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Spiders in North Carolina 

North Carolina has hundreds of spiders living in the state, and in this article, you will find 59 of the most common species.

In the US alone there are more than 3,500 different spider species, and more than 45,000 are found on the globe. North Carolina’s variety of grasslands, rocky outcrops, woodlands, and freshwater habitats make a perfect home for the spiders that live within the state.

This article will cover 59 of the most common spiders in North Carolina, but there are many more that live within the state. To identify one of these eight-legged creatures it is easiest to examine their body shape, webbing, size, characteristics, and behavior.

Tangle web spiders, jumping spiders, orbweavers, ground spiders, and funnel weaving spiders are some of the types you can find in North Carolina.

While spiders are often seen as frightening, most species are harmless. Their lifestyle and appearance are among the more unique in the animal kingdom, and it is fun to learn about the variety of species to be found.

Let’s take a look at some of the spiders found in North Carolina, and what is interesting about each one.

Table of Contents

Spiders in North Carolina
FAQ
Conclusion

Spiders in North Carolina

1. Bold Jumping Spider

Bold Jumping Spider (Phidippus audax) on someone's palm in Hubert, North Carolina, USA
Bold Jumping Spider (Phidippus audax) on someone’s palm in Hubert, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus audax
  • Other Names: Daring jumping spider
  • Adult Size: 6 to 19 mm (0.23 to 0.74 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30

The Bold jumping spider is one of the most common species in North America and is a spider you may come across in North Carolina. Bold jumping spiders live in open spaces and are active during the day.

While some spiders live in webs, jumping spiders like this species move around with quick movements and leaps. When moving about this spider uses a silk tether to prevent it from falling to its death, and escape from predators.

Bold jumping spiders breed in mid-spring, and early summer, which is when they are spotted often. Grasslands, fields, gardens, and residential areas are frequent areas inhabited by this species.

If they cross paths with a female, males will attempt to court them with a dance of legs, pedipalps, and fang movements. Females usually lay around 200 eggs and will continue to breed if the climate stays warm.

Bold jumping spiders are black, and covered in small hairs. They have three spot-like markings on the back of their abdomen, usually white but may also be orange or yellow.

White tufts of hair cover this species’ hair. Males are slightly smaller in size when compared with females, and also have more vibrant colorings. One of the most notable features of this species is its green iridescent chelicerae.

During the day when not breeding, this spider spends its time hunting. Their keen eyesight and quick movements are used to take down their prey.

Flies, crickets, and other insects are what this species feeds on. To avoid predators this spider creates a silken retreat to hide in at night.

2. Putnam’s Jumping Spider

Putnam's Jumping Spider (Phidippus putnami) on a leaf at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
Putnam’s Jumping Spider (Phidippus putnami) on a leaf at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus putnami
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 5 to 8 mm (0.19 to 0.31 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Putnam’s jumping spider is a species that lives in North Carolina and is 1 of the over 5,000 Salticidaes spiders that have been discovered. Putnam’s jumping spiders live in grasslands, urban areas, forests, and vegetated areas are where the Putnams jumping spider can be found.

This species is active during the day, and at night hides in a silk retreat. Putnam’s jumping spider is mostly active in the warm spring and summer periods.

Small in size, Putnam’s jumping spiders are a very furry species. This spider has black tufts of hair sticking out the top, and sides of its head. Fur also covers the rest of their body, and they have a tan, orange, or black colorings.

White, black, dark tan and orange markings cover this spider’s body. Like other jumping spiders they have two large eyes on their face and smaller ones that circle around their head. The shape and location of their eyes give them excellent vision, where they can see nearly 360 degrees.

Putnam’s jumping spiders can be found in a variety of places since they spend their time wandering off food. Using their keen eyesight they spot prey and stalk it like a cat.

This species is able to jump up to 5 times its length. They use their fast jumps to catch prey like flies or grasshoppers, but also to escape predators.

3. Ribbon Jumping Spider

Ribbon Jumping Spider (Metacyrba taeniola) on the corner of a wooden table at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
Ribbon Jumping Spider (Metacyrba taeniola) on the corner of a wooden table at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Metacyrba taeniola
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 4.4 to 7.2 mm (0.17 to 0.28 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Ribbon jumping spiders are native to North America, and are a species found in the eastern United States. Active during the day, Ribbon jumping spiders hide under rocks, logs, and bark when not moving about hunting.

This species is most common in wooded areas. They are active for most of the year, and in winter spend their time in a silk cocoon. This spider is also found in urban areas, and will occasionally make its way into your home.

Ribbon jumping spiders are a small species, with dark black coloring. Females and males have similar appearances, but females are slightly larger. White, cream or yellowish lines run down their back.

They have small hairs that cover their body, and reddish brown legs designed for jumping. Like other jumping spiders this species has two large eyes, and six smaller ones around its head.

Ribbon jumping spiders feed on small insects that they come across during the day. Like other jumping spiders they use their keen vision to track their prey.

They may stalk, and circle their prey like a cat before pouncing on them. Bites only occur if this spider is handled, but they will usually only attempt to flee if they are approached.

4. Dimorphic Jumping Spider

Dimorphic Jumping Spider (Maevia inclemens) on a leaf in Davidson, North Carolina, USA
Dimorphic Jumping Spider (Maevia inclemens) on a leaf in Davidson, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Maevia inclemens
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 4.75 to 8 mm (0.187 to 0.31 inches)
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30

Dimorphic jumping spiders are found in North America and are a spider inhabiting the eastern United States. This spider is commonly seen in highly vegetated areas but also lives in urban areas.

Like other Salticidae species, this spider is active during the day. At night they hide in a silk cocoon they make, usually hidden among leaf litter and other natural debris.

What makes this jumping spider unique is the variety of morphs this spider appears in. Males have two different morphs that are quite different, while females only have one coloring.

One of the morphs for the male is a gray morph, while the other is a black. These morphs appear in the wild at an even rate of around 50% each. While they are the same species, these spiders look different and even perform different dances when trying to mate.

The black morph of the dimorphic jumping spider has an all-black head and body, with black tufts of hair sticking out of its head. Their legs are a cream, or tan color, and are covered in dark bold hairs.

The other morph is light and dark tan colored, with a gray mottled pattern covering their body. Females have a larger abdomen, and a tan to light brown coloring.

While living in vegetated areas this spider feeds on a variety of small insects, usually pests that feed on plants. They face many predators like larger spiders, ants, and birds.

5. Brilliant Jumping Spider

Brilliant Jumping Spider (Phidippus clarus) on a leaf in Davidson, North Carolina, USA
Brilliant Jumping Spider (Phidippus clarus) on a leaf in Davidson, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus clarus
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 3 to 4 mm ( 0.11 to 0.15 inches)
  • Lifespan: 6 months to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The brilliant jumping spider is common in the Eastern United States and is an abundant spider in highly vegetated areas. Brilliant jumping spiders spend their time on plant life and are active during the day.

They are one of the most prevalent species in the east, and in states like North Carolina. Brilliant jumping spiders spend their time feeding and hunting small insects. Spring to fall is when this spider is active.

Brilliant jumping spiders are sexually dimorphic, with females being slightly larger. This species has a bright orange and black coloring.

Males have black legs and cephalothorax. Females have much larger abdomens, with tan fur covering them.

Brilliant jumping spiders feed mainly on plant-living insects, and often inhibit similar areas to crab spiders. Fruit flies, gnats, aphids, and beetles are some of the prey they eat.

Wasps and other spiders are the main prey this species faces. Their quick jumps help escape these predators but are also useful in capturing their prey.

6. Common Hentz Jumping Spider

Common Hentz Jumping Spider (Hentzia palmarum) on a sharp leaf in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, USA
Common Hentz Jumping Spider (Hentzia palmarum) on a sharp leaf in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Hentzia palmarum
  • Other Names: Stretch spiders
  • Adult Size: 4.8 to 11 mm (0.19 to 0.47 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The common Hentz jumper is a species of Salticidae found in North Carolina. This spider has a range in North America, Cuba, the Bahamas, and the Hawaii islands.

In the United States, this spider is primarily found in the southern and eastern states. Common Hentz jumpers live in areas with high vegetation, moving about by jumping during the day.

Being a spider of the genus Hentzia, males are identifiable by their large legs and jaws. Females have cream or tannish coloring and are covered in small furs.

Like other jumping spiders this species has two large eyes giving it excellent vision, and angular legs to help them jump. Males of this species have dark brown coloring and a bold white stripe running down their sides. Their legs are cream, and orange markings appear on their eyes.

Male Hentz jumpers use their long legs and elongated fangs for mating. Like other Salticidae they perform a mating dance to court a female.

It is also common for males of this species to fight each other, battling it out like a ram with their horns. If a male loses he will jump away to try not to get bitten, and the dominant males have more success with mating.

This species feeds on small insects it finds during the day. Small flies, aphids, and other spiders are what they feed on.

Like most spiders, mild venom is used to subdue its prey, but to humans this venom is harmless. At night they will hide in a secluded area, building a silk sac to rest in.

