects are what this species feeds on, and they are active at night.

If threatened they will drop to the ground, and play dead. 

46. Golden Silk Spider

Golden Silk Spider (Trichonephila clavipes) on its web in the dark in Loreto, Peru
A Golden Silk Spider (Trichonephila clavipes) on its web in the dark in Loreto, Peru. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Trichonephila clavipes 
  • Other Names: Banana Spider 
  • Adult Size: 24 to 50 mm (0.94 to 1.96 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 6 months to a year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Golden silk orbweavers are not commonly seen in California but are one of the most elegant spiders in the state. Gardens, woodlands, grasslands, and other areas with high vegetation are where they build their webs.

The silk of this spider looks golden and glows in the sun, which is where it gets its name. Late summer and fall are when they are seen most often, and when winter comes death occurs. 

Males are much smaller than females and spend their time trying to find a mate. Females are the only ones to build large webs and are often seen sitting in the center of them.

When breeding occurs in the fall females lay their eggs in secluded areas, then die. 

Females of this species are much larger than males and sit in their golden silked web. They have yellow abdomens covered in white spots.

Their carapace is much smaller than its abdomen and white in color. This species has long legs, with yellow, black, and reddish coloring. Males are much smaller and have red abdomens with banded legs.

This species eats whatever falls into its web, and females cannibalize the male after mating. Males attempt to mate multiple times with the female.

They massage their mate’s back with silk to calm them down and increase their chance of survival. 

47. Deadly Ground Crab Spider 

Deadly Ground Crab Spider (Xysticus Funestus) on a leaf in Florida, USA
A Deadly Ground Crab Spider (Xysticus Funestus) on a leaf in Florida, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Thomisidae 
  • Scientific Name: G  
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 10 mm (0.19 to 0.39 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

A common species in the U.S, the deadly ground crab spider can be found in every state. This species does not spin webs to live in but is a ground-dwelling species.

Deadly ground crab spiders dwell in forests, and woodlands, spending most of their time on the ground. Fall is when this spider is most active, and they roam around during the day.

Deadly ground crab spiders are small and colored to blend in with the ground. They are brown, tan, gray, or almost black.

They have large abdomens, with a crab-like structure. Like a crab, they can quickly move in any direction and have two large front legs to help them hunt. 

When active the deadly ground crab spider spends most of its time hunting. Bees, moths, roaches, and other insects they come across are what they feed on.

Found often in gardens, and other vegetated areas, they are great at reducing the population of pest insects. 

48. Regal Jumping Spider 

Regal Jumping Spider (Phidippus regius) on a green plant on Saint Simons Island, Georgia, USA
A Regal Jumping Spider (Phidippus regius) on a green plant on Saint Simons Island, Georgia, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae 
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus regius 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 18 mm ( 0.23 to 0.70 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: $30 

Regal jumping spiders live in woodland, forests, and garden habitats. They are a common species in the United States and are more common in the southeastern states.

In California, this species has been spotted in the southern counties of the state. Active during the day, this spider builds a nest to sleep in at night.  

Regal jumping spiders are sexually dimorphic with major differences between the two sexes. Females are slightly larger and have a bright orange coloring.

They have ten legs, with orange and black spots on their abdomen. Males look similar to the bold jumping spider and are black.

They have white tufts of hair on their body and green chelicerae. White spots appear on the male’s back. This species is slightly smaller than the bold jumper. 

Jumping spiders rarely bite humans. They have mild venom that is not medically significant to humans. Small insects are what they feed on.

Amazing eyesight and quick jumps are what make them deadly predators to insects like flies, smaller spiders, and other insects usually smaller than them. 

49. Zebra Jumping Spider 

Zebra Jumping Spider (Salticus scenicus) on wood near Angel Island State Park, California, USA
A Zebra Jumping Spider (Salticus scenicus) on wood near Angel Island State Park, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Salticus scenicus 
  • Other Names: Zebra Spider 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 9 mm (0.19 to 0.35 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

Salticidae is one of the most abundant spiders in the world, and the zebra jumping spider is one of the most recognizable species. Zebra jumping spiders have a large range across North America, Britain, Europe, and North Asia.

This spider lives in more open habitats and is common in urban areas. Active during the day, this spider spends its time hunting on vertical surfaces. 

Zebra jumping spiders are named after their black and white coloring. Males have darker and more vibrant colors.

Females and males are relatively the same sizes, but males have larger chelicerae. Like other jumping spiders they have two large eyes in front of their face, and 6 smaller eyes around their head. 

Zebra jumping spiders are diurnal hunters and use their excellent vision to stalk and track small prey. Their legs are designed to jump far distances, and allow them to pounce on their prey.

The zebra jumping spider is one of the species that was sent to space in 2012, but it did not make it back to earth. 

50. Rabbit Hutch Spider 

Rabbit Hutch Spider (Steatoda bipunctata) on its web in Aholming, Germany
A Rabbit Hutch Spider (Steatoda bipunctata) on its web in Aholming, Germany. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Theridiidae 
  • Scientific Name: Steatoda bipunctata
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 16 mm (0.75 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Rabbit hutch spiders are often found in the cages of rabbits, which is where they get their name. This species is found in California, but it also lives in every other state.

Vegetated areas near buildings are where this spider can be found.

Rabbit hutch spiders have poor eyesight, and create messy webs in secluded areas. They are only active at night and are often confused for the black widow.

The rabbit hutch spider has a large abdomen and spindly legs. It has a similar body shape to the black widow, but its color is dark reddish-brown.

Light color bands appear on their legs. Females are larger than males and have a cream pattern on their abdomen. 

The bite from a rabbit hutch spider is harmless, and they only do so when provoked. Small flying insects like flies and mosquitoes that get trapped in their web are what they feed on.

Insects that find their way into rabbit hutches are eaten by the spider, which gives the rabbit a more peaceful environment. 

51.  Red-spotted Ant Mimic Spider 

Red-spotted Ant-mimic Sac Spider (Castianeira descripta) on dry leaves in Oklahoma, USA
A Red-spotted Ant-mimic Sac Spider (Castianeira descripta) on dry leaves in Oklahoma, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Corinnidae 
  • Scientific Name: Castianeira descripta 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 13 mm (0.51 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

North America is the home of the red-spotted ant mimic spider. This spider is more common in the eastern United States but can be found in California.

Parks, backyards, woodlands, and other vegetated areas are where this species lives. Webs are not used by this spider to live, but they may use their silk to create a nest to live in.

Active during the day, they wander about looking for food. 

The red-spotted ant mimic spider is black, with a red marking on its back. Their abdomen is rounded, and some may confuse them for a black widow.

They have long legs, and body shapes similar to other ground-dwelling spiders. 

Ants are the main insect this spider feeds on. This species attempts to mimic ants’ behavior, so they can get close and prey on them.

Walking with its two front legs is how they mimic an ant’s antenna, and they move very slowly. By mimicking ants they are able to prey on them easily. 

52.  Leaf-curling Sac Spider 

Leaf-curling Sac Spider (Clubiona corticalis) on a white surface in Lemwerder, Germany
A Leaf-curling Sac Spider (Clubiona corticalis) on a white surface in Lemwerder, Germany. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Clubionidae 
  • Scientific Name: Clubiona corticalis 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 12 mm (0.19 to 0.47 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

The leaf curling sac spider is a species found all across the United States, and a spider you may come across in California. Spring is when this spider is most active, and they are most active during the day.

Woodlands, forests, and urban areas are the habitats they leaf in. This spider makes its home in leaves and uses its silk to curl them up into safe areas they inhabit.

Females also lay their eggs in these curled-up leaves to protect the egg sac from predators. 

Leaf curling sac spiders have light tan legs and a dark brown abdomen. They have large fangs and are covered in small thick hairs.

Leaf curling sac spiders look very similar to other sac spiders, and should not be confused with the Araneidae species, the leaf curling spiders. Leaf curling spiders are native to Australia, and not found in California. 