7. Regal Jumping Spider

Regal Jumping Spider (Phidippus regius) on a brick-red wall in Fayetteville, North Carolina, USA
Regal Jumping Spider (Phidippus regius) on a brick-red wall in Fayetteville, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus regius
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 6 to 18 mm ( 0.23 to 0.70 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: $30

Regal jumping spiders live across the Southeastern United States, found in abundance in states like North Carolina. This spider lives in habitats including meadows, open woodlands, and backyards.

Flora such as palms, trees, and bushes are common in the areas this species lives. They are active during the day, and at night they build a silk nest to rest, usually in the thick vegetation.

Being sexually dimorphic, both males and females have slight differences from each other. Males are all black, with white tufts of hair covering them.

Males are extremely similar to the other jumping spider species, Bold Jumping spiders. Regal jumping spiders are slightly larger than the bold jumping spider.

Male bold jumping spiders have white spots, white tufts of hair on them, and iridescent chelicerae. Females range in colors from gray to orange. This spider is extremely furry and is one of the largest jumping spiders.

Regal jumping spiders are one of the most common species kept as pets because of their vibrant coloring and size. This spider has a simple diet of small insects.

They use their keen eyesight and jump to track their prey. Jumping spiders are often found on vertical surfaces since they have a better position to watch for prey in this position. Birds, frogs, other spiders, and lizards are predators of this species.

8. Tan Jumping Spider

Tan Jumping Spider (Platycryptus undatus) on a leaf in Durham, North Carolina, USA
Tan Jumping Spider (Platycryptus undatus) on a leaf in Durham, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Platycryptus undatus
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 8.5 to 13 mm (0.33 to 0.51 inches)
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30

Tan jumping spiders live in the eastern United States in regions like North Carolina. This spider spends its time on vertical surfaces like trees, the sides of houses, tall vegetation, and fences.

Woodlands, grasslands, and urban areas. Moving around during the day, this spider often finds its way into homes.

Tan jumping spiders create silk sacs to lay their eggs or sleep and do so in the bark which helps them camouflage. In the summer this spider lays its eggs, and when winter comes they will overwinter in their silk tent. Each spider creates its own silk sac, and it is common for this species to overwinter with other spiders nearby.

Tan jumping spiders are small and furry. They range in colors from light gray to brown, with an undulating pattern on their abdomen.

This species has a mottled coloring, with dark bands running down its legs. The male and females of this species look very similar, but the females are a bit larger.

Flies, crickets, moths, and other insects smaller than them are what this spider eats. While they may go after larger prey, it is not as common since they get timid.

The eyesight of this and other jumping spiders is one of the best of all arachnids. The amazing eyesight these species possess is used to stalk prey, but also escape predators like birds, wasps, and lizards.

9. Red-backed Jumping Spider

Red-backed Jumping Spider (Phidippus johnsoni) on a leaf in Hampstead, North Carolina, USA
Red-backed Jumping Spider (Phidippus johnsoni) on a leaf in Hampstead, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Phidippus johnsoni
  • Other Names: Johnson’s Jumping Spider, Whitman’s Jumping Spider
  • Adult Size: 9 to 14 mm (0.35 to 0.55 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: $35

Red-backed jumping spiders are common in habitats like coastal dunes and woodlands. This species is most active from spring and into the summer months.

Active during the day, at night, or in bad weather this spider hides in a silk retreat. They make these silk nests in hidden areas like rocks, leaf litter, and in tree bark.

Mating also occurs in these sacs. The female will lay multiple clutches of eggs, and guard them until they hatch or she dies.

Implied in its name, this spider has a red or orange abdomen. Females have a black blotch on the center of their abdomen, while males have a fully red bottom.

The legs, cephalothorax, and fangs of these species are jet black. Some may confuse them for a black widow, but this jumping spider species are harmless and much more active.

The angular legs of this spider allow it to leap distances of up to 6 inches. They feed on small insects around half their size, including things like moths, flies, and caterpillars.

When mating the female of this species may occasionally feed on their male partner. While this spider has the colors of a black widow, it is harmless, and will generally flee when approached.

10. White-jawed Jumping Spider

White-jawed Jumping Spider (Hentzia mitrata) on a wet leaf at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
White-jawed Jumping Spider (Hentzia mitrata) on a wet leaf at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Hentzia mitrata
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 4 to 6 mm (0.15 to 0.23 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

A type of long-jawed Salticidae found in North Carolina, the white-jawed jumping spider is one of the more unique species to come across in the state.

This spider is active most in spring but can be seen in the days of summer. While found in the United States, this species also has a range in Canada, and the Bahama Islands.

Being a part of the genus Hentiza, white-jawed jumping spiders look similar to another species in North Carolina, the Common Hentz Jumper (Hentzia palmarum). White-jawed jumping spiders are lighter colored. They have a tan to orangeish stripe running across their abdomen, and an orangish color on their cephalothorax.

This species is covered in a mottled pattern, and snow white coloring on their legs, and the sides of their pedipalps. Males have large front legs and pedipalps. White fur also covers this species’ body.

Like other jumping spiders this species feeds on small insects, and occasionally cannibalizes each other. They are a jumpy species, hopping away if frightened.

11. Sylvan Jumping Spider

Sylvan Jumping Spider (Colonus sylvanus) on a leaf in Asheville, North Carolina, USA
Sylvan Jumping Spider (Colonus sylvanus) on a leaf in Asheville, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Colonus sylvanus
  • Other Names: Woodland jumping spider
  • Adult Size: 7.55 mm (0.29 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30

Living in vegetated areas, the Sylvana jumping spider is also called the woodlands jumping spider, since it is often found in forested habitats. As a jumping spider, this species is able to leap far distances.

They use a silk tether attached to a surface to protect themselves from falling to their death. This silk tether also helps escape predators since it can drastically change their course of direction while in mid-air.

Sylvana jumping spider males are painted in a variety of colors and are covered in small furs. They have brown abdomens, with two white stripes running along them.

Their legs are black, with orange bands near their tips. The center of their head has a white dot, with red markings on their face and around their eyes. Females are much paler, with a cream to tan coloration. They have dark spots on their abdomen and minimal orange around the crown of their head.

Leaping large distances helps this species feed on a plethora of small insects. They hunt in highly vegetated areas like gardens, but may occasionally make their way into your while. Since they are not harmful to humans some may keep them inside to help feed on pest insects nearby.

12. Twin-flagged Jumping Spider

Twin-flagged Jumping Spider (Anasaitis canosa) on a leaf on a rock in Charlotte, North Carolina, USA
Twin-flagged Jumping Spider (Anasaitis canosa) on a leaf on a rock in Charlotte, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Anasaitis canosa
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 5 to 6 mm (0.19 to 0.23 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: $15

Twin-flagged jumping spiders are named after the two flag-like markings that appear on the back of their heads. The white on this species’ pedipalps also looks similar to two flags when moving about.

This spider is black, with white and tan markings on its body. They are a very furry species and are covered in small hairs. Females of this species are larger, with less vibrant coloring.

Twin-flag jumping spiders are common in forested areas. They are often seen walking on the forest floor, moving about the leaf litter, rocks, and other structures they may come across. Spring and summer are when this spider is active.

A very small species of Salticidae, this spider is able to move very quickly. They leap and pounce on small prey they may come across like ants, flies, and caterpillars.

When hunting dangerous insects they may be more cautious, and wait until the right moment to jump on their prey. Insects like flies that are not capable of harming them will be hunted down effortlessly.

13. Emerald Jumping Spider 

Golden Jumping Spider (Paraphidippus aurantius) hanging onto a leaf at Rural Hall, North Carolina, USA
Golden Jumping Spider (Paraphidippus aurantius) hanging onto a leaf at Rural Hall, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner 
  • Family: Salticidae
  • Scientific Name: Paraphidippus aurantius 
  • Other Names: Golden Jumping Spider 
  • Adult Size: 3.04 mm (0.12 inches)
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20 to $30 

The Emerald jumping spider is a species found all across the US.

This spider lives in a variety of habitats like woodlands and grasslands but is also sometimes seen indoors. Spring and summer are when this species is active.

In winter many die off, and the younger spiders overwinter until next spring. Emerald jumping spiders are sometimes kept as pets because of the vibrant colorings they showcase.

Emerald jumping spiders come in a variety of colors. Tan, light brown, black, and white are some of the colors this species comes in.

Many specimens have emerald markings on their abdomen, and head, giving them their name. This species is extremely furry, with white and tan markings common on them. Males can be identified from females by their bolder colors, smaller abdomens, and longer front legs.

Emerald jumping spiders like other similar species hunt using their long-distance leaps. They have excellent eyesight due to their two large eyes, and smaller ones that circle their head like a crown.

Jumping spiders’ eye placement lets them sense things in nearly 360 degrees. Their bite is harmless, only affecting the small prey they eat. If seen they most likely will escape into small crevices and other hidden areas.

14. European Garden Spider 

Cross Orbweaver (Araneus diadematus) on a half dried leaf in British Columbia, Canada
European Garden Spider (Araneus diadematus) on a half dried leaf in British Columbia, Canada. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Araneus diadematus
  • Other Names: Cross Orbweaver, Pumpkin spider
  • Adult Size: 5.5 to 20 mm (0.2 to 0.7 inches)
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

While native to Europe, the European garden spider is a common species to find in North America. Inhabiting North Carolina, this species lives in woodlands, gardens, grasslands, and other highly vegetated areas.