The bite from this species is minor, but not dangerous to humans. Bites from this species occur more often than other spiders since occasionally they go into houses looking for food. 

53. California Ebony Tarantula 

California Ebony Tarantula (Aphonopelma eutylenum) on dry dirt in San Diego, California, USA
A California Ebony Tarantula (Aphonopelma eutylenum) on dry dirt in San Diego, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Theraphosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma eutylenum 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 88.9 to 101.6 mm (3.5 to 4 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 5 to 25 years 
  • Average Price Range: $25 to $75 

The California Ebony tarantula has a large range across the golden state, which stretches from southern California, until San Francisco. Grasslands and deserts are the habitats they are found in.

Like other tarantula spiders, they live in burrows that they create, or find from abandoned animals. California ebony tarantulas rarely leave their burrow. At night they wait near the edge of their hole to hunt, or males will wander to mate. 

This species comes in different shades of dark, and light brown. Some may be all black, while others are a more light tan. Like other spiders, this species is sexually dimorphic, with females being the larger of the sexes. The female’s large size makes it possible that breeding is more successful, and they are able to produce more eggs.

Mice, lizards, and other small animals that pass their burrow are what the ebony tarantula eats. They line the edge of their burrow with silk, so they can feel the vibrations of passing by prey.

Large fangs help administer mild venom to neutralize its prey. If humans are bitten their venom has almost no effect, as it is extremely mild.

The large size of the fangs can cause bleeding and possible infection. 

54. Atomic Tarantula 

Atomic Tarantula (Aphonopelma atomicum) on someones hand near Amargosa Valley, Nevada, USA
An Atomic Tarantula (Aphonopelma atomicum) on someones hand near Amargosa Valley, Nevada, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Theraphosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma atomicum 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 63.5 to 76.2 mm (2.5 to 3 inches)
  • Lifespan: 5 to 40 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Aphonopelma atomicum is one of the rarest and smallest species of tarantula that live in the United States. This spider inhabits the far southeast areas of Inyo County and lives within Death Valley National Park.

Not seen often, they spend most of their life in burrows, with males only coming out to breed.

Aphonopelma atomicum has no common name, and not much is known about this spider. Their small range and secretive nature make them difficult to study.

This tarantula has a light brown coloring and is covered in thick hairs. Females are more robust, but males have larger eggs.

Roaches, beetles, and grasshoppers are some of the insects this small species eats. If threatened they are able to kick up the hairs on their body and fling them towards their attack.

These barbed hairs irritate human skin and can cause a rash. Tarantulas are mostly harmless to humans, and their extremely docile nature makes them great pets. 

55. Desert Tarantula 

Desert Tarantula (Aphonopelma Iodius) on loose gravel in Brentwood, California, USA
A Desert Tarantula (Aphonopelma Iodius) on loose gravel in Brentwood, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Theraphosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma Iodius 
  • Other Names: Fresno county blond, Great basin blond,
  • Adult Size: 4.5 to 5.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 to 40 years 
  • Average Price Range: $30  

Desert tarantulas live in the desert regions of California, Nevada, and Utah. They are a burrowing species, and not seen often.

Only males will travel from their burrows and only do so in the fall to mate. Like a trap door spider, this tarantula may sometimes plug its burrow with a dirt silk cap to protect itself from the desert heat. 

The desert tarantula has tan coloring and is covered in thick hairs. Males are smaller than females and have a more slender appearance.

Females are large and robust and have a large carapace and abdomen. This spider, as well as other members of the Aphonopelma genus, are some of the largest spiders in California.

Spiders in this genus look extremely similar, and can not be told apart with the naked eye. Behavior, location, and minor differences are how these spiders are told apart. 

Desert insects like grasshoppers, beetles, lizards, and small animals are what this spider eats. At night they wait at the edge of their burrow to feed on unsuspecting prey.

Tarantulas make great pets for arachnid lovers, and this species is no exception. The desert tarantulas are one of the rare species to find in the pet trade since their coloring is so dull. 