European garden spiders live in large circular webs that they create. Similar to other orb-weaver species, this spider builds a new web daily and eats it to recycle its silk.

European garden spiders are also known as cross spiders since white blotches are seen on the back of their abdomen in the shape of a cross. This species has tan, gray, or yellowish coloring, Females have large round abdomens, while males have longer legs.

This species of orbweaver feeds on the variety of insects that get caught in their web. The bite of this species is harmless to humans.

Cross orbweavers are mostly seen in the summer and fall months, sitting on their web. Mostly active at night, this species will hide in a secluded area during the day.

15. Furrow Orbweaver

Furrow Orbweaver (Larinioides cornutus) on a small leaf on Green Mountain, North Carolina, USA
Furrow Orbweaver (Larinioides cornutus) on a small leaf on Green Mountain, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Larinioides cornutus
  • Other Names: Furrow orb weaver
  • Adult Size: 10 to 12 mm (0.39 to 0.47 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Furrow orbweavers live in moist habitats and live in large circular webs they build. It is common for this species to build its web on the sides of houses, and on other man-made structures like bridges.

Light is what attracts this spider, as they will feed on the insects that are attracted to the light. When their web is made near homes, some leave them alone so they can feed on pest insects like mosquitoes, flies, and gnats.

This spider gets its name from the furrow-like pattern that runs down its back. Tan is the most common color this spider is seen in, and they have dark bands that run down their legs.

Female furrow orbweavers have rounded abdomen, and are heavier than males. The males of this species have long legs, with a smaller abdomen.

Females of this species build the circular webs orbweavers are known for. When mature males will wander to find a female to mate with.

When finding the web of a female, male furrow orbweavers will pluck the strings of their web to get the female’s attention and mate with them. Females are able to lay hundreds of eggs, which hatch in around a month.

16. Giant Lichen Orbweaver

Giant Lichen Orbweaver (Araneus bicentenarius) taken with flash photography on its web in Transylvania County, North Carolina, USA
Giant Lichen Orbweaver (Araneus bicentenarius) taken with flash photography on its web in Transylvania County, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Araneus bicentenarius
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 10 to 30 mm ( 0.39 to 1.18 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Found in the eastern half of the United States, the Giant lichen orbweaver is known for the large webs that they sit in. The webs this species creates are capable of reaching up to 8 feet in diameter, and they sit on the edge of them.

Highly vegetated habitats like woodlands, and moist forests are where this species can be found. Active at night, during the day this spider uses its camouflage to hide from predators.

Giant lichen orbweavers have a greenish coloring, helping them blend into the lichen fungus in the habitats they live in. Females have large round abdomens, while males are more crab-like in appearance.

The legs of this species have orange and black bands on them. Along with the green, this spider has black and grayish markings on its body.

Spending most of their time on their web, this species is helpful in catching flying insects and helping in controlling their population. This spider is harmless to humans, and if they feel threatened they will shake on its web.

17. Six-Spotted Orbweaver

Six-spotted Orbweaver (Araniella displicata) hanging onto a leaf in Guilford County, North Carolina, USA
Six-spotted Orbweaver (Araniella displicata) hanging onto a leaf in Guilford County, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Araniella displicata
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 4 to 8 mm (0.15 to 0.31 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20

Six-spotted orbweavers are small spiders abundant in the eastern United States. This small species lives amongst vegetation, and its small size makes it hard to spot.

Like other orbweavers, this species creates circular webs, but they are much smaller in size than other species. Woodlands, fields, and the edges of the forest are where this species lives.

Six-spotted orb weavers are one of the smallest orb-weaving species. They are named after the six dots on the bottom of their abdomen.

This spider comes in cream, yellow, orange, white, or tan coloring. They have rounded abdomen and long spindly legs.

Small insects like flies and aphids found near vegetation are what this spider feeds on. In summer is when these mates are capable of laying up to 80 eggs.

Females die in the winter, while the eggs and spiderlings wait until the next spring to become active.

18. Red-femured Orbweaver

Red-femured Spotted Orbweaver (Neoscona domiciliorum) on its web in the sunlight in Charlotte, North Carolina, USA
Red-femured Spotted Orbweaver (Neoscona domiciliorum) on its web in the sunlight in Charlotte, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Neoscona domiciliorum
  • Other Names: Spotted Orbweaver
  • Adult Size: 5 mm ( 0.19 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Red-femured orb weavers are a species that inhabit the eastern United States. This spider lives in moist woodland habitats.

Summer and fall are when they are seen most often. Large circular webs are made by females for them to live in. Their webs are found on a variety of vegetation, but also on buildings.

New webs are created regularly, but when breeding seasons occur this spider may keep its web up to support the creation of eggs.

This spider is named after the red femur section of its leg. The redlegs of this species are their most identifiable trait, and they also have black and white bands running down their legs.

This spider comes in gray, cream, tan, white, and black coloring. Females have large abdomens, while males are smaller in size.

Red-femured orb weavers are nocturnal, and during the day hide in a secluded area. This spider will use silk-attached debris like a leaf so they can hide in their web.

Insects are the main food source for this spider, feeding on anything that gets caught in its web.

19. Arabesque Orbweaver

Arabesque Orbweaver (Neoscona arabesca) hanging onto flower buds at Pisgah National Forest, North Carolina, USA
Arabesque Orbweaver (Neoscona arabesca) hanging onto flower buds at Pisgah National Forest, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Neoscona arabesca
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 5 to 7 mm (0.19 to 0.27 inches)
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The arabesque orbweaver is named after the pattern found on the back of this species, with some saying it looks like a swirling arabesque painting. This spider varies in color from brown, black, orange, yellow, and brown.

They are covered in thick hairs and are most commonly seen sitting in the center of their web. Being nocturnal this spider only comes out at night, and females of this species create circular webs to sit in.

Males are much smaller in size than female orbweaver and mature much more quickly. Instead of building webs they wander around looking for a female to mate with. Females have rounded abdomen, and are seen much more often than males sitting in the center of their webs.

Arabesque orbweavers feed on insects that get caught in their web. They create their web in well-vegetated areas, secluded from common foot traffic.

This species is not aggressive, and if threatened they will just attempt to hide or flee.

20. Lined Orbweaver

Lined Orbweaver (Mangora gibberosa) on its web at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
Lined Orbweaver (Mangora gibberosa) on its web at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Mangora gibberosa
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 5 to 6 mm (0.2 to 0.25 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Lined orbweavers live across the United States, and are a small species you can find in North Carolina. This species lives in vegetated areas and creates small circular webs.

In the center of their web is an inner circle where they sit, made with much thicker silk than the rest of their web. Lined orbweavers webs are made with a fine design, so the smallest of insects can get caught in their trap.

Lined orbweavers are one of the most common spiders in the Mangora genus found in the United States. This species is small and covered in many thick hairs.

Their abdomens are white, with yellow and black markings on them. They get their name from the lined pattern that runs across their back.

Similar to other similar species, this spider feeds on a variety of insects that it catches in its web. Their webbing is made with a fine design, able to catch the smallest of insects.

21. Orchard Orbweaver

Orchard Orbweaver (Leucauge venusta) on a leaf in Greensboro, North Carolina, USA
Orchard Orbweaver (Leucauge venusta) on a leaf in Greensboro, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Tetragnathidae
  • Scientific Name: Leucauge venusta
  • Other Names: Orchard spider
  • Adult Size: 3.5 to 7.5 mm (0.13 to 0.29 inches)
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20

Found across the eastern US, the Orchard orbweaver is a species you may come across in North Carolina.

This spider is a species of long-jawed orbweaver, known for its large fangs and the circular webs they build. As their name suggests this spider is found in orchards and other highly vegetated areas like forests and meadows.

A colorful species, the orchard orbweaver has a white, or silver-colored elongated abdomen. They have white, yellow, black, and red markings covering their body.

This spider has extremely thin legs that are green in color. Males have much smaller abdomen, with long legs.

Orchard orbweavers feed on flying insects like moths, beetles, wasps, and other bugs that get caught in their web. They also feed on other spiders that may wander into their web.

Only females create these large webs, and males spend most of their time looking for a mate. Predators like birds and larger spiders are the main predators this species faces.

Not an aggressive species, this spider will attempt to escape if they are threatened.

22. Humpbacked Orbweaver 

Humpbacked Orbweaver (Eustala anastera) on a plant in Louisburg, North Carolina, USA
Humpbacked Orbweaver (Eustala anastera) on a plant in Louisburg, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Eustala anastera
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 2 to 30 mm (0.07 to 1.18 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Found in North and Central America, the Humpbacked Orbweaver is a native species found in North Carolina.

Like other orbweavers, this spider is mostly active in the summer and fall months. They live in moist areas filled with a variety of vegetation and plant life.

The humpbacked orbweaver is named after the shape of its abdomen, which has a rounded hump near the bottom of it. This species has tan, green, or gray coloring.

This spider is covered in small hairs and has a dark pattern on the back of its abdomen. Small hairs cover this spider’s body, and the greenish pattern they showcase helps them camouflage into the vegetation it lives in.