56. Johnny Cash Tarantula  

Johnny Cash Tarantula (Aphonopelma johnnycashi) on sand in Hornitos, California, USA
A Johnny Cash Tarantula (Aphonopelma johnnycashi) on sand in Hornitos, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Theraphosidae 
  • Scientific Name:  Aphonopelma johnnycashi 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 2 inches 
  • Lifespan: 5 to 40 years 
  • Average Price Range: $100   

Johnny Cash is not just a singer, but also a species of tarantula you can find in California. This species was discovered near Folsom Prison, California, which is similar to the famous Johnny Cash song “Folsom Prison Blues”.

Foothills, mountainous regions, and areas with sandy soil are where this tarantula can be found. Like other tarantulas, they live in burrows and rarely leave them. 

 Male spiders of this species have a more slender abdomen and long thin legs. Females are the large sex and have a more robust body.

Johnny cash tarantulas have brown and grey coloring and are covered in thick fur. They are around the average size for a tarantula and look similar to other species.

Tarantulas of different species are extremely similar in appearance, and some are nearly impossible to tell apart from the naked eye. Location, behavior and genetic data are how species are differentiated. 

Tarantulas are rarely seen, and it is mostly males that wander from their burrows. Males travel long distances looking for a mate in the fall breeding season.

Females rarely leave their nest and have a much longer lifespan than males. To feed this spider waits at the edge of its burrow in the night, and pounces on any small prey passing by.

Their venom is mild but works on small insects and animals. 

57. Mojave Dwarf Tarantula  

Mojave Dwarf Tarantula (Aphonopelma Mojave) on desert sand and pebbles in Hinkley, California, USA
A Mojave Dwarf Tarantula (Aphonopelma Mojave) on desert sand and pebbles in Hinkley, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Theraphosidae 
  • Scientific Name: Aphonopelma Mojave
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 1.5 to 2 inches 
  • Lifespan: 5 to 40 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a  

Mojave dwarf tarantulas are native to southern California. As their name suggests they inhabit the Mojave desert and are one of the smallest tarantulas in the state.

This spider is not seen often because they live in burrows to escape the desert heat. Its size and docile nature are why some decide to keep these as pets.

The best time to see these spiders in the wild is in fall, as males will wander to look for a mate. 

Mojave dwarf tarantula is smaller than other tarantula species, and like most other spiders females are larger than males. Females have a dark brown coloring, while males are black.

Males have longer and thinner legs. Mojave dwarf tarantulas have hairs on their abdomen, and sides, but lack the hair on their feet like other species.

Dry and sandy habitats are where this spider lives, as they need loose enough soil to build a burrow. Around their home is webbing so they can feel the vibrations, and know when prey is near.

Insects like crickets, beetles, and grasshoppers are some of the things they eat. Their appetite is small, and they only need to eat around once per month if they feed on large enough prey.

Their fangs are large and possess mild venom that is harmless to humans. 

58. False Tarantula 

False Tarantula (Calisoga longitarsis) on rocks in Sonoma County, California, USA
A False Tarantula (Calisoga longitarsis) on rocks in Sonoma County, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Calisoga  
  • Scientific Name: Calisoga longitarsis 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size:  50 mm (2 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 10 to 15 years 
  • Average Price Range: $25  

There are many tarantulas that live in California, but the false tarantula is a species that can be easily confused for them. False tarantulas are very similar to regular tarantulas and have many of the same lifestyle traits.

These spiders are rarely seen, as they live in burrows, and spend most of their time in them.

Mountains regions, forests, and grasslands are some of the habitats they live in. False tarantulas are found from sea level, up to 7,000 feet above sea level. 

False tarantulas can easily be confused for the real spider, but have slight differences. They are small in size, and tarantulas have thicker, and more hair on them.

False tarantulas are large spiders, with thick legs and a large abdomen. Their fangs are also different from true tarantulas and are parallel. 

Spending most of their time in their burrows, false tarantulas are only seen when mating. Females stay in their burrows, but males will travel and look for a mate in the fall.

The burrows of their tarantula’s entrances are lined with silk and let the spider know when a potential predator is nearby. They are ambush predators and wait in the night to pounce on small animals near their homes. 