Humpback orbweavers live near freshwater habitats, and prey on a variety of insects. The webs they build are made in vegetation, capturing bugs like flies, and mosquitoes.

In the wild, this spider faces parasitic larvae as a predator, which overtakes its body and mind. When infected with a parasite this spider will abdomen its natural instincts, and use its silk to create a cocoon for the larvae to mature in.

23. Spiny-backed Orbweaver

Spinybacked Orbweaver (Gasteracantha cancriformis) on its web in Pleasant Garden, North Carolina, USA
Spinybacked Orbweaver (Gasteracantha cancriformis) on its web in Pleasant Garden, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Gasteracantha cancriformis
  • Other Names: Thorn Spider
  • Adult Size:  6.35 to 12.7 mm (0.25 to 0.5 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Spiny-backed orb weavers are one of the more unique spiders found in North Carolina.

This species has a range found across the Southern United States and lives in large circular webs that it builds. Like other orb-weaving species, only females create these large webs, and males spend their time looking for a mate.

On the edge of woodland habitats is where this spider prefers to live. They are also seen in other vegetated areas like gardens, and grasslands.

This species has an oval-shaped abdomen, with large spikes protruding out the sides of its body. Their legs and head are black, with black dimples covering their back. The base color of this species varies from red, white, yellow, and orange.

Fall is when this species is seen the most often, but they are active year-round except in winter. Eggs are laid in a hundred and are covered in yellow silk.

This species feeds on insects like flies, moths, beetles, and whiteflies. They use their large circular webs to catch prey. Males and females are occasionally seen cohabitating on the web.

24. Marbled Orbweaver

Marbled Orbweaver (Araneus marmoreus) on its web in the woods in Harnett County, North Carolina, USA
Marbled Orbweaver (Araneus marmoreus) on its web in the woods in Harnett County, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Araneus marmoreus
  • Other Names: Pumpkin spider
  • Adult Size: 9 to 22 mm (0.35 to 0.86 inches)
  • Lifespan:  1 year
  • Average Price Range: $20

Marbled orbweaver is a species found in highly vegetated areas and moist habitats. A freshwater source like a river, lake, or stream is usually nearby in the areas they live.

Found in North Carolina and other areas of the eastern United States, they live in habitats such as marshes, forests, and meadows.

Marbled orb weavers are named after the marbled pattern that appears on their abdomen. Males are much smaller than females and have long legs.

While their abdomen is small, it still showcases the marble-like pattern. Females have large round abdomen and are sometimes called pumpkin spiders because of their shape and coloring. This spider has orange, yellow, tan, and gray coloring.

Marbled orbweavers create large circular webs to live in, and are most active in the warm summer and fall months. In winter they die off, while the younger spiders overwinter until spring. Small flying insects like flies and moths are what this spider feeds on.

When not sitting in the center of their web, they move to the hidden area. They attach a silk thread to use as a fishing rod, to know when something has fallen into their web.

25. Spotted Orbweaver

Spotted Orbweaver (Neoscona crucifera) on its web in Wake County, North Carolina, USA
Spotted Orbweaver (Neoscona crucifera) on its web in Wake County, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Neoscona crucifera
  • Other Names: Barn Spider
  • Adult Size: 9.5 to 19 mm (0.37 to 0.75 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Living across the eastern United States, the spotted orbweaver is a spider that inhabits North Carolina. Woodlands, fields, meadows, and other habitats with plenty of plant life are where this large orb weaver lives.

They are mostly seen in the warm months of summer and fall and will die off in the winter. Males of this species spend their time wandering and looking for a mate. Females create webs to sit in, capable of making them up to 2 feet in diameter.

Spotted orbweavers look very similar to other large orbweavers species. Females have large round abdomens, while males’ abdomen is much smaller.

Males have long legs that are thicker, and smaller than females. Spotted orbweavers have tan, brown, or reddish brown coloring. They are covered in small thick hairs and have dark bands covering their legs.

This species is also called the barn spider since it is commonly found in or around barns. One of the most important factors in where they will build their web is the number of insects that pass through the area.

Spotted orbweavers often make their webs on porches and other areas that have ample lighting, since insects are attracted to light. Mostly active at night, female spotted orbweavers may be active in the day to gain ample nutrition to lay eggs.

Spotted orbweavers are capable of laying up to 1,000 eggs. Wasps and birds are one of the main predators this species faces, which is why they tend to be more active at night.

26. Basilica Orbweaver 

Basilica Orbweaver (Mecynogea lemniscata) climbing around the stem of a flower at Sarah P. Duke Gardens, North Carolina, USA
Basilica Orbweaver (Mecynogea lemniscata) climbing around the stem of a flower at Sarah P. Duke Gardens, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Mecynogea lemniscata 
  • Other Names: n/a 
  • Adult Size: 5 to 9 mm (0.19 to 0.35 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Basilica orbweavers is a spider that lives across the United States, and in regions of South America. While a member of the orbweaver family, this species creates a more dome-like web, similar to that of a Bowl and Doily spider.

This species lives in a variety of vegetation, creating webs up to 20 inches wide. Younger spiders create webs that are circular in shape, but as they age their webs become more dome-like.

Basilica orb weavers have long thin legs, with a small elongated abdomen. Their abdomen is elongated and not round.

This spider has green, white, orange, brown, yellow, and black coloring covering its body. They have a marble-like pattern on their back, with small thick hairs covering their legs. 

Active mostly at night, this spider will create a new web daily. The egg sacs this spider creates have a shape similar to string beans and hang off vegetation.

The spider and egg sacs of this species are seen most often in the late summer and fall months. 

27. Triangle Orbweaver

Arrowhead Orbweaver (Verrucosa arenata) hanging from its dewey web in Chatham County, North Carolina, USA
Arrowhead Orbweaver (Verrucosa arenata) hanging from its dewey web in Chatham County, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Verrucosa arenata 
  • Other Names: Arrowhead spider 
  • Adult Size: 9.5 mm (0.37inches)  
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Triangle orbweavers are a species native to North Carolina and can be found across North America. This spider is seen most in the late summer and fall months.

Woodlands, grasslands, parks, and other areas with plenty of trees are where this spider lives. Open humid areas are where they prefer to make their web, and they will make their web in direct sunlight. 

The body of this spider is shaped like a triangle or arrowhead. They come in colors of black, brown, and red, and also have a triangle-shaped marking on their abdomen.

Dark bands run down this species’ legs, as well as dark thin hairs. Males do not have a triangle shape and are rarely seen. Much smaller in size, males are sometimes found sitting on the same web as a female. 

The large webs the triangle orbweavers sit on are made by females, in areas with large insect traffic. The thin silk was used to make their webs almost invisible to the insects that got caught in them. Small flies, mosquitoes, and moths are what their diet consists of. 

28. White Micrathena 

White Micrathena (Micrathena mitrata) hanging onto a flower stem at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
White Micrathena (Micrathena mitrata) hanging onto a flower stem at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Micrathena mitrata 
  • Other Names: Spiny orbweavers 
  • Adult Size: 4.2 to 10.8 mm (0.16 to 0.42 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

White micrathena live in woodlands type habitats and inhabit areas within North Carolina. This spider is small in size and has a turban-shaped abdomen.

They have white coloring, with dark blotches painted on them. On the tip of their abdomen are small spikes. White micrathena have reddish brown legs and heads.

This species lives on vegetation and feeds on the insects that go on plant life. Their webs are circular and made with thin silk.

White micrathena are also sometimes found in gardens and are seen as beneficial since they feed on a variety of pests and insects. Animals like birds and lizards are the predator this spider faces in the wild. 

29. Spined Micrathena 

Spined Micrathena (Micrathena gracilis) hanging on its web in the sun at Great Smoky Mountains National Park, North Carolina, USA
Spined Micrathena (Micrathena gracilis) hanging on its web in the sun at Great Smoky Mountains National Park, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Micrathena gracilis 
  • Other Names: Castleback orbweaver 
  • Adult Size: 4 to 10 mm (0.15 to 0.31 inches) 
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: n/a 

Spined micrathena are found in North and Central America. This spider lives in moist woodland habitats.

Forested habitats near marshes, ponds, rivers, lagoons, and other freshwater are where this spider is commonly found. While they build large circular webs to live in, this spider constantly moves about, finding new areas to build its web.

The large abdomen of the females of this species has large spines that protrude from it. The head and legs of this spider have reddish-brown coloring.

They look similar to the white micrathena but have spikes protruding from their body. Spined micrathena have yellow and black markings covering them. Males are much smaller than females, with a lighter coloring, and lack spikes. 

This species feeds on small insects that get caught in their web. Summer and fall are when this spider is seen most, and they will go inactive during the winter months.

The large webs this spider creates have a very little opening, making it easier to catch small insects like gnats, and leafhoppers. 

30. Arrowhead Micrathena

Arrow-shaped Orbweaver (Micrathena sagittata) hanging in the middle of its web on a rock in Gerton, North Carolina, USA
Arrow-shaped Orbweaver (Micrathena sagittata) hanging in the middle of its web on a rock in Gerton, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Micrathena sagittata
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 5 to 9 mm (0.20 to 0.35 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Arrowhead micrathena are named after their abdomen shape, which looks like the end of an arrow. Spikes also protrude from their body, with two large ones at the end of their body, and smaller ones found on their sides.

This species has yellow, black, and red coloring. Their abdomens are usually yellow and black, while their legs and head are all red. Males of this species are much smaller in size and lack the spikes on their bodies.

Large webs are made by the females of this species to live in, while males spend their time wandering for a mate. Forest habitats are where this spider prefers to live. They build their webs in highly vegetated areas, giving them plenty of places to hide.

Arrowhead micrathenas feed on small insects that get caught in their web. While this spider is colorful they are harmless.

Birds like hummingbirds, warblers, and wasps feed on this species. Birds will also use their silk to help fortify their nests.

31. Golden Silk Spider

Golden Silk Spider (Trichonephila clavipes) on its web at Green Swamp Preserve, North Carolina, USA
Golden Silk Spider (Trichonephila clavipes) on its web at Green Swamp Preserve, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Trichonephila clavipes
  • Other Names: Banana Spider
  • Adult Size: 24 to 50 mm (0.94 to 1.96 inches)
  • Lifespan: 6 months to a year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Golden silk spiders are named after their webbing, which is made with golden silk that shines when in the sun. This species is found in North Carolina and live in forests and open habitats.

Late summer and fall are when this spider is seen. Females are the creators of the golden webs and are able to create them up to 5 feet in diameter.

Females of this species are much larger than males and are more than double in size. They have yellow, white, and red coloring on their body. Their abdomen is elongated, and their legs are long and spindly.

These spider legs are covered in dark, yellow, and red bands. When sitting on their web it is common for them to sit with their head facing down, in the middle of their web.

Golden silk spiders are one of the largest orbweavers in North Carolina and feed on a variety of small and large insects. Grasshoppers, flies, and even small birds that get caught in their web are what they eat.

When something gets trapped in their web they encase them in a silk coffin, then begin to feed on them.

32. Banded Garden Spider

Banded Garden Spider (Argiope trifasciata) on its web by a lake in Durham, North Carolina, USA
Banded Garden Spider (Argiope trifasciata) on its web by a lake in Durham, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Araneidae
  • Scientific Name: Argiope trifasciata
  • Other Names: Banded orb-weaving spider
  • Adult Size: 15 to 25 mm (0.59 to 0.98 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Banded garden spiders are a large species of orb weaver found in North Carolina and across the US. This species lives in open vegetated areas like grasslands, meadows, and tallgrass prairies.

Females create large webs to live in and are active during the day. Active during the day, this species is mostly seen in the late summer and fall months. Females banded garden spiders are much larger than males and are more than double in size.

Males are around 5 mm large, while females are capable of growing up to 25 mm. This species has an oval-shaped abdomen, covered in yellow-white, yellow, and black bands.

The long thin legs of this species are covered in black and yellow bands. The head of this spider is white, and during the day they sit in the center of their web facing down. When sitting in its web this spider keeps its leg in an X shape and looks similar to a skull and bones.

Banded garden spiders feed on insects that get trapped in their web. Birds and large wasps are the main predators of this species. The large web this spider creates is able to reach around 23 inches.

Their silk is strong enough to capture small birds, which they sometimes feed on.

33. Yellow Garden Spider 

Yellow Garden Spider (Argiope aurantia) on its web in greenery in Clayton, North Carolina, USA
Yellow Garden Spider (Argiope aurantia) on its web in greenery in Clayton, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate 
  • Family: Araneidae 
  • Scientific Name: Argiope aurantia 
  • Other Names: Black and Yellow garden spider  
  • Adult Size: 5 to 28 mm ( 0.2 to 1.1 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year 
  • Average Price Range: $8

Black and yellow garden spiders are a large species of orb weaver found in North Carolina. This species lives in sunny areas, with tall vegetation nearby.

Prairies, grasslands, and other open fields are where this spider is most common. Large webs are created by females of this species for them to live. In the center of their web is a stabilimentum, which is a zig-zag pattern. 

As their name suggests this species is black and yellow. Males are smaller compared to females and rarely seen, only when sitting on the outskirts of the female’s web.

Females have large round abdomens and thin spindly legs. They have white heads and are seen during the day sitting in the center of their web. 

Grasshoppers, wasps, bees, butterflies, and flies are just some of the insects this spider eats. Black and yellow garden spiders feed on anything that gets caught in their web and encases them in silk to feed on them.

Unlike other orbweavers, this species is able to be active during the day because of its large size. Birds, lizards, and insect-eating mammals are what prey on this large spider.

Even though they are large in size, this species is harmless.

34. American Green Crab Spider

American Green Crab Spider (Misumessus oblongus) on rocky ground in Jackson County, North Carolina, USA
American Green Crab Spider (Misumessus oblongus) on rocky ground in Jackson County, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Thomisidae
  • Scientific Name: Misumessus oblongus
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 3 to 6.8 mm (0.12 to 0.27 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Found in woodlands, grasslands, are other vegetated fields, the American green crab spider is a species you may come across in North Carolina. This spider does not build webs to live in but wanders around looking for food.

Silk is only used by females to create egg sacs. Since males are much smaller in size they use silk to tie up the female so they can safely mate with them.

American green crab spiders, like other species of Thomisidae, are named after their crab-like appearance. This spider is neon green, white, or yellow.

They have long legs and flattened abdomens. At the end of their front legs are small claws used to hold onto their prey.

Insects are the main source of food this species feeds on. Bees, butterflies, and other insects found in vegetation are what the American green crab spider eats.

They hide in flowers, and other vegetation to capture unsuspecting insects.

35. Goldenrod Crab Spider

Goldenrod Crab Spider (Misumena vatia) hanging off a spiky flower in Maggie Valley, North Carolina, USA
Goldenrod Crab Spider (Misumena vatia) hanging off a spiky flower in Maggie Valley, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Thomisidae
  • Scientific Name: Misumena vatia
  • Other Names: Flower crab spider
  • Adult Size: 5 to 10 mm (0.20 to 0.39 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Goldenrod crab spiders live across North America and Europe. This spider is often found on goldenrod flowers but is also seen on other flows like milkweeds, daisies, trillium, and fleabane.

Females of this species sit on flowers to wait for prey and are attracted by the fragrance the flowers give off. Males wander around looking for a mate and are able to travel by ballooning. Ballooning is where a spider shoots its silk in the air, using the wind to get carried over long distances.

Goldenrod crab spiders are yellow or white and are able to change their color to better blend into the flowers they sit on. They change their shade slowly over time, and also have reddish markings on the side of their abdomen.

Males are smaller legs than females but have long legs. Females have large round abdomens, with crab-like legs used to capture prey.

Insects are the main food source of this species, and they feed mostly on pollinators. Goldenrod crab spiders wait on flowers for bugs like bees, flies, and butterflies to come by.

They pounce on unsuspecting prey looking to pollinate flowers and use their camouflage to stay hidden.

36. White-banded Crab Spider

White-banded Crab Spider (Misumenoides formosipes) in a purple flower in Asheville, North Carolina, USA
White-banded Crab Spider (Misumenoides formosipes) in a purple flower in Asheville, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Thomisidae
  • Scientific Name: Misumenoides formosipes
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 3 to 11 mm (0.11 to 0.43 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

White-banded crab spiders are named after the white band that is found on the top of their head. They are a small species with yellow or white coloring.

Like other crab spiders they are able to change their color slowly from white to yellow, and change depending on the flower they sit on. Males are much smaller in size, with a golden color. Females have a large abdomen, and both sexes have crab-like legs.

White-banded crab spiders live on flowers and are active mostly in summer and fall. Females spend their time sitting on a spider and feeding, while males wander around looking for a mate. When males find a mate they stay near her and guard them against other males.

This species feeds on pollinating insects like bees, wasps, flies, and butterflies. They wait for bugs to get near, and grab them with their strong front legs.

Because of the crab spider’s surprise attack, many insects have evolved over the years to gain fast reflexes to be able to avoid this spider.

37. Bowl and Doily Spider

Bowl-and-doily Spider (Frontinella pyramitela) in a leaf in Greensboro, North Carolina, USA
Bowl-and-doily Spider (Frontinella pyramitela) in a leaf in Greensboro, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Linyphiidae
  • Scientific Name: Frontinella pyramitela
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 4 mm (0.16 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Bowl and doily spiders are named after their web shape, which has two sections to them. The webbing this spider creates has a bowl-shaped section and a doily flat webbing.

This species hangs around the bowl-shaped part of its web so it can safely bite its prey safely. The flat section or doily is used to move prey into the bowl section. This species is found in areas with shrubs, fields, and other areas with high vegetation.

The bowl and doily spider is a small species and is most recognizable by the webbing it makes. The colors of this species range from dark, to reddish brown.

They have long spindly legs, and a rounded abdomen. This spider is seen living in large groups of webs with other members of its species.

Summer and fall are when the bowl and doily spider is active. Flying insects such as gnats and flies are what this spider feeds on.

Studies have shown this species is able to retain a memory of past prey it has captured, and distinguish it from other prey captured in their web.