59. Desert Recluse  

Desert Recluse (Loxosceles deserta) on tiny pebbles in Inyo, California, USA
A Desert Recluse (Loxosceles deserta) on tiny pebbles in Inyo, California, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Sicariidae  
  • Scientific Name: Loxosceles deserta 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 6 to 20 mm (0.24 to 0.79 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years 
  • Average Price Range: n/a  

In southern California lives the desert recluse. This spider lives in desert habitats and inhabits the lower half of the San Joaquin valley.

Desert recluses are not seen often in urban areas and tend to avoid places that are inhabited by humans.

Desert and mesic forest habitats in the Mojave and Sonoran deserts are where they prefer to stay. Sprint to fall is when this species is active, and they are associated with wild packrat dens. 

 The desert recluse is often mistaken for the feared brown recluse. In California, the brown recluse is not present, and the range of these two species is the easiest way to tell them apart.

The desert recluse has tan coloring, and a violin-shaped mark on top of its head, but this marking is very faint. Unlike other spiders, recluses only have six eyes, arranged in three pairs on their face.

The legs of this spider are large and thin, stretching out to its sides. Its abdomen is rounded, with a grayish tan coloring. 

Desert recluses are native to California and are the most common recluse in the state. The venom of this spider is necrotic and can damage the skin and the tissue of the area bitten.

Bites from this spider are rarely fatal, but the effects can be painful and take time to heal. 

FAQ

What are the most common spiders in California?

Cellar spiders, jumping spiders, and house spiders are some of the most common species to come across in California. Cellar spiders and house spiders can be active year-round unlike other species since they take shelter in climate-controlled man-made structures. 

Does California Have Tarantulas?

California has around 10 different species of tarantula in the state. Tarantulas are very durable and live across the state’s various habitats.

Dry areas are where these large spiders prefer to live, but they are not seen often since they inhabit burrows. California is one of the states with the most Tarantula species, which also includes Texas and Arizona.

Mountains, deserts, valleys, and grasslands are some of the habitats they are found in.

What is the most Dangerous Spider In California? 

The western black widow is the most dangerous spider in California. Its venom is the most potent in the state, but it is still rare for deaths to occur from them.

The desert recluse is an invasive species whose bite has necrotic properties. Spiders like the hobo spider and brown recluse have venom that is just as potent, but they do not live in California. 

Are Tarantulas Common In California? 

Many tarantulas live in the state of California, but they rarely go out in the open like other spiders.

Most tarantulas are active at night, during the fall. Most females stay in their burrows, but males are the ones to wander around looking for a female. 

What Seasons Are Spiders Most Active In California?

Spring to fall is when most spider species are active. In spring, the spider eggs hatch, and young spiders emerge from overwintering.

Summer and fall is the mating season for most species. During this period spiders are more active and roam about looking for a mate.

Winter is when most spiders die. Some spiders are able to survive the winter since they are hardy, but the state’s winter is not as harsh in some areas, keeping most spiders alive to die a natural death. 

What Are The Invasive Spiders In California?

Brown widows, western black widows, and the desert recluse are all invasive species that have managed to successfully make a home in California. Some may think of these spiders as native since they are so widespread and common. 

Wrapping up

California is home to many spiders and other various types of life.

The habitats of California are the most diverse in America and are home to a large range of wildlife. Most of these eight-legged creatures are harmless, but still many fear them.

Spiders are deadly forces to the insects that they live around. Spiders that live in homes, gardens, and farms are kept alive to help decrease the population of pest insects. 

Feeding on insects is not the only spiders benefit, as they are also used as food for various life.

Birds, lizards, frogs, fish, and wasps are just some of the animals that use spiders as food. The native spiders that live in California are essential in keeping a balanced ecosystem.

This list has more than 70 spiders that live in California, but there are more than live in the state. In the United States alone there are more than 3,000 species and more than 45,000 species on the globe.

Most spiders are harmless, and learning about them truly shows how interesting these creatures can be. 

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