38. Filmy Dome Spider

Filmy Dome Spider (Neriene radiata) in its web in Wake County, North Carolina, USA
Filmy Dome Spider (Neriene radiata) in its web in Wake County, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Linyphiidae
  • Scientific Name: Neriene radiata
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 3.4 to 5.3 mm (0.13 to 0.2 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Filmy dome spiders are a common species found in North Carolina, found in woodlands and other habitats with dense low-lying vegetation.

They build their webs on debris like walls or rock outcroppings. The web this species marks is shaped like an upside-down bowl and is made with fine silk in a messy pattern.

A small species, the filmy dome spider has long thin legs. They have a small rounded abdomen, painted in a white, tan, or yellowish coloring.

Mottled dark markings appear on their body. Small hairs cover their legs, and their eight eyes are bunched together in front of their face.

Filmy dome spiders are active for most of the year until the cold winter comes. They feed on small insects like gnats and mosquitoes.

When an insect lands in its web it will tear a hole in it and pull the insect down into the silk. Filmy dome spiders are great at reducing pest insect populations, but they are fed on by animals like birds and reptiles.

39. Black-tailed Red Sheetweaver

Black-tailed Red Sheetweaver (Florinda coccineae) on a web in Asheville, North Carolina, USA
Black-tailed Red Sheetweaver (Florinda coccineae) on a web in Asheville, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Linyphiidae
  • Scientific Name: Florinda coccineae
  • Other Names: Red Grass Spider
  • Adult Size: 3 to 4 mm (0.12 to 0.16 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The black-tailed red sheet weaver is found across North Carolina. The range of this spider extends across the Southeastern United States, Mexico, and the West Indies.

This small species inhabits lawns, grasslands, and grassy fields. They create messy sheet webs on the top of the grass, with non-sticky silk.

A very small species, this spider has a red head and abdomen. On the tip of the pointed abdomen is black coloring, making it look as if they have a black tail.

This species also has dark black eyes and small chelicerae. Their legs are covered in small thin hairs.

The most indefinable traits of this spider are its small size and red coloring. Males and females look very similar but they have smaller abdomens and longer legs.

Black-tailed red sheet weaver feed on very small insects that live in grassy habitats. Insects like aphids and leafhoppers are what they mainly feed on.

They use their sheet-like web to pull prey into it, but will also hide under the silk if a larger predator comes by.

40. Black Laceweaver

Black Laceweaver (Amaurobius ferox) on a fiberous white wall in Burnsville, North Carolina, USA
Black Laceweaver (Amaurobius ferox) on a fiberous white wall in Burnsville, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Amaurobiidae
  • Scientific Name: Amaurobius ferox
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 8 to 16 mm (0.31 to 0.62 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Named for their lace-like webbing, the black lace weaver is a spider you may find in North Carolina. This species is native to Europe but has managed to find its way across North America.

The webbing of this spider is extremely thin and has a wooly texture. When first spun its web has a faint blue hue and is extremely sticky. This species is most active at night, which is when its web is built.

Black lace weavers are a medium-sized species. They have dark black, or reddish brown coloring, with a yellow mottled pattern on their rounded abdomen. This spider has long legs, and its entire body is covered in small black hairs.

Bites from this species are not deadly, but dull pain is common when bitten. This spider is active for most of the year and is found in areas with natural debris like rocks, logs, and in vegetation.

Occasionally this species may wander into homes. Black lace weavers create their webs in crevices and feed on the insects that get caught in their trap.

41. False Black Widow

False Black Widow (Steatoda grossa) on a white wall in Durham, North Carolina, USA
False Black Widow (Steatoda grossa) on a white wall in Durham, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Theridiidae
  • Scientific Name: Steatoda grossa
  • Other Names: brown house spider, cupboard spider
  • Adult Size: 10 to 14 mm (0.39 to 0.55 inches)
  • Lifespan: 2 to 6 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

False black widows to some may look very similar to a widow spider, but they are only partially related. These spiders are a part of the Theridiidae family, which is also called the tangle-web, comb-footed, or cobweb spider family.

False widows have reddish brown to black coloring. They have large round abdomens, covered in a slight cream-mottled pattern. Widow spiders are a part of the Latrodectus genus, while this spider is of the Steatoda group.

Males of this species are much smaller, having a small founded abdomen and long legs. The body is covered in white markings. False widows lack the red hourglass marking, which can help distinguish the two since all widow spiders in North Carolina showcase this trait.

False widows live in messy webs they create in corners and secluded areas. This spider feeds on bugs that get caught in its web.

While their eyesight is poor, they are able to sense things by feeling the vibrations of their web. This spider’s bite is less minor than the black widow but has similar symptoms.

Anti-venom for the Latrodectus is useful in treating bites from this species.

42. Triangulate Cobweb Spider

Triangulate Combfoot (Steatoda triangulosa) hanging off a white flower petal in Raleigh, North Carolina, USA
Triangulate Combfoot (Steatoda triangulosa) hanging off a white flower petal in Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Theridiidae
  • Scientific Name: Steatoda triangulosa
  • Other Names: Triangulate Bud Spider
  • Adult Size: 3 to 6 mm (0.1 to 0.23 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Triangulate cobweb spiders are a common species that is found across North America, Europe, and parts of Asia. This species lives in mess webs and is one of the more abundant spiders found indoors.

Kitchens, bathrooms, and dark secluded areas are where this spider prefers to live. Since they live indoors this spider is able to be active year-round.

Triangulate cobweb spiders have dark brown coloring and are small species. This spider has a large rounded abdomen, and spindly legs similar to other members of the Theridiidae family. On the abdomen is a cream mottled pattern, and their legs have yellow and dark bands running on them.

This spider’s eyesight is very poor, and they use vibrations of their web to sense things around them. They feed on bugs like roaches, flies, and beetles.

Triangulate cobweb spiders are not dangerous, and some may keep them around to let them feed on pest insects in their home.

43. Leafly Cobweb Weaver

Leafly Cobweb Weaver (Theridion frondeum) climbing a plant in Blue Ridge Parkway, North Carolina, USA
Leafly Cobweb Weaver (Theridion frondeum) climbing a plant in Blue Ridge Parkway, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Theridiidae
  • Scientific Name: Theridion frondeum
  • Other Names: Eastern Long-legged Cobweaver
  • Adult Size: 3 to 6 mm (0.11 to 0.23 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Leafly cobweb spiders are a species found in the United States and the Bahamas.

This spider builds small cobwebs to live on vegetation like vines or bushes. This species lives in areas with lots of plant life, and are more common in higher vegetations.

A small species, Leafly cobweb weavers are not seen often because of their size and secretive nature. This spider has a cream, yellow, or tan coloring.

They have dark markings covering their body and a similar shape to that of a black widow. Males and females have similar appearances, but the female has a much larger abdomen.

This spider hides in vegetation and also creates a silk retreat to hide when predators come. Their egg sac is also hidden in leaves to protect them.

Leafly cobweb weavers create their cobweb near the ground and use it to catch a variety of insects that get near.

44. Northern Black Widow

Northern Black Widow (Latrodectus variolus) on a web in straw in Durham, North Carolina, USA
Northern Black Widow (Latrodectus variolus) on a web in straw in Durham, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Latrodectus variolus
  • Scientific Name: Latrodectus variolus
  • Other Names: Northern Widow
  • Adult Size: 12.7 to 15.24 mm (0.5 to 0.6 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: $20

Northern black widows are a common spider found in the summer and fall. This spider lives across the eastern US, and parts of Canada.

They create a tangle of webs to live in and inhabit secluded areas. Hollow Logs, fences, empty flower pots, and under outdoor furniture are areas perfect for this spider’s web.

Northern black widows are jet-black, with long spindly legs. Females are much heavier than males, and also have a much larger abdomen.

The females have a red hourglass on the bottom of their abdomen. The hourglass marking on the northern black widow is incomplete, and broken, which can help identify it from other widow species. White and red markings also appear on the back of this spider’s abdomen.

The bite from a black widow is one of the most dangerous amongst spiders and requires medical treatment. Nausea, swelling, pain, and muscle spasms are some symptoms caused by Latrodectism.

Bites from this spider are rare, as they will usually flee. Their venom is mainly used to neutralize insects that get caught in their sticky web.

45. Southern Black Widow

Southern Black Widow (Latrodectus mactans) upside down on a web in Asheville, North Carolina, USA
Southern Black Widow (Latrodectus mactans) upside down on a web in Asheville, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Theridiidae
  • Scientific Name: Latrodectus mactans
  • Other Names: Shoe-button Spider
  • Adult Size: 8 to 13 mm (0.3 to 0.5 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 3 years
  • Average Price Range: $20

Southern black widows are a species found in North Carolina and are one of the most dangerous spiders in the state. While this spider does not bite often, it is equipped with venom that attacks the nervous system.

They are found in dark and secluded areas, making their webs in those places. This spider is active at night and can be seen sitting in its web during this period.

During the day black widows rest in a hidden area but are hard to miss at night. They have all black coloring, but males have some white on their abdomens.

Similar to other black widows this species has a red hourglass marking on the bottom of its abdomen. The hourglass marking is complete, unlike the northern black widow which is also found in North Carolina.

Black widows have some of the strongest webs in their region, as it is much thicker than most spiders. Their web is said to be as strong as steel and is useful for catching insects to feed on.

Ants, moths, flies, and other insects are what this spider feeds on.

46. American House Spider

Common House Spider (Parasteatoda tepidariorum) climbing up a thread of web at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
Common House Spider (Parasteatoda tepidariorum) climbing up a thread of web at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Theridiidae
  • Scientific Name: Parasteatoda tepidariorum
  • Other Names: Common House Spider
  • Adult Size: 3 to 5 mm (0.11 to 0.19 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

American house spiders are one of the most common spiders in the U.S. and are a spider found in North Carolina. This species builds messy cobwebs to live in, and it is common for these species to build webs in close proximity to each other.

Homes, basements, warehouses, abandoned buildings, and other man-made structures are where this spider lives. They build their web in corners and secluded areas from people and are great at controlling insect populations.

Small in size, the American house spider has long thin legs, and a rounded abdomen. They have a tan, yellowish, or dark brown coloring, with a mottled pattern covering their body.

Male and females look similar, but the males are slightly smaller. Males will sometimes live in the same web as a female to mate, and this species is capable of laying up to 200 eggs in a sac.

American house spiders feed on small insects like flies, mosquitoes, roaches, and crickets. They wait for food to get caught in their web, and can shoot webs from a distance to entangle them.

This spider regularly cleans its webs, dropping old food to the ground.

47. Southern House Spider

Southern House Spider (Kukulcania hibernalis) on leaves in Orange County, North Carolina, USA
Southern House Spider (Kukulcania hibernalis) on leaves in Orange County, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Filistatidae
  • Scientific Name: Kukulcania hibernalis
  • Other Names: Southern crevice spider
  • Adult Size: 9 to 19 mm (0.35 to 0.74 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 8 years
  • Average Price Range: $30

Southern house spiders are medium-sized spiders, found in North Carolina and other southern states in the U.S.

This spider is common in dark places like window sills, barns, warehouses, and other dark secluded places indoors. This species builds a tangle of webs for them to live in, made by cracks or crevices. Males do not build webs and spend their time looking for a female.

Southern house spiders are one of the largest spiders that live indoors, with some confusing them for the brown recluse. They range from brown to gray coloring and have very long legs.

Males are smaller in size, with a sleeker frame. They also have large pedipalps, which look similar to legs.

The web of this spider has a tubular section for them to hide in. This species uses its web to catch prey and will pull them into their silk when near.

They prey on insects like flies and often build their web near lighting that attracts insects. This species is best known for its messy web and larger size.

48. Long-bodied Cellar Spider

Long-bodied Cellar Spider (Pholcus phalangioides) on a white wall in Orange County, North Carolina, USA
Long-bodied Cellar Spider (Pholcus phalangioides) on a white wall in Orange County, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Pholcidae
  • Scientific Name: Pholcus phalangioides
  • Other Names: Skull spider, Daddy long-leg spider
  • Adult Size: 6 to 10 mm (0.23 to 3.9 inches)
  • Lifespan: 0.5 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Caves and rock piles are the natural habitats of the cellar spider, but this species is common to find in basements, homes, garages, and on the sides of houses. They are active for most of the year, building messy webs to live in.

Long-bodied cellar spiders are more common in the warm months, but indoors they are able to thrive year-round. This species may live in communal webs, with other members of its species.

Long-bodied cellar spiders have small elongated bodies and thin lengthy legs. They have a tan, cream, or yellowish coloring, and have fangs so small they cannot penetrate human skin. Females have slightly larger abdomens but are still small spiders.

Long-bodied cellar spiders feed on various insects that get trapped in their web. They use their long legs and speed to wrap up anything that gets caught in their web and will inject them with mild venom.

This spider also feeds on other spiders and is useful in keeping down the population of other small pests and spiders.

49. Eastern Parsons Spider

Eastern Parson Spider (Herpyllus ecclesiasticus) on a white wall in Wake County, North Carolina, USA
Eastern Parson Spider (Herpyllus ecclesiasticus) on a white wall in Wake County, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Gnaphosidae
  • Scientific Name: Herpyllus ecclesiasticus
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 5 to 12.7 mm (0.2 to 0.5 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

The eastern parson spider is a common species that live in the eastern United States and is common in North Carolina. This species is a ground spider, meaning it does not build webs but spends its time wandering about.

It is active for most of the year except winter and roams around at night. During the day the eastern parson spider will find a secluded area to hide out in. Woodland and vegetated habitats are where this spider is common, and they may occasionally make their way into homes looking for food.

This species is black, with white markings on the back of its abdomen. They have long brownish legs, useful in traversing over the forest floor.

Eastern parson spiders are medium-sized, with females being slightly larger. They look identical to the western parson’s spider, but this spider is not found in the eastern US.

Small insects like roaches, beetles, and other spiders are what this species feeds on. Bites can be common since they are sometimes seen in homes looking for food.

This spider is harmless and is only dangerous if you are allergic.

50. Green Lynx Spider

Green Lynx Spider (Peucetia viridans) on a bright pink flower in Greensboro, North Carolina, USA
Green Lynx Spider (Peucetia viridans) on a bright pink flower in Greensboro, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Oxyopidae
  • Scientific Name: Peucetia viridans
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 12 to 22 mm (0.47 to 0.86 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 year
  • Average Price Range: $5

Green lynx spiders are appreciated for their emerald green coloring, a unique trait found in this species. This spider is most common in the southern United States and can be found in North Carolina.

Green lynx spiders are active during the day and spend their time hunting. They do not use silk to build webs, but to traverse around plant life. Highly vegetated areas were where green lynx spiders spend most of their time.

This species’ green coloring helps it blend into the meadows, woodlands, prairies, and other vegetated habitats they live in. They have black spots that cover them, as well as thick dark hair. Their translucent green appearance helps them blend into the surprising vegetation.

Lynx spiders are named after their cat-like hunting abilities, and nimble movements. This spider uses its web as a tiger rope and travels across great distances as if it is floating.

Lynx spiders feed on any insect they come across, and other spiders they are able to overpower.

51. Long-palped Ant-mimic Sac Spider

Long-palped Ant-mimic Sac Spider (Castianeira longipalpa) on a leaf in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, USA
Long-palped Ant-mimic Sac Spider (Castianeira longipalpa) on a leaf in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Corinnidae
  • Scientific Name: Castianeira longipalpa
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 3 to 13 mm (0.11 to 0.51 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Long-palled ant mimic spiders are found across the United States, living in grassy habitats.

This species is able to mimic ants and uses this ability to prey on them unsuspectingly. Ants make up a large portion of their diet, which is why they are regularly found near them.

This species is all black and is covered in light-colored markings. Dark brown bands cover their legs, and white markings appear on their body.

To mimic an ant this species will lift its two front legs, and walk very slowly. Their legs mimic the way ants’ antennae stick up in the air.

While copying an ant lets them get an easy meal, this spider also avoids being eaten and targeted by them. This spider is active most of the year, except during the colder periods.

When not hunting this spider creates a silk sac to rest in.

52. Woodlouse Spider

Woodlouse Spider (Dysdera crocata) on a dark ground in Woodfin, North Carolina, USA
Woodlouse Spider (Dysdera crocata) on a dark ground in Woodfin, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Dysderidae
  • Scientific Name: Dysdera crocata
  • Other Names: Woodlouse hunter, sowbug killer
  • Adult Size: 9 to 3 mm (0.35 to 0.59 inches)
  • Lifespan: 2 to 5 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Woodlouse spiders live in the eastern United States and are common in North Carolina.

This species is active during the day, and at night hides in a soil retreat. They live in damp and dark places, filled with rotting natural material. 

This species has a tan abdomen, and red head and legs. They have round body parts, with large fangs for their size. Females are the larger sex and can grow to be almost double the size of males. 

Wood mouse spiders are scavengers and hunters, feeding mainly on woodlice. This spider is found in areas with a high woodlice population and uses its large fangs to puncture through its exoskeleton.

They also eat other dead insects, and only have six eyes to help them see. Birds, mice, and snakes are this species’ main predators. 

53. American Nursery Web Spider

American Nursery Web Spider (Pisaurina Mira) on a leaf in Guilford County, North Carolina, USA
American Nursery Web Spider (Pisaurina Mira) on a leaf in Guilford County, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Pisauridae
  • Scientific Name: Pisaurina Mira
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 15 mm (0.59 inches)
  • Lifespan: 2 years
  • Average Price Range: $10

American nursery web spiders live all across the United States. They are common in woodlands, grasslands, and other highly vegetated habitats.

This spider is known for carrying its egg sac in its mouth, protecting it until the young are able to live on their own. Nursery web spiders are most active in the early spring up into the summer months.

The nursery web spider has tan coloring, and a brown mottled pattern covering its body. They look very similar to wolf spiders, or fishing spiders, but have a more slender appearance, and a pointed abdomen.

This spider has long legs and hydrophobic fur. They are able to walk on the water’s surface to catch prey or escape a predator.

Small insects are what this species feeds on, hunting mostly at night. Their bite is venomous but does not have any significant effects on humans.

54. Carolina Wolf Spider

Carolina Wolf Spider (Hogna carolinensis) on rocks and dirt at Catalina Foothills, Arizona, USA
Carolina Wolf Spider (Hogna carolinensis) on rocks and dirt at Catalina Foothills, Arizona, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Lycosidae
  • Scientific Name: Hogna carolinensis
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 19 to 25 mm (0.7 to 0.98 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Carolina wolf spiders are one of the largest spiders in North Carolina and are also the largest wolf spider species. This spider lives in burrows and is only active at night.

During the day if not in a burrow they may hide under debris or in plant life. Forests, coastlines, wetlands, and prairies are where just a few places this species can be found, as they are very adaptable.

The Carolina wolf spider is the largest of the Lycosidae family but looks very similar to other species. This spider ranges from dark to light tan and is covered in a mottled pattern. They have long legs and robust bodies.

This species feeds on insects, and other small invertebrates. They hunt at night, and they sneak into homes looking for bugs to prey on.

Frogs, birds, and lizards are this spider’s most common predators. Their eyes are designed to see well in the dark, which helps them catch prey and avoid predators.

55. Rabid Wolf Spider

Rabid Wolf Spider (Rabidosa rabida) on a leaf in Durham County, North Carolina, USA
Rabid Wolf Spider (Rabidosa rabida) on a leaf in Durham County, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Lycosidae
  • Scientific Name: Rabidosa rabida
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 13 to 21 mm (0.511 to 0.82 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 4 years
  • Average Price Range: $40.00

Rabid wolf spiders are found across North America and are a spider you may find in North Carolina. This species is active from spring to fall and is mostly seen in the warmer months.

They are nocturnal, and during the day hide in burrows, under debris, and in vegetation. Like other wolf spider species, this spider carries its egg sac around on its back, as well as its spiderlings, defending it until they are old enough.

Rabid wolf spiders have a similar body shape, and color to other Lycosidae species. They are extremely hairy, with light tan coloring and dark bold stripes running across their body. Their eyes are grouped in the front of their face and shine when flashed with a light at night.

Rabid wolf spiders spend their time hunting at night, for small insects. They are beneficial in reducing the pest insect population nearby and are used for food by birds, snakes, and other larger wolf spiders.

This species is aggressive, and if approached it may posture defensively. Bites from this spider are harmless, but their large fangs can cause pain if bitten.

56. Pantropical Huntsmans Spider

Giant Huntsman Spider (Heteropoda venatoria) on a large stem in Yunnan, China
Giant Huntsman Spider (Heteropoda venatoria) on a large stem in Yunnan, China. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Sparassidae
  • Scientific Name: Heteropoda venatoria
  • Other Names: Huntsman spider, Crane Spider
  • Adult Size: 22 to 28 mm (0.86 to 1.1 inches)
  • Lifespan: 2.5 years
  • Average Price Range: $40

Pantropical huntsman spiders are one of the largest spiders you can find in North Carolina and live in tropical habitats. Woodlands and moist habitats are where they prefer to live, and they are active for most of the year except for winter.

Being such a large species seeing this spider may cause a fright, and they occasionally make their way indoors looking for warmth or food. Their flat bodies make it possible for them to fit under doorways or other crevices easily.

The huntsman spider has extremely long legs and a small abdomen. They have eight eyes grouped in the center of their face, giving them excellent vision.

This spider has dark to light tan coloring, with a dark marking on its head. Their long legs are their most notable feature, which is covered in dark bands and spots.

As their name suggests the huntsman spider is an excellent hunter, taking down animals of similar or slightly larger size. They feed on insects, lizards, frogs, and other spiders.

Their agile movements and speed make it easy for them to take down prey. Being so large they are also preyed on by birds and other larger animals that can safely feed on them.

Huntsman spider bites can be painful, but their venom is harmless to humans.

57. Brown Recluse

Brown Recluse (Loxosceles reclusa) on a rocky surface in Raeford, North Carolina, USA
Brown Recluse (Loxosceles reclusa) on a rocky surface in Raeford, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Sicariidae
  • Scientific Name: Loxosceles reclusa
  • Other Names: Violin spiders
  • Adult Size: 7 mm (0.27 inches)
  • Lifespan: 1 to 2 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Brown recluses are one of the most dangerous and feared spiders in North Carolina. As their name suggests they have brown coloring and are identifiable by the dark violin marking that appears on their back.

This species has long thin legs, and a rounded abdomen. While bites from this species may be slightly painful, it is their necrotic venom that makes this species so dangerous.

The brown recluse lives in habitats filled with a variety of debris for them to hide under. They prefer dark and dry areas and are found under debris like woodpiles, metal sheets, and cardboard. Active at night, this species will find a secluded area to hide and rest during the day.

Brown recluse venom is necrotic and damages the skin and tissue cells around the bite mark. The bite of this species is common since they often make their way indoors looking for food or dry places.

They feed on insects, and actively hunt for them at night.

58. Southern Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider (Ummidia richmond) on dirt at Granite Falls, North Carolina, USA
Trapdoor Spider (Ummidia richmond) on dirt at Granite Falls, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Halonoproctidae
  • Scientific Name: Ummidia richmond
  • Other Names: Cork lid spider
  • Adult Size: (1 to 1.6 inches)
  • Lifespan: 5 to 20 years
  • Average Price Range: $30

The southern trapdoor spider is found in North Carolina but is not seen often since it spends most of its time underground. This species lives in moist woodlands and tropical habitats.

They build burrows underground and cover them with a cork made from silk and dirt. Southern trapdoor spiders are rarely seen since this spider spends most of its life in its burrows. If you see this spider wandering it is most likely a male looking for a mate, which happens in the warm summer months.

Southern trapdoor spiders are a medium-sized species, and range in color from brown to black. They have very large heads, with thick legs and a rounded abdomen. This species has a very robust body and large fangs.

This species uses its burrow as a home, as a place to lay its eggs, and also to hunt. Active at night, they wait at the edge of their burrows and pounce at pry when they get close.

Even when they have a cork lid covering their home they know when prey is nearby using vibrations. Southern trapdoor spiders are an aggressive species and may bite if provoked.

59. Atlantic Purseweb Spider

Atlantic Purseweb Spider (Sphodros atlanticus) on sand and rocks in Wake, North Carolina, USA
Atlantic Purseweb Spider (Sphodros atlanticus) on sand and rocks in Wake, North Carolina, USA. – Source
  • Experience Level: Advanced
  • Family: Atypidae
  • Scientific Name: Sphodros atlanticus
  • Other Names: n/a
  • Adult Size: 12.7 to 25.4 mm (0.5 to 1 inches)
  • Lifespan: 4 to 7 years
  • Average Price Range: n/a

Atlantic purse web spiders are a species not seen often in North Carolina. This spider lives in moist woodlands, swamps, marshes, and other tropical forest habitats.

They create burrows at the base of trees and build tubular webs up the sides of the trunk. Males are seen the most often since they will leave their tubular burrow to find a mate. Mating occurs in summer, and females lay tiger eggs in their burrows.

This species is a dark black, and the tips of their legs have an orange-red coloring. Their fangs and head are extremely large, as well as their abdomen. This spider is a bulky species, and males are identifiable by their large pedipalps.

This species is not well known due to its secretive nature. They spend most of their time in their burrows and tubular holes that they make propped against trees.

These tubes are used for hunting, and they will pull in any insects that land on it.

FAQ

What Are The Most Common Spiders in North Carolina?

Cellar spiders, house spiders, yellow sac spiders, and black widows are some of the most common species in North Carolina. These species have a large range in the state, but they are often seen the most often since it is common for them to inhabit near or around homes. 

Are There Big Spiders In North Carolina?

The pantropical huntsman spider is one of the largest species to be found in North Carolina, growing to nearly an inch. Wolf spiders are also abundant in the state and are a very large species to come across. The Carolina wolf spider is the largest of all Lycosidae and is also one of the largest spiders in North Carolina. 

What Is The Most Dangerous Spider In North Carolina?

Most spiders are harmless in North Carolina, but the brown recluse and black widow are the most dangerous. These spiders have dangerous venom that when bit may require medical treatment. Both of these spiders have venom more potent than a rattlesnake, but their small fangs only administer it in a small amount. 

Are Wolf Spiders Common in North Carolina? 

Wolf spiders are one of the most common spiders in North Carolina and are also one of the largest. This species lives in a variety of habitats, and are often considered pests. It is common for them to be found in homes, basements, and garages since they move inside to escape the cold of the winter. 

In North Carolina, When Are Spiders Most Active? 

Spring to fall is when spiders are most active in North Carolina. Each species has its own preference, but only spiders that live indoors tend to be active in the cold of winter. When winter comes most spiders die off, or become inactive until the next spring. 

Wrapping up

North Carolina is filled with hundreds of different spiders. This list shows just 59 of the species to be found, but there are many more to be discovered. Fearing spiders is common, but most are harmless and provide more good than bad.

The main benefit of spiders is controlling the pest insect population since that is what they mostly feed on. Spiders are also used for food by various predators like birds, lizards, and small mammals. 

 Spiders are extremely important to the environment, but they are also amazing creatures to examine. Many of the species on this list are kept as pets, but most do not live very long. North Carolina has a wide variety of spiders to find, and on this list, there are 59 that you may come across in the state. 

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